Video: Violence spreads to Alexandria as death toll in Cairo rises to 525

posted at 8:01 am on August 15, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

Did the Egyptian military make their precarious political situation even worse with an assault on protest camps in Cairo?  The death toll has skyrocketed since the assaults ended, with the Health Ministry now admitting that at least 525 people were killed and more than 3500 wounded.  They also acknowledge that the eventual totals are likely to be higher, even though the streets have returned to an “eerily calm” state, according to CBS News:

The Egyptian Health Ministry said Thursday that the death toll from clashes between police and supporters of the country’s ousted president had risen to 525.

Ministry spokesman, Khaled el-Khateeb, told The Associated Press that the number of injured in the previous day’s violence had also risen to 3,572. He said the ministry was in the process of updating the latest figures and that an even higher death toll was likely. …

CBS News producer Alex Ortiz, who was in the middle of the violence Wednesday as Egyptian forces laid siege to the protest camp outside the Rabbah al-Adawiya Mosque in Cairo’s Nasr City district, said the Egyptian capital was eerily quiet Thursday morning.

CBS News correspondent Charlie D’Agata reported that driving through Cairo’s streets on Wednesday night, it looked like a war zone and security was clamping down even tighter.

According to Ortiz, the dead protesters didn’t appear to have met their demise in a straight-up fight resulting from a police action that spun out of control.  Instead, they appear to have been killed by sniper fire and automatic weapons:

Most of the wounds Ortiz saw Wednesday at a make-shift hospital inside the Rabaah camp were gunshots to the head and chest, consistent with reports of police automatic weapons and sniper fire being directed at the camp. While the violence was not entirely one-sided — protesters pushed over a police car, killing four officers, and there were unconfirmed reports that some protesters were armed — the security forces used overwhelming force against them to clear the camps.

The term “massacre” would arguably apply in this instance.  Outrage over the military offensive spilled over into Alexandria, where protesters clashed with police in the streets:

The US issued a condemnation yesterday, but is that sufficient? National Review’s David Gartenstein-Ross argues that it’s time to issue an ultimatum over aid to the Egyptian army, and that American “dithering” contributed to the military’s perception that they could get away with an attack on civilians:

The real problem, then, is that the administration’s public indecisiveness was not accompanied by canny behind-the-scenes efforts, but by dithering in that sphere as well. The U.S. didn’t clearly communicate that there were red lines in dealing with the protesters that could cause a suspension of American aid.

Whatever one thinks of the Brotherhood — and I’m extremely critical of it — the status quo helps nobody. The dead protesters did not deserve to be killed. The moral costs for the U.S. are too high; and from a pragmatic perspective, the country’s image is further damaged in the region because it’s associated with the present atrocities. The mass killings are likely to radicalize the opposition, and predictions that the Brotherhood or significant factions therein could return to anti-government violence look more prescient each day. And al-Qaeda’s narrative is furthered, as Ayman al-Zawahiri’s dark predictions about Egyptian politics seem to be proven correct.

It’s time for the U.S. to end its dithering. While P. J. Crowley argues that the U.S. should now call what happened in Egypt a coup and cut off aid, that suggestion is even less principled than the course the administration took. Crowley’s suggestion would make the definition of a coup dependent upon the actions a military takesafter seizing power; further, it would end U.S. aid without even trying to change the Egyptian military’s posture.

Instead, the U.S. should offer a firm and concrete ultimatum that future aid is conditioned on Egypt’s undertaking a series of changes. For starters, the Egyptian regime should unequivocally apologize for the slaughter of protesters; the officers who ordered Wednesday’s massacre should be held to account and court-martialed; and there should be no further willful mass killings. If Egypt doesn’t comply, 100 percent of the U.S.’s military aid should be suspended.

Until now, the military hadn’t done anything over the last few weeks that they hadn’t done for more than thirty years when the aid flowed into their coffers.  The military supported a dictatorship and suppressed dissent, but the aid flowed because we wanted them to keep peace with Israel and cooperate with our intelligence efforts.  The problem now is that the political cost  of that aid has become much higher after this massacre. Gartenstein-Ross refers to moral cost, which is a factor, but the real issue now is political. The US can’t afford to pay off the Egyptian army and act like nothing happened, and therefore lose whatever credibility we have on human rights and democratization elsewhere, particularly in that region.

At the very least, we have to start acting like the Egyptian military needs us more than we need them, and right now, that’s the actual reality. The army has to start making concessions, or face the oncoming civil war completely on its own.


