Passionate, rich public-school advocate peaces out of public schools with his kids

posted at 9:01 pm on August 7, 2013 by Mary Katharine Ham

He’s an actor. And activist. And, so brave. A bravactivist. Who high-tails it from the status quo he enables at the first sign his own children might have to suffer the crappy education the rest of the little people do.

A father of four (three daughters, aged seven, five and three, and a stepdaughter, 15), this summer he is moving his family from New York to Los Angeles, and the challenge of giving them a childhood that remotely resembles the one he enjoyed is about to get even harder.

Choosing a school has already presented a major moral dilemma. “Sending our kids in my family to private school was a big, big, big deal. And it was a giant family discussion. But it was a circular conversation, really, because ultimately we don’t have a choice. I mean, I pay for a private education and I’m trying to get the one that most matches the public education that I had, but that kind of progressive education no longer exists in the public system. It’s unfair.” Damon has campaigned against teachers’ pay being pegged to children’s test results: “So we agitate about those things, and try to change them, and try to change the policy, but you know, it’s a tough one.”

I, like Damon, am a product of public schools and very much value the education I got in them. It wasn’t always good, but I had parents who had resources and willingness to supplement at home, helping the three of us kids through the pedagogical dry spells that inevitably came in between occasional amazing teachers. Perhaps the more important part of the education was social. I met a lot of different people, with totally different family lives than mine, from a range of socioeconomic statuses (the rich were not well-represented as they went to the schools Damon’s kids will attend). And, along the way, I learned that the heartbreaking thing about bad public education that’s allowed to remain bad is that I’m not the person it hurts, because of the aforementioned resources and parents. It was my friends, without those supplements, that weren’t getting what they needed and deserved. It’s for that reason that I’ve been an advocate for educational reform through charter schools and choice. It is powerful to give a kid a ticket to a different environment, and it’s an incentive for public schools to work to keep students by serving them well.

The argument liberals and union activists often make against school choice is that it takes resources from public schools. Even when that’s not the case, as with the D.C. Opportunity Scholarship which earned matching additional funds for D.C.’s public schools, they make that argument. Suddenly the idea of “helping just one kid” is blasphemy. If you can’t change everything for every kid in public schools, it’s wrong to offer the chance at choice to a few of them. But, by the liberal logic, aren’t kids like Damon’s just as important a resource for public schools? Kids with involved parents who agitate for change? I sympathize with his desire to put his kids where he knows they’ll get a good education, but what better way to agitate for change than from within? That’s the advice union reps and liberals are always giving school-choice activists. Don’t abandon the system! Fix it! When it comes to his kids, though, Damon would rather peace out. It’s too bad most of the kids languishing in L.A.’s worst schools don’t have the resources to do the same. This is not an isolated hypocrisy. According to a 2007 Heritage Foundation survey, national politicians sent their kids to private school at a rate almost four times more often than the general public, many while actively blocking attempts to give low-income kids the same opportunity.

Jeb Bush, who’s a well-known advocate for education reform, tweaked Damon today:

Meanwhile, at an L.A. teachers union meeting, one new school official had a novel idea for teachers constantly advocating for more funding and less accountability, and generally looking more worried about politics and their own hides than kids:

The Los Angeles teachers union must combat public perceptions that it protects bad teachers and should help them improve with better training, a city school board member told union activists in a wide-ranging speech Sunday.

Monica Ratliff, a fifth-grade teacher who pulled off an upset win in May for the Los Angeles Board of Education, told more than 400 leaders of United Teachers Los Angeles that the public likes teachers but distrusts labor unions.

“People have a fair amount of affection for teachers,” said Ratliff, who drew a standing ovation of cheers and chants. “People have a fair amount of distrust of labor. … If we don’t recognize it, it will be our undoing.”

Sounds like someone Damon could help agitate within the public school system when he’s done dropping his kids off at the academy.

You may remember Damon’s advocacy for public schools from this Reason video in 2011:


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Nothing to see, just another liberal hypocrite. Move along.

Scotsman on August 7, 2013 at 9:06 PM

Wasn’t there a special ring in Hell reserved for the hypocrites?

OT: I’ve now had two VERY ANNOYING Amber alerts blare through my cell phone within the last hour. Thanks, California.

John the Libertarian on August 7, 2013 at 9:06 PM

Yeah, saw this on DRUDGE earlier today.

Just another elitist hypocite from the entainment industry (as if there aren’t enough).

What more is there to say?

listens2glenn on August 7, 2013 at 9:07 PM

Capital H Hypocrisy.

CW on August 7, 2013 at 9:09 PM

I, like Damon, am a product of public schools and very much value the education I got in them. It wasn’t always good, but I had parents who had resources and willingness to supplement at home, helping the three of us kids through the pedagogical dry spells that inevitably came in between occasional amazing teachers.

