America’s shame: Wine catching up to beer as country’s preferred booze

posted at 5:01 pm on August 1, 2013 by Allahpundit

Beer’s still tops — by one slim point. Twenty years ago, it led wine by 20.

This isn’t America.

Young adult drinkers’ alcoholic beverage preferences have changed dramatically over the past two decades. In the early 1990s, 71% of adults under age 30 said they drank beer most often; now it is 41% among that age group. There has been a much smaller decline in the percentage of 30- to 49-year-olds who say they drink beer the most, from 48% to 43%, with essentially no change in older drinkers’ beer preference.

Younger adults’ preferences have shifted toward both liquor and wine, but more so toward liquor, over the past two decades. Those between the ages of 30 and 49 have moved exclusively toward liquor. Older Americans now increasingly say they drink wine most and are less likely to say they drink liquor most…

Since the early 1990s, both whites and nonwhites have become less likely to choose beer as their favorite alcoholic drink. However, nonwhites have shown a greater shift than whites, down 19 points and nine points, respectively. Both racial groups’ preferences for wine have increased, with smaller gains in both groups’ preferences for liquor.

Millennials, who are more left-wing than the rest of the electorate on most policy matters, evidently prefer the European approach for alcohol consumption too.

The stereotype that men are beer-drinkers and women wine-drinkers is also amply confirmed, by the way, although interestingly that’s less true for men these days than it was 20 years ago and more true for women. In the early 90s, men preferred beer to wine 64/15. Now it’s 53/20. Twenty years ago, women preferred wine to beer, 43/29. Today it’s 52/20. Also interestingly, both then and now, women have preferred hard liquor slightly more than men did. Everything … okay, ladies?

My hunch when I saw the data was that the average price of wine must have dropped over time. I can’t find hard data to back that up after Googling, though; on the contrary, this Slate piece from 2011 noted that super-cheap wine grew less popular with Americans between the mid-90s and mid-00s. I don’t think it’s cost that’s driving this. I think it’s probably health reasons. The public’s undeniably more aware of the consequences of obesity than it was 20 years ago, and it’s also more aware of the virtues of a low-carb diet. Wine typically will get you drunk with fewer calories, fewer carbs, and maybe some side health benefits. The more health-conscious America gets, presumably the more wine will gain on beer as its beverage of choice. And then, someday when Mike Bloomberg’s president, both of them will be banned and replaced with sugar-free fruit juice. The golden age is nigh, my friends.


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I like beer…good wine…and great scotch. Basically, an equal opportunity boozer.

JetBoy on August 1, 2013 at 7:23 PM

Excuse my rant.

Here it goes:

I’ve been in the wine industry for a few years. In my time being in wine, I have dealt with thousands of customers. There is a ridiculous notion in America: That one can either be a beer die-hard, or a wine die-hard.

I will say something and I hope it sticks. Wine and beer are no different. The ingredients and time involved are different, but the experience is the same. Wine and beer should provide a similar experience on the palate. Acid content reconciles tannins, mid-palate, and flavors on wine, and a good citrus note will do the same in beer. Both wine and beer (well made ones) should have a healthy mid-palate, not be angular, and be free of flaws. Both wine and beer can suffer from the same flaws (Hydrogen sulfide, for example).

The two sides must recognize the great things in each of their camps!

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 7:25 PM

And here is a phrase winemakers have in the community

It takes a lot of good beer to make good wine

During harvest, these guys are putting down LOTS of beers and margaritas.

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 7:27 PM

I remember the headline of some French paper a few years ago when a British paper reported that they (GB) imported more wine from Australia than France that year!

The headline:

BARBARIANS AT THE GATE!!

I LOL’d! The drama!

JAM on August 1, 2013 at 7:34 PM

JAM on August 1, 2013 at 7:34 PM

\

California is on pace to be the largest global producer in a few years.

Suck it, France!

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 7:36 PM

Health concerns, my Asperger’s!

It’s all part of the Left’s grand scheme for the Vagination of America.

Even our microbrewery industry is contaminated with widespread adding of fruit, spices, sugars, and other flavors more appropriate for ice cream or yogurt than beer.

