DEA accesses Americans’ phone records dating back to …

posted at 4:01 pm on September 2, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

Where were you in 1987?  Gary Hart had to bail out of the 1988 presidential race after photos surfaced of Donna Rice sitting on his lap.  Oliver North admitted to shredding documents in the Iran-Contra scandal.  The Dow dropped 508 points and shocked Wall Street. On television, Star Trek: The Next Generation started its seven-season run, and A Different World spun off from The Cosby Show for the first of its six seasons.

And, if you made a call that went through AT&T switches, you contributed to the DEA’s phone-records search capabilities at its start, too:

For at least six years, law enforcement officials working on a counternarcotics program have had routine access, using subpoenas, to an enormous AT&T database that contains the records of decades of Americans’ phone calls — parallel to but covering a far longer time than the National Security Agency’s hotly disputed collection of phone call logs.

The Hemisphere Project, a partnership between federal and local drug officials and AT&T that has not previously been reported, involves an extremely close association between the government and the telecommunications giant.

The government pays AT&T to place its employees in drug-fighting units around the country. Those employees sit alongside Drug Enforcement Administration agents and local detectives and supply them with the phone data from as far back as 1987. …

The scale and longevity of the data storage appears to be unmatched by other government programs, including the N.S.A.’s gathering of phone call logs under the Patriot Act. The N.S.A. stores the data for nearly all calls in the United States, including phone numbers and time and duration of calls, for five years.

This is akin to the NSA surveillance, but there is one crucial difference — and it really is the crucial difference.  The DEA is not collecting and storing the data on its own, but is instead searching the databases maintained by AT&T.  Those searches only get conducted, at least according to the NYT’s reporting, when investigators acquire an administrative subpoena for specific surveillance.  This was the point that was left unclear in the revelation last month of DEA surveillance and manufacturing of evidence trails.

Now, this still raises more than a few real questions, especially the use of administrative subpoenas, which are issued without any judicial oversight.  It essentially means that a federal agency has reviewed its own surveillance request and approved it, which doesn’t provide a lot of checks against abuses.  (Put on top of that the Department of Justice investigating its own subordinate agency, the DEA, in this practice.)  However, this isn’t quite the same thing as the NSA’s active capture of communications records from most if not all Americans over several years.  In this case, the telecom (AT&T) has held onto its records, and at least requires some sort of subpoena before granting access to the data.

When this was proposed as a means for the NSA to conduct their surveillance — seeking the subpoena first and requiring telecoms to hold the data — the intelligence community scoffed at the notion, saying it was impractical for telecoms and for rapid investigations.  The DEA and AT&T seem to think otherwise.  What other telecoms are cooperating with the DEA in this endeavor? And why isn’t the NSA operating in this manner, rather than defaulting to building its own massive databases of citizen transactions without any probable cause for 99.999% of those whose records are collected?


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Comment pages: 1 2 3 4

Dammit. They caught me watching Willis, Arnold and Kimberly.

Whatcu talking bout NSA/AT&T…

patman77 on September 2, 2013 at 4:05 PM

Where were you in 1987?

thumbing through a dog eared copy of 1984……

/still relevant

ted c on September 2, 2013 at 4:07 PM

And, if you made a call that went through AT&T switches, you contributed to the DEA’s phone-records search capabilities at its start, too:

so, the agents have records of all my sister’s calls to her boyfriend back when she’d never get off the damn phone………?…
how valuable…/

ted c on September 2, 2013 at 4:09 PM

Where were you in 1987?

Ninja Turtles

Jeddite on September 2, 2013 at 4:10 PM

Out of control

Schadenfreude on September 2, 2013 at 4:25 PM

So, all of my 976- phone calls which cost my dad $3.99/minute had been recorded?

Damnit!

madmonkphotog on September 2, 2013 at 4:27 PM

Where were you in 1987?

