Test scores for NYC students drop dramatically

posted at 3:51 pm on August 8, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

New York City officials are on the defensive today after test scores from public schools plummeted under new standards for achievement.  The city adopted the controversial Common Core curriculum and testing, and NYC was expected to be a test case for its implementation.  After going from bad to worse on achievement, though, parents may demand even more change:

The number of New York students passing state reading and math exams dropped drastically this year, education officials reported on Wednesday, unsettling parents, principals and teachers and posing new challenges to a national effort to toughen academic standards.

New York City, 26 percent of students in third through eighth grade passed the tests in English, and 30 percent passed in math, according to the New York State Education Department.

The exams were some of the first in the nation to be aligned with a more rigorous set of standards known as the Common Core, which emphasize deep analysis and creative problem-solving over short answers and memorization. Last year, under an easier test, 47 percent of city students passed in English, and 60 percent in math.

City and state officials spent months trying to steel the public for the grim figures.

But when the results were released, many educators responded with shock that their students measured up so poorly against the new yardsticks of achievement.

Common Core has been pushed by the Obama administration as one of the central programs in its policy, and the White House has had a lot of success in getting states to adopt it.  Only five states so far have yet to embrace Common Core, with New York and Kentucky two of the earliest states to get on board.  Kentucky took its first tests last year under the new curriculum, and experienced a similar drop in performance:

Kentucky’s higher academic standards took an expected toll on statewide reading and math proficiency rates when the state released its first results under its new “Unbridled Learning” testing system Friday.

State data showed that 48 percent of elementary students, 47 percent of middle-schoolers and 52 percent of high school students scored proficient or better in reading. By contrast, the rates last year were 76, 70 and 66 percent, respectively.

Math proficiency came in at 40 percent at the elementary school level, 41 percent at middle schools and 40 percent at high schools, figures that were also lower than last year, according to the Kentucky Department of Education data.

The question here is what has been measured in the past and now.  One can argue that the introduction of Common Core hurt achievement, or that previous measurements under other curricula produced test scores that overestimated proficiency.  Part of the problem in resolving the question will be the more subjective nature of the complex Common Core test, which might distort the results.  But the common link between the two is that under any measure, public schools are failing at educating students to proficiency in basic subject matter such as language and math.

The Week’s Jeb Golinkin underscores that consistent result:

The passage rate among the same group under the previous standard last year was closer to 50 percent in both subjects… as if having half of our kids not failing to keep up with the utterly unremarkable standard might have been acceptable. At best, the new statistics might be read as saying that we are only completely failing seven out of 10 of our young people.

The failure numbers are, in some sense, less revealing than what we learn about the adults teaching these students. One sentence sums it up: “Some educators were taken aback by the steep decline and said they worried the figures would rattle the confidence of students and teachers.”

Rattle the confidence of the students and the teachers? Oh. Yes. That’s definitely what we should be worried about right now, particularly the teachers’ confidence. Maybe if we tell everyone they are doing a bang-up job, the parents and teachers will sleep more soundly at night and our children will magically learn the basic skills they need to succeed in our modern economy.

I have no doubt about the loyalty and the meaningful effort our educators put in every day. But, with all due respect, the notion that we should care about their confidence is lunacy. Numbers can lie, but only on the margins. Hard work, charisma, creativity… these are attributes that go a long way. But they are useless without the basic foundation of reading and math skills that these tests are designed to measure.

Make no mistake. Our system of public education is completely and totally broken. And every change, whether we are talking about school vouchers (yes, even those, teachers unions), performance incentives (that push success and punish failure among our educators), 10-hour schooldays, the elimination of summer breaks… every single tool we can bring to give young people a chance to succeed, none of it should be off the table.

I haven’t immersed myself in the debate over Common Core; the Boss Emeritus has, and continues to push against its use, criticizing leaders in both parties for backing it.  So far, the results look singularly unimpressive.  Even if this first year of testing under the new curriculum succeeded in establishing a more honest assessment of actual performance by public schools — and even that much hasn’t been established yet — Jeb’s point is even more germane.  These schools need to bring students to proficient level now, not ten years down the road.  How many children will lose out while this ramps up to speed, assuming it ever does?  Nothing from the results in New York or Kentucky suggest that this is moving the ball forward at all.