I tried to warn you people. I told you there was a deadly secret behind the push for soccer beginning in the ’80s. Now our kids don’t play baseball, spit, and carry wooden bats around, they run around in short-shorts squealing like girls and not keeping score.

The Left, culminating in Obama’s testosterone-free Presidency, has drained America of our vital bodily fluids.

Adjoran on August 1, 2013 at 7:54 PM

Rise of the Upper Middle Class.

Punchenko on August 1, 2013 at 8:01 PM

Blatant is the resident expert, but I have an idea as to why:

Wine is distributed and sold just about everywhere. And good wine can be found in most gas station’s. That was never the case 10+ years ago.

I agree with the millenniums info above… but its all about availability

Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 8:10 PM

Adjoran on August 1, 2013 at 7:54 PM

Soccer actually has a very high rate of head injury, moreso than most other sports

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:17 PM

Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 8:10 PM

Wish I could get it in gas stations up here, my man!

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:17 PM

During harvest, these guys are putting down LOTS of beers and margaritas.

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 7:27 PM

Beer? For sure, in large quantities. Nothing better than cold beer at the end of long day and I make sure the fridge is well stocked for the crew.

Margaritas? Never seen one at a winery during crush yet. Maybe outside of GULAG winery world.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:21 PM

I’m sampling Scotch right now.

http://bluecollarphilosophy.com/2013/07/what-single-malt-scotch-whiskey-do-drink-for-you-health-picture/

But my fridge has a nice cross section of beer as well: Guinness, Moose Drool, and Allagash Curieux.

Blue Collar Todd on August 1, 2013 at 8:23 PM

Wine is distributed and sold just about everywhere. And good wine can be found in most gas station’s. That was never the case 10+ years ago.

Define “good”…or even “wine”.

In the city NYC), grocers can’t sell wine…so they carry “wine product” that looks like wine, but tastes like…well, sugary crud. I’ve seen the same abomination at gas stations across the state (NY) that carry real beer…but not real wine.

JetBoy on August 1, 2013 at 8:24 PM

Wine is distributed and sold just about everywhere. And good wine can be found in most gas station’s.

Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 8:10 PM

In a word, NO. As in HELL, NO!

Between what’s available at gas stations and convenience stores I easily and simply buy BEER instead. At least beer is mostly made with natural products, something that cannot be said of “affordable” wines, especially those from Oz land, which are generally a chemical cocktail that is developed in a chemical lab (for color and taste preference of “consumers”). See “Yellow Tail” as something that is just that. Or any other “animal” label so called wine.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:26 PM

Margaritas? Never seen one at a winery during crush yet. Maybe outside of GULAG winery world.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:21 PM

Few friends in Cali and Long Island like to hit em at the end

Which vineyard are you working for?

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:29 PM

Few friends in Cali and Long Island like to hit em at the end

Which vineyard are you working for?

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:29 PM

Hmmm… I work for myself. Make highly rated Pinots and Syrahs from some of the best vineyards in GULAG.

Hate to disagree with you, have not seen ANY Margaritas at GULAG wineries and I know and visit quite a few up and down the coast. Have no idea about Long Island, but then again wish they made wine.

But beer in large quantities.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:33 PM

But beer in large quantities.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:33 PM

A beautiful thing

And how can I go about gettin’ yo wine?!

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:34 PM

BTW, gulag? I’m missing the acronym

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:36 PM

Wine is distributed and sold just about everywhere. And good wine can be found in most gas station’s.
Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 8:10 PM

States vary.
In Colorado, wine, liquor and full strength beer can only be sold in liquor stores (at least they’re NOT state run though, like some states). I know in Maine, California, and other states you can get wine at grocery stores, gas stations and convenience stores – but not here. The liquor store lobby is very strong in Colorado.

dentarthurdent on August 1, 2013 at 8:38 PM

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:26 PM

I don’t doubt your personal preference – my beer taste’s are rarely found in a gas station. Green Flash, Chamay, Lagunitas are rarely, if ever found outside of a good package store…

But the fact Yellow Tail and 50 other brands are known, widely available and consumed – proves my point.

