The freaky triple deaky “mystery priest miracle” post

posted at 4:41 pm on August 8, 2013 by Allahpundit

I promised you some atheist material today. I lied.

If I’m desperate enough for content to post Slate’s anti-Redskins grandstanding, you’d better believe I’m willing to post this:

Reed’s team and emergency workers from several other jurisdictions tried for at least 45 minutes to remove the twisted metal from around Lentz. Various pieces of equipment broke and the team was running out of choices. A helicopter waited to carry Lentz to the nearest trauma center. Though Lentz appeared calm, talking about her church and her studies toward a dentistry degree, her vital signs were beginning to fail, Reed said…

That’s when Lentz asked if someone would pray with her and a voice said, “I will.”

The silver-haired priest in his 50s or 60s in black pants, black shirt and black collar with visible white insert stepped forward from nowhere. It struck Reed as odd because the street was blocked off 2 miles from the scene and no one from the nearby communities recognized him…

Everything happened quickly after that. Twenty emergency workers pulled together and sat the car upright, Churchill Lentz said. Katie Lentz’s vital signs improved and a rescue team from a neighboring community suddenly appeared with fresh equipment and tools. Lentz was removed and rushed to the hospital.

When they went to thank the priest, he was gone as mysteriously as he’d arrived — and according to Reed, among 69 photographs taken at the scene during the rescue, the priest doesn’t appear in a single one. Dude?

More from KHQA:

“He came up and approached the patient, and offered a prayer,” Reed said. “It was a Catholic priest who had anointing oil with him. A sense of calmness came over her, and it did us as well. I can’t be for certain how it was said, but myself and another firefighter, we very plainly heard that we should remain calm, that our tools would now work and that we would get her out of that vehicle.”

The Hannibal Fire Department showed up right after that prayer with fresh equipment and was able to finish the extrication. After getting Katie safely into the Air Evac helicopter, at least a dozen of the rescue workers turned around to thank the priest who was no where in sight. The highway had been blocked for a quarter of a mile during the hour and a half rescue, leaving no bystanders and no parked cars nearby. Lentz’ family and friends are amazed by the story.

“Where did this guy come from?” Lentz’s friend Travis Wiseman asked. “We’re looking for the priest and so far, no one has seen him. Whether it was a priest as an angel or an actual angel, he was an angel to all those and to Katie.”

In comparing the two accounts, I noticed that Reed is the only person who’s directly quoted as having seen the priest. But other people did see him; another person present at the crash site told KHQA he had dark hair, a dark complexion, an accent of some sort, and was maybe 5’6″ or so. Another bystander added that he had horn-rimmed glasses and bore a resemblance to Walter Matthau. How that description, of a short-ish dark-haired man, squares with the USA Today account of a man six feet tall or so with silver hair, I have no idea. Another discrepancy: USA Today says the road was blocked off for two miles but KHQA says it was only a quarter-mile. How hard is it to imagine a priest from out of state driving by, noticing the roadblock, figuring out somehow that there was an accident, and walking up the road to the scene in order to help? He had plenty of time to cover a quarter-mile during the hour or so that they were first working on her. Then, in the flurry of excitement once the car was back on its wheels and the emergency workers were preoccupied with evacuating Lentz, he simply walked back to his own car and drove away.

Let’s ask a fellow priest what he thinks of the angelic explanation:

Father James Martin, a Jesuit priest and author of My Life with the Saints, has a different theory.

“Most likely the priest will be identified, and people will be able to thank him,” he told The Huffington Post in an emailed message Thursday. “If he’s not found, that may mean he wants to remain anonymous. Could it have been an angel? There are similar ‘angelic’ stories in the lives of the saints, when a figure inexplicably appears and cannot be located afterwards. There are angels, of course, but we tend to ascribe to angels anonymous acts that we find incredibly loving — when in fact human beings do incredibly loving things in hidden ways every day.”

Imagine if you’re the mystery priest watching the buzz of excitement and wonderment from people who want to believe an angel was responsible. Do you come forward, or do you lie low to encourage it?