Mary Katharine Ham

.
I had the same “pedagogical dry spells that inevitably came in between occasional amazing teachers”, but I didn’t have the home environment that you did.

I’m jealous, but God bless your parents. We have need of more such parents, today.

listens2glenn on August 7, 2013 at 9:14 PM

Michelle Fields seems a little dopey. Maybe it’s the sing-songy, Valley-girl voice. Whatevs…she’s still kind of yummy.

BuckeyeSam on August 7, 2013 at 9:15 PM

I pay for a private education and I’m trying to get the one that most matches the public education that I had, but that kind of progressive education no longer exists in the public system. It’s unfair.

Oh, what complete F’in BS. Does this retard know that hundreds of thousands of adults the exact ages as he is ALSO went to public school at that time ? We all know that the public school system, while it may not be AS good as it may have been 25-30 years ago (due almost entirely to federal and / or state meddling in local education) the idea that there was some utopian “progressive” education system back then, but now it’s gone is absolutely ridiculous.

As if I could have LESS respect for Matt Damon, idiot savant.

deadrody on August 7, 2013 at 9:15 PM

Matt Damon: “MATT DAY-MON!!!”

Ukiah on August 7, 2013 at 9:19 PM

Hypocrisy is one of the top must requirements to be a liberal…

mnjg on August 7, 2013 at 9:20 PM

Why doesn’t he do like most Americans and move to a neighborhood where he can send his kids to public school? There are several other neighborhoods in our city, closer to our jobs, where we might have liked to live, but we went with the one we did because the schools were good. Most people can’t afford public schools, but they care about education so they make a sacrifice and live in a less central, less trendy neighborhood so they have access to good public schools.

bitsy on August 7, 2013 at 9:23 PM

What does it mean when Mr. Damon says the schools in California aren’t progress enough? I need some clarification.

Cindy Munford on August 7, 2013 at 9:23 PM

Anyone here suprised?

Bueller?

Bueller?

itsspideyman on August 7, 2013 at 9:26 PM

Magnet schools in LA are excellent but competitive to get into. There is one near his new house that is science/math oriented. But I doubt his kid is smart enough to be admitted.

He can whine all he want but he will send his kids to the same very expensive schools the other celebs send their kids to.

Someone in the other thread said that he may not want his kids photographed every day which would happen if they went to a public school. However, living in NYC, all his kids were photographed on the street every day.

Blake on August 7, 2013 at 9:26 PM

Damon?

Who’s that?

avagreen on August 7, 2013 at 9:27 PM

This fool. He’s one of my least liked hollyweirdos. Fool never seems to see the irony in nything he does. Advocates for public schools for my kids, but not his. Makes a movie about Classwarfare and the 1% where he plays the person hell never be yet he IS the 1%. I wonder if Neil Blomkamp chose this fool on purpose to expose the hypocrisy of these Hollywood hypocrites. He’s known to be weary of using Hollyweirdos in his movies.

jawkneemusic on August 7, 2013 at 9:28 PM

Was in the public schools from K-6.
In sixth grade the teachers went on strike for a large part of the year.
The next year the city we lived in was going to start bussing which for me meant a 45-60 minute bus trip each way, compared to a 15 minute walk each way each day, to the highest crime district in the city.

That’s when my folks put us in Catholic schools.

I’d like to thank the nuns and Jesuits who taught me from the seventh grade up through college.
The sister who taught math who yanked me out of a class and put me in an advanced one she set up.
The sister who helped my stuttering problem by making me speak publicly every week. I lecture to college students for a living.
The Jesuit priest who was there to talk to whenever you needed him.
I’d also like to thank my very Jewish PhD mentor and the very Catholic professor who drove me to first meet him when I was a college junior, and who was his old mentor. Friendships, both personal and professional, that have lasted to this day.

Bubba Redneck on August 7, 2013 at 9:29 PM

According to a 2007 Heritage Foundation survey, national politicians sent their kids to private school at a rate almost four times more often than the general public, many while actively blocking attempts to give low-income kids the same opportunity

.

You don’t get into Harvard with a public school diploma. UVA or William and Mary maybe but not the Ivy League! I don’t fault anybody for giving their kids the best education they can afford. My parents made huge sacrifices for the education of me and my three siblings. I am exceedingly grateful even though they discount the value of what they did.

But let’s not pretend that public education is what it needs to be. Not everybody is college-track material and yet the system says that they are. Where are the legitimate non-college career opportunities built into public school programs? We spend more time, resources, and effort on encouraging drop outs to get their GEDs than we do on helping the non-college group of students prepare for their careers.

