Pew poll: Majority of Republicans see tea party as a separate entity

posted at 8:01 pm on October 17, 2013 by Allahpundit

Interesting in light of all the third-party chatter from both sides lately, but even more interesting than the topline number is the trend over time. Contrary to what you might suspect, views of the tea party as separate from the GOP aren’t increasing among Republicans. They’re decreasing. That is to say, despite all the warring between RINOs and true conservatives over the past three weeks, more people in the party now see TPers as Republicans than they did two years ago.

More Republicans view the Tea Party as a separate movement from the GOP (51%) than as part of the Republican Party (32%). Opinion is nearly identical among independents (51% separate, 36% part of GOP). By contrast, Democrats are about as likely to say the Tea Party is part of the Republican Party as to say it is separate (48%-41%)…

Since April 2011, Tea Party Republicans have become more likely to see the Tea Party movement as part of the GOP. In 2011, Republicans who agreed with the Tea Party said the movement was separate from the GOP by a 67%-29% margin (38-point gap); today, that margin has narrowed to 52%-41% (11-point gap).

That surprised me, but maybe it shouldn’t have. Tea partiers have, for wise strategic reasons, spent three years working inside the GOP to change it rather than splitting off and trying to pressure it from the outside. It’s only logical that more people, including members of the movement itself, would begin to see them as a branch of the party rather than as an offshoot under those circumstances. Then again, the fact that we’re three years out from the full emergence of the movement and a majority of Republicans still see it as something separate makes me think maybe there’s something to the third-party murmuring after all. Is it sustainable long-term to have a party heavily influenced by a group that neither the party’s members nor the group itself regards as fully part of it? If not, how does that logic apply to, say, the Democratic Party and public-employee unions?

Anyway, if Republicans increasingly see the movement as part of the party, maybe the whole RINO/tea party divide is overblown. Then again, maybe not:

mod

Views of the tea party have turned more unfavorable at every point along the ideological spectrum (including conservative Republicans) but especially among moderate and liberal Republicans, who went from a net positive view of the movement four months ago at 46/35 to net negative now at 27/42(!). That feels like a serious rift, even if it’s not permanent; and the reason for it, I suspect, has less to do with wanting to torpedo ObamaCare than with the brinksmanship of the tactics. Look at the first graph on Pew’s page, gauging tea-party favorability among the general population, and you’ll see that the movement was net positive until the debt-ceiling brinksmanship of 2011, when it turned negative. It hasn’t recovered yet and is actually a few points worse than it used to be right now. The silver lining in the House GOP’s cave yesterday is that, if it does mean that congressional Republicans are less likely to use shutdowns or the debt limit as leverage in the near future, that might actually work to TPers’ advantage in rehabbing their brand among voters generally.

Another interesting tidbit: For all the venom spat at Boehner for selling out, he’s more popular with tea partiers than with RINOs. Seriously!

boeh

That data was collected from October 9-13, before the final cave, so maybe the numbers have shifted a bit now. Then again, maybe not; he was, after all, also more popular with tea partiers in June than he was with non-TP Republicans. That’s why House conservatives aren’t rushing to replace him. While grassroots righties may disdain Boehner for not winning real concessions whenever he tries a new round of brinksmanship, centrist Republicans hate him for engaging in that brinksmanship at tea partiers’ behest in the first place. It’s a bizarre position to be in, seen as one of the high priests of the RINO Beltway establishment by the base and as a pawn of conservative populism by moderates. Remind me again why he wants to keep his job.

One more to chew on. I’m going to guess this is an outlier based on a small sample size, but maybe that’s more a wish than a reasoned thought:

kids

Only nine percent of tea partiers are under the age of 30? I know that demographic leans left and that the tea party skews older, but that can’t be right. Can it?

Exit question: Pew polled tea partiers and centrist Republicans on various key issues and found a striking split on entitlements. When asked whether it’s more important to reduce the national debt or keep Social Security and Medicare benefits at their current levels, tea partiers prefer the former, 73/15, while centrists prefer the latter, 44/46. Is that gulf bridgeable? That issue, already momentous, will only become more important over time.


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Is that gulf bridgeable? That issue, already momentous, will only become more important over time.


Only a true RINO would not know the answer, AP

Yes, just as soon as we run out of other people’s money!

