Some jobs heading for extinction

posted at 7:01 pm on September 14, 2013 by Jazz Shaw

The jobs related website salary.com has what looked like a fairly interesting analysis this week which purports to discuss “Jobs on the brink” and asks the worrying question as to whether or not your job will be in danger of going extinct or needing to evolve to survive. Sadly, as you’ll see in a moment, a lot of the occupations they selected are either historical relics or fields which are simply shifting with the times. But it’s still a question which does affect many American workers.

First, their list of one dozen (there are expanded explanations for each at the link) and their alleged status:

EXTINCT: Video Store Clerk, Iceman, Newspaper deliverer, Switchboard operator

EVOLVED OR EVOLVING: Librarian, Professional Typist, Umps and refs, Travel agents, Family farmer, Supermarket cashier, Postal worker, On air DJ

The list of extinct jobs seems rather over-obvious for the most part, and they might as well have included “mammoth hunter.” The iceman went away with the advent of refrigeration technology and high speed, online data delivery did pretty much the same to the video store clerk. I would argue that switchboard operators actually “evolved” at individual business offices, but phone company operators no longer need to manually pull wires in and out of connection panels. Newspapers still get delivered, but at least where I live it tends to be done by adults in a vehicle. The days of the kid with the banana seat bike slinging papers into your shrubbery has pretty much faded out. But was that ever really a “job” in the first place?

Defining those other professions as “evolved” or “evolving” seems to be something of a red herring. Technology evolves in essentially every area of our lives and the jobs required to create and deliver it does as well. There are very few things done today in precisely the same way as they were fifty or even twenty years ago, with the exceptions of some boutique, hand crafting specialty fields. (Making custom saddles for horses comes to mind.)

But I think there are some jobs which are either going away or changing so radically that workers can’t reliably make the shift and say in that field. Others have just disappeared because of cultural shifts. One classic example is the small appliance repair shop and the parallel example of the television repairman. My recent experiences with my 20 year old toaster giving up the ghost brought the former to mind. As to the latter, when was the last time you heard of anyone having their broken television repaired and returned to service? We just throw things away now, and if you’re foolish enough to ask about repairing them, you’ll quickly be informed that the repairs will cost more than a new one, and don’t you really want the newer, better model anyway?

I also wonder if the venerable position of bartender is on the way out. Technology may play some role in this (there are already robot barkeeps on the job) but the entire idea of bars seems to be on the wane. Sin taxes drive up the price of liquor and rules about smoking empty out portions of the potential client base. The move to push drunk driving law definitions further and further to the extreme make it so that you’re not even sure if you can have a single beer and then drive home from a bar. We may be disapproving bartenders out of existence.

Are there any others? I’m sure I must be missing a lot of them.


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Are there any others? I’m sure I must be missing a lot of them.

RINO blogger?

steebo77 on September 14, 2013 at 7:02 PM

Come now. Did Kerry have such a bad week that you want to get rid of the position of Secretary of State?

hawkdriver on September 14, 2013 at 7:03 PM

If only Congress and Presidential positions would evolve: lower pay, limited Congressional terms…see Mark Levin’s new book for details.

Decoski on September 14, 2013 at 7:04 PM

But was that ever really a “job” in the first place?

Yes it was. My son delivered a route for two years. When we moved from the area they divided into two car routes. We heard from customers that he did a better job of getting the papers to them on time. Go figure.

chemman on September 14, 2013 at 7:06 PM

hawkdriver on September 14, 2013 at 7:03 PM

Nice.

chemman on September 14, 2013 at 7:07 PM

On the repair thing.

This stems form the cheap garbage we get from china. TV are poor quality and for that its cheaper. Back in the day, items actually were built to last. My parent still have that 15 inch tv that is surrounded by some cool looking wood… councle tv or whatever they are called… picture to this day is also as good as any cheap LCD you get from walmart.

What he says is very true about bars. I think they wanted to drop ( the federal mind you ) the BAL to a .05… yes one beer at dinner when your out makes your a drunk driver who can become a felon.

watertown on September 14, 2013 at 7:12 PM

What’s a poor, unemployed gas-lamp lighter to do? *sigh*

OldEnglish on September 14, 2013 at 7:17 PM

watertown on September 14, 2013 at 7:12 PM

console tv

avagreen on September 14, 2013 at 7:17 PM

Newspapers still get delivered, but at least where I live it tends to be done by adults in a vehicle. The days of the kid with the banana seat bike slinging papers into your shrubbery has pretty much faded out.

