CNet: FBI demanding installation of real-time intercept software at Internet providers

posted at 3:21 pm on August 5, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

While we’re watching government snooping expand from the NSA to the DEA, don’t forget the FBI.  CNet’s tech reporter Declan McCullough reported on Friday that the FBI has pressured Internet providers to install software that would allow the government to conduct real-time intercepts of Internet activity without notifying users, and claims that the PATRIOT Act requires their compliance:

The U.S. government is quietly pressuring telecommunications providers to install eavesdropping technology deep inside companies’ internal networks to facilitate surveillance efforts.

FBI officials have been sparring with carriers, a process that has on occasion included threats of contempt of court, in a bid to deploy government-provided software capable of intercepting and analyzing entire communications streams. The FBI’s legal position during these discussions is that the software’s real-time interception of metadata is authorized under the Patriot Act.

Attempts by the FBI to install what it internally refers to as “port reader” software, which have not been previously disclosed, were described to CNET in interviews over the last few weeks. One former government official said the software used to be known internally as the “harvesting program.”

There are a couple of differences between this and the activities of the DEA.  The FBI has legitimate jurisdiction for counter-terrorism and national security activities, while the DEA has little if any claim to operate in those areas.  This program might be limited to those activities, although it’s almost impossible to imagine that no one would ever cross the line if the data looked germane to a criminal probe. The legal framework for this kind of intercept capability precedes the PATRIOT Act, but PATRIOT allowed the FBI to get the data using a “pen register” order, which is much easier to get from a court than a search warrant.  It only requires a representation from law enforcement that the data — which should be limited to trap-and-trace data — has some value to an ongoing criminal investigation.

The 1994 CALEA law forced providers to standardize pen-register information for surveillance purposes.  That’s why the FBI can threaten to get contempt-of-court orders for providers unwilling to install real-time taps to get pen-register data, which is generally defined as IP connections and time data.  However, the FBI’s definition is apparently broader, which is why the providers are fighting the effort:

An industry source said the FBI wants providers to use their existing CALEA compliance hardware to route the targeted customer’s communications through the port reader software. The software discards the content data and extracts the metadata, which is then provided to the bureau. (The 1994 Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, or CALEA, requires that communication providers adopt standard practices to comply with lawful intercepts.)

Whether the FBI believes its port reader software should be able to capture Subject: lines, URLs that can reveal search terms, Facebook “likes” and Google+ “+1s,” and so on remains ambiguous, and the bureau declined to elaborate this week. The Justice Department’s 2009 manual (PDF) requires “prior consultation” with the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section before prosecutors use a pen register to “collect all or part of a URL.” …

Some metadata may, however, not be legally accessible through a pen register. Federal lawsays law enforcement may acquire only “dialing, routing, addressing, or signaling information” without obtaining a wiretap. That clearly covers, for instance, the Internet Protocol address of a Web site that a targeted user is visiting. The industry-created CALEA standard also permits law enforcement to acquire timestamp information and other data.

But the FBI has configured its port reader to intercept all metadata — including packet size, port label, and IPv6 flow data — that exceeds what the law permits, according to one industry source.

The larger issue is the expansion of comprehensive snooping by government agencies.  Regardless of the application of these laws and the definitions of data, Americans simply may not be prepared for the scope of data mining conducted by various agencies, nor for the pressure on telecoms to comply with even more intrusion into their communications.  The NSA and FBI may have legitimate needs to conduct the surveillance on the scope and scale they demand, and the recent plot might tend to argue in favor of those programs.  The entry of the DEA into the mix, along with their apparent instructions in how to cover it up, changes that calculus significantly by reminding Americans of the slippery slopes involved in government snooping.  There seems to be no limit to these demands, and Congress seems ineffective in checking the aggregating power in the executive branch.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Give up your freedom for security and you end up with neither, fools of the land, and of the world.

YOU deserve NO less.

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 3:23 PM

Exclusive: U.S. directs agents to cover up program used to investigate Americans

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 3:24 PM

Strike the “meta” and you got what they’re siphoning.