Instead, they prove that federal control over education isn’t helping our children, and neither are the monopolies on primary education enjoyed by public-school systems.  It’s long past time to allow parents to exercise choice with their education funding and create competition for students among schools that will have an incentive to educate children rather than please unions and politicians.


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Home School…

PatriotRider on August 8, 2013 at 3:54 PM

…well!…this proves we need Anthony Weiner as Mayor!…the left

KOOLAID2 on August 8, 2013 at 3:55 PM

The requirements are too new for the schools to know how to game the system yet.

Give them time.

portlandon on August 8, 2013 at 3:56 PM

Leftist NYC hero Albert Shanker is looking up and smiling.

Del Dolemonte on August 8, 2013 at 3:56 PM

These tests are racist

faraway on August 8, 2013 at 3:57 PM

They’re trying to catch up to Detroit.

Oldnuke on August 8, 2013 at 3:57 PM

Maybe these kids are suffering from the lack of nicotene and sugar due to Bloomberg’s bans.

Reno_Dave on August 8, 2013 at 3:58 PM

Kentucky scored much better than New York City in the older and new standards… It is all about the demographics and nature… You simply cannot win against nature no matter how much liberals wish it to be otherwise…

mnjg on August 8, 2013 at 3:59 PM

Dum and Dummer…

albill on August 8, 2013 at 4:01 PM

Oops. Nicotine.

Reno_Dave on August 8, 2013 at 4:01 PM

When you get unsatisfactory results, always change the scoring system. This isn’t a hard concept. Y’know, if we just eliminated grades or measuring accomplishment altogether, I think we’d easily reach our national goal. No child left behind.

a capella on August 8, 2013 at 4:05 PM

New York results STATEWIDE were something like 31%. So NYC was not to far off state average.
In my area, the Rochester City Schools weighted in at a whopping 5%.

My local school district was somewhat better at about 70%.

Jabberwock on August 8, 2013 at 4:07 PM

The exams were some of the first in the nation to be aligned with a more rigorous set of standards known as the Common Core, which emphasize deep analysis

You can’t analyse something ON ANY LEVEL if you are incapable of reading the problem.

creative problem-solving over short answers

All the long, creative answers in the world won’t make 2+2=5.

Resist We Much on August 8, 2013 at 4:08 PM

But azzhole Bloomberg wants slower elevators, so you’d walk.

Leading from behind

Schadenfreude on August 8, 2013 at 4:10 PM

If Common Core is supported by the AFT/NEA, it cannot be good for students, only teachers.
As Al Shanker used to say (when he was the leader of the AFT):
When students pay union dues, I’ll represent them.

Another Drew on August 8, 2013 at 4:16 PM

if we just eliminated grades or measuring accomplishment altogether

Probably why we can’t see Dear Leaders transcripts….
There are no grades there.

Another Drew on August 8, 2013 at 4:18 PM

Home School…

PatriotRider on August 8, 2013 at 3:54 PM

What makes you think their homes are any better than their schools?

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 8, 2013 at 4:19 PM

Common Core is just another excuse for failure due to poor work habits.

Bilingual education: fail.
Whole Math, Whole Reading: fail.
Common Core: developing fail.

I taught college kids and they cannot read, write or spell. The do know that Jefferson owned slaves and conservatives are evil.

PattyJ on August 8, 2013 at 4:20 PM

Jeantel is the new norm.

Learn Jeantelean…and Austrian, racists.

Schadenfreude on August 8, 2013 at 4:21 PM

I taught college kids and they cannot read, write or spell. The do know that Jefferson owned slaves and conservatives are evil.

PattyJ on August 8, 2013 at 4:20 PM

You just proved that Bill Ayers’ efforts over the past 40 years have succeeded.

Rixon on August 8, 2013 at 4:25 PM

like GM did years ago, schools districts are now just benefit delivery operations controlled by unions

privatize schools and the problems go away, or get locked out and end up in prison where they typically end up under today’s model anyway

DanMan on August 8, 2013 at 4:26 PM

PattyJ on August 8, 2013 at 4:20 PM

Soon they’ll know that “citizen” and “brown bag” are forbidden terms in Seattle.

Also, that this is “not racist, just drug related” but they gave the white kid a well-deserved black eye.