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For those who believe in God, no explanation is necessary. For those who do not believe in God, no explanation is possible.
— The Song of Bernadette

PackerBronco on August 8, 2013 at 6:43 PM

For those who believe in God, no explanation is necessary. For those who do not believe in God, no explanation is possible.
— The Song of Bernadette

PackerBronco on August 8, 2013 at 6:43 PM

THIS. ^^^

PatriotGal2257 on August 8, 2013 at 6:51 PM

BobMbx on August 8, 2013 at 6:43 PM

Oops! I meant to say “deathbed CONVERSION”. Proofread fail on my part. That said, I agree with your points. God alone knows. Thanks for the reply.

fortcoins on August 8, 2013 at 6:53 PM

Who are we to judge?

Think it couldn’t happen? Hmmmm…

;-)

Kraken on August 8, 2013 at 6:29 PM

These are the sort of things that trouble me. I can’t see myself yucking it up with Jeffery Dahmer. Ever.

BobMbx on August 8, 2013 at 6:43 PM

I would not worry that. Not to be snarky by any means, but I think God has those things covered.

Bubba Redneck on August 8, 2013 at 7:06 PM

These are the sort of things that trouble me. I can’t see myself yucking it up with Jeffery Dahmer. Ever.

BobMbx on August 8, 2013 at 6:43 PM

Nor could I. The chances of a Dahmer, Pol Pot, or anyone of that ilk actually having a deathbed confession are quite probably nil. It would require such a complete change of heart that would, in all likelihood, be beyond their capacity after the sins/crimes they committed. You can’t do what they did without building barriers that can’t be crossed without divine help. But an all-forgiving God does offer the chance to any who would sincerely admit they were wrong and asked for His forgiveness. If you’ve lived a live of sin, it would be almost impossible to complete an act of sincere contrition and ask forgiveness, but God is there to help if you only ask. But you have to ask.

BTW, do you know why suicide is such a horrible act? It’s the one sin from which there is no chance to ask forgiveness in this life. Meeting a repentant Hitler in Heaven isn’t going to happen.

Kraken on August 8, 2013 at 7:16 PM

For those who believe in God, no explanation is necessary. For those who do not believe in God, no explanation is possible.
— The Song of Bernadette

PackerBronco on August 8, 2013 at 6:43 PM

THIS. ^^^

PatriotGal2257 on August 8, 2013 at 6:51 PM

Amen!!!

For AllahP, there is no explanation.

Quartermaster on August 8, 2013 at 7:17 PM

Catholic Priests often carry a kit for emergencies like this and stop to render spiritual aid to the people and anoint an injured catholic…lately they have been barred (as in the Boston Bombing) from performing this vital sacrament.

It’s comforting to know this priest made it to the accident site.

Angel or priest…His actions gave comfort and are vital.

Thanks for posting the story AP.

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 4:56 PMCatholic Priests often carry a kit for emergencies like this and stop to render spiritual aid to the people and anoint an injured catholic…lately they have been barred (as in the Boston Bombing) from performing this vital sacrament.

It’s comforting to know this priest made it to the accident site.

Angel or priest…His actions gave comfort and are vital.

Thanks for posting the story AP.

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 4:56 PM

Barred? I doubt that. Do you have a link? Only reason would be for a security issue. Boston PD was first on the scene and I don’t think they would bar a priest with ID.

katy the mean old lady on August 8, 2013 at 7:38 PM

Priests aren’t supposed to lie. Living ones, anyway…

JetBoy on August 8, 2013 at 5:03 PM

They are also not supposed to seek glory in this life.
I believe.

katy the mean old lady on August 8, 2013 at 7:41 PM

Barred? I doubt that. Do you have a link? Only reason would be for a security issue. Boston PD was first on the scene and I don’t think they would bar a priest with ID.

katy the mean old lady on August 8, 2013 at 7:38 PM

Here ya go…

“Writing in the Wall Street Journal, Jennifer Graham tells me something that I hadn’t heard about Boston Marathon bombing. As dozens of victims were sprawled across Boylston Street, many of them in danger of death, Catholic priests came running to the scene—and were turned away.

Doctors and nurses were welcome at the bombing scene. Firefighters and police officers were welcome. But Catholic priests, who might have offered the solace of the sacraments, were not….”

http://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/the-city-gates.cfm?id=561

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 8:11 PM

Hebrews 13:2:

“Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.”

.
“Entertainment” and hospitality aren’t the only interactions people have had with angels, “unawares”.