I wont even go into “price vs quality” in wine – because it is all over the map. I have spit out $100 bottles and love me some $20 Duck Walk (hat tip to blatant – before we met here)…

Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 8:43 PM

BTW, gulag? I’m missing the acronym

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:36 PM

I’ve been referring to what you call CA as GULAG for quite some time now on this site and elsewhere. Being an immigrant from (once) USSR it reminds me greatly of that in its recent social decline and communist policies on the road to ruin. GULAG was Soviet Union’s, or rather, Stalin’s, system of prison camps for mostly political prisoners and built by the political prisoners for themselves (as in forced labor in inhumane conditions). Something that seems to be going on in CA these days.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:44 PM

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:44 PM

my mistake! sorry

I’m starting a label with a friend in GULAG, so I will be tripping out there quite a bit soon. Mendocino County.

Where do you get your fruit? Or you grow your own?

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:47 PM

But the fact Yellow Tail and 50 other brands are known, widely available and consumed – proves my point.

Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 8:43 PM

And like I said above, Yellow Tail and such are chemical concoctions. If you call them wine, fine. I don’t.

Do you know they are destroying roughly $40Million worth of “low level” wine in OZ as we speak since they can’t sell them?

Anyway. We seem to agree on quality beer. I am on a Belgium beer kick lately. Not a fan of Chimay, but Duvel, Corelanus and the most complex beer I have ever had by far: Brouwerijj Bosteels Tripel Karmielet.

And quality Bourbon, stopped drinking high end tequila and Cognac once I tasted an incredible Bourbon and never looked back. Try to find a bottle of Black Maple Hills. Or Rowan’s Creek/Noah’s Mill if you can’t, some of the most complex alcohol I have ever tasted. My son was laughing when I put a bottle of Black Maple Hills on the table next to Macallan 18 Year Old and told him he will not drink Mac after tasting Bourbon. He laughed at me. For about as long as it took him to pour Bourbon and taste it. That Mac bottle is still sitting unfinished since, neither he nor I want to finish it.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:54 PM

Between what’s available at gas stations and convenience stores I easily and simply buy BEER instead. At least beer is mostly made with natural products, something that cannot be said of “affordable” wines, especially those from Oz land, which are generally a chemical cocktail that is developed in a chemical lab (for color and taste preference of “consumers”). See “Yellow Tail” as something that is just that. Or any other “animal” label so called wine.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:26 PM

Pound that wine with some PVPP and you got some color!

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:58 PM

And today is IPA day, so IPAs tonight!

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:58 PM

Where do you get your fruit? Or you grow your own?

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 8:47 PM

I stick to West side of Sonoma, just love colder climate fruit for much more complexity and acidity, and thus, balance. What you will find in Mendo, so you’re on the right track.

Good luck in your endeavor! Mendocino has some great fruit, that’s for sure.

Time for dinner and a cigar after.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:58 PM

I bow to authority:

“Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us happy.” — Ben Franklin

That’s beer . . . not wine . . . beer.

Hic. Ooops . . . praden mie . . . hic . . .

BLOC on August 1, 2013 at 9:03 PM

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:54 PM

Port has been my thing, outside of beers. Bourbon, whiskey – haven’t approached that level yet, but we certainly could share and taste fine spirits…

Warre’s Otima 10 Tawny Port is my go to.

Being a shanty Irish kid from NY – I drank all the crap one can imbibe on until 30 or so. I find 2 Green Flash Palate Wreckers, a port with a nice cigar round me up nicely.

I also had a penchant for throwing punches with 10+ drinks, so I try to stick with quality over quantity… You can select a bourbon for me any time. Just 1 or 2 though ;)

Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 9:05 PM

And like I said above, Yellow Tail and such are chemical concoctions. If you call them wine, fine. I don’t.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:54 PM

Tried Yellow Tail and don’t really care for it.
You want to try a really bad wine? My father-in-law brought us a bottle of Hillbilly Shine Wine from Kentucky. My wife and mother-in-law tried it and couldn’t even finish the first glass…