Happy Nomad on August 7, 2013 at 9:30 PM

He’s probably pissed that they aren’t using Zinn’s book of historical anecdotes to teach history.

slickwillie2001 on August 7, 2013 at 9:30 PM

Damon sent his kids to Calhoun: http://www.calhoun.org/home

See, it calls itself “progressive” right on the website. :)

Blake on August 7, 2013 at 9:32 PM

Damon sent his kids to Calhoun: http://www.calhoun.org/home

See, it calls itself “progressive” right on the website. :)

Blake on August 7, 2013 at 9:32 PM

Child abuse.

jawkneemusic on August 7, 2013 at 9:35 PM

I know I’m counter to most folks, but I oppose vouchers. I can give you a one-word reason for my position: Madrasa.

Do you want to support Islamic teachings in your neighborhood? Remember that the Wahhabi sect runs most of the US mosques.

Wino on August 7, 2013 at 9:35 PM

If hypocrisy were a toxin he would be stone dead.

VorDaj on August 7, 2013 at 9:45 PM

I mean, I pay for a private education and I’m trying to get the one that most matches the public education that I had, but that kind of progressive education no longer exists in the public system. It’s unfair.”

LOL. Yes, those public schools in California are just too darn conservative! That’s the problem.

Who does this guy think he’s kidding? California public schools are all about the “progressive” agenda. It’s not the content of the curriculum that’s keeping Damon away, it’s the fact that California’s public schools are full of incompetent unionized teachers and illegal alien gang-bangers.

AZCoyote on August 7, 2013 at 9:47 PM

Ya know, when I first heard about the “Hillary movies” that are in production by NBC and CNN I was surprised that Diane Lane was being cast as Hillary Clinton. I figured Matt Damon was a lock for the part.

predator on August 7, 2013 at 9:50 PM

know I’m counter to most folks, but I oppose vouchers. I can give you a one-word reason for my position: Madrasa.

Do you want to support Islamic teachings in your neighborhood? Remember that the Wahhabi sect runs most of the US mosques.

Wino on August 7, 2013 at 9:35 PM

These exists with or without vouchers.

jawkneemusic on August 7, 2013 at 9:50 PM

Hey Crown Prince Jeb of the house of Bush…….maybe Matt Damon is afraid of your disaster curriculum COMMON CORE!!!!

Just curious did the Bush Royal family send any of our future Kings or Queens to public schools?

PappyD61 on August 7, 2013 at 9:50 PM

I know I’m counter to most folks, but I oppose vouchers. I can give you a one-word reason for my position: Madrasa.

Do you want to support Islamic teachings in your neighborhood? Remember that the Wahhabi sect runs most of the US mosques.

Wino on August 7, 2013 at 9:35 PM

I’ll give you a one-word response. Stupid.

Now if you staked out the position that our children should be exposed to all sorts of views and not sorted (by vouchers) into various bins. I think you have the basis to oppose vouchers.

Why I support vouchers is simple. Parents should not be locked into the local socialist indoctrination center for the education of their children. A child with particular talents should be given the opportunity to explore the limits of their talent in a specialized program instead of rote education at the local elementary school staffed by NEA drones.

SMART CHILDREN SHOULD NOT BE IMPRISONED IN FAILING SCHOOLS BECAUSE OF GEOGRAPHY. And, of course, fear that the teachers in the failing school will get less of a bonus if the smart kids move on and test scores are based on those that remain. Which is why I go a step beyond vouchers and advocate closing failing schools completely. Free the children to find better opportunity.

Happy Nomad on August 7, 2013 at 9:53 PM

What a hypocritical douchebag.

I believe in public schools, am a product of public schools, and you know what? I sent my children to public schools. Also (while working full time) I volunteered endless hours in the classroom, on the pta executive board, the pta council and went to many,many school board meetings to make sure things were done right.

No reason Mr. and Mrs. Damon couldn’t do the same thing if they really thought it was important.

LASue on August 7, 2013 at 9:53 PM

Who does this guy think he’s kidding? California public schools are all about the “progressive” agenda. It’s not the content of the curriculum that’s keeping Damon away, it’s the fact that California’s public schools are full of incompetent unionized teachers and illegal alien gang-bangers.

AZCoyote on August 7, 2013 at 9:47 PM

Yeah, if his kids can’t speak fluent Spanish they are the slow ones when it comes to California public schools.

Happy Nomad on August 7, 2013 at 9:55 PM

Damon also feels for the poor and downtrodden, I mean really FEELS for them, but living in Malibu is something he can do on their behalf.

And he promises to make sure his gardener gets at least 3 weekends off per year.

Bishop on August 7, 2013 at 9:57 PM

You want to see a real food fight over celeb schools, check out Urbanbaby.com

Blake on August 7, 2013 at 9:57 PM

Don’t forget that he is the same schmuck who was recently hawking his anti-fracking movie, funded by middle east oil barons.

the bourne idiot

can_con on August 7, 2013 at 9:59 PM

LOL. Yes, those public schools in California are just too darn conservative! That’s the problem.

Who does this guy think he’s kidding? California public schools are all about the “progressive” agenda. It’s not the content of the curriculum that’s keeping Damon away, it’s the fact that California’s public schools are full of incompetent unionized teachers and illegal alien gang-bangers.