This happened during the Zimmerman case wrap-up and not a peep on TV or otherwise, until now.

Schadenfreude on August 8, 2013 at 4:27 PM

That’s what you get in a city run by Republicans. Oh, wait…

Ward Cleaver on August 8, 2013 at 4:30 PM

Home School…

PatriotRider on August 8, 2013 at 3:54 PM

Thread winner, and on the first comment.

beatcanvas on August 8, 2013 at 4:31 PM

The requirements are too new for the schools to know how to game the system yet.

Give them time.

portlandon on August 8, 2013 at 3:56 PM

Common Core is absolutely rotten to the core. Think of the Fairness Doctrine (the one concerning income equality, not broadcasting content) applied to education. In order to help the disadvantaged students all other students are dumbed down. No joke, that is the aim of Common Core. From the Boss Emeritus:

There’s no better illustration of Common Core’s duplicitous talk of higher standards than to start with its math “reforms.” While Common Core promoters assert their standards are “internationally benchmarked,” independent members of the expert panel in charge of validating the standards refute the claim. Panel member Dr. Sandra Stotsky of the University of Arkansas reported, “No material was ever provided to the Validation Committee or to the public on the specific college readiness expectations of other leading nations in mathematics” or other subjects.

NotCoach on August 8, 2013 at 4:34 PM

In 20 years, the movie Idiocracy will be thought of as a documentary.

Ward Cleaver on August 8, 2013 at 4:35 PM

That’s what you get in a city run by Republicans. Oh, wait…

Ward Cleaver on August 8, 2013 at 4:30 PM

To be fair, the State rammed this down the district’s throat.
Cities and towns had very little choice in the matter.
“You want state aid ? Do it !”

In my town, both Teachers and Administration think little of this whole “common-core” approach.

Jabberwock on August 8, 2013 at 4:36 PM

Clearly the students are still not dumb enough. Forward !!!

VorDaj on August 8, 2013 at 4:38 PM

Welcome to Sharptonville and Rangeltown.

FlaMurph on August 8, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Jeantel is the new norm.

Learn Jeantelean…and Austrian, racists.

Schadenfreude on August 8, 2013 at 4:21 PM

Years ago, conservative talk show host David Gold had a show here in Dallas, right after the end of the Fairness Doctrine, when talk radio was first taking off. Some guy called in one time and said you weren’t a real American until you’d spent time in jail. I just shook my head then.

Now that looks like where we’re headed, thanks to the education system. A country full of losers.

Ward Cleaver on August 8, 2013 at 4:39 PM

In 20 years, the movie Idiocracy will be thought of as a documentary.

Ward Cleaver on August 8, 2013 at 4:35 PM

As will Alice in Wonderland and The Planet of the Apes and The Twilight Zone.

VorDaj on August 8, 2013 at 4:40 PM

we need more $chool funding!!! if you oppose more $chool funding, then you hate America and children!!!

burserker on August 8, 2013 at 4:46 PM

Bet they can all spell “welfare” and “food stamps” and “free Obamaphone” correctly…

albill on August 8, 2013 at 4:49 PM

NYC – “Detroit on the Hudson”

Midas on August 8, 2013 at 4:53 PM

Bet they can all spell “welfare” and “food stamps” and “free Obamaphone” correctly…

albill on August 8, 2013 at 4:49 PM

LOL, I’ll take that bet! :)

Midas on August 8, 2013 at 4:53 PM

which emphasize deep analysis and creative problem-solving over short answers and memorization.

You can’t build a mansion without the proper foundation. Funny how those of us who learned the old out of favor ways were able to do deep analysis and problem solve but those who don’t have the foundation are falling way short.

chemman on August 8, 2013 at 4:58 PM

Test scores for NYC students drop dramatically

Teachers set to vote on blaming global warming, climate change, Snowden or Bush; Bush favored to win.

BobMbx on August 8, 2013 at 4:58 PM

The number of New York students passing state reading and math exams dropped drastically this year,

That’s because they’ve learned from their Indonesian, 84 IQ, Dog-Eating idol that “and” means “division or a ratio” (“profit AND earnings ratios”) and that “on the precipice” carries a positive connotation (“e are on the precipice of an achievement”).

