Video: 50th anniversary of MLK’s “Dream” speech

posted at 9:21 am on August 28, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

The remembrances and celebrations of this anniversary mostly took place over the weekend, where people gathered on the Mall in Washington to celebrate Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s speech, life, and cause. Today is the actual 50th anniversary of the “I Have a Dream” speech, which will be commemorated again today in Washington. CNN’s Don Lemon previews Barack Obama’s remarks:

We certainly have come a long way since 1963. Would Dr. King be satisfied?  I suspect not, but his dissatisfaction would probably be across a broad number of issues, and not just limited to civil rights.  Rep. John Lewis (D-GA)’s more positive take is closer to the truth, I think.  We have changed greatly as a nation on the question of equality, and for the better.  We have eliminated government-imposed discrimination and boosted enfranchisement to parity levels.  These days, we have to ask whether government intervention — which undeniably drove those positive changes in the first years after this speech — has become more of an obstacle to progress, especially as it relates to education and economic opportunities.  On those scores, I’d guess that Dr. King might find his greatest disappointments.


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50+ years of The Great Society.

Murphy9 on August 28, 2013 at 9:24 AM

These days, we have to ask whether government intervention — which undeniably drove those positive changes in the first years after this speech — has become more of an obstacle to progress, especially as it relates to education and economic opportunities. On those scores, I’d guess that Dr. King might find his greatest disappointments.

He’d also probably be greatly disappointed by the hijacking of the civil rights movements by race-baiting clowns like Al Sharpton.

And I doubt he’d be too pleased with the anti-white racism among many blacks that continues to be ignored and often accepted.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 9:27 AM

MLK–Such a great man, his FBI files are sealed for 50+ years.

Philo Beddoe on August 28, 2013 at 9:30 AM

And blacks are worst than ever because of their self inflicted fatal wound… Financial dependency on taxpayers among a majority of them (directly and indirectly), the destruction of their families by having over 70% of children born out of wedlock and raised in fatherless homes, the insanely high crime rate and drugs infestation, very high rate of high school drop out, etc… and Of course the White Liberals have helped a lot in causing the plight of blacks in America by totally making a majority of them depending on the Welfare State in order to vote them into power…

mnjg on August 28, 2013 at 9:34 AM

These days, we have to ask whether government intervention — which undeniably drove those positive changes in the first years after this speech — has become more of an obstacle to progress, especially as it relates to education and economic opportunities. On those scores, I’d guess that Dr. King might find his greatest disappointments.

I don’t think that’s a question – we have the parallel lines of The Great Society and the dissolve of the nuclear black family. I know it is popular to assume how disappointed MLK would be at the state of society today (and I say what follows as a person who considers “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” to be among the greatest of American expressions, right there with the DecOfInd), but what would make him different than every other Democrat of the last 50 years? Faith in God? Let us count the reverends, the idealists whose views slowly melted over time thanks to the influence of feminism and the race hustle?

I’d like to think he would be better than that, but if he lived and was better than that, he’d be smeared as an Uncle Tom, an oreo and every other name given to good people who don’t toe the party line – ask Thomas Sowell, Clarence Thomas and other men of Dr. King’s generation how black men who don’t toe said line are treated. Dr. King’s speech deserves its honors, but its been betrayed as much by white people turning a blind eye to the problems that are of the black community as it is by the black community’s leaders who seek only to profit from his vision.

King B on August 28, 2013 at 9:36 AM

We’ve swung too far to the other side. Instead of black people being judged falsely by the color of their skin, white people (and one “white Hispanic”) are being judged by theirs.

CrustyB on August 28, 2013 at 9:36 AM

MLK would be out b’slappin about every other black dude alive today if he was half the man history portrays him to be. Having said that I’m sure he would shed tears for what has become of his people.