Didn’t exist yet. Whew. Suck it DEA.

mythicknight on September 2, 2013 at 4:27 PM

More squirrels. This stuff requires a subpoena.

The NSA extortion tools require only a willing Leftist.

faraway on September 2, 2013 at 4:31 PM

Where were you in 1987?

Ah yes, I remember it well. At Big 5, purchasing my first ever rifle, an Enfield No. 4 Mk 1/2.

hawkeye54 on September 2, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Where were you in 1987?

I could tell you, but then I’d have to kill you. Lets just say I was working abroad.

simkeith on September 2, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Where were you in 1987?

That was my Oriental period, where at once I was dating a girl from China, one from South Korea, and one from Japan.

So, I’m sure they’ve got a number of calls from me to Asia, as I’d always let the ladies call their families from my cell phone. Yes, I had one of the original Motorola cell phones, the size of a shoe and weighing in at about a kilo, and it looked kind of cute in their tiny little hands.

Fun times…

TXUS on September 2, 2013 at 4:47 PM

This makes me wonder how long the DEA has been politically corrupted by the democratic party-subservient greedy government union just as the IRS has.

slickwillie2001 on September 2, 2013 at 4:49 PM

Up to August: Germany [CTG168.4].
After that the Persian Gulf [CMEF].

DJ Elliott on September 2, 2013 at 4:49 PM

Time to put the screws on AT&T and drop them as a carrier like they are hot nuclear waste.
Too bad I already got rid of them. My ability to control them is limited.

astonerii on September 2, 2013 at 4:51 PM

Where were you in 1987?

Thousands of calls with “Welcome, You’ve got mail”

faraway on September 2, 2013 at 4:53 PM

This is out of hand.

pat on September 2, 2013 at 4:54 PM

This is akin to the NSA surveillance, but there is one crucial difference…

Well, there’s another key difference, at least the NSA purports to be spying for our own protection, as from terrorists. But to compromise our freedom and privacy in such a personal way to protect us from … ourselves?

That we may do drugs, that we are victimless criminals not harming anyone else, not blowing up bombs, even the sellers of drugs are just fulfilling a marketing demand and consensual transaction… like tobacco sellers.

It’s simply insane the way the thuggish door-busting dog shooting DEA has been given apparently unlimited power to invade our lives in a failing bid to control use of substances that we should be free to use anyway, even if they are bad for us!

This is cruel and unusual punishment:

In 1991, Robert Moss and his wife had a one-year old and a baby on the way when Moss was convicted of conspiracy to violate marijuana laws. Because of federal sentencing guidelines passed in the mid-80s, Moss was sentenced to more than 20 years in federal prison. Moss returned to his family in Seattle in the Fall of 2011.

The DEA in action:

In January 2007, a SWAT team in Lima, Ohio, shot and killed Tarika Wilson, a 26-year-old mother, during a drug raid at the home of her boyfriend, Anthony Terry. When the unarmed Wilson was shot, she was kneeling on the ground, complying with police orders. She was holding her 1-year-old son, Sincere, who was also shot, losing his left hand. A subsequent investigation revealed that Officer Joseph Chavalia heard another officer shooting Terry’s two dogs, mistook the noise for hostile gunfire, panicked, and fired blindly into the room where Wilson was kneeling.

anotherJoe on September 2, 2013 at 4:55 PM

…at this point in time…what difference does it make!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 5:04 PM

1987???

Damn I was a pioneer and didn’t even know it! Still not the right thing to do.

Happy Nomad on September 2, 2013 at 5:09 PM

Um, ok, there’s another point. Above I noted the brutality of SWAT raids and prison terms for victimles criminals. But if you are still all for the costly war on drugs, you might think that it’s worth it to try to control drugs, but consider that the war on drugs simply doesn’t work, that the war itself seems to cause increased drug use (consider Portugal), and so why are we allowing this by the DEA when what they do is counterproductive? As I said in the earlier headline thread:

When people start making the point that “drugs are bad” in order to justify the horrid costly drug war, I say “yes, drugs are bad, but the cure (police $tate) is worse than the disease.”