Our daily usual is Ironstone CabSauv, followed by McManis CabSauv. My wife prefers the Ironstone, I prefer the McManis.
But we have one bottle left (a 1999 Cab) in our wine fridge from a very small Calistoga winery – Silver Rose – that is no longer producing. Too bad – their wine was amazing.

dentarthurdent on August 1, 2013 at 9:05 PM

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 8:58 PM

T/A’s stay quite healthy in Mendocino since its hot day, cool night

Best to you as well

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 9:09 PM

Port has been my thing, outside of beers. Bourbon, whiskey – haven’t approached that level yet, but we certainly could share and taste fine spirits…

Odie1941 on August 1, 2013 at 9:05 PM

I love a good tawny port.
I just can’t get into whiskey or scotch, or much of any of that line. We’ve gone to a couple of scotch tastings (fund raisers for my college association of graduates), and it’s a lot of fun – but I have yet to find a scotch I could actually enjoy drinking.

dentarthurdent on August 1, 2013 at 9:10 PM

The real estate boom hit everything even wine making real estate. So people were opening wineries like crazy. There is a glut in the market, and with so many inexpensive good wines of course the market is going to grow. Beer on the other hand is getting more expensive not less. Simple economics.

I also recommend trying anything Cameron Hughes their business model is to take quality wines that people can’t move and move them. I have a $13 bottle of Chardonnay that is awesome.

Theworldisnotenough on August 1, 2013 at 9:16 PM

I blame wine in a box.

thatsafactjack on August 1, 2013 at 9:47 PM

I also recommend trying anything Cameron Hughes their business model is to take quality wines that people can’t move and move them. I have a $13 bottle of Chardonnay that is awesome.

Theworldisnotenough on August 1, 2013 at 9:16 PM

Open faced lie. Their first few vintages were. Now they are not. Same marketing BS as 2 Buck Chuck, who grow fruit specifically for the wine, Cameron BUYS fruit same as I and others do. Stop believing everything you’re fed, especially in wine world, I learned quickly.

Entire business model is based on marketing and hype and not much else. Some of the best wines I’ve had are little known and some of the worst I’ve had are well known and well reviewed. I’ve been running a well known wine tasting group since about 1999 and all we do is blind tastings. You’d be very surprised to hear that all the “experts” out there who I personally observed refuse to taste in blind format and most have no palates to speak of. Some can’t even keep track of 4 glasses in front of them. And their published scores (best known wine review magazines) and their blind tasting scores have no correlation. At all. Its all a myth propagated on sheeple consumers who then keep repeating same scores and BS tasting notes.

I caught a couple of winemakers telling shops they make my wine in their attempts to sell their own swill (and, thus, their reference to my much better wines), good thing I was alerted to shops’ emails and newsletters and was able to call and stop this BS.

I have been openly asked to buy a subscription to wine review newsletter to “receive better scores”. My 92-93 scores would be bumped up to 95-96. I said No even though that subscription cost $540 per year, I am stupid enough to have principles and beliefs. I also know that others “buy” scores via other means. I refuse to play this game. Most others have no shame in buying scores. To each his own. Distributors not selling your wine even when accounts call and beg for it since other, crappy wine, is sitting in the warehouse and not moving, sales reps are told to sell only what needs to be sold. Or sales reps not even wanting to sell wine at all when they can so easily generate commissions through beer and liquor sales that are emailed in while they are having donuts and morning coffee, why even make an effort? And federal government bought by said 3 tier distribution system making sure that you can only sell outside of GULAG if you have a distributor in other states. And on, and on, and on…

Wine business is one of the worst, if not THE worst, when it comes to people having no principles, bribery, back stabbing and shill marketing. All driven by reviewers who have little idea about wine and wine making.

As another winemaker said to me once, You can sell horse piss if you market it right. He was right on the money judging by what’s on the market lately.

OK. Bourbon break now.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 10:11 PM

Sorry, should read: “… I said No even though that subscription cost $50 per year…” above.

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 10:12 PM

riddick on August 1, 2013 at 10:11 PM

Most people in the wine industry have no palate. That’s a huge problem.

Even wine reviewers.