Steve Eggleston on August 5, 2013 at 3:24 PM

The embassy closures and the bla-bla surrounding it are but diversions from the NSA taking over 100% of your lives/activities and Benghazi, the IRS and etc.

The week will prove very embarrassing for millions of people.

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 3:26 PM

There seems to be no limit to these demands, and Congress seems ineffective in checking the aggregating power in the executive branch.

Congress seems ineffective? What gave that idea, was it their dismissal of Dog Eater’s criminality or their outright collusion with him.

Face it, the security state is upon us. The entire city of Boston cowered in fear and allowed police of every sort to invade their homes without so much as a by-your-leave, proof that Americans are not only willing to wear chains but also lick the hands that attach them.

Bishop on August 5, 2013 at 3:26 PM

FBI demanding installation of real-time intercept software at Internet providers

Since October 2011, mosques have been off-limits to FBI agents.

Watch everyone except the Muslims. But remember, stopping terrorism is their number one concern.

sharrukin on August 5, 2013 at 3:27 PM

Meanwhile obama is out golfing and marketing obana’care’…cause everyone is “clamoring to get it“.

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 3:28 PM

Mugabe just declared that he ‘won’, again, in Zimbabwe.

obama won the same way in 2012. It’s the biggest, untold, scandal.

Most all gov’t agencies are hooked into the NSA.

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 3:30 PM

The founders thought that life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness were equal in nature.

astonerii on August 5, 2013 at 3:30 PM

Patriot Act…the most dangerous legislation ever passed by Congress…

PatriotRider on August 5, 2013 at 3:30 PM

Can’t play this enough times, idiots.

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 3:31 PM

Snowden, no matter what you think he is, did the world a huuuuuuge favor.

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 3:32 PM

While this mentions “ISP’s”, I run a hosting commpany, and here’s my official response to similar requests made to me: “You want access to that data? Fine – show me a warrant, duly signed, and I’ll comply. No warrant, no data.”

psrch on August 5, 2013 at 3:33 PM

The entry of the DEA into the mix, along with their apparent instructions in how to cover it up, changes that calculus significantly by reminding Americans of the slippery slopes involved in government snooping.

It certainly does. My understanding is that the DEA is doing blanket eavesdropping on our telephones and texts and emails, and using that to go after people for drug “crimes” — and then saying their illegal or unconstitutional spying had nothing to do with the arrest. It seems like the DEA is actually the criminal in this. And the DEA is spying onf ALL of us! This comment I’m typing right now might somehow spark their ire, and get them knocking on my door. Insane. Am I showing courage? All of us? http://www.forbes.com/sites/rickungar/2013/08/05/more-surveillance-abuse-exposed-special-dea-unit-is-spying-on-americans-and-covering-it-up/

anotherJoe on August 5, 2013 at 3:33 PM

It’s not gonna stop. They have the whip hand.

a capella on August 5, 2013 at 3:34 PM

The NSA and FBI may have good intentions, but they most assuredly do not have “legitimate need.”

And I find it very troubling, Ed, that you use phrases like “not prepared,” as if it’s just a matter of getting us used to this police state, then it will all be ok.

notropis on August 5, 2013 at 3:35 PM

And now we no longer have to wonder why they tried to pull of the gun running program and took advantage of the tragedy in Sandy Hook to try and force gun control on the masses. It is the last hope for freedom in this country. Election don’t matter anymore. That game has been rigged for years.

Deano1952 on August 5, 2013 at 3:39 PM

This comment I’m typing right now might somehow spark their [the DEA] ire, and get them knocking on my door.

I should have said knocking down my door. Here’s a disturbing story of the DEA running amok: In January 2007, a SWAT team in Lima, Ohio, shot and killed Tarika Wilson, a 26-year-old mother, during a drug raid at the home of her boyfriend, Anthony Terry. When the unarmed Wilson was shot, she was kneeling on the ground, complying with police orders. She was holding her 1-year-old son, Sincere, who was also shot, losing his left hand. A subsequent investigation revealed that Officer Joseph Chavalia heard another officer shooting Terry’s two dogs, mistook the noise for hostile gunfire, panicked, and fired blindly into the room where Wilson was kneeling.

anotherJoe on August 5, 2013 at 3:40 PM

Deano1952 on August 5, 2013 at 3:39 PM

The Second Amendment is the last hope…that is.

