Did we almost nuke ourselves in 1961?

posted at 8:31 am on September 21, 2013 by Jazz Shaw

Something rather strange to start your weekend off, found when I was browsing the work of my friend Phineas (better known as Irishspy on Twitter) , writing at Sister Toldjah. I know that the early days of any emerging technology can produce the occasional snafu, but did we really almost blow up North Carolina in a nuclear furnace which would have put Hiroshima to shame?

Well, this is reassuring: In 1961, a nuclear-armed B-52 breaks up over Goldsboro, North Carolina, and in the process releases two 4-megaton H-bombs, one of which nearly detonated:

The Guardian has a report claiming that it’s true.

A secret document, published in declassified form for the first time by the Guardian today, reveals that the US Air Force came dramatically close to detonating an atom bomb over North Carolina that would have been 260 times more powerful than the device that devastated Hiroshima.

The document, obtained by the investigative journalist Eric Schlosser under the Freedom of Information Act, gives the first conclusive evidence that the US was narrowly spared a disaster of monumental proportions when two Mark 39 hydrogen bombs were accidentally dropped over Goldsboro, North Carolina on 23 January 1961. The bombs fell to earth after a B-52 bomber broke up in mid-air, and one of the devices behaved precisely as a nuclear weapon was designed to behave in warfare: its parachute opened, its trigger mechanisms engaged, and only one low-voltage switch prevented untold carnage.

Well, that’s rather disturbing to say the least. But I’ve been laboring under the perception for some time now that these devices have so many fail-safe features that they’re actually less likely to go off when you want them to than to accidentally unleash the forces of hell. What happened?

Jones found that of the four safety mechanisms in the Faro bomb, designed to prevent unintended detonation, three failed to operate properly. When the bomb hit the ground, a firing signal was sent to the nuclear core of the device, and it was only that final, highly vulnerable switch that averted calamity. “The MK 39 Mod 2 bomb did not possess adequate safety for the airborne alert role in the B-52,” Jones concludes.

The document was uncovered by Schlosser as part of his research into his new book on the nuclear arms race, Command and Control. Using freedom of information, he discovered that at least 700 “significant” accidents and incidents involving 1,250 nuclear weapons were recorded between 1950 and 1968 alone.

Parts of this sound like the premise that kicks off the classic movie War Games. (Which I’ll still sit through with a Bloody Mary when it turns up on TBS on a Saturday morning.) It’s a delicate balance between bombs which might lean toward going off on their own and ones which rely too heavily on squeamish humans to turn a key and fire them. But then, we’re talking about 1961 here. The H-bomb was still in development, at least in the command and control systems.

But it does lead to an interesting exit question for the weekend discussions. How might history have unfolded differently if a nuke more than 200 times the power of what we dropped on Japan had blown up in North Carolina? We weren’t in the middle of any major military engagement at the time (yet… we were in Vietnam, but it didn’t really ramp up to a full blown, army sized engagement for a few more years) but we were on a building spree. How would the media have reported it? How would the nation have reacted? Would we have curled up into a Japan-like shell and eschewed all nuclear endeavors from then on, surrendering the eventual field of play to the Soviet Union? Or would we have just “toughed it out” and moved on?

Things that make you go hmmmm.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

This story has been around for decades. What The Guardian has published is a story about an additional document being declassified. Check out the dates on the sources for the Wikipedia article on the accident.

ddh on September 21, 2013 at 8:40 AM

I think I saw this story a few years ago … if not, it happened more than once. Much ado about nothing. The bombs were not armed and can’t explode if they are not. Clearly this worked.

More worrisome from the same period is a story that came out recently that Castro wanted to nuke us deliberately. Krushchev cooperated with Kennedy because he was terrified that Castro would start something.

gh on September 21, 2013 at 8:40 AM

I am pooh-poohing the story, as gh is. Three of the four arming switching on one of the bombs armed themselves on impact. Only one switch kept the bomb from exploding.

ddh on September 21, 2013 at 8:44 AM

Not pooh-poohing, that is.

ddh on September 21, 2013 at 8:44 AM

The jury’s out was to whether the Dems would be in front of the MSM blaming either a) calling for more gun control, or b) blaming Bush.