PolAgnostic on October 17, 2013 at 8:04 PM

Tea Party is an idea and a reality. Knowledge that we are on an unsustainable course so elites can loot the Treasury is what motivates us. As for demographics, young people or old the pain the left inflicts won’t go away, and that is why we will win in the end. The only question is how much of the wreckage can be salvaged.

rob verdi on October 17, 2013 at 8:06 PM

I think polling this is almost impossible. Some of us are tea party and some of us are libertarian. Someone poll libertarians.

fatlibertarianinokc on October 17, 2013 at 8:10 PM

My qotd comment yesterday:

The GOP is in serious danger of fracturing.

This is major serious because we could lose the House in 2014 if the Tea Partiers and others decide to stay home or vote for divisive (but common) third candidates. And that could mean a free hand for Obama’s agenda of open borders and communal control of our economy and lives.

As far as our presidential candidate, now more than ever we need to get a strong conservative candidate to unify conservatives, NOT a moderate to attract Democrats. Because a moderate like the climate change pushing Chris Christie or Rubio would create a gargantuan “missing white vote” or missing Tea Party vote. The main issue is not going to be attracting a few stray Dems, but getting the greatest amount of party unity!

Something needs to be done to unify the party before 2014.

We could lose the House not because Dems or independents are upset with Republicans, but because Tea Partiers and other Republicans are upset with Republicans. Look, that was why Romney lost, because of this “missing white vote.” But Romney’s “missing white vote” might be a drop in the bucket in comparison to what the future could hold.

A strong presidential candidate, emerging early (soon!), could do a lot to unify the GOP, like Palin or Cruz, if they are able to convince Tea Partiers and Paulites and others not to bolt. One strength of Palin is that she relates to the working class. That’s huge. No other R that I know can do that like she can.

Also, with these bitter Tea Partier feelings of betrayal on the shutdown, it would be a disaster if the establishment, like Rino Ryan, pushes amnesty now. Talk about bad timing. Amnesty would be the last straw.

But for a bit of brightness on this dim night, an unusual positive spin is put on the seeming shutdown fiasco: http://www.redstate.com/2013/10/16/methinks-the-tea-party-just-went-back-on-the-warpath/

anotherJoe on October 17, 2013 at 8:10 PM

I’m not in the same party as Peter King or Johnny Mc…call it what you will.

d1carter on October 17, 2013 at 8:13 PM

Another poll? Must be true.

rjh on October 17, 2013 at 8:14 PM

The greatest failure of Republican leadership is in not embracing the TEA Party and making use of their grassroots organization.

Can you imagine the Democratics missing such an opportunity?

slickwillie2001 on October 17, 2013 at 8:19 PM

The tea party? The current co-opted movement or the original grassroots?

mythicknight on October 17, 2013 at 8:22 PM

*Which

mythicknight on October 17, 2013 at 8:23 PM

Always was, wasn’t it?

stenwin77 on October 17, 2013 at 8:23 PM

Exit question:
don’t do the first and the second will fix itself.
by imploding.
and then it all falls.

dmacleo on October 17, 2013 at 8:26 PM

That feels like a serious rift, even if it’s not permanent; and the reason for it, I suspect, has less to do with wanting to torpedo ObamaCare than with the brinksmanship of the tactics.

BS. It’s due to the fact that they won’t be able to push tea partiers into supporting leftist causes anymore. We won’t accept a slow decline instead of a rapid one.

We refuse to be stuck in a democracy where we’re the sheep voting with two wolves (the Democrat and Republican party) over what’s for dinner.

njrob on October 17, 2013 at 8:26 PM

*rubs temples -> shakes head -> sighs -> leaves*

Axe on October 17, 2013 at 8:26 PM

After this weeks fiasco it’s the other way around.

Skywise on October 17, 2013 at 8:26 PM

I suspect that the vast majority of Tea Party members view the Republican Establishment as a separate entity — useful idiots for, and classic enablers of, the fascist/authoritarian Dems …

ShainS on October 17, 2013 at 8:29 PM

After this weeks fiasco it’s the other way around.

Skywise on October 17, 2013 at 8:26 PM

… IOW, what Skywise said.