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Sounds like these Egyptian communities are being organized / agitated?

Wonder why?

PappyD61 on August 15, 2013 at 8:08 AM

At the very least, we have to start acting like the Egyptian military needs us more than we need them, and right now, that’s the actual reality. The army has to start making concessions, or face the oncoming civil war completely on its own

Smart power! Can’t we fix this by another apology tour? Seriously, where is America’s “leaders” and what are they doing other than giving bland stern lectures about human rights at hastily held press conferences at their vacation locations? Isn’t this reaching the point where Kerry or the rat-eared wonder might consider if they should in the office instead of the golf course?

Happy Nomad on August 15, 2013 at 8:11 AM

Hmm, the results of Smart Power is war and death? Whodathunkit?!?!

geojed on August 15, 2013 at 8:14 AM

Had Obama kept his nose and grubby fingers out of Egyptian internal affairs, this might not have happened.

Liam on August 15, 2013 at 8:14 AM

I still think, in the long run, Iraq is the bigger story.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/aug/15/iraq-car-bombs-baghdad

Oil Can on August 15, 2013 at 8:15 AM

Sounds like these Egyptian communities are being organized / agitated?

Wonder why?

PappyD61 on August 15, 2013 at 8:08 AM

Occupy Cairo. Seriously, I wonder if the rat-eared wonder realizes just how much regional stability relies on Egypt. It’s not the kind of stuff you learn while agitating in the slums of Chicago.

Put another way, I wonder just how much Obama identifies with the agitators and how much he understands the complexities of foreign policy. His Cairo speech would indicate that he really is clueless but maybe he’s evolved since then.

Happy Nomad on August 15, 2013 at 8:15 AM

Obama’s facilitating the coup of Mubarak is looking more and more like a genius idea…

But then for Obama it is all about getting the Muslim Brotherhood in power across the Middle East….with help and funding from Qatar.

albill on August 15, 2013 at 8:17 AM

Øbama’s on vacaycay.
.
Kerry is on a short leash.
.
You’ll have to wait until Ø gets back into town since he is snorkeling in the waters off The Vineyard.
.
Now, talk amongst yourselves about the value of rodeo clowns.

ExpressoBold on August 15, 2013 at 8:26 AM

horrific.

Just to be clear though, it’s baaad people doing this and not the “automatic weapons” themselves…right? IE, we’re not going to hear calls for gun control legislation in Egypt, are we?//

ted c on August 15, 2013 at 8:26 AM

Come on Bammy, whip out another fantabulous speech and quell the violence. Or just play back your old Cairo speech and pretend everything is just fine. You know, like you do with domestic policy speeches here at home.

fogw on August 15, 2013 at 8:29 AM

A lot of the dead are the security forces murdered by the MB. The MB was well armed. 45 churches and Christian organizations were attacked yesterday by the MB.

You want to follow what is going on, I suggest people read the twitter feed of secular Egyptian bloggers.

Here’s a good one: https://twitter.com/MarianneMagd

Big Pharoah and Sandmonkey are others. I would link them but I dont’ want to be sent to Hotair prison.

Blake on August 15, 2013 at 8:35 AM

The US can’t afford to pay off the Egyptian army and act like nothing happened, and therefore lose whatever credibility we have on human rights and democratization elsewhere, particularly in that region.

Becasus supporting a Muslim Brotherhood government which was overseeing the systematic genocide of Coptic Christians is the sure fire way to maintain “whatever credibility we have on human rights…particularly in that region”

tommyboy on August 15, 2013 at 8:38 AM

Come on Bammy, whip out another fantabulous speech and quell the violence. Or just play back your old Cairo speech and pretend everything is just fine. You know, like you do with domestic policy speeches here at home.

fogw on August 15, 2013 at 8:29 AM

Are you suggesting that when the rat-eared wonder heard about violence spreading to Alexandria he asked whether if it was in Virginia or Louisiana and what does that have to do with the 525 people killed in Southern Illinois?

I fully expect these people to muck things up further.

Happy Nomad on August 15, 2013 at 8:39 AM

The Big Pharaoh ‏@TheBigPharaoh 2m
Picture: Giza government building completely destroyed by fire after pro-Morsi stormed it a while ago. pic.twitter.com/VBUkffkZoq

Blake on August 15, 2013 at 8:41 AM

“What’s that? The Middle East is Bleeding? Oh, I thought you said the soft shell crabs are in season.”