Midas on September 21, 2013 at 8:45 AM

WarGames is on today at 4pm on G4TV.

njrob on September 21, 2013 at 9:00 AM

I read about this incident a while ago. Certainly, this isn’t as big a story as Selena Gomez being denied a visa to do concerts in Russia over LGBT issues, is it? Or the history-making(!) crowning of the world’s first transgender homecoming queen.

HA needs to get its priorities straight. /snark

Liam on September 21, 2013 at 9:05 AM

This is powerful and chilling. Makes you wonder about the one weapon that is buried off shore near Savannah, GA.

Rndguy on September 21, 2013 at 9:07 AM

Given that Kennedy was in the Whitehouse for only 3 days, speculation as to how we would have reacted has another dimension. Does JFK take the popularity hit and admit a mistake? Perhaps blame it on Russia? The country is in a ramp up of all things scientific to close the sputnik gap and in the middle of a cold war. Pulling the blanket over our heads wouldn’t have been the first choice of a cold warrior like Kennedy.

yetanotherjohn on September 21, 2013 at 9:08 AM

This is powerful and chilling. Makes you wonder about the one weapon that is buried off shore near Savannah, GA.

Rndguy on September 21, 2013 at 9:07 AM

Or even in today’s high tech world, full of pragmatic SOPs and policies, the fly over of those nukes from ND to Louisiana. Yikes. These stories are certainly chilling.

LaughterJones on September 21, 2013 at 9:12 AM

Or even in today’s high tech world, full of pragmatic SOPs and policies, the fly over of those nukes from ND to Louisiana. Yikes. These stories are certainly chilling.

LaughterJones on September 21, 2013 at 9:12 AM

Do you mean that incident where four live-nuke cruise missiles were accidentally loaded onto a B-52 when they should have been dummy/practice missiles?

Liam on September 21, 2013 at 9:16 AM

We are in the middle of a nuclear explosion right now, just not the conventional kind. As far as I can tell there is not one branch of government or anyone in the press, that is taking collective common sense measures to stop it.

When it is over with we can say that the class of entitled, ill informed voters and socialist destroyed a voting republic from within….

Far worse than anything the Russians or Islamic Terrorist could have done…

Tilly on September 21, 2013 at 9:16 AM

You wouldn’t want more than one switch doing the business of disarming the bomb. They make it sound like a bunch of switches failed but I doubt it.

Just because something becomes ‘declassified’ doesn’t mean it wasn’t a bunch of hooey to start with. It could even become classified originally because it’s a bunch of nonsense or unfriendly propaganda even inside the government. They had a lot of communists in the government even back then.

Buddahpundit on September 21, 2013 at 9:18 AM

…I think something will accidentally happen today….with the clowns that run the show….that did not occur….then!

KOOLAID2 on September 21, 2013 at 9:23 AM

The bombs fell to earth after a B-52 bomber broke up in mid-air, and one of the devices behaved precisely as a nuclear weapon was designed to behave in warfare: its parachute opened, its trigger mechanisms engaged, and only one low-voltage switch God prevented untold carnage.

Fixed for accuracy.

fossten on September 21, 2013 at 9:32 AM

No. It doesn’t fit in with the theme of Camelot.

Axeman on September 21, 2013 at 9:32 AM

Yeah, TWA 800 “conspiracy theorists” are total nutters. /sarc

CycloneCDB on September 21, 2013 at 9:35 AM

This is powerful and chilling. Makes you wonder about the one weapon that is buried off shore near Savannah, GA.

Rndguy on September 21, 2013 at 9:07 AM

The bomb off of Tybee Island?

At this point they think that if it actually is out there, its electronic triggering mechanism is so corroded by decades of salt water exposure that it wouldn’t be able to actually fire. Thats assuming of course that you believe its actually out there – which I’m quite skeptical of.

I spend a lot of time at Tybee (I named one of my dogs after the island) and I sail off the beach there all the time. I have no worries at all about it.

However, if the had blown up Goldsboro then a lot of fantastic Eastern Carolina BBQ restaurants would never have gone into business, and THAT would have been a national tragedy.

Defenestratus on September 21, 2013 at 9:40 AM

Yeah, we almost nuked ourselves but calmer minds, which I’ll refer to as liberals, took over and thought it better that this nation instead have a death by a thousand cuts. We’re getting close. After Obama, all we need is another incompetent like Hillary to put the final nail in the coffin.

iamsaved on September 21, 2013 at 9:42 AM

Nothing could be finer than to be in Carolina in the mor

OldEnglish on September 21, 2013 at 9:45 AM

It’s only a matter of time before a Nuke goes off someplace, either by accident or design. My money is on Iran or North Korea smuggling one into Europe or the West Coast of the US.