Not much you can do when you think intelligence is embodied in a moron who couldn’t pass a standard high school equivalency exam and makes idiotic mistakes that no normal American 8 year old would make.

“But he was Precedent of the Hah-vahd Lawn Review!!” Not bad for a nearly illiterate douchebag. Affirmative action. You’ve got to love it.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on August 8, 2013 at 4:59 PM

NotCoach on August 8, 2013 at 4:34 PM

Don’t worry the rest of the world is catching up (down) with us. I had a chat with a missionary our little church helps sponsor to Taiwan. He has been teaching English at a village grammar school. He said a couple of years ago the Taiwanese educational establishment notified all schools that the lowest grade a student could receive is a “B.”

chemman on August 8, 2013 at 5:04 PM

They should rename it The Commie Core Curriculum.

I’ve seen some exposés on the content — shocking.

Of all the mind-boggling examples I’ve seen from the Common Core is a video (no way I could track it down now, but it’s on YouTube somewhere) showing example of how they teach English — and it wasn’t about language skills, per se, but rather how to manipulate the reader with victimology and underhanded emotional tricks. Seriously. It also seemed to emphasize rebelling against parental influence.

The examples of English-language instruction were something like this (not a direct quote — I don’t remember the details precisely):

“Now students, don’t use passive language when constructing sentences. Use active verbs, and also engage with the reader or listener. So instead of saying

“Going to church is no fun,”

it’d be better to say

“I want to play outside instead of going to church,”

but best of all would be to say,

“Mom, I will be traumatized forever and eternally resentful of you and possibly become a serial killer if you force me into that church one more time!”

Seriously. Not quite that overt, but close. It seems that they use purported lessons about vocabulary to instead teach the children to whine and use passive-aggressive threats.

They want your children, mind and soul. Make no mistake about it.

Zombie on August 8, 2013 at 5:04 PM

we need more $chool funding!!! if you oppose more $chool funding, then you hate America and children!!!

burserker on August 8, 2013 at 4:46 PM

guaranteed this will be a card they play.

Of course NO Republican will stand up and blast the hell
out of them….just crumble in the corner, and give more funding…

ToddPA on August 8, 2013 at 5:05 PM

Puzzle of our time:

How to get dumb educators to create smart students.

Rich H on August 8, 2013 at 5:05 PM

Wayfare, foot tamps and obamafone–How did I do? Pass/ fail

rjoco1 on August 8, 2013 at 5:05 PM

As Al Shanker used to say (when he was the leader of the AFT):

When students pay union dues, I’ll represent them.

Another Drew on August 8, 2013 at 4:16 PM

Al was a piece of work. And many on the Left at the time called him a racist, as well as calling him a war-monger because he supported Lyndon Johnson’s Vietnam debacle.

Del Dolemonte on August 8, 2013 at 5:07 PM

….unexpectedly…..

Seriously, given how far standards have dropped since the 70s…Regents exams….

ProfShadow on August 8, 2013 at 5:11 PM

It’s long past time to allow parents to exercise choice with their education funding and create competition for students among schools that will have an incentive to educate children rather than please unions and politicians.

The money quote.
Literally.

Eliminate all government control above the local level.
If you want some kind of qualification standards, make them an “add on” like the Bar Exams, but only to provide information to high school or college admission committees and to employers, not a guild license (think: Consumer Reports, Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval, Underwriter’s Laboratory – assuming all of those are still legit).

In time, some standards will become respected and sought after, while others will be ignored, based on actual merit. If a school consistently turns out students who can’t satisfy any reputable standard, then it’s up to the school board and the parents to deal with it, no one else.

Feds and states exercise control because they pass out funds based on adherence to their dictates, basically by confiscating money from some school districts to send to others.

Private foundations should take over that role, soliciting donations from people who want to redress the “unfair” conditions that result from uneven demographics.
(I’m a big fan of “put your money where your mouth is” in politics as well as business.)

However, it has been shown over and over again that the prime determinant of educational success is not money, but desire; much more success can be achieved by uniting teachers and parents in the endeavor to reach actual educational objectives, rather than engaging in “cause of the year” social engineering.

Create other institution to do the latter, and leave the schools alone.
(Start by eliminating all of the perverse government incentives to break up families and destroy personal initiative.)