HotAirian on August 28, 2013 at 9:37 AM

Dear leader gave an awesome speech
-lsm

Preview of the lsm reaction

Forget Syria they have a squirrel today

cmsinaz on August 28, 2013 at 9:38 AM

Had King lived, it would have been interesting to have seen his position on some of the social issues like abortion, the destruction of the two-parent African-American families and the denigration of focusing on education vs. celebration of the gangstah culture that the RINOs (Reverends In Name Only) like Jackson and Shapton assiduously avoid, less they go against the liberal Democratic Party line.

jon1979 on August 28, 2013 at 9:38 AM

We’ve swung too far to the other side. Instead of black people being judged falsely by the color of their skin, white people (and one “white Hispanic”) are being judged by theirs.

CrustyB on August 28, 2013 at 9:36 AM

Case in point from the child rape thread…

Is anyone surprised this happened? Her last name is Morales.

libfreeordie on August 28, 2013 at 8:30 AM

It’s very clear who is living MLK’s dream and who is not.

fortcoins on August 28, 2013 at 9:39 AM

“The fear is gone… We are better people.”

Sure, unless you’re Jesse Jackson walking alone at night and notice a group of black youths walking behind you. But, there are always going to be bigots out there. What do you do.

/“There is nothing more painful to me … than to walk down the street and hear footsteps and start thinking about robbery, then look around and see somebody white and feel relieved.”

- Jesse Jackson, 3/10/96

Paul-Cincy on August 28, 2013 at 9:41 AM

I find it sadly ironic that one of the most racist presidents in the 50 years since King’s speech will be front and center, basking in the glow and using King’s words and spirit to perpetuate racism and the continued undermining of individual liberty.

TXUS on August 28, 2013 at 9:43 AM

These days, we have to ask whether government intervention — which undeniably drove those positive changes in the first years after this speech — has become more of an obstacle to progress, especially as it relates to education and economic opportunities. On those scores, I’d guess that Dr. King might find his greatest disappointments.

Well, I’d say the war on poverty has been the single biggest obstacle to fulfilling the dream. And sadly in 2013 that means a sub-culture within America more intent on more government intervention and “free stuff” instead of seeking economic opportunity for all.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 9:44 AM

And blacks are worst than ever because of their self inflicted fatal wound… Financial dependency on taxpayers among a majority of them (directly and indirectly), the destruction of their families by having over 70% of children born out of wedlock and raised in fatherless homes…
mnjg on August 28, 2013 at 9:34 AM

And I wonder if MLK would blame the black-white achievement gap on “institutionalized racism” by whites or on cultural problems perhaps self-perpetuated by many blacks.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 9:44 AM

I find it sadly ironic that one of the most racist presidents in the 50 years since King’s speech will be front and center, basking in the glow and using King’s words and spirit to perpetuate racism and the continued undermining of individual liberty.

TXUS on August 28, 2013 at 9:43 AM

Obama has zero credibility with me on any issues of race. Zero. So … it’s just as you say.

Paul-Cincy on August 28, 2013 at 9:46 AM

I find it sadly ironic that one of the most racist presidents in the 50 years since King’s speech will be front and center, basking in the glow and using King’s words and spirit to perpetuate racism and the continued undermining of individual liberty.

TXUS on August 28, 2013 at 9:43 AM

I find it sadly ironic that one of the speakers today is a fat angry black woman whose personal experience with racism has been that she was denied the ability to buy Hermes scarfs in Paris and was told “no” at a snooty Swiss botique. Will we ever get rid of such atrocities? /

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 9:47 AM

MLK’s dream and big liberal government are like Harry Potter & Voldemort.

One cannot live while the other survives.

22044 on August 28, 2013 at 9:47 AM

50th anniversary of a dream that has turned into a nightmare and an increasingly obvious showcasing that total equality – of races or sexes – is unworkable and undeniably destructive to the society that tries it.

The Zimmerman case came within a whisker of authorizing every worthless street punk from Californication to Florida to whomp on more productive citizens with legal immunity. Expect another such case soon. There are mountains of evidence that the black community will willfully ignore any amount of crime and poverty so long as the Democrats hand them welfare checks robbed from whites and Asians. The illigitimacy and abortion rates are something out of an Orwellian nightmare.