ShainS on October 17, 2013 at 8:30 PM

Most people see the Tea Party as separate, and if you are confused, it reminds me that I could have a teeny bit of pity on the IRS workers who don’t know if the Tea Party is a party or a movement or if it is the same. Only a teeny bit.

Where I live the Tea Partiers are two types: home schooler moms especially those with non mainstream “non denominational” Christian religions who mix their politics with their religion, need to stay away from the crazy public schools, and libertarians who want to Free the Drugs. No Ted Cruz around here, mostly Ron Paul fans…There is no confusing them with Republicans.

Fleuries on October 17, 2013 at 8:33 PM

morning joe hardest hit….

cmsinaz on October 17, 2013 at 8:35 PM

Did the Democratic Party attack the OWS movement?

(The Federal Gov’t is spending our money years before we earn it)

mjbrooks3 on October 17, 2013 at 8:37 PM

All this talk about Tea Partiers and the GOP and the rift and the rest is just Bravo Sierra. Goal One is and must be keeping the House, first and foremost, and Goal Two is taking the Senate if we can. Fvck 2016 at this point, as we are toast if we give Obama both chambers in 2014.

That’s why it’s important to elect as many true conservatives to the House and Senate as we can in 2014, but we cannot lose the House under any circumstances.

TXUS on October 17, 2013 at 8:38 PM

The liberals have resurrected their Tea Party rhetoric and blame guys like Boehner and others as having either been “bought off” or “doing the bidding” of the Tea Party. I argued with one liberal buddy about the Speaker specifically…where I argued that the Tea Party wouldnt exactly make Boehner their poster boy. Which makes the notion that he’s more popular with Tea Partiers than the GOP centrists comes as a shock to me.

I’ve never considered myself as a Tea Party guy. I’m not anti-Tea Party either, and I do agree with most of the issues they’re proponents of. But isn’t the whole purpose of the Tea Party to focus on grassroots issues in various local/state regions…the majority of the time? Are there plans to centralize the Tea Party under a national leadership?

JetBoy on October 17, 2013 at 8:39 PM

How does one poll a person that belongs to the “Tea Party”? Sure, one can find self appointed spokesmen or groups organized under that banner but they are in the minority. What you aren’t finding are those who espouse the same beliefs about the direction our government should take but don’t officially belong to any group with that label.

One would be better off peering into the millions of homes where people are shouting at their televisions when left wing idiots spout their repeated and rehearsed talking points or when people like Obama, Reid, Pelosi, and jerks like Schumer talk to the cameras in their grating voices.

iamsaved on October 17, 2013 at 8:42 PM

30%? The GOP wishes it had it so good.

besser tot als rot on October 17, 2013 at 8:44 PM

Well, it seems that the Tea Party, if there actually IS such an organization, is pissing off all the right people.

Sign me up.

Cleombrotus on October 17, 2013 at 8:45 PM

I don’t think there will be a ‘split’

I think there will be a ‘gutting’ … within the GOP tent

kind of like renovating a kitchen, ( which is what I am doing now btw **__**)

the GOP framework will continue to stand, but as many Congress members inside it, as possible, who are not true to the Conservative planks of the GOP platform, will be removed, and replaced by ‘new cabinets’

the mechanism for this will be the 2014 midterms

the seats of power in DC, on the GOP side, (Committee Chairs, House, Senate Leaders) will be replaced by True Conservative Fighters

Bring on the 2014 Midterms!

exodus2011 on October 17, 2013 at 8:47 PM

That majority includes 100% of the tea party members themselves.

Jaibones on October 17, 2013 at 8:48 PM

Views of the tea party have turned more unfavorable at every point along the ideological spectrum (including conservative Republicans)

LOL. Any truly conservative Republican is a Tea Partier. The others are not conservative and just plain, lying sacksOS – Lady Lindsey and McShame type douchebags.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on October 17, 2013 at 8:48 PM

30%? The GOP wishes it had it so good.

besser tot als rot on October 17, 2013 at 8:44 PM

This works both ways. Remember…much of the GOP’s unfavorable rating comes from … Republicans of one form or another.

Jaibones on October 17, 2013 at 8:49 PM

Fvck 2016 at this point, as we are toast if we give Obama both chambers in 2014.