- Barack Obama

hat tip Kieth Koffler

hillsoftx on August 15, 2013 at 8:42 AM

Big Pharoah and Sandmonkey are others. I would link them but I dont’ want to be sent to Hotair prison.

Blake on August 15, 2013 at 8:35 AM

Comments with multiple links get flagged as potential spam (for very good reason), but we check that queue frequently during the day, and approve non-spam posts. Feel free to post multiple links to these Twitter feeds, and we’ll get it out of “Hotair prison” quickly.

Ed Morrissey on August 15, 2013 at 8:44 AM

Becasus supporting a Muslim Brotherhood government which was overseeing the systematic genocide of Coptic Christians is the sure fire way to maintain “whatever credibility we have on human rights…particularly in that region”

tommyboy on August 15, 2013 at 8:38 AM

Look wrong at a muslim and we get a lecture on tolerance. But when muslims carry out systemic murder of Christians not a peep – except from lefty Kristin Powers and only because her husband’s family are Coptics in Egypt, otherwise like a good lefty, she wouldn’t give a shite.

Blake on August 15, 2013 at 8:46 AM

Whatever is the outcome of this turmoil,one thing is for sure,Christians will be worse off. Everything Obama involves himself with turns to crap.

celtic warrior on August 15, 2013 at 8:50 AM

Don’t forget… He’s the Smartest President Evah

PointnClick on August 15, 2013 at 8:50 AM

Did the Egyptian military make their precarious political situation even worse with an assault on protest camps in Cairo?

ANswer=NO!
The Egyptian military understands Islamic muslim terrorism.
They know/realize they won’t be “talking” the MB out of being terrorists. They understand what it takes to stop terrorists and that what they are doing exactly what it takes. More power to em’.

rodguy911 on August 15, 2013 at 9:00 AM

Ron Ben-Yishai has an analysis of the fighting. He says the Muslim Brotherhood was starting to turn the protest camps into barricaded outposts.

Moreover, there were credible reports, including from Brotherhood members, that the pro-Morsi protesters in Cairo were accumulating weapons and defensive equipment and were also building barricades, meaning that as time passed it would become harder to remove them by force and the number of casualties would have been greater.

I am in no way condoning what happened to the innocent. But the Brotherhood was loading for bear.

In light of this, it is clear why the army decided to clear the Nahda Square and Rabaah al-Adawiya pro-Morsi sit-ins in Cairo. Hundreds of thousands of Islamists barricaded themselves in al-Adawiya, the larger protest encampment, located at the heart of the bustling middle-class Nasr City neighborhood.

Apart from the threat on the legitimacy of the regime in Egypt, this compound disturbed the locals and was slowly becoming an environmental hazard. This begs the question: Why was it not evacuated sooner? The main reason is the Egyptian army’s fear of global public opinion.

Meryl Yourish on August 15, 2013 at 9:02 AM

*sips coffee*

BigGator5 on August 15, 2013 at 9:02 AM

The Egyptian military understands Islamic muslim terrorism.
They know/realize they won’t be “talking” the MB out of being terrorists. They understand what it takes to stop terrorists and that what they are doing exactly what it takes. More power to em’.

rodguy911 on August 15, 2013 at 9:00 AM

All I know is that this really requires more attention from Kerry and Obama than stern warnings about human rights abuse from their vacation venues. If only to send a message to the Egyptian government who seem to be the instigators of the violence and to the protesters who see the hands-off approach as tacit approval of the violence. You can’t send that message when you’ve got a golf club in one hand and lobster claw in the other.

Happy Nomad on August 15, 2013 at 9:05 AM

And here’s a slice of just what was going on in and around these Muslim Brotherhood “protest” camps:

http://frontpagemag.com/2013/raymond-ibrahim/inside-egypts-terrorist-camps-torture-rape-mass-murder/

tommyboy on August 15, 2013 at 9:08 AM

He’s made sure our effort in Iraq went south.He’s guaranteeing a loss in Afganistan and now years of our tax money and effort in Egypt is kaput.

docflash on August 15, 2013 at 9:09 AM

Daddy, stop the Gulf leak bloodshed in Egypt.

trs on August 15, 2013 at 9:27 AM

…..You can’t send that message when you’ve got a golf club in one hand and lobster claw in the other.
……..
True enough needs to be repeated more.

rodguy911 on August 15, 2013 at 9:30 AM

The army has to start making concessions, or face the oncoming civil war completely on its own.

Excuse me, but the army already made concessions, which resulted in the election of Morsi and the near collapse of the Egyptian state, which would have included mass starvation.