MelonCollie on August 28, 2013 at 9:48 AM

And I wonder if MLK would blame the black-white achievement gap on “institutionalized racism” by whites or on cultural problems perhaps self-perpetuated by many blacks.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 9:44 AM

It is possible that he would have done so… I think that the man is extremely overrated… So much so that he is the only American with an official Holiday named after him…

mnjg on August 28, 2013 at 9:48 AM

From We Have A Dream to We Have Free Insurance, Free Obamaphones and Free Food Stamps in 4+ short years…

hillsoftx on August 28, 2013 at 9:49 AM

MLK–Such a great man, his FBI files are sealed for 50+ years.

Philo Beddoe on August 28, 2013 at 9:30 AM

^ something they don’t tell you in public school.

MelonCollie on August 28, 2013 at 9:50 AM

And I wonder if MLK would blame the black-white achievement gap on “institutionalized racism” by whites or on cultural problems perhaps self-perpetuated by many blacks.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 9:44 AM

72% of black children are raised in single or no-parent homes (ie raised by relatives). 50% of black babies are aborted. The drop-out rate among young black males is around 50% with the highest unemployment rates within society. There is a glorification of the drug culture among young black males. Black-on-black crime is so commonplace that it rarely becomes newsworthy.

None of these facts and statistics can be attributed to institutionalized racism by whites.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 9:51 AM

After MLK was assassinated, the Professional Race Baters decided that the whole “content of their Character” thingy was too hard, so they wen with “the color of their sking” thingy, instead.

Self-inflicted Regress, instead of Progress

kingsjester on August 28, 2013 at 9:54 AM

I see equality every morning at the corner store.The white and hispanic men are buying coffee and snacks and the black men are buying 40 ouncers.

docflash on August 28, 2013 at 9:57 AM

And I wonder if MLK would blame the black-white achievement gap on “institutionalized racism” by whites or on cultural problems perhaps self-perpetuated by many blacks.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 9:44 AM

More blacks today see blacks as racist than they see whites as racist.

This is encouraging, it tells me that there is a silent majority of blacks out there that see through the Jacksum/Sharpie race huckster industry. We need to do what we can to empower that honest majority.

slickwillie2001 on August 28, 2013 at 9:57 AM

Has Bark given a speech yet wherein he ties himself to King in every way possible, even so far as alluding that they may have the same grandmother?

Oh yeah, MLK also never ate dog. Bark is a dog eater.

Bishop on August 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

These days, we have to ask whether government intervention — which undeniably drove those positive changes in the first years after this speech — has become more of an obstacle to progress, especially as it relates to education and economic opportunities.

An equally large obstacle is the refusal of those who have been offered opportunities educationally or economically to take personal responsibility for their improved circumstances. The grievance mongers are looking for equality of outcome, a situation which shapes these gatherings into perpetual gripe venues.

onlineanalyst on August 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

After MLK was assassinated, the Professional Race Baters decided that the whole “content of their Character” thingy was too hard,

kingsjester on August 28, 2013 at 9:54 AM

Jesse Jackson, certainly, would not have been able to enrich himself the way that he has if he had continued the path that MLK had set with the dream speech. Jesse, Al, and countless others only profit when they keep blacks mad and convinced they are victims of institutionalized racism. In one respect they can’t stand it that a black man is in the White House because it undermines half a century of victimhood training.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 10:02 AM

What a great man of deep religious faith and a well of tempered wisdom.

Where are great men like this today? Certainly not in any leadership positions I can think of.

Marcus Traianus on August 28, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Has Bark given a speech yet wherein he ties himself to King in every way possible, even so far as alluding that they may have the same grandmother?

Oh yeah, MLK also never ate dog. Bark is a dog eater.

Bishop on August 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

“If my dad wasn’t a Kenyan communist, he’d look like MLK.”

22044 on August 28, 2013 at 10:04 AM

Or Bark will claim his struggle to overcome racism was equal to that of MLK, that smoking choom on a Hawaiian beach is akin to marching through Selma.