When I was living in Michigan it was still by teens and was an afternoon delivery. The paper always made it to the front door (unlike my Wall Street Journal delivery which, turns out, can make an awesome display when jetted out of a snow blower).

Then economics took hold and delivery wasn’t a job for neighborhood kids but people with cars and a larger territory. Nowdays, where I lived in MI only has print papers on certain days corresponding with the ad inserts.

You say newspaper delivery is heading for extinction. I say newspapers are.

Happy Nomad on September 14, 2013 at 7:23 PM

A machine will now make a complete Hamburger ready to eat. It will not be long before a fast food joint will need no employees except the delivery man.

Robots are already sold that can be taught to do many factory jobs workers now do. These robots will become much more advanced in the next few years. Think how primitive the first IPhone was. That was only a few years ago. Technology is just barely able to do robots right think Siri.

It is very difficult to imagine a job robots will not be able to do. Childcare perhaps.

Groceries will most likely be delivered to you in robotic cars and placed in your fridge by a robot within 20 years. That is if the food you eat will not be delivered instead.

Steveangell on September 14, 2013 at 7:25 PM

Steveangell on September 14, 2013 at 7:25 PM

Well, I hope they look like the robots from the Warner Bros. cartoons where they’re essentially skinny stick figures usually on a wheel with 2 skinny arms and a round head. Those would be great to see in real life!

The Nerve on September 14, 2013 at 7:29 PM

Are there any others? I’m sure I must be missing a lot of them.

Healthcare providers, specifically doctors.

Once ObamaCare is implemented, who’s going to want to pay the traditional price in education, time, and money … just to become some lame federal employee with continually declining earning power who’ll be overruled on healthcare decisions by some bureaucrat in DC?

ShainS on September 14, 2013 at 7:32 PM

If only Congress and Presidential positions would evolve: lower pay, limited Congressional terms…see Mark Levin’s new book for details.

Decoski on September 14, 2013 at 7:04 PM

…listen to him too!

KOOLAID2 on September 14, 2013 at 7:35 PM

Well I can tell you with absolute certainty that there was a certain job at a Chicago hospital where the pay went from $100k to $300k……..but the former occupant of that job moved to the White House and her position was never filled.

Go figure.

GarandFan on September 14, 2013 at 7:37 PM

A machine will now make a complete Hamburger ready to eat. It will not be long before a fast food
joint will need no employees except the delivery man.
Robots are already sold that can be taught to do many factory jobs workers now do. These robots
will become much more advanced in the next few years. Think how primitive the first IPhone was.
That was only a few years ago. Technology is just barely able to do robots right think Siri.
It is very difficult to imagine a job robots will not be able to do. Childcare perhaps.
Groceries will most likely be delivered to you in robotic cars and placed in your fridge by a robot
within 20 years. That is if the food you eat will not be delivered instead.
Steveangell on September 14, 2013 at 7:25 PM

Have they adjusted your medication since the election? You managed to make less sense than your comments during the campaign.

Murphy9 on September 14, 2013 at 7:46 PM

ShainS on September 14, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Ray Bradbury, in “Fahrenheit:451″ wrote in that story (back in the early 1950′s) of “medical technicians” who serviced people, in much the same way as a maintenance technician would service a machine.

In the 1990′s, HMO/PPO pushed the private practice down from doctors to “nurse practitioners” for GP’s.

IMHO, Obamacare will drive a push towards medical service that mirrors IT call centres, including EMT first responders to accident scenes, under a maintenance tech accident response model.

Wanderlust on September 14, 2013 at 7:46 PM

The days of the kid with the banana seat bike slinging papers into your shrubbery has pretty much faded out.

Nope. It’s a guy in a pickup truck veering madly from side to side as he drives solo down the street flinging papers out of each open window of the truck.

Been that way in Los Angeles for well onto 50 years, when I, a kid fresh from Buffalo, tried to get a job with the Los Angelese Times equivalent to that which I had with the Buffalo Courier Express.

The Buffalo papers even gave its carriers a wagon specifically designed to carry a whole route’s worth of papers, said wagon painted in the newpaper’s colors (the Courier Express wagon was blue, and its rival, the Buffalo Evening News, was green).