AZCoyote on August 7, 2013 at 9:47 PM

Agree it’s bullsh!t, but I’m sure there are some “progressive” private schools in CA that make the public schools there look like KKK training camps, as hard as that is to believe. When it comes to CA, all logic must be thrown out the window.

TXUS on August 7, 2013 at 10:04 PM

Who does this guy think he’s kidding? California public schools are all about the “progressive” agenda. It’s not the content of the curriculum that’s keeping Damon away, it’s the fact that California’s public schools are full of incompetent unionized teachers and illegal alien gang-bangers.

AZCoyote on August 7, 2013 at 9:47 PM

Ditto. He sounds pretty racist to me.

monalisa on August 7, 2013 at 10:06 PM

Just another typical libtard.
Do as I say, not as I do…..

dentarthurdent on August 7, 2013 at 10:09 PM

Matt Damon, liberal HYPOCRITE!

GarandFan on August 7, 2013 at 10:13 PM

because ultimately we don’t have a choice.

Idiot.

He DOES have a choice… that’s the point. If he didn’t have a choice, his kids would be attending public school.

malclave on August 7, 2013 at 10:15 PM

liberal HYPOCRITE!

GarandFan on August 7, 2013 at 10:13 PM

Redundancy alert!!!
That’s why I didn’t use the word hypocrit in my post…..
;)

dentarthurdent on August 7, 2013 at 10:15 PM

jawkneemusic on August 7, 2013 at 9:50 PM

The difference is that I’m not paying for them, now. With vouchers, I will be.

Happy Nomad on August 7, 2013 at 9:53 PM

I’ll give you a one-word response: Ignore. If you want to go ad hominem, the go ahead. I didn’t read a word beyone your personal, and therefore pointless, response.

Wino on August 7, 2013 at 10:18 PM

…his brain turned to sh!t…what’s the problem?

KOOLAID2 on August 7, 2013 at 10:21 PM

Not everybody is college-track material and yet the system says that they are. Where are the legitimate non-college career opportunities built into public school programs? We spend more time, resources, and effort on encouraging drop outs to get their GEDs than we do on helping the non-college group of students prepare for their careers.

Happy Nomad on August 7, 2013 at 9:30 PM

Bumped, A+, Kudos, and Amen! What has happened to vocational programs?

My bright sunny grandson graduated last year and he is floundering at life after school. I asked him, and he doesn’t know how to type. He doesn’t know how to balance a checkbook. He is practically illiterate when it comes to the written word, cursive or not. He has no trade skills, no direction, nothing to show for it whatsoever, except for a piece of paper that certifies that he graduated.

“Graduated”. It’s another word I am starting to associate with the undermining of the American spirit.

RushBaby on August 7, 2013 at 10:23 PM

What does it mean when Mr. Damon says the schools in California aren’t progress enough? I need some clarification.

Cindy Munford on August 7, 2013 at 9:23 PM

He also moved to Pacific Palisades, CA so he’s got to be referring to the Santa Monica, CA public school district…

Santa Monica, CA, which OTHER LA people call “Communist China”.

Not Progressive enough? Enough? What, to Damon, is “Progressive enough”? Santa Monica is about as Left as Left can be in the USA, I’d say akin to, as to public education, Seattle or Detroit.

Lourdes on August 7, 2013 at 10:34 PM

Not Progressive enough? Enough? What, to Damon, is “Progressive enough”? Santa Monica is about as Left as Left can be in the USA, I’d say akin to, as to public education, Seattle or Detroit.

Lourdes on August 7, 2013 at 10:34 PM

…Santa Monica, not impoverished like Detroit, but certainly as Leftwing as to public education, as Left as any Democrat-Leftwing area can be or is.

The Palisades, where Damon and family have resettled, is full of Hollywood/Medical/Legal people, a nice area logistically and materially, but is very, very Leftwing.

Lourdes on August 7, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Why isn’t there a picture of Barack Obama here?

Or is Sidwell Friends now public?

At least Jimmy Carter sent Amy to DC public schools. He learned something about leadership at the Naval Academy.

Whereas Barack Obama went to the Harvard “Do as I say but not as I do” school of elitist aristocrats.

NoDonkey on August 7, 2013 at 10:38 PM

But, here’s reality:

Damon IS living in a public school district that IS about as Progressive as any Socialist could ever want and aspire to.

What he’s doing, what’s reality, is that he’s trying to push the definition of what IS Progressive farther to the Left, as in, the old New York-ish version of Communism.

Maybe Damon thinks he’s pushed a smart one or made a funny, I don’t know, but him admitting he’s “agitating” is his reveal of either/or both.

“Not Progressive enough” remarked about a very Progressive distict is like saying to a bartender that you won’t pay for that martini you just downed because it wasn’t martini-enough, so you’re owed two more as long as they’re much more martini than the one you just drank but won’t pay for.