They think flaws are characteristics, etc.

blatantblue on August 2, 2013 at 12:22 AM

Before my first pregnancy 27 years ago, I drank a variety of alcohol, including beer. After I gave birth, I lost my taste for beer and never regained it. I am now almost exclusively a white wine drinker. Mixed drinks are almost always sweet and hold no appeal.

I am the exception in my family. My daughter likes a variety of beverages including beer, the guys are almost exclusively beer drinkers unless we’re having margaritas.

Common Sense on August 2, 2013 at 12:46 AM

I have no idea where people get the idea the beer is somehow inherently more American than wine.

The favorite drink of the founding fathers was Madeira wine.

One of the leading causes of the Revolution was the British seizure of John Hancock’s ship the “Liberty”. It was holding over 5,000 gallons of Madeira in its hold.

Both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution was toasted with Madeira.

Madeira was used to christen the USS Constitution.

Washington, Jefferson, both Adams, and Franklin drank prodigious amounts of Madeira.

Now if you really want to talk about an American drink, then there’s only one real choice….whiskey.

If it wasn’t for whiskey, most farmers would have starved since there was no where for them to sell their surplus grain or corn. And whiskey was much easier to ship to market than grain or corn.

Until the advent of refrigeration, everyone drank whiskey because beer would spoil.

And if it wasn’t for whiskey, there would be no NASCAR.

panzerkardinal on August 2, 2013 at 12:50 AM

There is a ridiculous notion in America: That one can either be a beer die-hard, or a wine die-hard.

Sounds like a cat-dog thing. So many insist you can’t like both. You have to choose one.

I too loves my booze. Drinking a Summer Shandy as I type. Always enjoy a nice taste of wine, also.

And, Jack. My old pal. He is always there.

Moesart on August 2, 2013 at 1:17 AM

Moesart on August 2, 2013 at 1:17 AM

Amen!
I am a big fan of the “celebrate diversity” movement.
I like lots of different drinks – beer, wine, port, tequila, vodka, etc etc (depending on the occasion, weather, food, and just whatever I feel like); same with food, music, and guns (multiple different sizes, shapes, and calibers).
I even have a t-shirt that says “Celebrate Diversity” – along with silhouettes of 56 different guns.

Typing this while drinking the remainder of a bottle of Pacific Rim Sweet Riesling that my son opened (for a date) and left in the fridge a couple days ago. Not MY favorite, but I hate to waste any decent alcoholic beverage….

dentarthurdent on August 2, 2013 at 1:32 AM

Sounds like a cat-dog thing. So many insist you can’t like both. You have to choose one.

Moesart on August 2, 2013 at 1:17 AM

Oh ya – and we have 2 cats and 2 dogs….

dentarthurdent on August 2, 2013 at 1:33 AM

And if it wasn’t for whiskey, there would be no NASCAR.

panzerkardinal on August 2, 2013 at 12:50 AM

Understood – BUT – I know darn well the original moonshine runners occasionally made RIGHT turns also…..

dentarthurdent on August 2, 2013 at 1:38 AM

America’s shame: Wine catching up to beer as country’s preferred booze

Probably because most of the beer guzzlers are dying off. I like a nice cold beer once in a while, but I’ll never get these guys that sit there every day and down at least a 6 pack. It’s a cheap high and I suppose more patriotic than smoking weed like some damn hippie.

As for wine, I don’t know what wine tastes like. All I’ve ever drunk I know is swill. I would like some day to actually taste a really good wine.

Dr. ZhivBlago on August 2, 2013 at 1:52 AM

I have no idea where people get the idea the beer is somehow inherently more American than wine.

The favorite drink of the founding fathers was Madeira wine.