But the Courier Express is long gone — folded into the Buffalo Evening News, which is now the Buffalo News.

http://www.conelrad.com/atomicsecrets/secrets.php?secrets=03

I don’t expect the LA Times to be around in print form much longer either — they’ve been shedding readers like a dog sheds fleas, and even turnaround guys like the Koch Brothers gave them a pass — I would assume after looking at the books.

unclesmrgol on September 14, 2013 at 7:49 PM

But was that ever really a “job” in the first place?

well, i guess for high class people named Jazz it wasn’t…but for the rest of us, yeah.

in fact i’ll go the whole way..gus pump attendants and people like them provided good jobs for lots of people…now they just sit at home collecting their checks and watch someone twerking on the TeeVee…yeah, Jazz..that’s what passes for progress

but the very first comment nailed it

RINO blogger?

steebo77 on September 14, 2013 at 7:02 PM

r keller on September 14, 2013 at 7:51 PM

IMHO, Obamacare will drive a push towards medical service that mirrors IT call centres, including EMT first responders to accident scenes, under a maintenance tech accident response model.

Wanderlust on September 14, 2013 at 7:46 PM

Interesting insight.

If so, let’s hope those jobs aren’t outsourced to India, China, etc. ;-)

ShainS on September 14, 2013 at 7:53 PM

Jobs are overrated anyhow.

patman77 on September 14, 2013 at 7:55 PM

The days of the kid with the banana seat bike slinging papers into your shrubbery has pretty much faded out. But was that ever really a “job” in the first place?

Sure it was. It was my first job at age 12 and I had 114 homes I delivered to in the suburbs. Also was responsible for collecting payment each Saturday from the people on my route. An early introduction to responsibility and finance. Oh yeah, it costs 42 cents a week to have the paper delivered Mon-Sat. And I had cheapskate customers who would hand me two quarters and stand there waiting for their change.

Yeah I’m that old.

fogw on September 14, 2013 at 7:59 PM

If so, let’s hope those jobs aren’t outsourced to India, China, etc. ;-)

ShainS on September 14, 2013 at 7:53 PM

Or Apple “geniuses”. :)

OldEnglish on September 14, 2013 at 8:03 PM

Delivering newspapers is a job. I walked my route until I had saved up enough money to purchase a bike. The papers were delivered in one bundle and the inserts in another. I had to open each paper and insert the advertisements (and comics on Sundays). No tossing the paper onto the front lawn; each was placed between the screen door and front door.

I had to collect for the papers in person, too. No central billing office. At the tender age of 12, I had to sort out the sob stories from people who wanted me to float them a couple of weeks.

I tell the young people who work for me now that, as corny as it sounds, their first job will set the tone for the rest of their working life. The same things I hated about delivering papers are the same things I hate about running my business now (mostly deadbeat accounts).

Yeah, it’s a real job (is blogging?).

windbag on September 14, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Coal miner?

CW on September 14, 2013 at 8:09 PM

Driver-less cars will create a whole lot of business for bars.

daveundis on September 14, 2013 at 8:19 PM

The days of the kid with the banana seat bike slinging papers into your shrubbery has pretty much faded out. But was that ever really a “job” in the first place?

Let’s see. What I remember from 40 years ago as a paper girl. From 10 to 13 years old, every morning before school, my brother and I woke up at 5am to fold and rubber band the papers and fill the canvas shoulder bags with about 50 papers each. (On Sundays, more subscribers and larger papers, we filled four bags and had to return home to get the second round.)

We’d head out as soon as we were ready, because some subscribers would complain if they didn’t have their papers before 6am. We walked a mile and a half to our route as that was the only one available. On rainy and snowy days, we had to tuck the papers inside the doors or put them under the mats to keep them from getting wet (and again avoid complaints.) Our mom would only drive us if it was pouring rain (more to keep the papers dry than to help us.) Sometimes, if there was time, I got a cat nap in before going to school.

We had to keep track of people’s vacation and stop days, and whether they wanted to receive the papers when they got back or not. (If they did we brought them in a bag and left them off for them. If we went on vacation, we were in charge of finding someone to take our route, train them and then pay them out of the little money we received.

Once a month, we had to go out and collect money from the subscribers. My brother would send me to the “mean” houses as the customers were less likely to yell at a girl asking for payment. Some would go months without paying us but a few would throw in a little tip for us. Also, once a month, we would have to produce the receipts for the papers and show the newspaper liaison our collection booklets that showed who paid. They would eventually intervene if too much time passed between payments. They would deduct a certain amount for any “missed” papers, whether we objected or not. We would give the liaison the money to cover the papers and were able to keep any overages (tips).

It was real job, done by children but with real world lessons. I am a stronger person for having delivered newspapers. It was one of the hardest jobs that I ever had. As I got older, babysitting took its place. Babysitting paid a whole lot better for a lot less work (50 cents an hour).

Fallon on September 14, 2013 at 8:21 PM

Yeah, it’s a real job (is blogging?).

windbag on September 14, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Yup. We learned a lot about people, didn’t we?