There will not be a civil war in Egypt if the army is left alone to cut off the Brotherhood’s balls.

This is not a Tea Party protest on the Mall, or an Occupy Wall Street camp. This is serious business against an armed, serious threat.

Sniper fire? You’re telling me you think the snipers were soldiers?

Any concessions made to the Brotherhood at this point will result in an Egyptian civil war. That’s Machiavelli 101, and something a conservative should understand.

Mr. Arkadin on August 15, 2013 at 9:40 AM

He’s made sure our effort in Iraq went south.He’s guaranteeing a loss in Afganistan and now years of our tax money and effort in Egypt is kaput.

docflash on August 15, 2013 at 9:09 AM
……………………..
Actually, both Afghanistan and Iraq will revert back to the violence of centuries before as islamic terrosts do what they have historically done,kill one another in the name of allah. We didn’t introduce much change in either country. Maybe a little in Iraq since they will now have a lot of oil money. But, far less in Afghanistan which is still has a narco economy after many years of our efforts.
As for Egypt the military came in to rescue the country and help us just in time.
They realized that Morsi is little more than an obama pawn and is hell bent on fomenting islamic mayhem whenever and wherever. Egypt would be a basket case after five yers of his rule.
The military did just the right thing, IMHO.
They(the military) would be doing a lot more if they were not being blackmailed by the obama regime who are threatening to cut funds off if they don’t let some MB terror type who has the goods on zero out of jail.

rodguy911 on August 15, 2013 at 9:42 AM

If you understand the modern history of Egypt, then you know this was inevitable since 1980.

Let the military do what needs to be done.

Obliterate the Brotherhood in Egypt, and the region will begin to course-correct itself away from Sharia and the Islamo-Fascists.

budfox on August 15, 2013 at 9:42 AM

This will simply be a recruiting tool for a huge Muslim call to arms. Look out, the ME is getting close to critical mass!!

Deano1952 on August 15, 2013 at 9:48 AM

The only thing that can unite the Muslim masses now would be some kind of common goal or enemy with the Star of David on their flag. I wonder who that could be….

Deano1952 on August 15, 2013 at 9:51 AM

Charred bodies lie in Cairo mosque, unrecognised by Egyptian state

By Alexander Dziadosz and Tom Perry

CAIRO | Thu Aug 15, 2013 9:19am EDT
***********************************

(Reuters) – In a Cairo mosque lie the charred and mutilated bodies of more than 200 Egyptians, apparently uncounted and unacknowledged by the state after security forces crushed Islamist protest camps.

Helpers at the Al-Iman mosque accused the government of ignoring the rows of corpses, laid out in white shrouds to await collection by relatives in a charnel house that looked like the aftermath of a battle from World War One.

Medics pushed burning incense sticks into blocks of ice covering the bodies and sprayed air freshener to cover up the overpowering stench of decay. A cry of “Allahu akbar” (God is Greatest) echoed through a loudspeaker at the back of the mosque.(More…)
=========================================================

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/15/uk-egypt-protests-mosque-idUKBRE97E0MP20130815

*********** WARNING_GRAPHIC ****************************

Footage of protesters burning in Egypt.
Added: 22 hours ago Occurred On: Aug-14-2013
———————————————

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=116_1376493951

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 9:51 AM

Tweets All / No replies

The Associated Press ‏@AP 5m

MORE: Morsi supporters torch two local gov’t buildings in Giza, Cairo’s twin city that is home to the pyramids: http://apne.ws/1bzbFuA -DC
=================

https://twitter.com/AP

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 9:53 AM

Tweets All / No replies

The Associated Press ‏@AP 1m

Latest on Egypt: –Health Ministry: 525 dead, 3,717 injured –Morsi supporters torch gov’t buidlings in Giza –Mass funeral for police
=========

The Associated Press ‏@AP 19m

MORE: Obama will speak to reporters about Egypt at 10:15 a.m. EDT from Martha’s Vineyard: http://apne.ws/1a82P8Z -DC
View summary
=============

https://twitter.com/AP

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 9:55 AM

I’m having difficulty grasping this. The Egyptian people, supported by the military, ousted what was essentially a hardline islamist administration headed and upheld by thugs. These thugs, along with their supporters, recently reorganized for mass protest. Keeping in mind the fact that protests in that part of the world typically involve the tossing of Molotov cocktails, widespread rape and other such barbarism, and that the military is supposedly acting in accordance with the will of the people, that the military took decisive, brutal action and quashed an uprising and resurgence of the Muslim Brotherhood seems, dare I say it… reasonable?

