To cleanse the palate, in case you haven’t seen it already at Ace’s blog or every other site on the Internet. (It’s approaching four million views in just a day of action on YouTube as I write this.) As an advertising stunt, it makes perfect sense. The real money from a “Carrie” remake will be made on teens and young adults, i.e. the only segment of the population that might be unfamiliar with the DePalma classic. How do you reach web-savvy teens and young adults? With a viral marketing campaign, of course. Coming soon, presumably: The BuzzFeed-esque “Carrie” social-media marketing rollout, with all of the scenes from the original re-created with fuzzy duckies and kittens.

One curious note here: Most of the victims of the prank seem relatively unphased. They’re alarmed, of course, and there’s a scream or two, but no real terror of the sort we’re familiar with from immortal classics like the Brazilian elevator ghost prank and the Chilean LG meteor ad. Why is that? Is it as simple as the fact that those pranks put the victim in fear for his/her life whereas this one really doesn’t? Or is it the fact that this is New York and it’s a coffee shop and, well, you expect some eccentricity when you walk in? Remember, most of the people here likely just got off the subway. Even with men being thrown against walls by telekinetic forcefields right in front of them, the “eventful” part of their day is already over.