AesopFan on August 8, 2013 at 5:11 PM

my hunch is that the state has been watering down their test standards for the last several years to give an appearance of ‘improvement’. And now they’ve been caught

go to the main nyt article and look at the chart…’improvements’ then crash.

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/08/08/nyregion/test-scores-drop-under-tougher-standards.html?ref=nyregion

like i say, they got caught with their pants down.

The huge issue that no good Socialist or Republican will dare address is individual differences in school performance. The correct way of dealing with a broad range of abilities is to teach children on something like a ‘tract’ system.

judging everyone by one standard is cruel…to teachers, parents And children.

Also, please look at the actual test examples…i will post then after this…look at the math and the english comphrension sections.

Now i have no idea what i knew in 4th grade, or 8th for that matter…but but i daresay the math test looks challenging. This is great for average and high performing students. But the goals of the low performing student should be much more modest…arithmetic (understanding financial interest payments, mortgages…and this should be done at a very practical level)

this is mostly a waste of time…driven by an obsessional leftist idea of making everyone the same.

r keller on August 8, 2013 at 5:13 PM

This is actually very interesting to me. In Pennsylvania, they adopted the Common Core last year and changed the tests this year. For the first time my daughter (10th grade) failed to achieve the “advanced” level in reading/writing. (She did in math, science, and social studies.) This doesn’t concern me because I know she is not an advanced level reader or writer, but the previous state tests always showed her to be. When I brought up her scores with her last night, she complained about the test being much harder than the old tests and with a lot more essay-type questions on “things that don’t have anything to do with English.” She said the teachers warned students that they could not just do a bunch of flash-card drills to study for these tests.

I have not delved deeply into what the Common Core curricular standards are, as it isn’t going to affect my kids. But it does appear that it is going to be much harder to just “teach to the test” as many teachers, students, and parents complain has been dine under No Child Left Behind. If so, that is a good thing.

I suspect these new tests probably are doing a better job of determining what kids have actually learned, and we should all be concerned about that given these low scores.

rockmom on August 8, 2013 at 5:17 PM

It’s so hard to study on a meager calorie diet and small soft drinks.

NYC and the left wants them to grow up to be lean mean non-thinking machines.

Don L on August 8, 2013 at 5:18 PM

Total school choice. Let the parents be the customers of the education product.

If teachers are rattled by these test scores, imagine how stressed they’ll be when they actually have to woo parents to buy their services.

PackerBronco on August 8, 2013 at 5:22 PM

The concept of ‘hey, there are certain things that all American kids should know by the time they finish X grade’ isn’t a bad one. It could keep teachers focused on teaching instead of ‘Mmm mmm mmm, Barack Hussein Obama’ indoctrinating. Detractors accuse teachers of ‘teaching to the test’ like that’s some sort of a bad thing…if the standards require kids to know X, Y, and Z, then by all means teach X, Y, and Z. Just as long as X is not the exact X question on the actual test.

But the implementation depends on an honest group of independently-minded educators determining exactly what is the core which is to be made common. Since there currently is no such thing, the common core as it is known today is an abject failure.

Over on Twitchy I saw an example of a 3rd grade math test question that looked more like something I remember from taking the SAT. Rigorous standards are one thing, but they need to be appropriate to the age of the students.

James on August 8, 2013 at 5:23 PM

Supporting school choice is an obvious answer for GOP. Will it cost some money yes, but less than what we are paying now. It will also produce better results and will cut the money pump for the Democratic party that is the public school teacher unions.

Plus it is a wonderful wedge issue that speaks to middle, low and poor families who would like to see their children get a better education than what they are getting now. The campaign ads almost wrote themselves. Republicans want education emancipation and the Democrats want to keep your children enslaved to failing schools OR White liberals send their kids to wealthy private schools, while your children are forced to go to failing public schools.

Etc…there are so many ways to use this if the GOP had any brains and guts at all.

William Eaton on August 8, 2013 at 5:26 PM

which emphasize deep analysis and creative problem-solving over short answers and memorization.

You can’t build a mansion without the proper foundation. Funny how those of us who learned the old out of favor ways were able to do deep analysis and problem solve but those who don’t have the foundation are falling way short.

chemman on August 8, 2013 at 4:58 PM

I’m old-fashioned and not an “expert” (so I will be derided by proggies), but it always seemed to me the brain is like a muscle that must be exercised and built up properly to develop. Those who spurn “short answers and memorization” are like banner ads that promise weight loss and muscle growth without exercise.