Bishop on August 28, 2013 at 10:05 AM

Has Bark given a speech yet wherein he ties himself to King in every way possible, even so far as alluding that they may have the same grandmother?

Bishop on August 28, 2013 at 10:00 AM

When one is unable to stand on one’s own accomplishments, the weak and cowardly will attempt to associate themselves with those that are credited with achieving great things. Obama wants us to judge him by the color of his skin and not the content of his character- which is why his closing out today’s commemmoration is so offensive to me. He puts race relations back at least three decades by the divisive way that he has polarized this nation.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 10:06 AM

Where are great men like this today?

Marcus Traianus on August 28, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Beaten down by the race industry. Anybody that leaves the plantation of black racist ideology is mercilessly attacked. And you can’t be a great man of vision and leadership if you agree with criminals like Sharpton and Jackson.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 10:09 AM

It would have been terrific if Dr. Ben Carson had been the speaker,

onlineanalyst on August 28, 2013 at 10:11 AM

Would Dr. King be satisfied?

He must surely weep.

Bmore on August 28, 2013 at 10:12 AM

The part of his speech that gets ignored these days:

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

I’m guessing you won’t hear that on MSNBC today.

Or any day.

Mr. Bingley on August 28, 2013 at 10:14 AM

I don’t give a damn anymore. The well has been poisoned for me. When I see a black person now, I automatically assume that said person is: On welfare, is unmarried, has a bunch of children w/ different ‘daddies’(or father’d a bunch of kids w/ different ‘mommas’), blames ‘whitey’ for everything, and worships Zero.
I know my feelings are wrong, but over the past 8+ years…Obama/ Holder built that.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 28, 2013 at 10:15 AM

None of these facts and statistics can be attributed to institutionalized racism by whites.
Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 9:51 AM

Absolutely right.

Whenever I hear “institutionalized racism” my BS detector goes off. It’s a term that means, “we can’t prove it, but the racism is there whether or not it is being done purposefully.” The whole thing is a crock pushed in “ethnic studies” classes.

Another term that should raise red flags is “people of color” which just means “anything but white.” If you hear someone use that term, they’re probably feeding you a load of skin color-obsessed malarkey. Often when the term “people of color” is used, the person is either trying to elevate non-whites’ (as a group) desirability when it comes to job hiring/college admissions, or they’re using to say how victimized non-white people are/how privileged whites are. The implication is that all who aren’t white share a victimhood status and should band together.

This is where we’re at today. Many of the people loudly praising MLK today are some of the most racially divisive people out there.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 10:16 AM

I wonder what MLK would think about blacks with so-so SAT scores getting into top colleges when some higher achieving asians and whites are denied purely based on the differences in the applicants’ races.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 10:20 AM

None of these facts and statistics can be attributed to institutionalized racism by whites.
Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 9:51 AM

Remember Obama’s 2008 campaign speech, where he said “this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal; this was the moment when we ended a war” … on this 50th anniversary of MLK’s “Dream” speech, perhaps this is the moment when it becomes understood the challenge of the black community is not outside of them, in white racism, or institutional racism, or lack of equal opportunity, or the legacy of slavery, or barriers to voting, no; the challenges are all within their own power to solve, in their own hands.

Paul-Cincy on August 28, 2013 at 10:26 AM

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 10:16 AM

I agree about “people of color”. It’s a pretty obvious attempt to set up a false rivalry between whites and everyone else in the world. I hear it and I know I’m dealing with a malignant race hustler or a person who doesn’t recognize the importance of words.

forest on August 28, 2013 at 10:27 AM

This is where we’re at today. Many of the people loudly praising MLK today are some of the most racially divisive people out there.

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 10:16 AM

Yep. They praise MLK but they refuse to admit how much America has changed since the March on Washington.

The next year the first voting rights act was passed by Republicans and not Democrats like Al Gore’s dad.

The year after that, America saw Bloody Sunday at the Edmund Pettis Bridge.