Lourdes on August 7, 2013 at 10:40 PM

Yep, only in the liberal mind can JP Morgan et al be responsible for the squandering (or theft) of money (a recent case in Memphis comes immediately to mind), cheating (Atlanta), and tenured degenerates that can’t be fired but are simply moved around in the system (all over the country). This is but another example of liberal projectionism. Whatever they do, they will accuse conservatives of. Whenever policies they promote crash and burn, they immediately blame conservatives/Republicans (which in and of itself is funny since the two are mutually exclusive these days).

Yep, the ‘fairness’ of liberalism – when it adversely affects them, then of course that isn’t fair that they don’t have some kind of advantage. Wow; that makes my head hurt.

ghostwalker1 on August 7, 2013 at 10:42 PM

The public schools in LA aren’t “progressive” enough for this little dope’s kids. Priceless.

Let me translate from liberal dope-speak: “I didn’t make $100 million making bad movies just to send my girls to school with black guys and Mexicans, are you fu**ing kidding me?”

- Day-Mon!

Jaibones on August 7, 2013 at 10:45 PM

Hey Crown Prince Jeb of the house of Bush…….maybe Matt Damon is afraid of your disaster curriculum COMMON CORE!!!!

Just curious did the Bush Royal family send any of our future Kings or Queens to public schools?

PappyD61 on August 7, 2013 at 9:50 PM

This.

Michelle Malkin had a very good article about “Common Core” the other day on her site, with many valuable links.

bofh on August 7, 2013 at 10:45 PM

Not Progressive enough? Enough? What, to Damon, is “Progressive enough”?

Lourdes on August 7, 2013 at 10:34 PM

The public school’s textbooks probably teach that George W. Bush was elected President twice, rather than organizing a coup robbing Gore and Kerry from their rightful prize.

malclave on August 7, 2013 at 10:46 PM

Hey Damon, you are a POS hypocrite who plays a character in a movie raging against the same NIMBY in real life that you are.

Why try to get to Elysium…..when you are….MR. Elysium.

KirknBurker on August 7, 2013 at 10:52 PM

Matt Damon is a bullsh**ter. That’s what he does for a living -a very fine living- he tells the most outrageously perfect lie possible. His children were always going to go where the security detail could best protect them. Any educational deficiencies were always to be, and will be, ameliorated by tutors.

M240H on August 7, 2013 at 10:58 PM

Looking back , there is almost nothing I learned either in high school or college that directly led to anything financially successful EXCEPT a fluid English conversational and writing ability (schools with high Hispanic populations are at an even bigger disadvantage here but, some have argued, that black hip-hop gansta’ rap is also a completely different language) and enough mathematics to figure out supply and demand curves.Therefore, based on my own experiences, I would conclude that graduating from high school functionally illiterate is almost a 100% guarantee of career failure (unless you have sports skills.) That, at least, is obvious.

What is not so obvious is how did our public schools get so bad and so fast? The inner city public schools’ failure falls both on the teachers, their greedy unions and PC which doesn’t allow teachers to properly discipline unruly kids and the kids themselves who often are sans parents,and, in fact, are in more danger traveling to and from the school than your average citizen living in Afghanistan. In these inner city schools , since nothing is taught in this chaotic hell (except how to stay alive second-by-second-or, maybe, how to get pregnant) it makes little difference whether the students are taught Shakespeare or how to tear copper tubing off a building to buy a fix because virtually all of the students, at the very best, will hold menial jobs of no import and will be divorced alcoholics and druggies–the same as their parents. The financially successful will spend the rest of their lives in prison when they are finally busted for gang racketeering and drug dealing.

The more affluent public schools, alas, are haunted by the same lousy teachers and their ethically disoriented unions. PC now prevails in most school studies but, at least, the environment is less intimidating. A student transferring from an inner city to a suburban public school, in some respects, is jumping from the frying pan into the fire but at least the environment is more conducive to studying.

MaiDee on August 7, 2013 at 11:00 PM

If hypocrisy were a toxin he would be stone dead.

VorDaj on August 7, 2013 at 9:45 PM

If hypocrisy had a child, it would look like a liberal.

BobMbx on August 7, 2013 at 11:04 PM

When you have the kind of money that Damon has earned thus far, education is not important. It’s networking, your name and your money that gets you places.

There are some real idiots out there who have attended private this or that but want for nothing. Some of these public schools are indeed train wrecks, but the private label doesn’t necessarily mean better. What’s the difference between a can of DelMonte green beans and a can of generic green beans? Nothing but the name and the price.

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 7, 2013 at 11:20 PM

MN Democrat legislature (both houses) and Democrat (DFL) governor Dayton removed all requirements for HS graduation and all tests for teacher certification in the legislative session that ended May, 2013.