But actually the police state and huge spending $ isn’t even a cure at all. Look at Portugal, they ended their drug war by decriminalizing ALL drugs in 2000, and since then addiction rates have dropped dramatically, apparently. The Portugal case suggests that if you get it out in the open, people become educated, people think for themselves, people just say no.

anotherJoe on September 2, 2013 at 5:23 PM

Where were you in 1987?

Playing drums in a punk rock band. One of our original tunes was a pro-drug song called “Just Say No to Nancy”.

That was before the Democrat Party left me, btw.

Del Dolemonte on September 2, 2013 at 5:32 PM

I plan to get off the grid as much as possible over the next few years. It won’t be 100%, but it’ll be fun trying.

What are the odds my plan violates at least 5 secret federal laws?

BobMbx on September 2, 2013 at 5:42 PM

I plan to get off the grid as much as possible over the next few years. It won’t be 100%, but it’ll be fun trying.

What are the odds my plan violates at least 5 secret federal laws?

BobMbx on September 2, 2013 at 5:42 PM

As long as you do it using only Green alternatives, the tree huggers won’t touch you. Get a fancy wind turbine, a bunch of solar panels, and do geo-thermal.

But you’ll run into trouble if you try to do it using one of those evil full-house generators. After all, those use that nasty black liquid!

Del Dolemonte on September 2, 2013 at 5:47 PM

Where were you in 1987?

A future concept(ion) (by 3ish years).

nobar on September 2, 2013 at 5:53 PM

I could tell you, but then I’d have to kill you. Lets just say I was working abroad.

simkeith on September 2, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Epic fail. You’ll never make it in security. First kill, then tell.

unclesmrgol on September 2, 2013 at 5:54 PM

As long as you do it using only Green alternatives, the tree huggers won’t touch you. Get a fancy wind turbine, a bunch of solar panels, and do geo-thermal.

But you’ll run into trouble if you try to do it using one of those evil full-house generators. After all, those use that nasty black liquid!

Del Dolemonte on September 2, 2013 at 5:47 PM

Those wind turbines can put lots of meat on the table if you site them properly.

unclesmrgol on September 2, 2013 at 5:56 PM

So this capability along with all of the other tools aquires in the war in drugs in the past 20 years and we are still drawing in drugs. Good work.

myrenovations on September 2, 2013 at 5:59 PM

Maybe the lawyers can help here:

Does not revealing this to the defense attorneys violate the requirements under

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brady_v._Maryland

Is every federal drug conviction for the last 25 years now appeal-able?

patch on September 2, 2013 at 6:06 PM

I plan to get off the grid as much as possible over the next few years. It won’t be 100%, but it’ll be fun trying.

What are the odds my plan violates at least 5 secret federal laws?

BobMbx on September 2, 2013 at 5:42 PM

As long as you do it using only Green alternatives, the tree huggers won’t touch you. Get a fancy wind turbine, a bunch of solar panels, and do geo-thermal.

But you’ll run into trouble if you try to do it using one of those evil full-house generators. After all, those use that nasty black liquid!

Del Dolemonte on September 2, 2013 at 5:47 PM

Make yourself some sixties tie-dye for political camouflage.

slickwillie2001 on September 2, 2013 at 6:09 PM

Let’s go ahead for a moment and accept that the 4th Amendment guarantee against unreasonable search and seizure is not implicated because the DEA reached an agreement with AT&T to look at AT&T’s data. The “administrative subpoena” is not meant to safeguard the criminal target’s 4th Amendment rights, its just a legal-sounding euphemism for a contractual requirement that AT&T imposes on the DEA in order to give the DEA access to AT&T’s databases.