Johnnyreb on September 21, 2013 at 9:51 AM

How would the nation have reacted? Would we have curled up into a Japan-like shell and eschewed all nuclear endeavors from then on, surrendering the eventual field of play to the Soviet Union? Or would we have just “toughed it out” and moved on?

Considering the political and cultural climate at that time, we probably would have launched a “retaliatory” strike against the USSR, with or without POTUS authorization.

This was the era of “Duck and Cover”, Civil Defense Wardens (basically, the neighborhood Nazi who walk around and write your name down if your curtains weren’t closed at night), fallout shelters, and an endless stream of Sci-Fi movies dealing with the use of or the aftermath of nuclear war. Some of them were really good (Failsafe), and some were quite campy but on point (Dr. Strangelove). Both of them were released in 1964, which would be just about right in terms of timing (a couple of years to write, film and edit).

BobMbx on September 21, 2013 at 10:07 AM

Am I the only one looking at the story with a “cup half full” perspective? The switch did what it was supposed to do. I’m sure that the weapons currently in the nuclear stockpile have much better safety devices installed, devices designed and built with this event in mind. If a weapon does accidentally explode, it won’t be a device from the United States’ stockpile.

RoadRunner on September 21, 2013 at 10:22 AM

…I think something will accidentally happen today….with the clowns that run the show….that did not occur….then!

KOOLAID2 on September 21, 2013 at 9:23 AM

There is a higher probability of them allowing the muslim terrorists sneaking across our southern border to do it. There have been several alarming articles about the number of them coming in.

dogsoldier on September 21, 2013 at 10:25 AM

can you imagine what would go through the bomb disposal techs mind???!!! “You want me to WHAT????”

Dannyp8262 on September 21, 2013 at 10:31 AM

Did we almost nuke ourselves in 1961?

Hey..BigSven was sittin’ in sunny Spain in the mid-60s when the US gubbamint lost a couple of nukes (3 to be exact) in a tomato patch on the sunny Spanish coast… mid air collisions can happen..Murphy’s Law

And hey..Liberals want the gubbamint to creat more gun control laws because gubbamint knows best and will keep YOU safe??? :(

BigSven on September 21, 2013 at 10:32 AM

Had it gone off?

You would have seen re-unification of North and South Carolina in the late 1960′s, creating Carolina.

Virginia and West Virginia would have taken note and followed in a matter of years, but serious negotiations
would still be in the workings to create Dakota.

Wander on September 21, 2013 at 10:32 AM

How might history have unfolded differently if a nuke more than 200 times the power of what we dropped on Japan had blown up in North Carolina?

That was my first thought as well. Not an easy question to answer, either. The Soviets would have had to have been on board with any nuke moratorium for the US to do the same…this was still an uncertain time in the Cold War. Public outrage over nukes certainly would have been far greater than a few hippies in tie-dye t-shirts.

Narrowly averting a major disaster isn’t the same as experience one, and what the public didn’t know wasn’t going to hurt them. I’d think “close calls” like this were more common than we’ve been told. 1966 in Palomares, Spain. And in 2007 there was the mistaken transport of nuclear warheads over the US.

As long as these weapons are transported from one place to another, the risk of detonation will be present. By the grace of God they haven’t accidentally gone off.

JetBoy on September 21, 2013 at 10:32 AM

What if Hendrix hadn’t passed out and suffocated on his own vomit 43 years ago this month at the age of 28? What if JFK Jr’s plan hadn’t gone down? What if Gore had won? Bigger fish frying…

MT on September 21, 2013 at 10:32 AM

Nope.

TimBuk3 on September 21, 2013 at 10:36 AM

President Obama, when asked to comment, replied:

“Now let me be clear. The participation in this incident by my predecessor George W. Bush was completely unacceptable.”

Khun Joe on September 21, 2013 at 10:43 AM

MT on September 21, 2013 at 10:32 AM

Sure glad you didn’t mention John Lennon…I woulda spewed..

BigSven on September 21, 2013 at 10:43 AM

can you imagine what would go through the bomb disposal techs mind???!!! “You want me to WHAT????”