The year after that, Barbara Jordan became the first black woman to serve in the Texas Senate……

And any fair assessment of racial equality in America would include the incremental steps that have occurred over the past fifty years. Instead, many on the National Mall and most of the Speakers would have you believe the blood is still fresh in Selma and blacks are still banned from sitting at lunch counters.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 10:31 AM

Where are great men like this today?

Marcus Traianus on August 28, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Being draped with the Medal of Honor by a preznit who isn’t worthy to shine their shoes.

Bishop on August 28, 2013 at 10:33 AM

Obama shouldn’t attend this. He’ll make it all about himself and then talk about social justice and how mean American society remains even though they elected him twice. He’s a fraud, an antagonist, a disappointment, and an embarrassment.

I will find something better to do during today’s speechifyin’ session.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2013 at 10:34 AM

perhaps this is the moment when it becomes understood the challenge of the black community is not outside of them, in white racism, or institutional racism, or lack of equal opportunity, or the legacy of slavery, or barriers to voting, no; the challenges are all within their own power to solve, in their own hands.

Paul-Cincy on August 28, 2013 at 10:26 AM

Self-determination and self-accountability has long ago been stomped out of the black community. Whites are blamed that the unemployment rate is so high among young black males- not the high drop out rate and glorification of gang culture. Whites are blamed for blacks not having economic opportunity- even as they take the welfare payments and freebies that are designed to temporarily help all Americans get to a better economic place.

No, perceived victimhood has become part of the “black experience.” MLK and the ideals he expressed would not be welcome among those gathered on the National Mall this afternoon.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 10:36 AM

Obama shouldn’t attend this. He’ll make it all about himself and then talk about social justice and how mean American society remains even though they elected him twice. He’s a fraud, an antagonist, a disappointment, and an embarrassment.

I will find something better to do during today’s speechifyin’ session.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2013 at 10:34 AM

With God as my witness, I will utterly lose it if the thin-skinned tyrant brings up Trayvon Martin as to why the struggle continues. Or if he attributes his economic failures to social injustice. Or if Obamacare is held up as a partial fulfillment of MLK’s dream.

I don’t plan on watching any of the coverage because all three elements above will be part of his speech. And you’re right, it will be all about him.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 10:39 AM

Did You Know MLK’s “I Have a Dream” Speech is Copyrighted?

http://reason.com/blog/2013/08/28/did-you-know-mlks-i-have-a-dream-speech

Fallon on August 28, 2013 at 10:40 AM

Obama shouldn’t attend this. He’ll make it all about himself and then talk about social justice and how mean American society remains even though they elected him twice. He’s a fraud, an antagonist, a disappointment, and an embarrassment.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2013 at 10:34 AM

You know he’ll make it about himself, or Sasha and Malia. Maybe he’ll mention again how he was followed by a clerk in a department store once, or talk about people who look like him, or falsely claim his life is some kind of example of an uphill fight against racism. If he says, again, that this is a great country because only in this country could someone like him be elected president, I’ll puke.

Later I’ll scan the text of his speech and work hard to find anything worthwhile in it. If I do, I’ll post it on HotGas, and praise it. It will have to be some unequivocal truth that empowers blacks to do the work to accomplish their own, personal dream, whatever it may be. Not some mealy-mouthed, general, qualified throwaway line mixed in with a bunch of other crap. I’ll point that out too. Because that’s what it will be.

Paul-Cincy on August 28, 2013 at 10:43 AM

I think MLK’s biggest dissapointment would be the growing gap between the rich and the poor in this country. I pesonally believe the Government dealt with his antics when he was just speaking to Black people but he was killed shortly after annonucing his plans to start a “poor persons” movement.

The Government loves to keep us seperated and fighting amongst each other so that we dont band together and work to unseat those really in contorl. As long as they can keep it Black vs White. Republicans vs Democrats. They’re happy. If there was ever a real movement like what MLK was trying to do (Not occupy wall street) then their power would be in jeporady and they cant have that.