Even if you accept that argument (and its hardly a given), how does the DEA explain failing to provide criminal defendants and the courts with this information during discovery? And how many federal and state convictions will be jeopardized because of this? I don’t like the idea of overturning the convictions of thousands of drug-dealing gangsters, but the DEA cannot be allowed to issue its own “subpoenas” during criminal investigations and then conceal them from both the court and the defense during a criminal trial. There is zero judicial review in that process, and the courts are not going to allow it to stand.

Lawdawg86 on September 2, 2013 at 6:12 PM

As long as you do it using only Green alternatives, the tree huggers won’t touch you. Get a fancy wind turbine, a bunch of solar panels, and do geo-thermal.

But you’ll run into trouble if you try to do it using one of those evil full-house generators. After all, those use that nasty black liquid!

Del Dolemonte on September 2, 2013 at 5:47 PM

Make yourself some sixties tie-dye for political camouflage.

slickwillie2001 on September 2, 2013 at 6:09 PM

I was thinking beaver trapper style, which includes a squaw to chew leather for my shoes.

BobMbx on September 2, 2013 at 6:14 PM

I was searching for Dianna Troi pron on local BBS’s.

lorien1973 on September 2, 2013 at 6:18 PM

lorien1973 on September 2, 2013 at 6:18 PM

And yes, it exists. The actress was a soft-core pron actress prior to STTNG.

lorien1973 on September 2, 2013 at 6:18 PM

Just saw Miss Lindsey on Special Report. God help us if the only thing between us and nuclear armageddon is really that stupid man!
Cheerleading for the thin-skinned rat once again. I hope he gets some serious primary competition- all they’ll have to do is point out the many ways electing Graham is helping Obama.

Happy Nomad on September 2, 2013 at 6:20 PM

Where were you in 1987?

In my room, grounded. Again.

Flange on September 2, 2013 at 6:26 PM

Now, this still raises more than a few real questions, especially the use of administrative subpoenas, which are issued without any judicial oversight.


Hey
… wouldn’t it be more accurate to phrase this as:

the use of a memo

And why isn’t the NSA operating in this manner, rather than defaulting to building its own massive databases of citizen transactions without any probable cause for 99.999% of those whose records are collected?


Silly question!

The AT&T database has inconvenient organic interfaces in the form of AT&T personnel.

The NSA database has streamlined the process and taken any human conscience out of the loop.

NSA motto – “No More Snowdens”

PolAgnostic on September 2, 2013 at 6:32 PM

Where were you in 1987?

Had been married for three years (we’re coming up on 30 next year) and learning my way around the graphics job I was lucky enough to get the year before.

PatriotGal2257 on September 2, 2013 at 6:56 PM

OT: Hearing radio ads with Obama praising SS Disability and encouraging people to sign up.

Murphy9 on September 2, 2013 at 7:00 PM

Given my experiences with AT&T: slamming (changing it to their company without customer authorization) my long-distance service, going without land line for two weeks after they “upgraded” equipment but didn’t bother to see if it worked, to various billing scams, lost payments, to payments having had a week to be received having been held over weekends to get extra charges. Though the latter charges were comparatively small if they can do that to thousands and get away with it that’s considerable money for nothing.

Meanwhile, I’m getting the vibe that now that the Barky regime is caught trying to get dirt on everybody and his and sleazy Holder’s various excuses not working they’re trying an “they all do it” excuse” reminiscent of the Clintoon years.

Reagan took precautions on espionage matters that Barky and Clintoon would not. For example, Reagan had Judge Webster at CIA not only to guide the agency but to know its proper bounds. If monitoring has a legitimate subpoena (shows cause) then the 4th Amendment has been respected. With the Barky Regime the all out dirt gathering such as the Rosen debacle and the judges of easy virtue who rubber-stamped such intrusion clearly violated the 4th Amendment and goes far beyond the tracking of know drug kingpins or the like.

viking01 on September 2, 2013 at 7:08 PM

DEA accesses Americans’ phone records dating back to …

“Mr Watson— Come here! I want to see you.”