Fallon on September 14, 2013 at 8:22 PM

I also wonder if the venerable position of bartender is on the way out.

I had a theory of the government pushing draconian drunk driving laws, didn’t want people gathering and discussing things. And I think it was kinda working till the internet came along.

lowandslow on September 14, 2013 at 8:23 PM

I should add that I think the bar business is starting to rebound a little. It usually does when there’s high unemployment.

lowandslow on September 14, 2013 at 8:25 PM

After 0bama and the fascist greenies, there won’t be much call for electricians or car mechanics.

Rebar on September 14, 2013 at 8:31 PM

Someone may have mentioned this, but one of my pet peeves: airline curbside check-in attendants.. Some make 100k a year w/ tips.. extortion at its finest.

Intrepid767 on September 14, 2013 at 8:33 PM

Steveangell on September 14, 2013 at 7:25 PM

can’t be any worse than it is now

gerrym51 on September 14, 2013 at 8:35 PM

EXTINCT: … Iceman,

yea that guy delivering ice to the convenience store is an illusion i guess.

newrouter on September 14, 2013 at 8:35 PM

The days of the kid with the banana seat bike slinging papers into your shrubbery has pretty much faded out. But was that ever really a “job” in the first place?

this is stupid. dude it was a job to get those papers out for this former 12-16 year old. 7 days a week, 365 days a year so stuff it clown.

newrouter on September 14, 2013 at 8:39 PM

Wanderlust on September 14, 2013 at 7:46 PM

In California, they just passed a law allowing nurse practitioners to perform abortions in places where there are “too few” doctors practicing.

A companion bill, which would have allowed nurse practitioners to prescribe medicines and perform most of the other acts a GP performs, in areas where there are “too few” doctors practicing, died in committee.

The difference is that the California Medical Association endorsed the former, and refused to endorse the latter.

My take: California’s doctors want out of the abortion business but are too liberal to say so out loud, whilst they do not want to give up the lucrative low end medicine.

unclesmrgol on September 14, 2013 at 8:43 PM

Fallon on September 14, 2013 at 8:21 PM

I take it you tip well, nowadays.

unclesmrgol on September 14, 2013 at 8:43 PM

EXTINCT: Video Store Clerk, Iceman, Newspaper deliverer, Switchboard operator, Independent Auto Mechanic

EVOLVED OR EVOLVING: Librarian, Professional Typist, Umps and refs, Travel agents, Family farmer, Supermarket cashier, Postal worker, On air DJ, Police Officer

The auto mechanic who works on any car, no matter the make, is pretty much dead.The combination of highly computerized vehicle control systems and proprietary software almost guarantees that within a decade, the only place you’ll be able to get your five year old or less car worked on will be at a dealership belonging to its manufacturer. I foresee security firmware installed at the factory specifically to prevent “third party” work, on the principle of anti-hacking countermeasures.

Speaking as someone who’s been there, policing has evolved so much since I got my degree in Forensic Science (1979) that I doubt I’d even recognize half the equipment in a modern black-and-white. And a modern crime lab deals in things that were barely even science fiction then, like DNA analysis. (BTW, that’s one that very few of the SF writers even came close to predicting; like the Internet, it pretty much caught them by surprise.)

Considering what police work is like today, by 2050 it will probably look like a cross between Star Trek and Starship Troopers, with patrol units equipped with advanced sensor systems, officers wearing “uniforms” that are probably “smarter” than a modern laptop and can protect them from most low-to-medium-level threats, and less-than-lethal weapon systems that may not be as flashy as a phaser, but get about the same result.

If they get in over their heads, the tactical team that responds will probably look more like something out of the G.I. Joe movies. Right to the V/STOLs and powered armor. And their weapons will be anything but “less-than-lethal”; more like something that reduces the target to a splat of goo with a center hit.

Well, at least they’ll still be able to ID the perp’s remains. With DNA analysis.

clear ether

eon

eon on September 14, 2013 at 8:48 PM

Some jobs heading for extinction

Uh, all of them?

Dr. ZhivBlago on September 14, 2013 at 8:48 PM

Yup. We learned a lot about people, didn’t we?

Fallon on September 14, 2013 at 8:22 PM

Ain’t that the truth.

windbag on September 14, 2013 at 8:49 PM

I read a piece several weeks ago discussing how self-driving cars are going to affect us. There take was that it isn’t cars that will be big sellers, but trucks. The very large dump trucks used in surface mining are already being converted to GPS-guided self-driving trucks. Next on the horizon will be GPS-guided self-driving long-haul trucks; the 18-wheeler were so familiar with out on the open road. How many thousands of people make a good living as long-haul truckers today?