Dannyp8262 on September 21, 2013 at 10:31 AM

Its much easier to “dis-arm” a nuke than it is to dis-arm a grenade. Its the radio-active potential that is of greater concern.

Imagine the prospect of walking up to a scene where a hunk of plutonium is just kinda sittin’ right there…..and there, and over there, etc……

BobMbx on September 21, 2013 at 10:53 AM

The answer is no. The weapons had a series of safety mechanism that in aggregate didn’t fail. We learned lessons from this incident and improved the system. This story is old news. It has been written about in many places and it has always been stated that there were multiple safeties and the last one worked.

jerryofva on September 21, 2013 at 10:54 AM

can you imagine what would go through the bomb disposal techs mind???!!! “You want me to WHAT????”

Dannyp8262 on September 21, 2013 at 10:31 AM

Speaking from experience I can tell you that is NOT what goes through the tech’s mind. It’s more like “Ok, first we’ve got to verify the arm/safe switch in the disconnect position then disconnect the battery, then account for all the dets, and igniters and put them in a secure position….and it just goes on from there. When you can do it in complete darkness dressed in full NBC gear with an OBA without either getting killed and blowing up half the base/ship then then you’ve passed.

Oldnuke on September 21, 2013 at 10:55 AM

Defenstratus: It’s not just the circuitry. The Pit degrades over time and without maintenance a nuclear weapon becomes incapable of reaching critical mass.

jerryofva on September 21, 2013 at 10:59 AM

Johnny Reb — The Russians accide3ntally detonated something in the Urals in iirc the 60′s. It was discovered when scientific papers from Russia started appearing going over the botanical effects of a very large dose of radiation over many square miles of plants.

levi from queens on September 21, 2013 at 10:59 AM

Its much easier to “dis-arm” a nuke than it is to dis-arm a grenade.

Perhaps…but if they go off, it’s the difference between one life vs. millions of lives. Not to mention the sick and dying, or that radiation levels would render half a state unlivable for centuries.

If we’ve had some close cals with nukes here…I can only imagine what might have happened in the Soviet Union with these same weapons. In a “War Games” movie similarity, a Soviet nuke base in the 80′s had shown multiple US missile launches, and the ranking officer at the time was simply filling in for another guy…Because of his calm, collected approach, he defied orders to shoot off retaliatory nukes with US targets. It was later shown it was a simple error in some chip. The guy was discharged from the Soviet military for his efforts.

We may owe all our lives to that man.

JetBoy on September 21, 2013 at 11:01 AM

Johnny Reb — The Russians accide3ntally detonated something in the Urals in iirc the 60′s. It was discovered when scientific papers from Russia started appearing going over the botanical effects of a very large dose of radiation over many square miles of plants.

levi from queens on September 21, 2013 at 10:59 AM

Not sure about this but I don’t think that was a detonation. I think it was an inadvertent criticality event that resulted from improper storage of high level wastes. If I’m thinking about the right event it was a rather large one.

Oldnuke on September 21, 2013 at 11:02 AM

What if, what if,what if.

What if Napoleon had F-22 Raptors?

fogw on September 21, 2013 at 11:04 AM

Things would have been far different. That is for sure.

I am not sure how close this detonation was, but a B-52 breaking up and dropping its cargo is disturbing enough. And in 1961 there were a lot of missiles and bombs on standby ready to be sent off if there was any indication of an attack by the USSR.

Mr. Joe on September 21, 2013 at 11:05 AM

What if South Africans showed up in the American South during the civil war with M-16s?

Mr. Joe on September 21, 2013 at 11:06 AM

If I’m thinking about the right event it was a rather large one.

Oldnuke on September 21, 2013 at 11:02 AM

BZZZZZZZZZTTTT! “Oh shit…..[thump]“

BobMbx on September 21, 2013 at 11:06 AM

The Mk 39 was designed as an airburst weapon,its impact detonation was a “last resort” in event of system failure. The most likely result of an accidental initiation under these circumstances would not have been a nuclear detonation, because with that many switches failing the simultaneous initiation of the HE charges that caused implosion of the fission core would be very unlikely. Instead, they would have blown the plutonium “sphere” apart, scattering pieces of it over a fairly wide area.

Pu239 is a b!tch to clean up safely, being not only radioactive but toxic as hell into the bargain. But the result would have been a serious hazmat situation, not a nuclear event.