Glenn Jericho on September 2, 2013 at 7:08 PM

faraway on September 2, 2013 at 4:31 PM

What subpoena might that be? That’s right its one the agency provides for itself without going to a Judge. You are certainly welcome to accept that but I find it reprehensible.

chemman on September 2, 2013 at 7:12 PM

BobMbx on September 2, 2013 at 5:42 PM

Then I am already in deep trouble as I have mostly been off the grid for nearly 5 years.

chemman on September 2, 2013 at 7:20 PM

Not many probably remember or know one of the reasons AT&T was split up was because of something called Direct Message Accounting (DMA) which they’d used for decades. It tracked and recorded all calls from point of origin to point of destination and duration. While for long-distance calls this was legit for billing for all local area calls it was not.

The hinge-pin being that when the FBI or local authorities had need for tracking of phone calls in crime investigations and that information could be used to rule in or rule out suspects those data were denied to legitimate investigators. IOW there wasn’t a need to “trace” many calls because the trace already existed in those DMA records. So AT&T had misled those trying to solve crimes, by AT&T not wanting to be bothered and who knows how many criminals got the out they needed or how many innocent missed out on information which could corroborate their innocence?

viking01 on September 2, 2013 at 7:21 PM

To be GOVERNED is to be kept in sight, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right, nor the wisdom, nor the virtue to do so. . .

To be GOVERNED is to be at every operation, at every transaction, noted, registered, enrolled, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished.

It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be placed under contribution, trained, ransomed, exploited, monopolized, extorted, squeezed, mystified, robbed.

Then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint,

to be repressed, fined, despised, harassed, tracked, abused, clubbed, disarmed, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, outraged, dishonored.

That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality.

roflmmfao

donabernathy on September 2, 2013 at 7:21 PM

Which is what, a lesson in trusting any of these fuds.

Bishop on September 2, 2013 at 7:27 PM

Since 1987??????? At least the old Soviet Union gave no pretense of freedom. You lived in a government controlled police state. You had to accept the fact that government watched or listened to you in secret. What’s next? a fence around us that’s supposed to keep people out that actually keeps us in

jaywemm on September 2, 2013 at 7:38 PM

in 1987 that 508 point DJ drop caused a dollar/yen inversion and killed my new found career as a fish importer. :(

Mini-14 on September 2, 2013 at 8:17 PM

1987?

Cruising the main drag in my 1968 Mustang, with a back seat full of girls, all of whom had boyfriends. The car was that good.

CurtZHP on September 2, 2013 at 8:17 PM

I was reading Little House on the Prairie and Little Britches.

I am not opposed to turning over data when a real, actual, signed by a judge and requested outside a fishing expedition warrant is sought and delivered. All this other sh1t, including this “administrative warrant” is B.S.

Also, how damn hard it is to stop drug sales if they have been using Unconstitutional means for damn neared 30 years and it is as bad as it has ever been and contributed to an invasionary force crossing our southern border?

cptacek on September 2, 2013 at 8:20 PM

What are the odds my plan violates at least 5 secret federal laws?

BobMbx on September 2, 2013 at 5:42 PM

You’re already on double secret probation just from being a veteran. They probably have a satellite tasked just for you. You’re hosed.

Oldnuke on September 2, 2013 at 8:23 PM

You’re already on double secret probation just from being a veteran. They probably have a satellite tasked just for you. You’re hosed.

Oldnuke on September 2, 2013 at 8:23 PM

Yep. Nothing riles the O’Barky Regime more than those whom have defended the Constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic.

viking01 on September 2, 2013 at 8:31 PM

Meanwhile, the federal government is so deeply concerned about illegal drugs that it allows Mexican drug cartels to set up marijuana farms in U.S. national parks, and to run huge quantities of drugs freely across the southern border every damn day.