The article also talked about delivery truckers loosing their jobs, but until a large number of retail stores start using robotic devices to stock their shelves, I don’t see these truckers being put out of work any time soon.

svar42 on September 14, 2013 at 8:49 PM

Paperboy. Afternoon routes, then a morning route, as well. Also did “odd jobs” through the city “youth job bank.” Lots of cleaning out basements/attics, yard work, and scrubbing ceilings (back when everyone smoked, that was a job, too…)

Then:

Carriage Boy, Bagger (which promotion required me to take 6 hours of un-paid training,) then, my big break – I got a job at Lafayette Radio, every day after school, and all day Saturday.

There, I learned about commissioned sales, and add-on sales, and cultivating repeat and word-of-mouth customers.

massrighty on September 14, 2013 at 8:50 PM

I take it you tip well, nowadays.

unclesmrgol on September 14, 2013 at 8:43 PM

Always generously, even bad service. I feel the kindness you show to others comes back to you.

Fallon on September 14, 2013 at 8:56 PM

Have they adjusted your medication since the election? You managed to make less sense than your comments during the campaign.

Murphy9 on September 14, 2013 at 7:46 PM

Boy you live in the 90′s or something? You obviously have no idea about science either. Romney did make five RINO’s in a row who ran for President and surprise, surprise lost.

Research robots. Research artificial intelligence. Research speech recognition.

Robots will replace almost all humans within 20 years.

Call almost any company and robots is all you can easily talk to even today. When you talk to a person they might as well be a robot often. Within a few years the robots will do a far better job than the Indians they replace.

By the way. The current robots are not creating more jobs. They are mostly made by robots who are replacing humans in China and other countries.

Steveangell on September 14, 2013 at 9:01 PM

Hopefully my sister will still be able to make $6,000 a month from her laptop.

Flange on September 14, 2013 at 9:03 PM

Here is one that should go extinct: Democrat politician.

Warner Todd Huston on September 14, 2013 at 9:17 PM

Flange @ 9:03 PM

HAHAHA… I see what you did there.

teacherman on September 14, 2013 at 9:26 PM

Teachers. The advent of education on demand has only just started, and with education equivalence and skills tests the idea that you will be educated in a brick and mortar facility is going the way of the Dodo. Really, shouldn’t learning be self-paced and oriented towards knowledge and the ability to use it, not just being taught to a test?

The current system is bloated, ineffective and now being overhauled on the outside.

Also: school administrators, school staff.

There will be a need for tutors or those who can teach on a smaller basis for groups of children who have parents looking to augment automated and home schooling.

The institution that featured a brick and mortar school, with one teacher and lots of students taking notes dates back to the 14th century and a lack of books. Now the information is readily available at all times, and the only question is can a child learn to ingest information, analyze it and then do a critical appraisal of what they have learned? Currently our schools fail at this job. It is a requirement for a society to have individuals able to do this. Ergo, schools and all that goes with them are heading towards the extinction/extreme transformation area.

The other: Network News Reader.

Replacement: Robots.

Why? Robots have more feelings, more versatility and will get the facts across which our current readers do not.

Also on the chopping block are networks. Expect shows to go ala carte and you pay for series, not for a thousand channels with nothing to watch.

Medicine is about to undergo a radical change with the advent of telemedicine and robotics. Expect something like Larry Niven’s Autodoc to show up in the next 20 years. That will destroy all need for ‘insurance’. Our current system will try to stop this and will fail at great cost and debt.

ajacksonian on September 14, 2013 at 9:37 PM

According to a recent article in Slashdot 45% of US jobs are headed for extinction: 45% of US Jobs vulnerable to automation

JimK on September 14, 2013 at 9:47 PM

One classic example is the small appliance repair shop

I have such a shop several miles from me. I’m pretty handy with a set of tools, so I’ve never had them repair anything for me, but they have sold me parts to repair my water heater, refrigerator, washer, dryer, A/C compressor and blower, and oven.

Kafir on September 14, 2013 at 9:53 PM

The iceman went away with the advent of refrigeration technology

That’s only partly correct-there’s still a huge “ice industry” supplying ready-made ice in cube and block form to convenience stores and supermarkets, and any self-respecting fish monger and seafood restaurant considers crushed ice and other forms of frozen water essential for storage purposes.

The market alone for pre-packaged ice for use in coolers qualifies it for Astronaut Status.

And here in New Hampshire we still have folks who harvest frozen lake ice and then store it in sawdust in ice houses. For use the upcoming summer in old-fashioned ice boxes at an elite Leftist summer camp!