The MN Dems have three choices:
1 – live in rural areas where schools are better than St. Paul/Mpls metro
2 – Put their kids in private schools (Dayton and his siblings, etc. all went through very private, very expensive schools)
3 – Don’t have kids – as many of the Dem metro area legislators appear to be

Disgusting. Dems love to talk about the children until the adults demand attention (or big children demanding attention???) – witness the ignoring of kids in school choice and ignoring of kids in SSM.

Sad is an understatement

MN J on August 7, 2013 at 11:24 PM

Happy Nomad on August 7, 2013 at 9:30 PM

I was a public school chemistry teacher until I retired in 2007. Between 1987 and 2007 I had public school students from my College Prep and AP chemistry classes accepted into second rate universities like MIT, Stanford, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, Harvey Mudd, UC Berkley, UCLA, UC San Diego, Columbia, the Naval Academy, West Point, The Air Force Academy, Brown just to name a few. To further bust your meme I taught in low socio-economic school districts.

However, I would agree that not many public school teachers can match the above and attending a public school is mostly detrimental to any child’s emotional and educational health.

chemman on August 7, 2013 at 11:36 PM

MN J on August 7, 2013 at 11:24 PM

I would agree with a number of your points but tests for teacher certification and even teacher certification has not really worked out well in public education.

chemman on August 7, 2013 at 11:39 PM

Brave Sir Robin!…….

williamg on August 7, 2013 at 11:42 PM

OK, another leftist hypocrite? Shocking…

Doomsday on August 7, 2013 at 11:54 PM

Like I said on the earlier thread, the public schools aren’t f-ed enough, as far as he’s concerned. He’d like to send his kids to the commie school Obama’s mama went to.

Ward Cleaver on August 8, 2013 at 12:00 AM

This guy is the most odious douchenozzle in popular culture. Have you ever seen him interviewed? What an ignorant, obnoxious pretentious little pr*ck… “Sarah Palin is a cu*t, “Howard Zinn is my hero…” And all his lame-a*s Socialist American-hating movies. He’s the poster boy for hypcritical Progressive punkdom.

rrpjr on August 8, 2013 at 12:07 AM

The Los Angeles teachers union must combat public perceptions that it protects bad teachers

And where would that perception come from?

This is like saying we must combat the notion that drinking impairs driving skills. It’s not a “perception” that public school (unions) protect the incompetent – it’s well known.

School choice would kill some public schools … primarily those that deserve to die.

virgo on August 8, 2013 at 12:30 AM

Anyone up for some Schadenfreude? I live in West Hollywood, no doubt close to where ever Matt Damon would send his kids to school. I have a 5 year old and a 3 year old and did a ton of research on the schools in our area, both public and private.

The best school in this area for Elementary School age actually is a public school in LA Unified. LA Unified isn’t as bad as you hear – its much worse. But Rosewood Elementary has an awesome Principal and a lot of great teachers that make it a great school despite how badly they are hamstrung by LAUSD (the school gets very little money for what it needs, but diversity pamphlets? We have truckloads of those!).

The irony is that if Damon wasn’t a moron and had actually checked out the schools in Hollywood he could have sent his kids to an excellent public school.

Kaisersoze on August 8, 2013 at 12:47 AM

My parents encouraged me to learn to read at a young age, and tried to provide me all the access to books and learning a lower-middle class income could. I had some great teachers, and some very stupid ones. But parents and home are NOT the problem nearly so much as the teachers’ unions and the educrat establishment wants us to believe.

Take the standardized testing. At age 8, in third grade, American students generally score near the top of the 15 industrialized nations. Rarely 1st, usually top three in all areas, though. By age 18, in 8th grade, they fall to the bottom or next to it in most areas tested.

Most of them had the same parents, but different teachers. So who should be blamed?

Adjoran on August 8, 2013 at 12:48 AM

The irony is that if Damon wasn’t a moron and had actually checked out the schools in Hollywood he could have sent his kids to an excellent public school.

Kaisersoze on August 8, 2013 at 12:47 AM

Never. It’s more about the cachet and social status than the education.

rrpjr on August 8, 2013 at 12:55 AM

Someone had to post it.

Dunedainn on August 8, 2013 at 1:13 AM

Matt Damon…As irritating as the original.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PajyQrpu26I

glcinpdx on August 8, 2013 at 1:15 AM

You must have low expectations. I was bored to death in high school (1985 was my senior year) and my kids were bored to death. They didn’t learn very much at all, I’m grateful that they got into military intelligence specialties, they’ll have jobs when they decide to leave the service as I did, and they’re proficient (fluent) in foreign languages.

I still have one of my fathers high school math books – calculus (he was born in 1940) – it’s beyond most college students.