Deano1952 on August 5, 2013 at 3:40 PM

The need for ever larger data storage is a great tell…they are not just storing the data. It is being mined. What is it going to take..?

d1carter on August 5, 2013 at 3:41 PM

It’s spelled G-E-S-T-A-P-O.

rplat on August 5, 2013 at 3:41 PM

Soylent Green is on TCM today…

d1carter on August 5, 2013 at 3:42 PM

And I find it very troubling, Ed, that you use phrases like “not prepared,” as if it’s just a matter of getting us used to this police state, then it will all be ok.

notropis on August 5, 2013 at 3:35 PM

Like Roberts and Petreaus, they got dirt on him?

astonerii on August 5, 2013 at 3:43 PM

CNet: FBI demanding installation of real-time intercept software at Internet providers

What the hell is wrong with these people? Are these really Americans behind all this?

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 5, 2013 at 3:45 PM

‘As the author of the Patriot Act, I am extremely troubled by the FBI’s interpretation of this legislation. While I believe the Patriot Act appropriately balanced national security concerns and civil rights, I have always worried about potential abuses.

The Bureau’s broad application for phone records was made under the so-called business records provision of the Act. I do not believe the broadly drafted FISA order is consistent with the requirements of the Patriot Act. Seizing phone records of millions of innocent people is excessive and un-American.

I insisted upon sunsetting (section 215 of the act) in order to ensure Congress had an opportunity to reassess the impact the provision had on civil liberties. I also closely monitored and relied on testimony from the Administration about how the Act was being interpreted to ensure that abuses had not occurred.

The Department’s testimony left the Committee with the impression that the Administration was using the business records provision sparingly and for specific materials. The recently released FISA order, however, could not have been drafted more broadly.

I do not believe the released FISA order is consistent with the requirements of the Patriot Act. How could the phone records of so many innocent Americans be relevant to an authorized investigation as required by the Act?’

- Rep Jim Sensenbrenner (R-WI), 6 June 2013

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 3:45 PM

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 3:45 PM

where is your alphabet post?

astonerii on August 5, 2013 at 3:47 PM

shut it down shut it all down.

no government on earth should have access to this type of spying and information gathering. Anyone that believes in freedom should be fighting this.

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 3:48 PM

where is your alphabet post?

astonerii on August 5, 2013 at 3:47 PM

Working on it. You only think that you know how many Federal agencies are!

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 3:50 PM

Working on it. You only think that you know how many Federal agencies THERE are!

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 3:51 PM

SO I guess the FBI would be ok opening up their servers to the public. After all if they got nothing to hide they should be fine with having anyone who wants to snoop on their daily activates within the FBI buildings and with agents not undercovered tracked right?

right?

right?

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 3:52 PM

The NSA and FBI may have legitimate needs to conduct the surveillance on the scope and scale they demand, and the recent plot might tend to argue in favor of those programs.

Do we even know if there was or is a “real” plot? Does anyone think that this administration or the war against terror apparatus are not capable of just faking this in order to provide a justification for their ongoing intercept efforts. I would not put it past them to come up with some sort of phony “lives saved” statistic for each time they say they have uncovered a plot of some kind. They could run it right under the “jobs saved or created” number. It would make the NSA seem a little more cuddly and friendly. Brian Williams could sign off each night with a “that’s another 10 American lives saved by the NSA bringing this year’s total to 176″.

JohnnyL on August 5, 2013 at 3:52 PM

They’re just looking for emanations of penumbras of wrongdoing.

trubble on August 5, 2013 at 3:53 PM

Control of the flow of information is the tool of the dictatorship. Those who are capable of tyranny are capable of perjury to sustain it.

jpcpt03 on August 5, 2013 at 3:53 PM

I look forward to seeing the email stream between Dog Eater and Killary as the Benghazi attack was occurring.

What do you mean I can’t see tho….ooooooohhhh, that’s right, I’m just a number, Citizen 42719.