Am I missing something?

Birchbark on August 15, 2013 at 9:57 AM

I wonder who might be fueling the violence? Probably the same person arming the Muslim Brotherhood. Who could that be? One wonders.

There sure were a lot of signs on the streets against Obama when Egypt threw out his dictator. Some people might take something like that personally. Obama wouldn’t, though. He’s above things like that.

JellyToast on August 15, 2013 at 9:59 AM

So,Hopeys stellar Foreign Policy is Failing!!

And,I blame the Cairo Speech too!!

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:01 AM

Am I missing something?

Birchbark on August 15, 2013 at 9:57 AM

Yeah. The MB was well armed and armed with ARs and killed a number of police. They lynched a high level police official and executed a number of low young security officials. They pushed that police vehicle off a bridge and then beat the survivors. They have now torched 50 churches. Thank god there are no Jews left in Cairo.

Blake on August 15, 2013 at 10:07 AM

Egypt’s President Morsi removed from power

3 killed, 55 wounded in clashes between Muslim Brotherhood and residents in Alexandria – @AlArabiya_eng

55 secs ago from editor
=============================

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:17 AM

Trying to make the supporters of the Moslem Brotherhood look like your regular old neighborhood soccer moms and such…

Yeah. Sure. That’s aqccurate.

They are anything and everything but. They are armed, there are foreign fighters among them, and they have but one goal…destroy Egypt and build a new Caliphate, no matter how many die.

Then, they hope to do the same in every other Moslem countries and then off to do the same in non-Moslem countries.

They will align with the most fundamentalist jihadi Islamists in order to gain that they seek. They will turn on them when they no longer need them or see them as a threat…just look at Syria.

They have been a threat to Egypt for decades….and to the rest of the Middle east.

They are not just simple peace loving wonderful folks who are beset by some sort of police oppression. They’ve declared war.

If in the next weeks the Egyptian military can put them down…and firmly…then the rest of Egypt can get back to doing what most Egyptians desire…to live, freely, to learn, build and live…without the threat of some whacked out jihadi telling them they must die because they do not wear a beard or they do not wear the hijab.

The Islamists started this…let them earn their reward.

Leave Egypt to do what Egypt simply must do.

coldwarrior on August 15, 2013 at 10:22 AM

Hopey Speaks at 10:15AM????????

LIVE FEED:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:25 AM

Hopey Speaks at 10:15AM????????

LIVE FEED:

http://www.whitehouse.gov/live

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:25 AM

Even his pre-taped speeches are late.

Steve Eggleston on August 15, 2013 at 10:29 AM

Jim Roberts ‏@nycjim 18s

Obama emphasizes “longstanding partnership” with #Egypt. Live here: http://reut.rs/302mGz

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:30 AM

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:25 AM

Even his pre-taped speeches are late.

Steve Eggleston on August 15, 2013 at 10:29 AM

Steve Eggleston:True dat,GoodMorning Steve:)

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:31 AM

Reuters Top News ‏@Reuters 8s

Obama says U.S. strongly condemns Egypt violence, opposes the pursuit of martial law – live remarks http://live.reuters.com/Event/Egypt_Unrest_3
View summary

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:32 AM

The death toll from the Obama administration’s blunders is staggering. Just like the national debt.

kirkill on August 15, 2013 at 10:32 AM

Egypt’s President Morsi removed from power

President Obama announces cancellation of upcoming ‘Bright Star’ joint US-Egyptian military exercise – live audio

1 min ago by editor

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:34 AM

10:15 Egypt Speechy:

Well,another words,

Egypt your on your own,sorry
for the Cairo Speech….

…Good Luck
-Hopey/Changey

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:37 AM

Pro-Morsi Supporters Chant in Favor of Islamic Law and Martyrdom

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3UtshShveY

nazo311 on August 15, 2013 at 10:38 AM

Egypt’s President Morsi removed from power

More: President Obama says US does not take sides with any party or political figure in Egypt – @Reuters, live audio

1 min ago by editor
=========================

Egypt’s President Morsi removed from power

President Obama calls on protesters to act peacefully, says authorities should respect right of peaceful protest – live audio

2 mins ago by editor

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:40 AM

Oh yeah – g’mornin’ canopfor.

Steve Eggleston on August 15, 2013 at 10:42 AM

The US issued a condemnation yesterday, but is that sufficient?