What ‘Bronco posted earlier:

For those who believe in God, no explanation is necessary. For those who do not believe in God, no explanation is possible.
— The Song of Bernadette

PackerBronco on August 8, 2013 at 6:43 PM

listens2glenn on August 8, 2013 at 8:26 PM

BobMbx on August 8, 2013 at 6:20 PM

The Bible also says this…

“So they went out and preached, bidding men repent; 13 they cast out many devils, and many who were sick they anointed with oil, and healed them…” – Mark 6:13

http://www.newadvent.org/bible/mar006.htm#vrs13

“The text of St. James reads: “Is any man sick among you? Let him bring in the priests of the Church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. And the prayer of faith shall save [sosei] the sick man: and the Lord shall raise him up [egerei]: and if he be in sins, they shall be forgiven him.” – James 5:14-15

http://www.newadvent.org/bible/jam005.htm#vrs14

Text source on the teaching…for those interested.
http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05716a.htm

This is how Catholics view the sacrament…Protestants see things differently

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 8:32 PM

Catholic Priests often carry a kit for emergencies like this and stop to render spiritual aid to the people and anoint an injured catholic…lately they have been barred (as in the Boston Bombing) from performing this vital sacrament.

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 4:56 PM

.
Why would any sacrament performed by a human be vital?

(serious question)

DarkCurrent on August 8, 2013 at 5:05 PM

.
( This isn’t just to DarkCurrent, it’s to all of us )
.
Define “vital”.

The single most “vital” sacrament ever performed was purported by a ‘real, live man’ who was more pure than the wind driven snow, and offered himself as a sacrafice for all of us not-so-pure people.

It was necessary for a pure, sin-free man to do this, to restore
us to a relationship with God, because our forefather Adam caused all of his posterity to be separated from God.

listens2glenn on August 8, 2013 at 9:14 PM

This is how Catholics view the sacrament…Protestants see things differently…

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 8:32 PM

.
Well ….. nobody’s perfect.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (except me)

listens2glenn on August 8, 2013 at 9:17 PM

God intervenes in this world. He did with me, mine is first account:

http://www.charismaticsandiego.com/testimonies.htm

theCork on August 9, 2013 at 12:06 AM

The priest has been identified.
His name is George Bailey of Bedford Falls.

NeoKong on August 8, 2013 at 5:19 PM

Clarence!

Every time a bell rings, an angel gets his wings.

Incidentally, the little girl (Zuzu) was played by Carolyn Grimes. I met her in a bookstore in Newburyport, MA, as she was signing autographs. She was as wonderful as a middle-aged adult as she was as a child with Jimmy Stewart.

thejackal on August 9, 2013 at 12:54 AM

We shouldn’t be so amazed when miracles happen.

Axion on August 9, 2013 at 1:45 AM

We shouldn’t be so amazed when miracles happen.

Axion on August 9, 2013 at 1:45 AM

Indeed. But yet, each and every time they occur it is beyond awesome.

Several years ago I started to write a book about, essentially, ‘how to find miracles.’ Anyone can do it; that is, find them.

I had written all but the first sentence of the Prelude as well as the first chapter. I could not find the opening sentence which would convey the purpose of my book. After days of reflection I prayed for help. I had the second sentence in mind, just could not find the first.

Literally a moment after my prayer the first sentence was ‘presented’. It was this, in God’s words, not mine:

Miracles abound and surround.

My already written second sentence was:

Often they occur without recognition.

Perhaps I’ll finish the book one day.

May God send blessings all ’round.

Opinionator on August 9, 2013 at 3:31 AM

This is how Catholics view the sacrament…Protestants see things differently…

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 8:32 PM

Your own link uses the word “presbyters” in quoting James 5:14–correctly I might add–why you substituted “priests” confuses me.

Surely you wouldn’t say “Now, his ‘priest’ son was in the field” when quoting Luke 15:25 or “one by one, beginning at the ‘priestest'” when quoting John 8:9, or certainly not “the priest women” when quoting 1 Timothy 5:2–SURELY you correctly use the word “elder” (or eldest in the case of John) in each of these passages. ;)

Auralae on August 9, 2013 at 4:07 AM

Within the covers of the Bible are the answers for all the problems men face.