Bishop on August 5, 2013 at 3:54 PM

Slippery slope? We’re already well on our way down.

Individual rights have become meaningless. Cops across the nation are getting off on displaying raw power of fully armored SWAT raids on citizens for the smallest of violations. And I believe that is with purpose.. to display to America, as I said, raw power. Fear them! They are the police! You are not. And if you’re not police you are nothing.

2 lines are left to cross… random, warrentless searches of our homes at any time for any reason (including random stops and searches on the streets). And making it illegal to disagree with the party in power. We are so close to that.

Obama speaks at a college and the Young Republicans on campus are barred from attending because they are considered a security threat… and nothing is said or done about it. Just another day.

JellyToast on August 5, 2013 at 3:56 PM

The NSA and FBI may have legitimate needs to conduct the surveillance on the scope and scale they demand, and the recent plot might tend to argue in favor of those programs.

You know if you were fighting a war against say Russia would you consider the loss of a couple cities a price you were willing to pay for your freedom? I think we can come to terms with the loss of some Americans in our fight against terrorism, if it means our freedoms remain. If we don’t lose one life but we lose everything we as a country have held dear for the last 200 years who really won the war?

At some point the country will have to decide if they want freedom or a supposed safety/police state.

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 3:56 PM


U.S. directs agents to cover up program used to investigate Americans

DEA monitors everything we do too. Because it’s illegal to base an investigation on improperly obtained evidence, if they find anything questionable they go back and construct a parallel investigation containing everything they learned when using illegal means to gather info, and couch it all in terms acceptable to established legal investigative processes.

They call it PARALLEL CONSTRUCTION. There’s a PowerPont at the link describing to DEA Nazis how to do it.

This is complete and total high-tech Nazism.

Akzed on August 5, 2013 at 3:58 PM

I look forward to seeing the email stream between Dog Eater and Killary as the Benghazi attack was occurring.

What do you mean I can’t see tho….ooooooohhhh, that’s right, I’m just a number, Citizen 42719.

Bishop on August 5, 2013 at 3:54 PM

I doubt there was any email stream between them at all. They were both pre-occupied that night with more important matters.

Bitter Clinger on August 5, 2013 at 3:59 PM

Working on it. You only think that you know how many Federal agencies are!

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 3:50 PM

Alrighty. You just got my hopes up and I been waiting!

astonerii on August 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM

There seems to be no limit to these demands, and Congress seems ineffective in checking the aggregating power in the executive branch.

“Any attempt to limit the government’s power is dangerous.”

Krispy Kreme
McWacko
Obummer
etc. etc.

Burke on August 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM

This is complete and total high-tech Nazism.

Akzed on August 5, 2013 at 3:58 PM

the next step is to just make it up when there is no wrong doing. Once you have the tools framing people who are a “threat” is done quick.

It’s getting to the point I can’t stand law enforcement. they ar e becoming the redcoats to King Obama.

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM

This Obama Regime is nothing but a fascist police state type government. Every day, we see article after article highlighting the one blatantly intrusive infringement on our freedoms and liberties after another.

From the NSA spying on literally everything you all do, to the IRS, soon to have all of your medical records, and now this. Land of the Free? Hardly.

Meople on August 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM

trubble on August 5, 2013 at 3:53 PM

Attention! You can get 18 credits of favorable points for turning people in.

I have rule books with award levels and rates for helping to preserve freedom available free of charge.

You may want to look a few posts up for someone who needs reeducation.

Hint: We don’t use the word “citizen” anymore. It upsets the visitors we have here in the millions with millions more to come. And that number doesn’t look legit. Turn him in!

IlikedAUH2O on August 5, 2013 at 4:01 PM

Presidential Job Approval
Gallup: 44% Approve – 48% Disapprove
Rasmussen: 46% Approve – 53% Disapprove
RCP Average: 45.2% Approve – 49.3% Disapprove

– RCP

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 4:02 PM

What the hell is wrong with these people? Are these really Americans behind all this?

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 5, 2013 at 3:45 PM

Of course they are. They’re the same kind of people who come to this site and argue that there’s no right to privacy as a justification for the intrusive government meddling that they support, while fraudulently calling themselves conservative. Stoic patriots, if you will.