These days, everyone wants a gold medal, but no one wants to sweat.

Marcola on August 8, 2013 at 5:36 PM

Maybe these kids are suffering from the lack of nicotene and sugar due to Bloomberg’s bans.

Reno_Dave on August 8, 2013 at 3:58 PM

More likely lack of adequate calories because of Moochelle’s idiotic interference in school lunch programs.

slickwillie2001 on August 8, 2013 at 5:43 PM

“Home school” is a serious comment.

Home schoolers in NY are required to take the same state exams. Wouldn’t you like to see those scores?

Are they compiled and then hidden in a file drawer somewhere?

marybel on August 8, 2013 at 5:44 PM

And this – read to the end, and send the hypocrites to Hades.

Schadenfreude on August 8, 2013 at 5:45 PM

Meanwhile

Schadenfreude on August 8, 2013 at 5:45 PM

With any change in testing, the scores will change. I would say that the test results do not yet show any change in the educational level of the students, only the measurement of it.

Many people were complaining prior to these tests that the tests were starting ahead of the curriculum being fully enacted–in other words, kids were being tested on things they hadn’t been taught yet.

None of that is to say whether CC is an improvement or not over the prior testing or curriculum. I just says that if you change the tests and the criteria, you will get different results.

Apparently also, the results match more closely New York’s scores on the NAEP testing–which suggests at least some confirmation of the accuracy of the tests.

It may be that the new tests are more accurate than the old.

HakerA on August 8, 2013 at 6:00 PM

Test scores for NYC students drop dramatically

Sugar and salt deprivation.

MaiDee on August 8, 2013 at 6:07 PM

After going from bad to worse on achievement

this is a feature of common core not a bug. Anything to dumb down the population so our Masters can rule without opposition

unseen on August 8, 2013 at 6:25 PM

Marcola on August 8, 2013 at 5:36 PM

well put

unseen on August 8, 2013 at 6:27 PM

The exams were some of the first in the nation to be aligned with a more rigorous set of standards known as the Common Core, which emphasize deep analysis and creative problem-solving over short answers and memorization. Last year, under an easier test, 47 percent of city students passed in English, and 60 percent in math.

I’m somewhat divided over which is a better way of testing. Kids need to be taught to think logically, and not just repeat back what they have heard without critical thinking. This is one skill that is taught in high school geometry (not only calculation of areas and volumes, but deductive reasoning to prove why two line lengths or angles are equal or proportional), and this skill is also tested on the SAT, used by colleges for admission standards.

It’s also important for a student to express him/herself in writing, using good grammar and sentence structure to develop thoughts in English.

However, there is a danger if essay questions are used to test the ability of a student to write well, if the essay is judged on the opinion being expressed instead of the logical arguments the student uses to support his/her ideas, with an intent to give better grades to students whose opinions agree with those of the testers.

Perhaps a multiple-choice test, similar to the SAT Reading and Writing sections would be fairer, where a student is asked to choose the best way of expressing a certain fact or opinion logically, regardless of whether the student agrees with it.

If such tests are used to evaluate students in third through eighth grades, the test format could be similar to the SAT, but the questions and vocabulary used in the test could be reduced to that expected of a child at each grade level.

Steve Z on August 8, 2013 at 6:28 PM

Maybe if we tell everyone they are doing a bang-up job, the parents and teachers will sleep more soundly at night and our children will magically learn the basic skills they need to succeed in our modern economy.

This is the “common core” reason why schools are failing to educate. Kids must feel good about themselves. Teachers must feel good about themselves. We can’t have teacher pay based on student outcome-the teachers would feel bad. We can’t use red pen to mark papers-the kids would feel bad. We can’t put an “X” next to a wrong answer-the kids would feel bad.
Administrators spend time, money and resources presenting feel good assemblies for the kids.
If school districts just spend more time on the basics, the students would learn.

hopeful on August 8, 2013 at 6:36 PM

SO WHAT THE HELL ARE PRIVATE SCHOOLS DOING “DIFFERENTLY”?

OR ARE THE ELITE EDUCATIORS GOING TO RE-INVENT THE FREAKING WHEEL AGAIN?