Del Dolemonte on September 14, 2013 at 10:26 PM

Full-time jobs are headed for extinction under ObamaCare. Doctors will be the first to go extinct.

Philly on September 14, 2013 at 10:38 PM

It was real job, done by children but with real world lessons. I am a stronger person for having delivered newspapers. It was one of the hardest jobs that I ever had. As I got older, babysitting took its place. Babysitting paid a whole lot better for a lot less work (50 cents an hour).

Fallon on September 14, 2013 at 8:21 PM

^^^this

Ugly on September 14, 2013 at 11:27 PM

My parent still have that 15 inch tv that is surrounded by some cool looking wood… councle tv or whatever they are called… picture to this day is also as good as any cheap LCD you get from walmart.

LIAR!

Anybody else know how we can tell this person is LYING? It’s very obvious. I’m not even taking the details about HD into consideration. This is even more basic than that. Too bad this Luddite doesn’t even know the technology he touts is dead in the water…unless he lives in Mexico.

He/She/It needed to make their point seem valid, so they LIED! Pathetic.

This is a perfect representation of the Tea Party. Sarah Palin is that you?

I also wonder if the venerable position of bartender is on the way out. Technology may play some role in this (there are already robot barkeeps on the job) but the entire idea of bars seems to be on the wane. Sin taxes drive up the price of liquor and rules about smoking empty out portions of the potential client base.

What utter BS. Name one region, city, airport whatever where bartenders are losing jobs to automation or bureaucracy. Maybe you forgot your sarc tag.

Also, the only repair I’ve ever had to make to a flat panel was to replace the bulb. If you’re too dumb to to that you’re too dumb for aspiration.

Longtime Listener on September 14, 2013 at 11:53 PM

Longtime Listener @ 11:53 PM

Little excitable there, fella?

teacherman on September 15, 2013 at 12:07 AM

“Community Organizer” jobs are looking pretty bleak…

shorebird on September 15, 2013 at 12:12 AM

Coal miner?

CW on September 14, 2013 at 8:09 PM

Oh we will still mine coal. We just will have to sell it abroad to China and India because the progressive left will not allow us to use it here. Thus our manufacturing jobs will become extinct because we will have to use higher cost solar and windmill power and won’t be competitive. (Natural gas would have worked but I think they are going to ban fracking so its price will go back up even if its export is still blocked by the administration.)

KW64 on September 15, 2013 at 12:15 AM

Little excitable there, fella?

teacherman on September 15, 2013 at 12:07 AM

Pardon my honesty. I see no reason to sit here and pretend that either person was credible in their assertions. You want to blow smoke up their butts? Go right ahead.

According to Jazz Shaw, you might not have the right to do so for much longer.

Longtime Listener on September 15, 2013 at 12:19 AM

Really with the way the economy is going I would think people would flock to bars to drown their sorrows.

Ukiah on September 15, 2013 at 12:30 AM

What utter BS. Name one region, city, airport whatever where bartenders are losing jobs to automation or bureaucracy. Maybe you forgot your sarc tag.

Also, the only repair I’ve ever had to make to a flat panel was to replace the bulb. If you’re too dumb to to that you’re too dumb for aspiration.

Longtime Listener on September 14, 2013 at 11:53 PM

It is true that bartender jobs have been increasing while many other fields have been decreasing. We also take for granted vast improvements in everyday things that replace things that had flaws our hazy memories have forgotten were annoyances in years past. Sealed bearings on equipment has eliminated lots of lubrication effort. We do not have winter versus summer tires or oils that we used to have to change. License plates don’t corrode away like they used to so we don’t have to change them every year. Writing letters stamping and mailing have been greatly reduced as has check writing. Speakers for sound systems have better quality sound and are not nearly as heavy as they used to be. The days of driving around looking for places has been dramatically changed by GPS location systems. Life was not better way back when and we are wrong when we say things were better made. Lots of the things that were around when we were young did not last but since they are in landfills, we hardly even remember them.

I do think that if we keep raising the minimum wage, more low skill entry level jobs like front counter clerks at fast food restaurants will give way to vending machine type technology; but that is the fault of government manipulation of the labor markets not because of frightening technology changes.

We also have created jobs that never existed in place of these older jobs that some workers have become comfortable in. This is the trade off of a dynamic economy that allows consumer choice to create beneficial change for the consumer.

If government does not kill the entrepreneur’s spirit, there will be things for willing capable humans to profitably do. Look at the people employed in the oil and gas industry using novel techniques developed in the private sector rather than through government funded “Green Job Development” boondogles.