BTW, one of the H-bombs released over Palomares, Spain did exactly the same thing when it landed in a farmer’s field. Except that its firing circuit actually did detonate the HE charges. The result was exactly what I described here.

Yes, the farmer got a big chunk of money from Uncle Sam.

cheers

eon

eon on September 21, 2013 at 11:09 AM

I am not sure how close this detonation was, but a B-52 breaking up and dropping its cargo is disturbing enough. And in 1961 there were a lot of missiles and bombs on standby ready to be sent off if there was any indication of an attack by the USSR.

Mr. Joe on September 21, 2013 at 11:05 AM

There’s a very long list of accidents and incidents involving nuclear weapons, but not one “yield” event.

The Thule and Palomares accidents are near the top of the “almost” list.

BobMbx on September 21, 2013 at 11:12 AM

Well, since South Carolina got nuked back in 1983, why should North Carolinians escape a like fate?

whatcat on September 21, 2013 at 11:17 AM

I’m sick of everything since being denominated in ‘Hiroshimas’. Give me the damn yield in MT or KT.

slickwillie2001 on September 21, 2013 at 11:21 AM

I’m sick of everything since being denominated in ‘Hiroshimas’. Give me the damn yield in MT or KT.

slickwillie2001 on September 21, 2013 at 11:21 AM

Mk39 bomb was 3-4 Mt.

Oldnuke on September 21, 2013 at 11:29 AM

Daniel Ellsburg told me this in an interview 30 years ago and I printed it in an NC magazine. It’s nothing new. And from what I’ve been told by real nuke experts, the bomb wouldn’t have detonated with the failure, it just would have made detonation possible. Crash was because of constantly having the planes in the air. We don’t do that today.

fleiter on September 21, 2013 at 12:05 PM

I am not sure how close this detonation was, but a B-52 breaking up and dropping its cargo is disturbing enough. And in 1961 there were a lot of missiles and bombs on standby ready to be sent off if there was any indication of an attack by the USSR.

Mr. Joe on September 21, 2013 at 11:05 AM

And, to make matters worse…the Three Stooges were in the White House
(Jack,Bob, and Lil’ Ted)

The world went to pot after IKE…everyone knows that !

BigSven on September 21, 2013 at 12:35 PM

Eric Schlosser wrote an interesting book about averted nuclear mishaps

Command and Control: Nuclear Weapons, the Damascus Accident, and the Illusion of Safety
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6452798-command-and-control

Former Sec Def For Clinton, William Cohen wrote a novel (Blink of an Eye) about a nuclear bomb lost off the cost of Savannah, GA. I wouldn’t recommend it, though. The perps who detonate the bomb are right-wing Republicans.

Kalifornia Kafir on September 21, 2013 at 12:42 PM

Just think, the capital of North Carolina might have been Asheville today if that one switch had worked….

cthulhu on September 21, 2013 at 12:50 PM

Goldsboro is my hometown. That bomb was actually dropped in Pikeville, just north of Goldsboro. If it had detonated, yours truly wouldn’t be here.

antifederalist on September 21, 2013 at 12:50 PM

Would have been “interesting” had that device gone off…

There is one still buried deep in the mud along the Carolina coast somewhere.

For those who are not that familiar with some of the very real dangers we faced back in the 60′s-70′s, there is always that Nike Hercules/Zeus shield we built around all our major metropolitan areas. Nuclear tipped Nike missiles…thousands of them…just ready, armed and waiting for the NORAD folks to give the launch alert.

Now, give this some thought. The Army did late in the game. Looked to de-activate those sites. Once they looked at the data.

Scenario:

Squadrons of Soviet bombers entering American air space with evil intent. We launch hundreds and hundreds of nuke tipped missiles into the atmosphere over our cities.

First…the big BOOM. Followed by an EMP off the register.

CONELRAD suddenly not able to broadcast those emergency instructions…but, at that point, why bother?

Then, errant or failed missiles dropping out of the sky…into major American metropolitan areas. More big Booms.

Then, Soviet bombers and their loads, armed, ready to go, falling out of the sky.

Third set of big booms.

Soviet bombers not destroyed in the air completing their missions.

Fourth set of big booms.

Some estimates from the late 60′s looked at the entire Eastern seaboard, Detroit, Chicago, and most of the California coast being destroyed, and millions of Americans killed by fratricide.