As far as Blacks in America I think this thread is a perfect example of some things that still need to be worked on. In MLK’s speech he said “To judge each other by the content of our characters not the color of our skin” yet and still I see many commenters here still lumping all Blacks together. I cant speak for every Black person in America because I dont know them but I can say that my circle of friends and myself all have two year degrees or higher, have no kids, and all are gainfully employed and have never been on Government assistance. A few of us owned our first homes by the age of 23. So yeah, again I cant speak on all Black people and shouldnt be asked too the same way no other race is asked to speak for all others of their race but the ones I know are living their own lives and striving to be successful.

Happy 50th anniversay MLK. You’ll alway’s be a hero to me.

Politricks on August 28, 2013 at 10:49 AM

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/aug/28/i-have-a-dream-50-years-later/?page=all#pagebreak

And this ^^^^ is the reason why Dr. Ben Carson should have been the featured speaker.

onlineanalyst on August 28, 2013 at 11:27 AM

I wonder what he’d think of the treatment of people like Allen West, Herman Cain, Clarence Thomas, Ben Carson, and Dr. Rice by the elites?

nazo311 on August 28, 2013 at 11:32 AM

I don’t plan on watching any of the coverage because all three elements above will be part of his speech. And you’re right, it will be all about him.

Happy Nomad on August 28, 2013 at 10:39 AM

Picture that gigantic MLK concrete statue and picture Obama standing beneath it speechifyin. THAT, my friend would be the best possible visual comparison that could ever be made between MLK and BHO.

I hope we get some sort of Drudgtaposition today. That’d be awesome.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2013 at 11:37 AM

About that “content of their character” thing…A Kentucky legislator was shacked up with the good Rev. King the night before his assassination in Memphis. She has written about it. Stolen speeches and sermons have been noted. The FBI knew most of this but kept quiet. If it makes them happy to rewrite history, so be it! They lie about almost everything else!

Marco on August 28, 2013 at 11:38 AM

For crying out loud, we have come to this in the tee shirt/soundbite era.
http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/356970/mall-trayvon-martin-luther-king-jr-t-shirts-sale-mow-anniversary-charles-c-w-cooke

onlineanalyst on August 28, 2013 at 11:44 AM

Whoah, I just tried posting a link to Twitchy, and it went to moderation. Let me try that again with by using a “tiny URL”

“Let Freedom Ring”
http://tinyurl.com/olaa7n9

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 11:46 AM

This thread would have 300 entries by now if CP were not banned.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 11:50 AM

I have a few dreams and wishes:

1. That I not be around to live through the centennial anniv. of this.

2. That the race hucksters, obama, Sharpton and Jackson on top, not make a mockery of MLK’s dream.

3. That MLK come back and really send all the hucksters into a hot place.

He is disgusted with how he’s ‘celebrated’. Of that I’m certain.

The race-whores never want equality.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 11:52 AM

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/aug/28/i-have-a-dream-50-years-later/?page=all#pagebreak

And this ^^^^ is the reason why Dr. Ben Carson should have been the featured speaker.

onlineanalyst on August 28, 2013 at 11:27 AM

Thanks for the article. They have several other articles by him there at the Wash Times. I’m really a big fan of his, for many reasons. I’m awed by how he writes and speaks with such intelligence and humility. This is a role model for me. When he speaks, I listen. I need to get one of his books, but I’m not sure which one. Maybe “Gifted Hands”, his autobiography.

Paul-Cincy on August 28, 2013 at 11:53 AM

This thread would have 300 entries by now if CP were not banned.
Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 11:50 AM

What was the post that finally did him in?

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 11:55 AM

can we please have some Thomas Sowell

When the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was pending in Congress, my hope was that it would pass undiluted, not because I thought it would be a panacea but, on the contrary, because “the bitter anticlimax that is sure to follow may provoke some real thought in quarters where slogans and labels hold sway at the moment.”

But the bitter anticlimax that did follow provoked no rethinking. Instead, it provoked all sorts of new demands. Judging everybody by the same standards came to be regarded in some quarters as “racist” because it precluded preferences and quotas. There are people today who talk “justice” when they really mean payback — including payback against people who were not even born when historic injustices were committed.