– Ronald Reagan My take.

kingsjester on August 9, 2013 at 6:42 AM

This is how Catholics view the sacrament…Protestants see things differently…

workingclass artist on August 8, 2013 at 8:32 PM

Your own link uses the word “presbyters” in quoting James 5:14–correctly I might add–why you substituted “priests” confuses me.

Surely you wouldn’t say “Now, his ‘priest’ son was in the field” when quoting Luke 15:25 or “one by one, beginning at the ‘priestest’” when quoting John 8:9, or certainly not “the priest women” when quoting 1 Timothy 5:2–SURELY you correctly use the word “elder” (or eldest in the case of John) in each of these passages. ;)

Auralae on August 9, 2013 at 4:07 AM

Here is the source from which I quoted…not substituted. The explanation is in bold.

“The text of St. James reads: “Is any man sick among you? Let him bring in the priests of the Church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord. And the prayer of faith shall save [sosei] the sick man: and the Lord shall raise him up [egerei]: and if he be in sins, they shall be forgiven him.” It is not seriously disputed that there is question here of those who are physically ill, and of them alone; and that the sickness is supposed to be grave is conveyed by the word kamnonta and by the injunction to have the priests called in; presumably the sick person cannot go to them. That by “the priests of the church” are meant the hierarchical clergy, and not merely elders in the sense of those of mature age, is also abundantly clear. The expression tous presbyterous, even if used alone, would naturally admit no other meaning, in accordance with the usage of the Acts, Pastoral Epistles, and 1 Peter 5; but the addition of tes ekklesias excludes the possibility of doubt (cf. Acts 20:17). The priests are to pray over the sick man, anointing him with oil.

Here we have the physical elements necessary to constitute a sacrament in the strict sense: oil as remote matter, like water in baptism; the anointing as proximate matter, like immersion or infusion in baptism; and the accompanying prayer as form. This rite will therefore be a true sacrament if it has the sanction of Christ’s authority, and is intended by its own operation to confer grace on the sick person, to work for his spiritual benefit. But the words “in the name of the Lord” here mean “by the power and authority of Christ”, which is the same as to say that St. James clearly implies the Divine institution of the rite he enjoins. To take these words as referring to a mere invocation of Christ’s name–which is the only alternative interpretation–would be to see in them a needless and confusing repetition of the injunction “let them pray over him”. But is this rite recommended by St. James as an operative sign of grace? It may be admitted that the words “the prayer of faith shall save the sick man; and the Lord shall raise him up”, taken by themselves and apart from the context, might possibly be applied to mere bodily healing; but the words that follow, “and if he be in sins, they shall be forgiven him”, speak expressly of a spiritual effect involving the bestowal of grace.

This being so, and it being further assumed that the remission of sins is given by St. James as an effect of the prayer-unction, nothing is more reasonable than to hold that St. James is thinking of spiritual as well as of bodily effects when he speaks of the sick man being “saved” and “raised up”.

It cannot be denied that in accordance with New Testament usage the words in question (especially the first) are capable of conveying this twofold meaning, and it is much more natural in the present context to suppose that they do convey it. A few verses further on the predominating spiritual and eschatological connotation of “saving” in St. James’s mind emerges clearly in the expression, “shall save his soul from death” (v, 20), and without necessarily excluding a reference to deliverance from bodily death in verse 15, we are certainly justified in including in that verse a reference to the saving of the soul. Moreover, the Apostle could not, surely, have meant to teach or imply that every sick Christian who was anointed would be cured of his sickness and saved from bodily death; yet the unction is clearly enjoined as a permanent institution in the Church for all the sick faithful, and the saving and raising up are represented absolutely as being the normal, if not infallible, effect of its use…”

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05716a.htm

workingclass artist on August 9, 2013 at 6:49 AM

kingsjester on August 9, 2013 at 6:42 AM

My take: grow the beard back so your Grinch grimace is better concealed

DarkCurrent on August 9, 2013 at 5:56 PM

We shouldn’t be so amazed when miracles happen.

Axion on August 9, 2013 at 1:45 AM

Here here. And also suspend all skepticism when confronted with flimsy accounts of supposed miracles that accord with any religion we were brought up with.

DarkCurrent on August 9, 2013 at 6:05 PM