TXUS on October 17, 2013 at 8:38 PM

Too late. This US already is toast. You are living in the American Socialist Superstate, now, and there will be no return of the American Constitutional Republic. The only way that Constitutional Republic will exist again is if it is started anew. This nation has suffered irreparable damage and will not be the vehicle by which American ideals are propagated.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on October 17, 2013 at 8:52 PM

I’ve never considered myself as a Tea Party guy. I’m not anti-Tea Party either, and I do agree with most of the issues they’re proponents of. But isn’t the whole purpose of the Tea Party to focus on grassroots issues in various local/state regions…the majority of the time? Are there plans to centralize the Tea Party under a national leadership?
JetBoy on October 17, 2013 at 8:39 PM

You don’t need a national leadership to have national representation. Reps and senators come from the states and those very grass root foundations. In fact I think NOT having a national leadership is better because that concentrates your power into an elite few who run the “national party platform”.

Now you need something like that for a Presidential campaign run but the tea party isn’t there… Yet… (Don’t even have a candidate)

Skywise on October 17, 2013 at 8:56 PM

and when every purported lie of the Tea Party regarding Obamacare gets revealed as truth, where will all of these haters stand?

hillsoftx on October 17, 2013 at 8:59 PM

Too late. This US already is toast. You are living in the American Socialist Superstate, now, and there will be no return of the American Constitutional Republic. The only way that Constitutional Republic will exist again is if it is started anew. This nation has suffered irreparable damage and will not be the vehicle by which American ideals are propagated.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on October 17, 2013 at 8:52 PM

+1

An exponentially-increasing $222 trillion national debt ticking time bomb that WILL eventually explode …

ShainS on October 17, 2013 at 9:00 PM

Don’t deny the reality – this is no longer a political battle… This is ideological and the country club Republicans haven’t figured that out yet. The socialists upped their game after being exposed in 2000 and were upping ours.

That’s why you see the blatant vitriolic discourse on the part of main stream leftists. They think they’re more righteous than you and their frothing religious intensity has long left the bounds of rational discourse.

You can’t argue with Obama who 24 hours ago demands capitulation to his political whims and 12 hours later condemns those who won’t work together. No rational consensus can ever come from that.

So we either let them bully their way into a socialist state or we fight back on their terms.

I choose the latter.

Skywise on October 17, 2013 at 9:05 PM

part of the problem is that most ‘conservative’ pundits (costa, york, et al) are young…and don’t know history

here’s history

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gj9TkjL87Rk

in 1968 Richard Daley presided over a DNC convention torn by strike inside the party…and riots outside the hall.

An insurgent wing challenged the establishment. in 1968 Ribicoff nominated McGovern…and said some mean things about the establishment Ds…4 years later McGovern won the nomination and lost badly.

politics is a long game. polls are a snapshot of what people ‘feel’. Those people need leadership. GOPe is not capable of leading, so they attack their own.

we need to play the long game…it is this countries only hope.

btw, if the immigration thing passes with the help of the Schumer Rs, that will be it…GOP will be over at the national level. hopefully, they know this.

r keller on October 17, 2013 at 9:11 PM

Another interesting tidbit: For all the venom spat at Boehner for selling out, he’s more popular with tea partiers than with RINOs. Seriously!

But of course, just as nearly 60% of moderates voted for Obama.

ddrintn on October 17, 2013 at 9:11 PM

torn by strike..or, well, strife

r keller on October 17, 2013 at 9:13 PM

The GOP: “We stand for everything the Democrats support. Just slower.”

Jeddite on October 17, 2013 at 9:16 PM

All this means is that the media has done it’s job for the liberals.
First, push the narrative that tea baggers are jihadist, hostage takers and then poll to see if it worked. Then trick would be conservatives into writing a handwringing blog about the death of conservatives.

Vince on October 17, 2013 at 9:22 PM

Skywise on October 17, 2013 at 9:05 PM

Damn that’s good. +1000

Cleombrotus on October 17, 2013 at 9:31 PM

Skywise on October 17, 2013 at 9:05 PM

Damn that’s good. +1000

Cleombrotus on October 17, 2013 at 9:31 PM

…agree!