The nation has just been through a sensationalized murder trial in Florida, on which many people took fierce positions before a speck of evidence was introduced, based on nothing more than judging those involved by the color of their skin.

how is it that he can always tell the truth and yet so many struggle?

r keller on August 28, 2013 at 11:56 AM

We certainly have come a long way since 1963. Would Dr. King be satisfied?

NO:

1. He would really hate the race-hucksters.

2. He would hate the way he is abused by the race harlots.

He wanted equality and judgment by character, not hue, and these whores are enriching themselves, the liars, and keeping minorities in modern day plantations, subjugated, for votes and their own power and riches.

One day said minorities will wake up and I’ll laugh a lot.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 11:57 AM

He would be highly disgusted that all the R/C blacks are openly called “uncle Toms” and worse, by the leftist Utopian bastards of the land.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 12:02 PM

bluegill on August 28, 2013 at 11:46 AM

It wasn’t Twitchy that irritated the “mill” – there are at least 3 words in the title that could have…

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 12:04 PM

I don’t think that’s a question – we have the parallel lines of The Great Society and the dissolve of the nuclear black family. I know it is popular to assume how disappointed MLK would be at the state of society today (and I say what follows as a person who considers “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” to be among the greatest of American expressions, right there with the DecOfInd), but what would make him different than every other Democrat of the last 50 years? Faith in God? Let us count the reverends, the idealists whose views slowly melted over time thanks to the influence of feminism and the race hustle?

Well first, he’d be different from every Democrat of the last 50 years because Martin Luther King Jr. was a Republican.

Another thing about King they don’t teach in public school.

Why do you think no Republicans were invited to Obama’s praising of himself and his legacy at the same step as MLK? Because I guarantee any Republican worth their salt would bring that up, and that’d be unfortunate for the gaggle of race hucksters that will invoke King’s name today to spit on everything he stood for: faith in God, faith in human character, faith that right would eventually win.

Glenn Beck had the decency to at least speak a few steps fewer. Obama will show no similar courtesy, and I bet if he had his druthers he’d want to be a few steps higher.

BKennedy on August 28, 2013 at 12:57 PM

The part of his speech that gets ignored these days:

Mr. Bingley on August 28, 2013 at 10:14 AM

One of the reasons most of the speech never gets quoted is because the entire thing has been copyrighted since later the same year it was made.

Last week, Power Line had a very interesting observation-they went back to examine how the Washington Post covered the 1963 speech. Apparently the WaPo had at least six different articles about that day and MLK’s speech, but not once did they take notice of its importance.

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 1:09 PM

This thread would have 300 entries by now if CP were not banned.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 11:50 AM

It finally happened? Which thread did the trick?

That’s too bad, in a way, as I wanted to ask CP about the new news out about tolerance for Muslims in (Democrat) New York City, where the NYPD has designated entire mosques as terrorism organizations.

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 1:11 PM

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 1:11 PM

Del, I don’t know. Last night on the QotD Bmore and CurtZHP said it’s certain.

My hunch is that it might have been on the Miley Cyrus or one of the “racism” threads. Also, it appears that Ed did not say so in the thread, and just did it, and notified these two folks by e-mail.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 3:12 PM

Barkys speech on social justice,,, ummm. No.

wolly4321 on August 28, 2013 at 3:29 PM

Video: 50th anniversary of MLK’s “Dream” speech

And 50 years later to the day we get an Obama speech. Guess who’s speech will be remembered 50 years from now?

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 28, 2013 at 3:32 PM

For how long will people continue to lionize MLK?

He’s as much a “Dr.” as Sharpton is “Rev.” or Obama a “Constitutional scholar”.

He was a tool of the international Left and turned to the usual Leftist causes as soon as he ran out of options on “Civil Rights”.