It’s more than enough. Let them kill each other.

Ronnie on August 15, 2013 at 10:51 AM

The Islamists started this…let them earn their reward.

Leave Egypt to do what Egypt simply must do.

coldwarrior on August 15, 2013 at 10:22 AM

coldwarrior:

Exactly,a Terrorist Group got elected,and Team Obama legitimized it!

Btw,I watched a BBC Documentary on Syria,and the Muslim BrotherHood
had to be wiped out,during Assad Sr. rein,they were busy sowing
KAOS back when!

Agreed on the MBHoodGoons,and Islamists are asking for it part!

Heres McCain words of wisdom,checked against Egyptian
Authorities,go figure:O
========================

Updated August 14, 2013, 7:51 p.m. ET
U.S. Pleas Fail to Stave Off Egypt Crackdown
Military Government’s Move Against Muslim Brotherhood Defies Washington’s Call for Restraint, as Influence Wanes
***************************************************

McCain:

“We bear a large amount of responsibility for the bloodletting that’s taking place,” Sen. McCain said.

Egyptian officials:

said they reached the opposite conclusion. “We bent over backwards to bring in the Brotherhood,” said the Egyptian official in Cairo. “No responsible government could take any more of this.”

(More……..)
==============

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324139404579012742246337448.html

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:53 AM

Egypt Reuters Jihady/Goon Cam:

[This feed switches between two sources: state-owned Nile TV (footage displaying a red pyramid logo) and anti-Islamist/pro-miltary private On TV (footage displaying a yellow circular logo)]

http://live.reuters.com/event/egypt_unrest_3

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 10:58 AM

Defiant Muslim Brotherhood vows to ‘bring down’ military coup in Egypt, as protesters storm government buildings
Published August 15, 2013
FoxNews.com
**************

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/08/15/muslim-brotherhood-vows-more-protests-after-day-of-bloodshed/#ixzz2c3B9sN4F

http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/08/15/muslim-brotherhood-vows-more-protests-after-day-of-bloodshed/

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 11:02 AM

The military is doing the right thing. Or ask yourself: Do you side with Ubama and all the nancyboys?

antisense on August 15, 2013 at 11:05 AM

Hopey Egypt Speechy:
====================

Report Video Issue

President Obama Statement on Egypt
Aug 15, 2013

White House Travel | Domestic Trip

President Obama made an audio statement on the increasing violence and political unrest in Egypt during his vacation in Martha’s Vineyard. He expressed support for the Egyptian people and called on the interim .. Read More

8 minutes |
*************

http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/314575-1

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 11:11 AM

Gas Prices to go up,in this Fall-Out:

And,Jordan Mission Creep!!
==========================

Syrian civil war

US mission in Jordan could last years as troops help contain fallout from Syrian civil war, US General Martin Dempsey says – @Reuters

4 mins ago by editor
========================

Egypt’s President Morsi removed from power

Brent oil prices climb above $111 per barrel to 4-month high amid fears about Egypt violence – @Reuters

4 mins ago from uk.reuters.com by editor
===========================================

http://www.breakingnews.com/

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 11:15 AM

Churches burned by the MB and Christians slaughtered by the hundreds…

Schadenfreude on August 15, 2013 at 11:17 AM

coldwarrior on August 15, 2013 at 10:22 AM

Excellent post.

Mr. Arkadin on August 15, 2013 at 11:17 AM

At the very least, we have to start acting like the Egyptian military needs us more than we need them, and right now, that’s the actual reality. The army has to start making concessions, or face the oncoming civil war completely on its own.

What like letting the muslim brotherhood back in power? Those protestors weren’t going to leave until Morsi was back in power. That what you want , Ed? They weren’t innocent in all of this either. They had plenty of weapons to fight back against the military and they clearly used them.

sadsushi on August 15, 2013 at 11:23 AM

Look….couldn’t you guys just wait a few weeks to report this stuff? President and messiah, Barack Hussein Obama really (really, really) needs a break….I mean the man has just been so busy changing the world one speech at a time….that he really just needs to play a few hundred rounds of golf and make sure Michelle has plenty of lobster and shrimp.

It ain’t easy president’n ya’ll!

Maybe he can squeeze in another magical Cairo speech in a couple years.

KMC1 on August 15, 2013 at 11:27 AM

Hopey Egypt Speechy TRANSCRIPT:
===============================

By Washington Post Staff, Thursday, August 15, 10:41 AM

President Obama delivered the following remarks on the unrest in Egypt on Aug. 15 in Martha’s Vineyard, Mass.
*********************************************

PRESIDENT OBAMA: Good morning, everybody.