KOOLAID2 on October 17, 2013 at 10:11 PM

Yeah! The media and the Dems are on a jihad against the “Tea Party”
and have given the RINOS a pass (at least as long as they attack
their shared enemy.)

shorebird on October 17, 2013 at 10:19 PM

The Tea Party, or the tax revolt that started in 2006 has gotten us more people on welfare, more people on food stamps, a socialized healthcare system and more government regulation on everything.

How in the heck do we keep believing these Tea Party people are conservative or against any of that? They do what ever it takes to take us down the road to socialism.

With friends like the Tea Party, the GOP would do better with enemies.

The Tea Party has not accomplished one good thing. They have set back conservatism a century.

petunia on October 17, 2013 at 10:26 PM

The Tea Party has not accomplished one good thing. They have set back conservatism a century.

petunia on October 17, 2013 at 10:26 PM

LOL. You have no clue what conservativism is, so stop using the word. You just expose your stupidity. Be quiet and try keeping that a secret.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on October 17, 2013 at 10:30 PM

Hey! Part of the 9%… Man, that’s depressing.

AdatGuy on October 17, 2013 at 10:37 PM

“The Tea Party, or the tax revolt that started in 2006 has gotten us more people on welfare, more people on food stamps, a socialized healthcare system and more government regulation on everything.

How in the heck do we keep believing these Tea Party people are conservative or against any of that? They do what ever it takes to take us down the road to socialism.

With friends like the Tea Party, the GOP would do better with enemies.

The Tea Party has not accomplished one good thing. They have set back conservatism a century.

petunia on October 17, 2013 at 10:26 PM”

O-o

I’m a..
well
I don’t even…

shorebird on October 17, 2013 at 10:48 PM

I started reading it for the headline. Saw it was a mash of poll data with eeyore weighing in on his opinion.

Kickin’ the neighbors cat and goin’ for a beer. fuk it.

DanMan on October 17, 2013 at 10:59 PM

So the media hammers on conservatives for 6 weeks. Then the lefties at Pew take a poll. WTF do you expect? Anybody acting on this is foolish.

But fwiw, the Tea Party should be very happy not to be associated to the party of John McCain.

ignatzk on October 17, 2013 at 11:16 PM

Majority of Republicans see tea party as a separate entity

Good one, we’re evil conservatives. Of course they don’t relate to us. Tea party is pretty much single issue pure capitalistic economics. The rest are snark, lies and theft.

DanMan on October 17, 2013 at 11:40 PM

Majority of Republicans see tea party as a separate entity

Good one, we’re evil conservatives. Of course they don’t relate to us. Tea party is pretty much single issue pure capitalistic economics. The rest are snark, lies and theft.

DanMan on October 17, 2013 at 11:40 PM

The lack of understanding in the GOP is directly related when the congressman or senator was elected. Yup, it is a generation gap. Not only among the elected. But, more importantly, among their staffs. Neither the old dogs, nor their staffs understood the concerns of the younger members. And it bit them in the behind. The Tea Party is the GOP. The bulk of the new members who will be elected either share or believe in the majority of ideas that form the Tea Party, and by 2014 they will be the majority. Skywise is dead on and vast majority of elected members that were elected under the Tea Party banner share his view. The D.C. Media (like Pew) has a blind spot when it comes to this kind of thing. They see their own beliefs, but cannot, or will not, aknowedge others. These sorts of polling biases make pew and other type polls worthless. We are watching a generational shift occur, men like Peter King, John McCain have had their day. New blood is flowing thru the body politic, but it takes time.

flackcatcher on October 18, 2013 at 12:12 AM

Something needs to be done to unify the party before 2014.

We could lose the House not because Dems or independents are upset with Republicans, but because Tea Partiers and other Republicans are upset with Republicans. Look, that was why Romney lost, because of this “missing white vote.” But Romney’s “missing white vote” might be a drop in the bucket in comparison to what the future could hold.

anotherJoe on October 17, 2013 at 8:10 PM

Not to worry, Karl Rove came out a couple weeks ago saying that the wonderful 2010 election victories weren’t won by the massive support of Conservatives and TEA Party folks, it was the independents who secured all those victories for the Republicans.

Karl didn’t go on to explain how they got their asses handed to them in 2012. Somehow Karl and his NE establishment rinos must have angered the independents in 2012. Maybe Mitt Romney, a liberal governor from the most liberal state in the union wasn’t quite what they wanted, perhaps a true card carrying Democrat candidate is what Karl & Co need to run to recapture the “independents.”