AZCoyote on September 2, 2013 at 9:09 PM

I was reading Little House on the Prairie and Little Britches.

Boy Howdy did I get that wrong at first glance, I was like “Man, you hate Laura Ingles Wilder that much?”

Bishop on September 2, 2013 at 9:12 PM

Meanwhile, the federal government is so deeply concerned about illegal drugs that it allows Mexican drug cartels to set up marijuana farms in U.S. national parks, and to run huge quantities of drugs freely across the southern border every damn day.

AZCoyote on September 2, 2013 at 9:09 PM

.
If you paid bribed our government, as much as they do, then you could … WHOOPS . . . . . . . . . never mind … I deny that completely … I didn’t say nuttin’ … I mean, you didn’t hear nuttin’ … I mean, you didn’t READ nuttin’ … (dang it, you know what I mean)

listens2glenn on September 2, 2013 at 9:40 PM

I was in germany operating under a prp security system so my calls were monitored anyways .

dmacleo on September 2, 2013 at 9:54 PM

I just learned that my parents’ old home had been turned into a meth lab and was torn down — in Provo, Utah. So don’t talk to me about how the war on drugs is a bad thing.

When they start putting people in re-education camps, I’ll object. For now, if it helps get rid of this scourge, I’m for it. I think making and selling meth, heroin and cocaine should be a capital offense.

How did the feds defeat the Mafia? Phone tapping.

flataffect on September 2, 2013 at 9:58 PM

“The DEA is not collecting and storing the data on its own, but is instead searching the databases maintained by AT&T.”

Did/Is the Federal government pay/paying AT&T for the cost of storing the data, possibly including conversion to a common and easily retrievable, searchable form?

“In this case, the telecom (AT&T) has held onto its records, and at least requires some sort of subpoena before granting access to the data.”

Did the FCC (or another alphabet agency), or possibly Congress, through legislation, change the record retention requirements of the telephone companies either in 1987 or at some time just prior to the deadline for continuing to keep 1987 records? Um, maybe. Per a Start Page query I find this possibly relevant passage in a post at Empty Wheel with respect to records retention by telecoms as it related to the breaking NSA scandal:

It’s a pretty breathtaking selective reliance on FCC regulations. Because, as this post explains, the current 18-month retention requirement actually came about in response to a DOJ request in 1985 based, in part, on their need to access the records for the two purposes for which Section 215 can be used against Americans, terrorism and spying.

“Not only does this federal regulation provide a legal retention obligation, but it is also unrelated to the “business purposes” of the telephone companies and in fact was promulgated by the FCC at the specific request of the DOJ in order to aid in terrorism investigations. The retention period had previously been six months, but the DOJ petitioned the FCC to extend it precisely because such telephone records “are often essential to the successful investigation and prosecution of today’s sophisticated criminal conspiracies relating, for example, to terrorism . . . and espionage.” The FCC therefore extended the legal retention period for as long as the DOJ said was necessary.

DOJ/NSA/ODNI may believe that this regulation, which became effective in 1986, is outdated or no longer adequate, but pretending that it (and many similar state regulations) doesn’t exist or that those agencies couldn’t have done more to update or expand this regulation to suit the Executive branch’s current “needs” undermines their argument.”

So, it appears there was a 1985-1986 push by DOJ for telecoms to hold records for as long as DOJ wanted them to. Seems to fit AT&T holding records back to 1987 to a tee. What. A. Surprise.

Dusty on September 2, 2013 at 10:08 PM

Where is the QOTD thread?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 10:32 PM

I was just thinking the same thing OC!!

:(

CoffeeLover on September 2, 2013 at 10:34 PM

I just learned that my parents’ old home had been turned into a meth lab and was torn down — in Provo, Utah. So don’t talk to me about how the war on drugs is a bad thing.