I just finished a discussion with my national security team about the situation in Egypt, and I wanted to provide an update about our response to the events of the last several days.

Let me begin by stepping back for a moment. The relationship between the United States and Egypt goes back decades. It’s rooted in our respect of Egypt as a nation, an ancient center of civilization and a cornerstone for peace in the Middle East. It’s also rooted in our ties to the Egyptian people, forged through a long-standing partnership.

Just over two years ago, America was inspired by the Egyptians’ — people desire for change as millions of Egyptians took to the streets to defend their dignity and demand a government that was responsive to their aspirations for political freedom and economic opportunity. And we said at the time that change would not come quickly or easily, but we did align ourselves with a set of principles: nonviolence, a respect for universal rights, and a process for political and economic reform. In doing so, we were guided by values but also by interests, because we believe nations are more stable and more successful when they’re guided by those principles as well.

And that’s why we’re so concerned by recent events. We appreciate the complexity of the situation. While Mohammed Morsi was elected president in a democratic election, his government was not inclusive and did not respect the views of all Egyptians.

We know that many Egyptians, millions of Egyptians, perhaps even a majority of Egyptians were calling for a change in course. And while we do not believe that force is the way to resolve political differences, after the military’s intervention several weeks ago, there remained a chance for reconciliation and an opportunity to pursue a democratic path. Instead, we’ve seen a more dangerous path taken, through arbitrary arrests, a broad crackdown on Mr. Morsi’s associations and supporters and now, tragically, violence that’s taken the lives of hundreds of people and wounded thousands more.

The United States strongly condemns the steps that have been taken by Egypt’s interim government and security forces. We deplore violence against civilians. We support universal rights essential to human dignity, including the right to peaceful protest. We oppose the pursuit of martial law, which denies those rights to citizens under the principle that security trumps individual freedom or that might makes right. And today the United States extends its condolences to the families or those who were killed and those who were wounded.

Given the depths of our partnership with Egypt, our national security interest in this pivotal part of the world and our belief that engagement can support a transition back to a democratically elected civilian government, we’ve sustained our commitment to Egypt and its people. But while we want to sustain our relationship with Egypt, our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets and rights are being rolled back.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/transcript-president-obamas-remarks-on-egypt/2013/08/15/5f69252a-05b7-11e3-a07f-49ddc7417125_story.html
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Part Two:

As a result, this morning we notified the Egyptian government that we are canceling our biannual joint military exercise, which was scheduled for next month.

Going forward, I’ve asked my national security team to assess the implications of the actions taken by the interim government and further steps that we may take as necessary with respect to the U.S.- Egyptian relationship.

Let me say that the Egyptian people deserve better than what we’ve seen over the last several days. And to the Egyptian people, let me say the cycle of violence and escalation needs to stop. We call on the Egyptian authorities to respect the universal rights of the people. We call on those who are protesting to do so peacefully and condemn the attacks that we’ve seen by protesters, including on churches. We believe that the state of emergency should be lifted, that a process of national reconciliation should begin, that all parties need to have a voice in Egypt’s future, that the rights of women and religious minorities should be respected and that commitments must be kept to pursue transparent reforms to the constitution and democratic elections of a parliament and a president.

And pursuing that path will help Egypt meet the democratic aspirations of its people while attracting the investment, tourism and international support that can help it deliver opportunities to its citizens. Violence, on the other hand, will only feed the cycle of polarization that isolates Egyptians from one another and from the world and that continues to hamper the opportunity for Egypt to get back on the path of economic growth.

Let me make one final point. America cannot determine the future of Egypt. That’s a task for the Egyptian people. We don’t take sides with any particular party or political figure. I know it’s tempting inside of Egypt to blame the United States or the West or some other outside actor for what’s gone wrong.

We’ve been blamed by supporters of Morsi; we’ve been blamed by the other side as if we are supporters of Morsi. That kind of approach will do nothing to help Egyptians achieve the future that they deserve. We want Egypt to succeed. We want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous Egypt. That’s our interest. But to achieve that, the Egyptians are going to have to do the work.

We recognize that change takes time and that a process like this is never guaranteed. There are examples in recent history of countries that are transitioned out of a military government towards a democratic government. And it did not always go in a straight line and the process was not always smooth.