All his signature speeches were lifted from the works of some white Southern preacher, and he was a bully and pervert in his private life. If he were alive today, he’d be out there hoodie-preachin’ like the rest of the race-pimps.

Ash-heap of history indeed.

sartana on August 28, 2013 at 4:43 PM

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 1:11 PM

Del, I don’t know. Last night on the QotD Bmore and CurtZHP said it’s certain.

My hunch is that it might have been on the Miley Cyrus or one of the “racism” threads. Also, it appears that Ed did not say so in the thread, and just did it, and notified these two folks by e-mail.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 3:12 PM

Hmm, I will have to check out those threads. Usually skip QOTD as it’s on too late!

Too bad, I also wanted to ask CP about why the only African-American Senator, Tim Scott, was not asked to speak at today’s MLK festivities. Maybe libfree can explain that to us!

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 5:18 PM

MLK–Such a great man, his FBI files are sealed for 50+ years.

Philo Beddoe on August 28, 2013 at 9:30 AM

As they should be — forever. There’s no reason for files to be made public about people who committed no crimes. None at all.

Isn’t that even less than the modern mantra — that not even private files should be kept on people who’ve committed no crime?

unclesmrgol on August 28, 2013 at 5:24 PM

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 5:18 PM

I never want to be on your bad side :)

Thanks for all. I marvel, often.

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 5:31 PM

unclesmrgol on August 28, 2013 at 5:24 PM

NSA, NSA, NSA!!!

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 5:32 PM

NSA, NSA, NSA!!!

Schadenfreude on August 28, 2013 at 5:32 PM

Indeed. But, at the time those records were assembled on MLK, wasn’t there a very good reason for them? Hasn’t that reason dissipated by now?

unclesmrgol on August 28, 2013 at 5:44 PM

Early morning, April 4
Shot rings out in the Memphis sky
Free at last, they took your life
They could not take your pride

Although the lyrics botched the time of day, the song is a fitting tribute to the man and his legacy.

He was taken from us way too early.

rukiddingme on August 28, 2013 at 6:30 PM

OK, think I found Capitalist Porky’s last stand. It was in Erika’s Green Room thread about Miley.

It was in response to a post by another one of our Democrat Dummies, urban effetist:

People have been complaining about dirty dancing at least since Elvis and probably long before. And if you spent a decade playing a virginal imp on TV, you might be tempted to reach for the other extreme, too.

Was it in bad taste? Gloriously so.

Did she earn the vicious response that she’s getting in some quarters? No.

But is it fun to see so many self-appointed minions of morality rending their garments and gnashing their teeth? Heck yes.

The free market — ain’t it grand?

urban elitist on August 27, 2013 at 11:20 AM

Inane “response”:

You are forever banned from Pearl Clutchers of HA. You won’t be included in this years calendar. CurtZHP is the new October pin-up.

Capitalist Hog on August 27, 2013 at 12:25 PM

Ed swooped in 4 minutes later:

If we find out that a commenter is attempting to harass other commenters, that commenter will no longer be allowed on our site. But we do need the heads-up, because we don’t read every comment posted.

Ed Morrissey on August 27, 2013 at 12:29 PM

And Ed’s final word:

I’d also prefer that the e-mail go to our tips line, so that all of us can be copied on it.

Ed Morrissey on August 27, 2013 at 12:30 PM

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 6:32 PM

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2013 at 6:32 PM

I think the ban-worthy offense is further up-thread, when CH was outing people.

John the Libertarian on August 28, 2013 at 8:36 PM

Yeah, we’ve got a black President now.

If you could just end Affirmative Action, that’d be great.

/Lumbergh

RedNewEnglander on August 28, 2013 at 8:55 PM

Where are great men like this today?

Marcus Traianus on August 28, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Murdered by their crack-wh0re mothers in a state-sponsored operation, most likely.

Seriously, someone like King only comes along once or twice a century and that’s IF he/she survives to adulthood. Kill tens of millions of black babies and the probability of another being born anytime in the next millennium drops to almost nothing.

MelonCollie on August 29, 2013 at 1:53 AM