GarandFan on August 8, 2013 at 7:08 PM

Bet they can all spell “welfare” and “food stamps” and “free Obamaphone” correctly…

albill on August 8, 2013 at 4:49 PM

LOL, I’ll take that bet! :)

Midas on August 8, 2013 at 4:53 PM

Ya – just cuz they know how to get them doesn’t mean they know how to spell them correctly.
In fact I’d guess an inability to spell it correctly enhances your chances of getting the handouts…

dentarthurdent on August 8, 2013 at 8:54 PM

All this talk of concepts and communication and essays I fear means that they will be taught to read and write by espousing progressive philosophy, as Zombie said. It’s true of the tests they take to get into college. I tutored kids for the English SAT and all the essay prompts and “correct” answers were liberal. I told the kids, who were upset at the liberalism, to just give them what they wanted.

PattyJ on August 8, 2013 at 9:26 PM

Home School…

PatriotRider on August 8, 2013 at 3:54 PM

Thread winner, and on the first comment.

beatcanvas on August 8, 2013 at 4:31 PM

No. This will not work. Homeschooling curriculum is being aligned to CCSS. David Coleman, the chief architect of CCSS is now head of the College Board which writes the SAT. It will be aligned to CCSS. Homeschoolers (and private schooled kids) who aren’t privy to CCSS will not test well.

Read this about David Coleman. BTW, he’s “the one” who has designed this for the majority of American children. His teaching experience? One summer in camp teaching children:

http://www.missourieducationwatchdog.com/2013/06/straight-from-david-colemans-mouth.html

manateespirit on August 8, 2013 at 9:39 PM

This is actually very interesting to me. In Pennsylvania, they adopted the Common Core last year and changed the tests this year. For the first time my daughter (10th grade) failed to achieve the “advanced” level in reading/writing. (She did in math, science, and social studies.) This doesn’t concern me because I know she is not an advanced level reader or writer, but the previous state tests always showed her to be. When I brought up her scores with her last night, she complained about the test being much harder than the old tests and with a lot more essay-type questions on “things that don’t have anything to do with English.” She said the teachers warned students that they could not just do a bunch of flash-card drills to study for these tests.

I have not delved deeply into what the Common Core curricular standards are, as it isn’t going to affect my kids. But it does appear that it is going to be much harder to just “teach to the test” as many teachers, students, and parents complain has been dine under No Child Left Behind. If so, that is a good thing.

I suspect these new tests probably are doing a better job of determining what kids have actually learned, and we should all be concerned about that given these low scores.

rockmom on August 8, 2013 at 5:17 PM

Rockmom, CCSS has been described as NCLB on steroids. The reason your child didn’t do as well may have more to do with the fact that the assessments (now copyrighted by private organizations) were not ready and so what your child is learning is not aligned to the assessments. How could she do well?

This is a travesty. This is NOT a good thing. CCSS takes away any semblance of local control and has given it to private organizations funded by the DOEd. Think of it as an educational Solyndra model. (And you know how that turned out).

The reason her essays don’t have “anything to do with English” is the cross curriculum mandated via CCSS. Think social justice issues contained in a questionnaire. Look at this economics paper from a community college and figure out how much has to do with economics vs an agenda:

http://www.missourieducationwatchdog.com/2013/08/economics-assignment-questions.html

Your child’s assignment is probably not “harder”…it just contains whatever agenda is in vogue.

For further information on Common Core, go to http://www.truthinamericaneducation.com or better yet, go to http://nopacommoncore.com/

manateespirit on August 8, 2013 at 9:53 PM

When we keep making excuses like calling Ubonics another form of communication this is the result. Everyone wants to be payed without accountability. We must get back to the adage “don’t give me effort, give me results”

RdLake on August 8, 2013 at 10:39 PM

RdLake on August 8, 2013 at 10:39 PM

Duuude – you ole skooo….

dentarthurdent on August 9, 2013 at 12:28 AM

ALL the states, except a few, jumped on-board with Common Core BECAUSE OBAMA PROMISED “ADDITIONAL MONEY” to those states that would go with Common Core!!! NOW, they’re seeing what “a few extra bucks” is going to cost them!

DixT on August 9, 2013 at 12:16 PM