There are going to be false starts. There will be difficult days. America’s democratic journey took us through some mighty struggles to perfect our union. From Asia to the Americas, we know that democratic transitions are measured not in months or even years but sometimes in generations.

So in the spirit of mutual interest and mutual respect, I want to be clear that America wants to partner in Egyptian people’s pursuit of a better future. And we are guided by our national interest in this long-standing relationship. But our partnership must also advance the principles that we believe in and that so many Egyptians have sacrificed for these last several years, no matter what party or faction they belong to.

So America will work with all those in Egypt and around the world who support a future of stability that rests on a foundation of justice and peace and dignity.

Thank you very much.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/transcript-president-obamas-remarks-on-egypt/2013/08/15/5f69252a-05b7-11e3-a07f-49ddc7417125_story_1.html

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 11:34 AM

Hey, don’t bother Obama with this stuff. He’s busy golfing and rubbing elbows with fatcats in Martha’s Vineyard.

RebeccaH on August 15, 2013 at 11:45 AM

WOW??
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Egypt’s crackdown on Morsi supporters

Photo: Army in ruins of Rabaa mosque in Cairo – @BowenBBC

3 mins ago from t.co by editor
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https://twitter.com/BowenBBC/status/368032269434232833/photo/1

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 11:49 AM

I’m really not feeling that horrified or sad about the deaths of bunches of Islamist thugs.

Illinidiva on August 15, 2013 at 12:01 PM

Egypt’s crackdown on Morsi supporters

Egyptian oil and gas production by major companies unaffected by crisis in Egypt, BP, Shell and BG spokesmen say – @Reuters

4 mins ago from http://www.reuters.com by editor
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Egypt oilfields still open but companies on alert

LONDON | Thu Aug 15, 2013 11:47am EDT
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Aug 15 (Reuters) – Egyptian oil and gas production by major companies including BP and BG has been unaffected by the crisis in Egypt, although Royal Dutch Shell has closed its office for the next few days and restricted business travel there.

“Operations and production are unaffected. We are monitoring the security situation in the (urban) areas where we have offices. All our people are safe and accounted for,” a BP spokesman said after at least 525 people were killed in a security crackdown. .

Egypt produces around 728,000 barrels of oil a day, about 0.9 percent of global output, and 60.9 billion cubic metres of gas, 1.8 percent of world supply.

BP produces about 15 percent of that oil and over 30 percent of the gas along with its partners, which include Shell.

“To ensure the safety and security of our staff, Shell offices in Egypt are closed for business today and into the weekend, and business travel into the country has been restricted. We will continue to monitor the situation in Egypt,” a Shell spokesman said in a statement.

A spokesman for BG, whose offshore liquefied natural gas (LNG) operations in Egypt account for about a fifth of its total production, said there was no change to report and that all its people were safe and accounted for. The company already in July pulled out 100 expatriate staff and dependents.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/08/15/egypt-protests-shell-idUSL6N0GG2KJ20130815

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 12:08 PM

coldwarrior on August 15, 2013 at 10:22 AM

The Left has long since been suckered by the Muslim Brotherhood, which has portrayed itself as moderate. Remember this idiocy from Clapper?

DNI James Clapper: Muslim Brotherhood “Largely Secular,” “Has Eschewed Violence”

Not reported in the US media are some very critical facts on the ground, as well. The MB was attempting to cordon off sections of Cairo, building walls and barriers and establishing areas of Muslim Brotherhood control. No government can permit that and survive. Every day they waited was just going to make it tougher to root them out.

The bloodshed is tragic, but this is the legacy of Islam, which has stunted the development of Arab culture and Arab countries for centuries. The barbarism is part and parcel of a culture that is essentially barbaric by modern standards. When your organizing principles are those of a blood cult, blood will be spilled. Until and unless they sicken of spilling blood, it will continue, no matter what we think or want or do.

novaculus on August 15, 2013 at 12:14 PM

The United States’ and the world’s paramount interest is stability first, democracy second.
In an intellectual debate one could make the case for a different order. But for immediate, pressing matters with very serious repercussions, stability is the obvious choice.

Hence, if any kind of aid, be it economic or military will achieve the cause of stability the best, it should be given. If not, then not.

And that, my friends, is why the western world had sold its soul decades ago and has been dealing with dictators all these years.

AlexB on August 15, 2013 at 2:46 PM

The Associated Press ‏@AP 3m

BREAKING: Egyptian Health Ministry spokesman: Death toll in Wednesday’s violence rises to 638.

canopfor on August 15, 2013 at 3:32 PM