Armin Tamzarian on August 5, 2013 at 4:04 PM

Obama speaks at a college and the Young Republicans on campus are barred from attending because they are considered a security threat… and nothing is said or done about it. Just another day.

JellyToast on August 5, 2013 at 3:56 PM

Get over it. They will live.

The Jews took that kind of thing for a decade or more and there were still millions infesting Europe who had to be exterminated when the time came.

IlikedAUH2O on August 5, 2013 at 4:04 PM

– RCP

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 4:02 PM

thought that said RIP

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:05 PM

Chief Executive Dick Costolo promotes Twitter as a protector of more than 200 million people who broadcast their lives, be it love for a new pop song or Tahrir Square protests. But increasingly, freewheeling tweets are clashing with divergent global laws and standards in markets where Twitter is spreading its wings……

……
In recent weeks, Twitter has found itself labeled a censor, an enabler of hate speech and a tool of Big Brother. It drew flak in July for turning over to French prosecutors information about users who tweeted anti-Semitic messages. U.K. lawmakers in the last week have blasted Twitter for failing to deal effectively with abusive tweets, after an activist was threatened repeatedly by other Twitter users.

Twitter’s hands-off approach to users’ expression is being stressed as it opens offices in countries including France, Germany and Brazil ahead of its expected initial public stock offering—making workers and company assets subject to arrest or seizure if it breaks local laws.
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887323997004578643883120559180.html?mod=WSJ_MIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsSecond

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:07 PM

After an arrest was made, agents then pretended that their investigation began with the traffic stop, not with the SOD tip, the former agent said. The training document reviewed by Reuters refers to this process as “parallel construction.”

Akzed on August 5, 2013 at 4:07 PM

give up our 4th amendment rights, and the rest will soon follow. if you think trading freedom for security is a good idea; you deserve neither

burserker on August 5, 2013 at 4:10 PM

I think they are going to drive real Americans underground. An encrypted communications network outside the internet may be quite workable.

TerryW on August 5, 2013 at 4:10 PM

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:07 PM

I saw that kind of thing coming from the word go with both TWITter and FB. One of the many reasons will never use either one of them. Ever.

Meople on August 5, 2013 at 4:11 PM

Support your local police!

That’s an order!

Akzed on August 5, 2013 at 4:12 PM

The most comical part is that Obama supporters still won’t believe he’s responsible for these actions. Benghazi/CIA thread:
 

Do you actually believe that the CIA and its operations teams are run by a bunch of liberals?
 
bayam on August 1, 2013 at 7:43 PM

 
If only Stalin knew!
 
((D) voters, google the phrase to read about your 100% new phenomenon.)

rogerb on August 5, 2013 at 4:12 PM

The training document reviewed by Reuters refers to this process as “parallel construction.”

Akzed on August 5, 2013 at 4:07 PM

there is another word for it. It’s call entrapment

The entrapment defense in the United States has evolved mainly through case law. Two competing tests exist for determining whether entrapment has taken place, known as the “subjective” and “objective” tests. The “subjective” test looks at the defendant’s state of mind; entrapment can be claimed if the defendant had no “predisposition” to commit the crime. The “objective” test looks instead at the government’s conduct; entrapment occurs when the actions of government officers would usually have caused a normally law-abiding person to commit a crime.[5]

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:13 PM

Obama’s Socialist ‘Banana Republic’ Borg seizure, control, and assimilation of the nation is in ‘full steam ahead’ mode. Americans have rolled over like a submissive b!tch at the revelation that we are being abandoned/betrayed to die atthe hands of terrorists, targeted/intimidated/abused by government agencies like the IRS/ATF/EPA/FBI/DHS, that Obama has his own ‘military’ (DHS, with enough ammo to wage a real war against the American people), & that this government is collecting and storing, in violation of the Constitution & US Law, every bit of personal information and communication of every US citizen.

After all of this, I am left completely stumped to answer the question, “What exactly WILL cause Americans to become so fed up with the current government that they will be able to become so angry as to get up off the couch and actually DO something?”

easyt65 on August 5, 2013 at 4:14 PM

rogerb on August 5, 2013 at 4:12 PM

The said the same about Hitler.