This is grossly inaccurate. From Ben Franklin being a booster and publisher of many recipes for beer, with Thomas Jefferson designing and building a Maltster and Brewhouse on Monticello, To a George Washington “small beer” recipe scribbled by the young lad during the French and Indian War; not to mention Sam Adams being a multi-generational maltster and brewer, or the fact that THE star Spangled Banner was sewn in a Baltimore Brewery in 1812, Id say that there is a pretty rich history of beer going back to the Mayflower.
Of course, Im sure you doubt that the original Tea Partiers and Boston Massacre rebel rousers were in a local tavern knocking back a few Porters before becoming sufficiently riled up… Right…

Outofmehead on August 2, 2013 at 5:15 AM

Strippers don’t drink beer.

tmitsss on August 2, 2013 at 9:37 AM

It also might be the general trend among young Americans to want to be “hip”. Movies and books and such made wine “trendy” and gave it some cachet. Remember when merlot suddenly became the drink of choice for those in the know? blecch. I’ll drink wine or beer, or sometimes liquor. But, I drink it because I want to, not because it makes me hip or cool. (And, trust me, you ain’t cool when you’re on your fifth glass – no matter how trendy your choice of drink was – you’re just embarassing yourself; and I have the pics to prove it.)

GWB on August 2, 2013 at 9:40 AM

Great, more beer for me.

Good beer is tastier, more complex and far more varied than wine.

Wine and beer were both perfected in Europe, basically because water would kill you, whereas the process of making wine or beer killed bacteria.

Wine was made in the more romantic region (France and Italy) whereas we Germans etc from the more barbaric, uncool places, made beer.

NoDonkey on August 2, 2013 at 9:46 AM

Excuse my rant.

Here it goes:

I’ve been in the wine industry for a few years. In my time being in wine, I have dealt with thousands of customers. There is a ridiculous notion in America: That one can either be a beer die-hard, or a wine die-hard.

I will say something and I hope it sticks. Wine and beer are no different. The ingredients and time involved are different, but the experience is the same. Wine and beer should provide a similar experience on the palate. Acid content reconciles tannins, mid-palate, and flavors on wine, and a good citrus note will do the same in beer. Both wine and beer (well made ones) should have a healthy mid-palate, not be angular, and be free of flaws. Both wine and beer can suffer from the same flaws (Hydrogen sulfide, for example).

The two sides must recognize the great things in each of their camps!

blatantblue on August 1, 2013 at 7:25 PM

This is certainly true enough, but I think most people develop a preference for the set of tastes generally involved in wine or those generally involved in beer, even if they appreciate the other. In my own case, growing up in the wine industry with over 50 years tasting experience, I vastly prefer wine to beer, except for a limited number of circumstances where beer flavors seem more appropriate.

CatoRenasci on August 2, 2013 at 10:18 AM

Good beer is tastier, more complex and far more varied than wine.
….
NoDonkey on August 2, 2013 at 9:46 AM

de gustibus non est disputandum

Methinks your knowledge of wine is limited. Even of German wine. Consider that some German wines can retain their character and drinkability for something in the order of three hundred years (from the mid-15th through the mid-18th century by reliable report), even with the relatively primitive sealing methods available in the Renaissance.

CatoRenasci on August 2, 2013 at 10:24 AM

Green Flash, Chamay, Lagunitas are rarely, if ever found outside of a good package store…

Come to Austin Texas. We have all that stuff in convenience stores.

Missy on August 2, 2013 at 12:28 PM

The favorite drink of the founding fathers was Madeira wine.

One of the leading causes of the Revolution was the British seizure of John Hancock’s ship the “Liberty”. It was holding over 5,000 gallons of Madeira in its hold.

Both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution was toasted with Madeira.

Madeira was used to christen the USS Constitution.

Washington, Jefferson, both Adams, and Franklin drank prodigious amounts of Madeira.

Love Madeira. In fact I bought a bottle of Sercial last night and had a few glasses. It is underappreciated.

Missy on August 2, 2013 at 12:29 PM

It’s all part of the Left’s grand scheme for the Vagination of America.

Even our microbrewery industry is contaminated with widespread adding of fruit, spices, sugars, and other flavors more appropriate for ice cream or yogurt than beer.

I tried to warn you people. I told you there was a deadly secret behind the push for soccer beginning in the ’80s. Now our kids don’t play baseball, spit, and carry wooden bats around, they run around in short-shorts squealing like girls and not keeping score.

The Left, culminating in Obama’s testosterone-free Presidency, has drained America of our vital bodily fluids.

Adjoran on August 1, 2013 at 7:54 PM

This!

Doomsday on August 2, 2013 at 12:48 PM

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