When they start putting people in re-education camps, I’ll object. For now, if it helps get rid of this scourge, I’m for it. I think making and selling meth, heroin and cocaine should be a capital offense.

flataffect on September 2, 2013 at 9:58 PM

But the drug war doesn’t help get rid of the drug scourge, it exacerbates it. How could that be? First, that’s what the evidence is if you look at Portugal and elsewhere where they ended their war on drugs, and addiction and use declined.

How could drug use decrease by ending the drug war?

Maybe partly because education and personal responsibility supersede what had been a world with nebulous information (on drugs), and openness supersedes the shadowy lure of the illicit. And also, the drug pushers that wouldn’t exist without the illegal black market, they, the pushers, have a very high margin product and can afford de facto “salespeople” to push demand. So that could be another reason why, when we stop the drug war as in Portugal, drug use… drum roll… drops.

But lets keep spending billions of dollars a year and turning this country into a police and spying state for the purpose of.. increasing drug use?? That’s nonsensical, irrational.

anotherJoe on September 2, 2013 at 10:44 PM

QOTD?

I’m fairly sure the NSA blocked it…

viking01 on September 2, 2013 at 10:46 PM

Where is the QOTD thread?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 10:32 PM

Maybe all the HA posters have a labor day hangover? (“labor day” not capitalized intentionally)

Cuz there’s stuff out there to discuss:

The Kerry’s

Our friend, Grahamnesty

More union unhappiness with Ocare

Just to name a few…

predator on September 2, 2013 at 10:56 PM

predator on September 2, 2013 at 10:56 PM

Maybe the bloggers are on strike?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:06 PM

Maybe the bloggers are on strike?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:06 PM

They want that $15 an hour, and they want it NOW!

predator on September 2, 2013 at 11:11 PM

predator on September 2, 2013 at 10:56 PM

Maybe the bloggers are on strike?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:06 PM

Well, holiday weekend could mean skip it anyway. Or, treating it as a regular monday, could be thirty minutes more and perfectly normal. Or, QOTD could be gone forever. If so — I blame Nova.

Where were you in 1987?

Trying to graduate while working three jobs and becoming a father. Good to know my government had its act together.

Axe on September 2, 2013 at 11:12 PM

Where were you in 1987? ….. Star Trek: The Next Generation started its seven-season run

Wrong.

Star Trek: The Next Generation premiered in 1987.

portlandon on September 2, 2013 at 11:13 PM

Wrong.

Star Trek: The Next Generation premiered in 1987.

portlandon on September 2, 2013 at 11:13 PM

Misread it.

Star Trek: The Next Generation started its seven-season run

I read it “starred in it’s seven season run”

Sorry Ed.

portlandon on September 2, 2013 at 11:15 PM

Where were you in 1987? ….. Star Trek: The Next Generation started its seven-season run

Wrong.

Star Trek: The Next Generation premiered in 1987.

portlandon on September 2, 2013 at 11:13 PM

?

Axe on September 2, 2013 at 11:17 PM

So, is this the de facto QOTD thread?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:17 PM

–O

Axe on September 2, 2013 at 11:19 PM

Where is the QOTD thread?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 10:32 PM

Oh Hi.

We are all over at the QOTD thread having a blast.

Why don’t you come over and join us?

Twerp and Cozmo are wrestling, Jackie is dancing, RWM is looking for her eyeball, Axe is eating Cheetos and making noun sounds, Scrumpy is Swooshing, B9 is eating salad, Dire is wearing a fedora just like old times.

SparkPlug on September 2, 2013 at 11:19 PM

Bwaaah, making noun sounds. Oh that was good.

SparkPlug on September 2, 2013 at 11:20 PM

When was the last time we went without a QOTD? I’m not sure I can go to bed without reading it.