KW64 on September 15, 2013 at 12:36 AM

ajacksonian on September 14, 2013 at 9:37 PM

I agree with you about college level educators being displaced by tele-education systems. At the elementary and 2ndary levels the educators will be replaced with what amount to child care givers who turn on the tele-education systems. Parents do not want their children at home while they are working and do not want to pay for child care. Schools will continue to be the daycare centers that they have become as actual education became secondary to other agendas.

KW64 on September 15, 2013 at 12:43 AM

Speakers for sound systems have better quality sound and are not nearly as heavy as they used to be.

You realize that weight was part of the sound, right? Cabinets are not made like they used to be. Ergo studio monitors are not made like they used to be. I know of more than one tech who swapped out new guts into an old wood cabinet for awesome sound quality.

But that’s just an aside.

If government does not kill the entrepreneur’s spirit,

That you entertain this as a possibility suggests you know little about that spirit.

Longtime Listener on September 15, 2013 at 12:45 AM

The article also talked about delivery truckers loosing their jobs, but until a large number of retail stores start using robotic devices to stock their shelves, I don’t see these truckers being put out of work any time soon.

svar42 on September 14, 2013 at 8:49 PM

Manufacturing plants use GPS forklifts also. This keeps you from not knowing where your inventory is as well as replacing forklift drivers.

KW64 on September 15, 2013 at 12:47 AM

That you entertain this as a possibility suggests you know little about that spirit.

Longtime Listener on September 15, 2013 at 12:45 AM

The entrepreneurial spirit can be driven pretty far underground in societies like Cuba, North Korea or the old Maoist or Stalinist versions of China and Russia. It can also be lulled to sleep by handouts that make productive effort seem unnecessary. However, you are correct that the human thirst for freedom whether personal or economic is inherent in man and would take virtual generations of forcible removal from the gene pool to eliminate.

KW64 on September 15, 2013 at 12:52 AM

Few jobs more useless to the Constitution nowadays than Attorney General of The United States.

Sleazy Eric Holder and Janet Barbecue Reno have devolved that into a protection racket which would embarrass Frank Nitti.

viking01 on September 15, 2013 at 1:06 AM

EXTINCT: Iceman

Val Kilmer hardest hit.

apostic on September 15, 2013 at 5:17 AM

Longtime Listener on September 14, 2013 at 11:53 PM

A gratuitous shot at Tea Partiers, Sarah Palin and Jazz Shaw for the win! (All in one post)

Evolving: Paid Trolls

BigAlSouth on September 15, 2013 at 6:37 AM

You know something, Listener? I just checked out your link which is currently featuring a shot against the late Sen. Jesse Helms (R-NC).

Yeah, still using the race card to smear an honorable man, years after his death. Because whistling “Dixie” when race hustler, intellect extraordinaire Carol Mosley-Brown is in the elevator with you is just so darn racist!

The country would be much better off with a hundred “Senator No’s” in Washington.

BigAlSouth on September 15, 2013 at 6:53 AM

Also, the only repair I’ve ever had to make to a flat panel was to replace the bulb. If you’re too dumb to to that you’re too dumb for aspiration.

Longtime Listener on September 14, 2013 at 11:53 PM

….I think you need to replace YOUR bulb….Lisper!

KOOLAID2 on September 15, 2013 at 7:24 AM

Wanderlust on September 14, 2013 at 7:46 PM

On your point the latest trend is a medical facility staffed with PA’s (physician assistants).
The last time I went for a checkup I had less than five minutes face time with my doctor.
Apparently doctors go room to room to confirm that what the PA wrote up was accurate, recommends a treatment, prescription, or makes a referral, then their off to the next number.
Internet MD’s are only a reserved parking spot away.

kregg on September 15, 2013 at 8:02 AM

Oops:

… then their they’re off to the next number.

kregg on September 15, 2013 at 8:05 AM

Little excitable there, fella?

teacherman on September 15, 2013 at 12:07 AM

Pardon my honesty. I see no reason to sit here and pretend that either person was credible in their assertions. You want to blow smoke up their butts? Go right ahead.

According to Jazz Shaw, you might not have the right to do so for much longer.

Longtime Listener on September 15, 2013 at 12:19 AM

Um hey f$cktart liberal Hot Air regular wannabe. My in-laws had a 15-16 year old console tv up to just about two weeks ago. They gave it away with a picture as good as the day they bought it because they needed more room. How about you take your meeds before you go on another one of your rants calling better people than you liars?

hawkdriver on September 15, 2013 at 8:05 AM

Meds … Take your meeds.