“If der Fuehrer only knew about this! This must be a mistake! Adolf Hitler would never let this happen… if only he knew!”

Akzed on August 5, 2013 at 4:15 PM

It’s fever in the fever swamp. Every little federal agency wants the latest, spanking, Constitution-busting spyware. It will never stop. Goodbye, America.

rrpjr on August 5, 2013 at 4:15 PM

I saw that kind of thing coming from the word go with both TWITter and FB. One of the many reasons will never use either one of them. Ever.

Meople on August 5, 2013 at 4:11 PM

yeap the answer to both is not to use them. but the way this scandal is growing and the government overreach is progressing if you are plugged in at any point to modern technology the government can and will and has tracked you.

I have no idea why Twitter stores its information. When you send a tweet it should be gone from all sources. that way the company can not trace it for the government. If your objective is to be the “free speech” place. Why would you store users tweets, timestamps etc.

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:15 PM

– RCP

Schadenfreude on August 5, 2013 at 4:02 PM

What difference, at this point, does it make? His base loves him and always will. By the time he’s done, the 47% will be 57% and the Left will never look back.

rrpjr on August 5, 2013 at 4:17 PM

“I’m too comfortable to care.”

or …

“I’m too scared to fight the Federal government.”

or …

“It’s too late, they’ve already got us … no use resisting.”

or …

“I, for one, am glad to welcome our Government Over Lords.
Everyday life will be safe and secure, now. Can’t beat that!”

listens2glenn on August 5, 2013 at 4:18 PM

the COTUS was written by men who understood how evil other men can be and that even the good ones will be tempted by power to become evil. therefore the only answer they could come up with it to limit the access to the evil of power. Sadly we has a nation have forgotten this basic wisdom.

I don’t care if Reagan was POTUs today I would be aghast at the reach of the federal gov. to spy on its citizens.

Freedom means something. we are not free if every word, movement and though can be traced by a government.

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:19 PM

It’s fever in the fever swamp. Every little federal agency wants the latest, spanking, Constitution-busting spyware. It will never stop. Goodbye, America.

rrpjr on August 5, 2013 at 4:15 PM

human nature and the laws of physics say that for every action there e is an equal and opposite reaction. I would imagine as the screws tightens the economic and moral incentives to create anti-spyware so people can surf, tweet, and drive in privacy will be too big for the government to have control over.

Freedom is an animal that can not be caged for long.

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:22 PM

Of course they are. They’re the same kind of people who come to this site and argue that there’s no right to privacy as a justification for the intrusive government meddling that they support, while fraudulently calling themselves conservative. Stoic patriots, if you will.

Armin Tamzarian on August 5, 2013 at 4:04 PM

Funny, last I checked the people who are dedicated to defending a “right to privacy” are liberals. I’m not sure if you noticed this, but a majority of the Democrats voted to discontinue the NSA’s data collection, while a majority of the Republicans voted to continue it.

But hey, I’m sure the vote went the way it did because there are so many conservative Democrats, right? /s

Stoic Patriot on August 5, 2013 at 4:25 PM

Some lawyers say there can be legitimate reasons for not revealing sources. Robert Spelke, a former prosecutor who spent seven years as a senior DEA lawyer, said some sources are classified. But he also said there are few reasons why unclassified evidence should be concealed at trial.

The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.[1]

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:26 PM

Alrighty. You just got my hopes up and I been waiting!

astonerii on August 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM

Only about 40%…

The ABCs of the ABCs: Have You Ever Wondered Who Gave You A Federal Agency?

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 4:27 PM

U.S. directs agents to cover up program used to investigate Americans

Don’t you love that?

The Government breaks the law in the hopes they find Americans breaking the law.

Hey.. did any of these agencies notice Fast and Furious?

JellyToast on August 5, 2013 at 4:27 PM

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger; nor shall any person be subject for the same offense to be twice put in jeopardy of life or limb; nor shall be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself, nor be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.[1]

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:28 PM

Some lawyers say there can be legitimate reasons for not revealing sources. Robert Spelke, a former prosecutor who spent seven years as a senior DEA lawyer, said some sources are classified. But he also said there are few reasons why unclassified evidence should be concealed at trial.