ICBM’s…seemed to be the new wave of the future back then. Bombers from the USSR ended up being their second string.

Slava, Bogu.

Fortunately, those Nike sites were de-activated, with the meme at the time being they were out of date and ineffective.

So, one errant bomb…falling to earth over North Carolina…and having one set of controls work as intended…well…we were so very lucky for so many years.

As for other nuke incidents involving weaponry? Lots of them. Some not so big, some a lot bigger.

Have a nice day. :-)

coldwarrior on September 21, 2013 at 1:01 PM

Just think, the capital of North Carolina might have been Asheville today if that one switch had worked….
cthulhu on September 21, 2013 at 12:50 PM

I see what you did there and I’m ticked that I didn’t come up with it first.

whatcat on September 21, 2013 at 1:10 PM

We may owe all our lives to that man.

JetBoy on September 21, 2013 at 11:01 AM

I never heard about that. If he’s still alive, he’s probably in some hovel in Siberia.

Firefly_76 on September 21, 2013 at 2:24 PM

What better proof could we have that Christ via His mother, Holy Mary of the Immaculate Conception, protects and keeps us safe? The blessed Virgin is, after all, the great patronness of our blessed country. Furthermore, we ask her help in securing graces for ourselves and our posterity every time we say the prayer, “God bless America!” (Keep that in mind next time a godless Libertarian accuses you of having a “jingoistic patriotism.”)

TXJenny on September 21, 2013 at 3:21 PM

I never heard about that. If he’s still alive, he’s probably in some hovel in Siberia.

Firefly_76 on September 21, 2013 at 2:24 PM

His name is Stanislav Petrov, Wiki HERE

Video HERE on the incident

JetBoy on September 21, 2013 at 3:26 PM

We may owe all our lives to that man.
JetBoy on September 21, 2013 at 11:01 AM

Hey…you gonna die someday anyways. There are a whole lot far worse ways to go!!

Besides..that photo Hotair dug up is one damn fine piece of photography!! We just can’t find good shots like this anymore !

BigSven on September 21, 2013 at 4:52 PM

Oldnuke

Damn your posts are always interesting. I wish you would write a book on your experiences. I’d read one by Coldwarrior, too.

teacherman on September 21, 2013 at 8:44 PM

My Dad was a Navigator on B-52′s, and a SAC Nuclear Weapons Safety Instructor. He served from the late ’60′s into the mid ’80′s. I called him about this article, and he said it’s BS. As in, “That is BS. That is not what happened. Trust me.” He ain’t saying more than that, but given his job description and the time he served, I’d say he probably was familiar with this incident and the exact information on how the devices functioned.

Oh, and he said never believe anything printed in the Guardian.

quikstrike98 on September 21, 2013 at 9:14 PM

Which I’ll still sit through with a Bloody Mary when it turns up on TBS on a Saturday morning

How squishys spend Saturday mornings; kids (or grandkids) are in one room watching socialist environmental wacko superhero cartoons while they start the weekend off boozing in another room watching old movies. Nice.

peacenprosperity on September 22, 2013 at 12:03 AM

Would we have curled up into a Japan-like shell and eschewed all nuclear endeavors from then on, surrendering the eventual field of play to the Soviet Union? Or would we have just “toughed it out” and moved on?

We had a competent President in 1961 and two parties that put American interests first, as well as a populace that didn’t hate the country, as so many apparently do today.

JIMV on September 22, 2013 at 12:58 PM

We weren’t in the middle of any major military engagement at the time

No? The Cold War doesn’t count?!? (Let’s see, wasn’t 1962 the year we had a tense little confrontation over an island in the Caribbean?)

As to the “OMG! We came so close!” attitude over 3 fail-safes failing, but the fourth one didn’t…. Isn’t that why there were 4 fail-safes?!? That’s the whole point. They all have a certain percentage chance of failure, so you layer them, reducing the chances of an actual problem to a miniscule level. It doesn’t scare me, it makes me feel good that people were smart enough to put in that 4th fail-safe. What scares me is non-critical thinkers voting……

GWB on September 22, 2013 at 1:29 PM

Oh, and he said never believe anything printed in the Guardian.

quikstrike98 on September 21, 2013 at 9:14 PM

Well, yeah, it has that working against it, too.

GWB on September 22, 2013 at 1:35 PM