*sigh*

joekenha on September 2, 2013 at 11:20 PM

SparkPlug on September 2, 2013 at 11:19 PM

LOL- I actually am! I am making noun sounds too.

bazil9 on September 2, 2013 at 11:23 PM

joekenha on September 2, 2013 at 11:20 PM

There have been nights we went w/o a QOTD thread…

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:24 PM

Where the hell is allah, anyhow?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:26 PM

assuming that this is in fact the qotd, i’ll just put this out. Ari Fleischer sent out a tweet that seems to really represent a wing of the RINO party that I can no longer tolerate

RT @AriFleischer Once again, I support POTUS. Drone strikes, indefinite detention, NSA program and on the limited Syria strike, I'd vote yes— Glenn Greenwald (@ggreenwald) September 2, 2013

really bizarre because i bet that few Rs would accept all these things. The horrible thing is that Alan Grayson, that awful leftist, makes sense on Syria.

r keller on September 2, 2013 at 11:32 PM

…ok!…Are we making the Q O T D ?

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:33 PM

KCB!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:33 PM

Bmore!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:33 PM

B9!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:34 PM

…Bishop!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:34 PM

….Wooly!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:34 PM

…Shad!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:35 PM

Coffeeloooooover!

bazil9 on September 2, 2013 at 11:35 PM

EG!

bazil9 on September 2, 2013 at 11:36 PM

…oh he11!…I just refreshed…and you guys started one!

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:36 PM

and, this from Frontpage takes the obama administration (and assorted RINOs) down, and down hard

http://frontpagemag.com/2013/dgreenfield/the-wall-street-journals-misleading-report-on-the-moderate-syrian-opposition/#.UiVGUxcyewQ.twitter

Gramhan/McCain are shameless. A casual trolling thru the wiki entries on the syrian opposition shows a mix of 1. the MB 2. Islamistists and 3 some mercenaries paid by Qatar and the Emirates.

(have to break stuff up because i’ve been caught up in the spam filter before)

r keller on September 2, 2013 at 11:36 PM

SparkPlug on September 2, 2013 at 11:19 PM

LOL- I actually am! I am making noun sounds too.

bazil9 on September 2, 2013 at 11:23 PM

See? Some of us can verb nouns. :)

Anyone jonesing for the QOTD has a few options. One, Community QOTD. Commandeer this thread, post your own quote, and then respond to it. :) Two, The Gulch. Three, go to yesterday’s QOTD and kick the dead horse. Four, release the T virus — but I was saving that for the day RWM was banned. Five, wander aimlessly and forlorn until tomorrow.

I’ll be wandering aimlessly and forlorn.

Axe on September 2, 2013 at 11:37 PM

B

Schadenfreude on September 2, 2013 at 11:38 PM

…last post I showed was at 7:30 something!
hahahahahahahahahahah

KOOLAID2 on September 2, 2013 at 11:39 PM

Who knew the HA editors were unionists?

Schadenfreude on September 2, 2013 at 11:40 PM

“Eats” is a noun and a verb.

viking01 on September 2, 2013 at 11:42 PM

Wonder if Ed will be pisssed we hijacked his thread, or will he appreciate the hits?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:42 PM

Schadenfreude on September 2, 2013 at 11:40 PM

I had no idea.

Good evening, Paladin. :)

thatsafactjack on September 2, 2013 at 11:43 PM

That was before the Democrat Party left me, btw.

Del Dolemonte on September 2, 2013 at 5:32 PM


Hallelujah

Schadenfreude on September 2, 2013 at 11:44 PM

Evening Jackie :)

Schadenfreude on September 2, 2013 at 11:46 PM

The Masquerade Is Over – Steve Cole

thatsafactjack on September 2, 2013 at 11:46 PM

Wonder if Ed will be pisssed we hijacked his thread, or will he appreciate the hits?

OmahaConservative on September 2, 2013 at 11:42 PM

Let him ban all of us :)

Schadenfreude on September 2, 2013 at 11:46 PM

This is what its like when its over.

Bmore on September 2, 2013 at 11:47 PM

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