I’m mostly certain that the only thing that high school (and 4 year colleges for that matter) produces is Burger King burger flippers and wannabe porn stars (also ethnic and gender bitterness studies majors). Maybe Matt Damon wishes for the education his grandparents got – but the kids aren’t getting that because of leftist scum. We can’t even do like the Soviets and Chinese did, rush the bright kids out of the pig farm and into the KGB prep school. meh, we’re screwed… and Matt is a hypocrite of the first order.

John_G on August 8, 2013 at 1:38 AM

When it comes to his kids, though, Damon would rather peace out. It’s too bad most of the kids languishing in L.A.’s worst schools don’t have the resources to do the same. This is not an isolated hypocrisy.

You mean from Hollywood limousine liberals or Matt Damon in particular?

Damons latest movie “Occupy Wall Street in Spaaaaaace!” is headlined by Damon himself, with an estimated worth of 65 million and Jodie Foster playing an orbital Nancy Pelosi and who has almost as much wealth as Pelosi (Foster is worth 100 million, Pelosi is worth 109 million).

Apparently, being a 0.0001%er is ok when they do it.

Alberta_Patriot on August 8, 2013 at 2:15 AM

Public schools are a life support system for teachers’ unions, which are subsidiaries of the Dem party.

There’s nothing wrong with them that free markets and private sector competition can’t fix.

petefrt on August 8, 2013 at 3:05 AM

“The argument liberals and union activists often make against school choice is that it takes resources from public schools.”

This is not a compelling argument.

Firstly, the resources money comes from the taxpayers and the kids come from the parents. The money and the kids don’t belong to the schools.

Secondly, the “resources” diminish only in proportion to the number of students leaving. I.e., when parents rescue their kids from public schools, there are fewer resources left behind in the public government schools, but there are fewer students sharing the remaining resources. (Although the defector parents do continue to have their tax dollars siphoned into the government school crapholes. This is of no consequence to loudmouth limousine liberals, but parents of more modest means do feel the pain of paying twice for their kids’ education.)

It’s very difficult for me to view this “loss of resources” as a crippling tragedy for government educators.

Let’s try this scenario; maybe libs can understand how absurd this sounds:

Government-funded Abortion Clinic A is providing lousy abortion services, à la Kermit Gosnell. Women begin flocking to private Abortion Clinic B for better abortion services. Local liberals argue against abortion clinic choice because it takes resources from Abortion Clinic A. “Don’t abandon the system! Fix it!”

Idiotic, no?

RightKlik on August 8, 2013 at 5:06 AM

The public school wasn’t progressive enough was the reason.
Translation–They weren’t indoctrinating his kids into socialism.

vityas on August 8, 2013 at 6:13 AM

For those interested in the “common-core” thingy, NYS has just released it’s first pass at the testing. Pretty discouraging numbers.
IIRC, for grades 3-8, across the state proficiency was 31%.
In the City of Rochester it was an abysmal 5%.
That’s right, in the largest school district in my neck of the woods, 1 in 20 students is considered proficient at their grade level.

Jabberwock on August 8, 2013 at 8:05 AM

Douchebaggery is alive and well in Hollywood :D

BigSven on August 8, 2013 at 8:32 AM

I don’t blame Damon.
His kids are precious to him.
As mine are to me.

When advocating for public spending on education, one is talking about spending somebody else’s money to educate somebody else’s kids. So one advocates positions that one hopes will have an acceptable result for the bulk of the students at a price the typical disinterested taxpayer is willing to support.

But when making educational decisions for one’s own children, the calculus is different. For one’s own children, one wants the optimal result, custom tailored to each one, and as an interested party, the parent is willing to provide financial support at a much higher level.

As a taxpayer, I get some secondary benefits from the public school system. The kids are off the street for much of the day, and many of them actually learn to read and do basic math, which helps the economy and keeps the prison population down. This is worth money to me, but not much.

As a tuition paying parent, I get direct benefits for every dollar I spend on my child’s education. I get a smarter kid with a better potential future. I get better chance a middle age unburdened by the worry of supporting dependent adult children. I get the joy of seeing my children succeed and the hope of beautiful and intelligent grandchildren who will also succeed. I am willing to pay a lot of money for that (and I do!)

Haiku Guy on August 8, 2013 at 8:36 AM

I don’t watch Damon the Dumb’s movies anymore.

All Hail Damon the Dumb!

Sherman1864 on August 8, 2013 at 8:41 AM

The problem with all of these wealth-transfer schemes is that you are asking people to pay money for something that provides them no benefit, or very limited benefits. Even if, somehow, every public school was operated perfectly and every teacher was intelligent and effective, you are still asking people to spend money for something that does not benefit themselves. This makes no sense, and people are not willing to do it.

Then, on the other side of hte coin, once public money is allocated, it is in the benefit of every individual involved in the system to minimize effort and accountability. This is just human nature.

And most kids are just trying to skate by. This is just kids being kids.

So the system is at odds with basic human nature at every level. Is it any wonder the system fails?