RJL on October 18, 2013 at 12:33 AM

Exit question: Pew polled tea partiers and centrist Republicans on various key issues and found a striking split on entitlements. When asked whether it’s more important to reduce the national debt or keep Social Security and Medicare benefits at their current levels, tea partiers prefer the former, 73/15, while centrists prefer the latter, 44/46. Is that gulf bridgeable? That issue, already momentous, will only become more important over time.

And yet the big take away among most liberals I know is that during the TP protests against the ObamaCare vote, it was the Tea Party who was arguing against the Medicare cuts. The media consistently showed people protesting against the cuts, and always labeled them as Tea Partiers. And made sure everyone knew this was a wide-spread belief and position amongst the Tea Party.

I always thought they were mainstream Republicans (along with more than a few lefties running false-flag operations). But the press insisted on attributing that particular argument to the TP movement.

It stunk to me at the time, but I didn’t have any evidence to back up my suspicions. Turns out my gut was right.

nukemhill on October 18, 2013 at 12:49 AM

Establishment Republicans, like their partners-in-crime Democrats, hate and will try to demonize anyone, or any group, that doesn’t fit, nor cater to, their agenda.

Sterling Holobyte on October 18, 2013 at 12:58 AM

Not to worry, Karl Rove came out a couple weeks ago saying that the wonderful 2010 election victories weren’t won by the massive support of Conservatives and TEA Party folks, it was the independents who secured all those victories for the Republicans.

RJL on October 18, 2013 at 12:33 AM

Some people never learn, do they?!

Sterling Holobyte on October 18, 2013 at 1:00 AM

petunia on October 17, 2013 at 10:26 PM

There’s that self righteous indignation…

You realize the tea party started in 2009 as a direct response to nationalization of healthcare with Obamacare and not 2006?

Skywise on October 18, 2013 at 1:07 AM

Pew poll: Majority of Republicans see tea party as a separate entity

More like a benign tumor.

Good luck with that third party. It will be a small one.

lexhamfox on October 18, 2013 at 2:18 AM

I’m all for breaking from the GOP (I’m already gone). The main excuse I hear for not doing so is that if the GOP is split Democrats will win. Newsflash: They already do! Milquetoast RINO candidates don’t give anyone a reason to vote for them and when you put a John McCain or a Lindsay Graham in the Senate you’re just putting someone in who will do whatever the Dems want them to do.

Everyone might be very surprised how fast a conservative, pro-America, pro-small government, pro-economic growth party would take off. As for young people, we have an uphill battle to undo the years of anti-America brainwashing most have endured in school, but it can be done. Most young people today see no positive future for themselves. How quickly would they want to be in a party that isn’t promising handouts, but promising opportunity for a bright future?

Lizzy on October 18, 2013 at 7:11 AM

The widespread problem with the interpretations of the pundits and other talking heads is that the “TEA Party” is a philosophy, not an entity. So if I, someone who relates to the TEA party, is asked my opinion of Republicans, I won’t hesitate to say they suck, and I am referring to the likes of McCain, King, Graham, and my two senators Alexander and Corker. Polls showing the disapproval of Republicans include my vote, as well as those of the liberals. They are getting hit from both sides of the spectrum. And I am not alone. That factor is lost to the pundits.

Not long ago I would have voted for the Repub over the Dem every time, regardless. No more. If they are not conservative, they will not get my vote. My hopes are that they get primaried.

The missing point of the actions of Cruz over the past few weeks is that he has focused a spotlight on those Repubs who claim to be conservative, but are not. As true conservatives consider running in the primaries, this focus will encourage them to run and they will find supporters ready and willing. Thanks to Cruz. My own Lamar Alexander is a perfect example. His primary opponent, State Senator Joe Carr, already has my support, and money. As will other true conservatives who primary the imposters. The establishment Repubs are scared and for good reason. Hence they join the dems in demonizing the TEA philosophy.

I do not think a third party will be necessary, we will simply take over the Republican party and the wailing and gnashing of teeth among the “moderates” reveals how fearful they are of losing their lock on the Republican party.