In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for his defence

which part of the 6th amendment does the DEA not understand?

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:30 PM

It’s fever in the fever swamp. Every little federal agency wants the latest, spanking, Constitution-busting spyware. It will never stop. Goodbye, America.

rrpjr on August 5, 2013 at 4:15 PM

This.

The NSA revelations got every Dept. head demanding the same good stuff. Why should the NSA have all the toys?

Ah, the American Dream… to be an Oligrach with a high security clearance contact in the MIC.

BoxHead1 on August 5, 2013 at 4:31 PM

The Government breaks the law in the hopes they find Americans breaking the law.

JellyToast on August 5, 2013 at 4:27 PM

‘Did you really think we want those laws observed? We want them to be broken.

You’d better get it straight that it’s not a bunch of boy scouts you’re up against… We’re after power and we mean it… There’s no way to rule innocent men.

The only power any government has is the power to crack down on criminals. Well, when there aren’t enough criminals one makes them. One declares so many things to be a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws.

Who wants a nation of law-abiding citizens? What’s there in that for anyone?

But just pass the kind of laws that can neither be observed nor enforced or objectively interpreted – and you create a nation of law-breakers – and then you cash in on guilt. Now that’s the system, Mr. Reardon, that’s the game, and once you understand it, you’ll be much easier to deal with.’

― Dr Floyd Ferris, Atlas Shrugged

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 4:35 PM

yeap the answer to both is not to use them. but the way this scandal is growing and the government overreach is progressing if you are plugged in at any point to modern technology the government can and will and has tracked you…

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:15 PM

While that’s true, I pretty much know that the Regime is tracking everything I post in all the comment threads.

For any government analyst reading this now, please know that I’m flying you biggest double bird I can possibly fly. Up your’s, Jo-boo.

Meople on August 5, 2013 at 4:37 PM

For any government analyst reading this now, please know that I’m flying you biggest double bird I can possibly fly. Up your’s, Jo-boo.

Meople on August 5, 2013 at 4:37 PM

yeap same here. I hate hate hate these petty tryants

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:41 PM

Alrighty. You just got my hopes up and I been waiting!

astonerii on August 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM

.
Only about 40%…

The ABCs of the ABCs: Have You Ever Wondered Who Gave You A Federal Agency?

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 4:27 PM

.
John Adama gave us the “United States Public Health Service”?

I would never have guessed that one.
.
That is a superb compilation, RWM. Carry on !

listens2glenn on August 5, 2013 at 5:00 PM

The software discards the content data and extracts the metadata, which is then provided to the bureau.

And what if there’s a back door that allows them to send the entire data at the flick of a switch? It’s probably encrypted, so no one would know. Once these structures are in place anything can happen out of the public’s view.

paul1149 on August 5, 2013 at 5:03 PM

reminding Americans of the slippery slopes involved in government snooping. There seems to be no limit to these demands, and Congress seems ineffective in checking the aggregating power in the executive branch.

Ask, and ye shall receive — especially if you can hide what you are asking for.

The software discards the content data and extracts the metadata, which is then provided to the bureau.

Anybody believe they can’t change that with the flick of a coding pen?
In fact, the switch is probably already built into the software, waiting for the right request parameters.

AesopFan on August 5, 2013 at 6:49 PM

Great minds and all that.

paul1149 on August 5, 2013 at 5:03 PM

Believe it or not, despite the time difference, I missed your post, because I have auto-refresh blocked and my screen ended one before yours.

AesopFan on August 5, 2013 at 6:51 PM

No person shall be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury

unseen on August 5, 2013 at 4:28 PM

Zimmerman was charged with murder.
Why no grand jury? Was that constitutional?

anotherJoe on August 5, 2013 at 7:12 PM

anotherJoe on August 5, 2013 at 7:12 PM

No, Florida, as with many states, only requires a grand jury for first-degree murder.

Resist We Much on August 5, 2013 at 10:07 PM