Haiku Guy on August 8, 2013 at 8:49 AM

OT: I’ve now had two VERY ANNOYING Amber alerts blare through my cell phone within the last hour. Thanks, California.

John the Libertarian on August 7, 2013 at 9:06 PM

Thank the FEC for mandating those types of “emergency” texts.

You can opt out of them, except for those initiated by the White House that is.

Steve Eggleston on August 8, 2013 at 9:24 AM

Hey Damon, you are a POS hypocrite who plays a character in a movie raging against the same NIMBY in real life that you are.

Why try to get to Elysium…..when you are….MR. Elysium.

KirknBurker on August 7, 2013 at 10:52 PM

Nothing is topping this one in this thread.

Steve Eggleston on August 8, 2013 at 9:28 AM

You know, Damon, I wish I could afford to send my kids wherever the heck I felt like sending them.

I wish e-learning had progressed to the point where homeschooling was a better option for us before my oldest was of kindergarten age (this year).

The choice I, and millions like me, are forced to make, is where can I live that’s in a (comparatively) good school district, in a safe neighborhood, large enough for my family, and affordable on my salary?

I don’t think you can really fathom how difficult this is, and I feel like where we are is as much providence as work, if not more. And even so, I have a LOT of reservations of putting my kid on the school bus in the mornings. I just want them to have a good education and a stable environment where we’re not moving to new districts every few years, and hope that I don’t live to regret this.

Frankly, I don’t fault you for sending your kids to the best you could arrange for them. I DO fault you for actually thinking this was a decision you had to agonize over. They’re your FREAKING KIDS, man. If you’re even considering whether the needs of other children, or the state of local teachers unions, or whatever, even competes with that priority, that’s messed up, man.

The Schaef on August 8, 2013 at 10:00 AM

Little Latino Prince Jebby Bush went to the same “public” H.S. the Great Freedom Fighter GW Bush attended, Phillips Academy Andover! At least we expect a lousy lefty like Damon is a hypocrite but idiot ex-Governor, prospective POTUS & proponent for NWO and Hispanic takeover of the US, traitor Jeb Bush the ‘Conservative’ is actually 100 times the devious hypocrite AHole than private citizen Damon could ever even conceive!

el Vaquero on August 8, 2013 at 10:18 AM

Never forget that Latino Prince JEB BUSH very strongly endorses & supports this NWO crap/suck-fest of sedition, the FTAA, Free Trade Area of the Americas! This is NAFTA with the steroids of the Drug Trade for Banksters/Politicos and Latino Socialism added to the smelly stew!

el Vaquero on August 8, 2013 at 10:39 AM

We spend more time, resources, and effort on encouraging drop outs to get their GEDs than we do on helping the non-college group of students prepare for their careers.

That was pretty much happening when I was in junior high and high schools. Our school counselors gave most of their attention to those on either end of the scholastic spectrum – trying to help the failing hang on and prepping the academic elite for moving on to university. Those in the middle were on their own.

hawkeye54 on August 8, 2013 at 11:53 AM

Aren’t “Liberal” and “Hypocrite” redundant when used in the same sentence?

PJ Emeritus on August 8, 2013 at 12:06 PM

In theaters this Christmas, “The Bourne Hypocrisy”.

Bruce MacMahon on August 8, 2013 at 12:23 PM

Don’t expect the “elite” to live by the same rules they expect you, “the rabble”, to live by.

kjatexas on August 8, 2013 at 12:44 PM

the idea that there was some utopian “progressive” education system back then, but now it’s gone is absolutely ridiculous.

As if I could have LESS respect for Matt Damon, idiot savant.

deadrody on August 7, 2013 at 9:15 PM

Let it not be forgotten that he was raised in the People’s Republic of Cambridge, Mass, so he did get a progressive public education – that’s one of the reasons he can’t think in anything other than clichés.

jclittlep on August 8, 2013 at 12:59 PM

HW frauds love Obama the fraud for mutual quality.

vnohara on August 8, 2013 at 2:02 PM

Yes, Mary Katherine Ham, my public school followed the Common Core of its day, the New York State Regents curriculum. You did not have to take it but it was available in every school. (They tell me it’s been ruined now.) But we had tests every year.

Now on Damon: I think if he moved back to Boston he would find some of the elite public schools to his liking, they are full of progressive think. And lots of liberal elites, they shun private schools. But they do use them, and tell you because there is something special about the child, but they think you should go to your crappy public school… which is most of them outside of Newton, and Brookline etc., basically follow the money. The school boards of the elites have retained a lot of the courses that liberal elite parents want, even whilst condemning that there should not be tracking in public schools, even while saying the classes should be “fair” to everyone…(average difficulty) but their kids NEED these things because they need to get into Harvard…or whatever…

Fleuries on August 8, 2013 at 2:18 PM

predator on August 7, 2013 at 9:50 PM

They said Matt was too bitchy

PJ Emeritus on August 8, 2013 at 3:10 PM