Or really, just go the he11 away because the people here have the trolls pretty much wired and you’re not going to have much fun.

hawkdriver on September 15, 2013 at 8:08 AM

Man, Longtime Listener comes of like a crucifix dipped in urine. Chill!
I tend to agree about the bartender. The greatest expense by the bartender would be Oblahblah Care.
Perhaps if they get moved down to part time status they can roll joints for the digitally challenged. ;)

kregg on September 15, 2013 at 8:58 AM

The tv debate is not one about how pretty a device was back in the day, it’s about how sturdy the thing was built. Applies not just to televisions but to all major appliances. If a bulb burnt out in one of those things, you went to the hardware store and bought a replacement. I took our 70s family television when I moved out and it never died, I just dumped it around 1990 for something ‘better’.

A family bought a washer, a stove, a refrigerator back in the day and it was expected to last for decades, and oftentimes DID. That applied to vehicles, which were not only repairable, but you could do it at home.

Since then I’ve bought an endless array of cars, washers, dryers, refrigerators, and ALL of them have had problems and had to be replaced. Americans like bells and whistles, and those aspects are usually the first thing to break. The lifespan of our appliances are frankly, ridiculously short.

We may have advanced our communication technology through PCs, cell phones and the net, but the workmanship stinks on ice because we don’t make things ourselves anymore..and what we do create, we don’t take a lot of pride in.

New is not automatically ‘better’, new is just new. A new thing to break down and then that shiny new toy is just another expensive pile of crap plastic.So if you’re going to talk about jobs that go away, you should also talk about jobs that will expand or be added. Like ‘robot repairman’. If you want to hear about just how badly our technology actually is, spend some time chatting with someone who repairs appliances for a living. You’ll discover that there is no good brand, doesn’t matter how much you pay for something, it’s going to break repeatedly.

Crap design is crap.

GeeWhiz on September 15, 2013 at 10:01 AM

As a guitar amplifier builder/hobbyist and guitarists I can confirm that nothing sounds better than a trusty old tube amp (depending on the circuit).
Carbon comp resisters are great in the tone circuit, but, they can’t take the heat in the power grid and have been replaced with other reliable resistor types. This is also true with capacitors and teflon wire (thanks NASA).
Gimmicks and redesigns always sell because people love new gadgets.
Yes, technology is better, contrary to some arguments, parts DO last longer.
The real issue is that people do not keep things long enough to find out how long they last.

Examples:
1/ I have a seven year old HVAC unit that the tech wanted me to replace for a new unit after the board got fried by an electrical power surge. Obviously he was trying to make a sale 7 grand -vs- 300 dollars.

2/ I have multiple TV’s throughout my main house. If a TV goes (volume or picture) we give it away and buy a newer version. In the past the TV’s could be repaired with ease
This is especially true based on the size of the components, as well as, the use of computer circuits that are pretty much obsolete after six months. Also, the prices have come down substantially.

kregg on September 15, 2013 at 10:40 AM

It’s OK! All of those jobs were so taxing on the mind and body that it drove people to disability benefits and they are out of the job market anyway.

PleaseFlyOver on September 15, 2013 at 10:46 AM

I also wonder if the venerable position of bartender is on the way out. Technology may play some role in this (there are already robot barkeeps on the job) but the entire idea of bars seems to be on the wane.

This can only have been written by someone who doesn’t go out.

Lehosh on September 15, 2013 at 11:53 AM

Sorry, newspaper carrier is NOT extinct.

I still get one of my papers delivered by carrier every day. I don’t know how much longer this will continue, but it enable me to read it with my morning coffee. And reading it from a computer is a bad option as internet service is not very good in this area.

The other (3x weekly) is by mail.

This does not address the quality of these two newspapers. That is a whole ‘nother topic.

new2wnc on September 15, 2013 at 1:39 PM

The days of the kid with the banana seat bike slinging papers into your shrubbery has pretty much faded out. But was that ever really a “job” in the first place?

I delivered newspapers six days a week for a couple of years in junior high school (the paper didn’t have a Saturday edition). Folding and delivering the newspapers generally took between one and two hours a day. I was kind of like a subcontractor… I bought the newspapers and supplies like rubber bands and plastic bags from the newspaper, and was responsible for both delivery and collecting the subscription fees on my route.

When my father was underemployed during that time, my paper route allowed me to help with the family’s living expenses.

So, you tell me… was that a job?

malclave on September 15, 2013 at 4:36 PM

obsolete jobs? hmmmmmmm…..Girlfriend? Black father??

Dollayo on September 15, 2013 at 6:00 PM