PS: Does anyone know who is primarying Peter King, McConnell, Graham, etc? I have my checkbook out and ready to start donating. If I am joined by a few million others like me, who knows, maybe we can send them home. And then we will have representatives who do something.

CTimbo on October 18, 2013 at 7:52 AM

Look, that was why Romney lost, because of this “missing white vote.” But Romney’s “missing white vote” might be a drop in the bucket in comparison to what the future could hold.

RJL on October 18, 2013 at 12:33 AM quote attributed to anotherjoe.

The “missing white voters” in the battleground states is an interesting topic. They were the Reagan Democrats. Sean Trende went wrong with a few articles in the recent past talking about this demographic. When you look at the number of republicans that came out for George Bush in 2000 and Romney in 2012 there are…white republicans missing we can conjecture…and if you look at census data you can see that those who were 70+/80+ years old, voting for Bush, are 80+/90+ years old and the population in 2012 is much smaller because republican voters don’t come back from deceased status to vote for republicans. My own UAW card carrying dad, voted for Reagan, and is not here voting today. So, where are the Reagan Democrats? Rest in peace.

Bush got more votes than Romney, but Romney got more votes than McCain. If you look at the battleground states, and the electoral loss for Romney, it is a matter of less than a million votes in the proper places that made the difference. For instance in CA, 4 million people voted for Romney, but their vote did not count in the battleground states where it would have made a huge difference.

We would do better as a party if we encouraged disaffected conservative republicans in CA or other blue states to move to stattes like CO, FL, VA, OH (don’t know why they would go here, people who want to be successful are leaving OH) NM and NH that could use a few more votes. VA was lost by 100K votes, FL the same, and probably only in FL was the Hispanic/cuban vote not with Cus, if you recall Alan West who won for congress in 2010 could not survive the onslaught there from the democrats in 2012. The democrats fight for power and with them, the end justifies the means. In VA the black, identity voters cannot be blamed for coming out for their non performing president, they are like any identity voters, evangelicals, Mormons, they are inspired by one of their own whether they are very good or not.

Fleuries on October 18, 2013 at 8:13 AM

I suspect that the vast majority of Tea Party members view the Republican Establishment as a separate entity — useful idiots for, and classic enablers of, the fascist/authoritarian Dems …

ShainS on October 17, 2013 at 8:29 PM

I’ve been saying that for 20 years, so that’s nothing new. What Codevilla called the “Ruling Party” I call the Liberal Establishment. The GOP left, which includes the GOP establishment, is part of the liberal establishment and they all have the same goal. That’s why the Demoncraps will pass some egregiously illegal program (e.g. Zer0care) and the GOP ends up setting it in concrete. Zer0care may be the final straw for the economy, but the GOP wing of the Lib Establishment doesn’t care. They just want the good times to keep rolling so they can keep engaging in their version of crony capitalism like the Dimocraps.

You realize the tea party started in 2009 as a direct response to nationalization of healthcare with Obamacare and not 2006?

Skywise on October 18, 2013 at 1:07 AM

It actually began in the fall of 2008 as a result of the crap sandwich passed to bail out banks that had caused the problem in the first place. It reached its peak with Zer0care being forced down our throats.

When asked whether it’s more important to reduce the national debt or keep Social Security and Medicare benefits at their current levels, tea partiers prefer the former, 73/15, while centrists prefer the latter, 44/46. Is that gulf bridgeable? That issue, already momentous, will only become more important over time.

That gulf will take time to bridge and the country does not have the time required to do so. I doubt the country will survive another 10 years as a political entity. The people of the US have shot themselves sin the foot repeatedly in elections and keep sending people that only increase the problem. Goldwater wrote a book back in the 80s entitle “The Coming Break Point.” That breakpoint is rapidly approaching and the meltdown of 2008 was a red flag and the problems have not been fixed. The Fed has tried to paper over the problem with the printing press, but history tells us where that leads. Then comes war.

Quartermaster on October 18, 2013 at 10:56 AM

Boehner is annoying because he seems to pull a gun, aim it, and have no intention of ever firing the gun. Either don’t pull the gun and aim it or pull it, aim, and fire. This backing off at the last minute does no good at all. And it shows the other side you aren’t really serious.

{^_^}

herself on October 18, 2013 at 8:00 PM