Quelle horreur: Being rude to the French president is no longer an infraction

posted at 6:31 pm on July 26, 2013 by Erika Johnsen

It’s Friday, and you know that I spend much too much time around here knocking France’s current administration in all of their infinite Socialist “wisdom” not to have a chuckle with this one. I actually didn’t even know this was a thing, and only do now inasmuch as it’s not a thing anymore: Apparently, and in a win for freer speech, the French legislature decided do away with a particular aspect of an old law forbidding public ‘rudeness’ directed at the French head of state, via Reuters:

Being rude to the French president is no longer an offense after parliament agreed on Thursday to amend legislation dating back to 1881 in favour of freedom of speech.

Whereas before any rude remark risked an automatic fine for “offending the head of state”, the president is now reduced to the same category as ministers and parliamentarians and would need to have a judge prove there had been slander or defamation. …

Anyone found by a judge to have slandered the president still runs the risk of a fine of up to 45,000 euros.

President Francois Hollande has so far shown a thick skin, however, as critics have given him a string of unkind nicknames like “Flanby”, a brand of wobbly caramel pudding or “Mr. Little Jokes”.

Oh, goodness. Francois Hollande might have thick skin, but he is not at all a much-liked figure in France right now — he’s hardly more than a year into his presidency, but his approval rating in June already dropped to yet another new low with only 31 percent of French citizens having a “good opinion” of him. …I wonder if he isn’t going to be the subject of quite a bit more public ‘rudeness’ in the not-so-distant future.

In related news, the French economy is struggling to such a degree that the government is for once trying to actively protect their status as the world’s number-one tourist destination — by nudging the French away from their legendary rudeness and getting residents to condescend to speak “touriste,” via the AP:

France has long had a reputation — particularly in the English-speaking world — for being a bit difficult to visit. We love to hate it, with its surly waiters and superior shopkeepers. But we also love to love it: More people visit France than any other country in the world.

But now, after years of casually riding a reputation for stunning monuments and world-class food, the French are starting to talk about tourism as an economic benefit — and one they need to do more to capitalize on. This is a sea change in a country that has long prided itself on not doing anything as gauche as catering to visitors.

“I want to make France No. 1, period,” Tourism Minister Sylvia Pinel told reporters last year as a new government took the reins and laid out its priorities. Improving France’s “welcome” was one of those — creating a true tourism policy for the first time, Pinel said.

Pinel wasn’t shy in linking the cultural and commercial: She called tourism a lever for growth and jobs, both of which France desperately needs. The country’s economy is in recession, and unemployment is nearly 11 percent. So it cannot afford to ignore the tourism industry, which accounts for more than 7 percent of the country’s gross domestic product, more than the auto industry, she said.


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The French got their independence.

Well, merde!

Schadenfreude on July 26, 2013 at 6:44 PM

Funny, now the Americans are forbidding it.

Schadenfreude on July 26, 2013 at 6:45 PM

the French legislature decided do away with a particular aspect of an old law forbidding public ‘rudeness’ directed at the French head of state

The French rude?

Jamais! /

Resist We Much on July 26, 2013 at 6:48 PM

But can they insult camel fornicating Mohammad by telling the truth about that thing.

VorDaj on July 26, 2013 at 6:50 PM

If you look to tourism for your money and to French culture for your tourism, importing Muslims (and non-French people in general) is mad.

David Blue on July 26, 2013 at 6:50 PM

Related – Teh SCOAMT is looking into making any disparaging remark of himself a death penalty case.

Steve Eggleston on July 26, 2013 at 6:54 PM

The French rude?

Jamais! /

Resist We Much on July 26, 2013 at 6:48 PM

Come on – the French are only rude to each other when it’s time for a revolution. At all other times, they save their rudeness for the non-French.

Steve Eggleston on July 26, 2013 at 6:55 PM

But can they insult camel fornicating Mohammad by telling the truth about that thing.

VorDaj on July 26, 2013 at 6:50 PM

Only in the non-”special” zones. Do remember they’re standing tough against feature-conceling headscarves.

Steve Eggleston on July 26, 2013 at 6:56 PM

First, UK billboards warning illegal immigrants. Now, France allows insulting their president.

Meanwhile, in The Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave, you’re a racist for respecting existing immigration law or supporting bankruptcy proceedings for Detroit.

Christien on July 26, 2013 at 7:02 PM

Why not, their rude to everyone else.

GarandFan on July 26, 2013 at 7:07 PM

Taunt him! Taunt him like he was an English knighit! And his hamster father, and his elderberry-smelling mother, aussi.

Christien on July 26, 2013 at 7:14 PM

Got a killer French Restaurant for you if you are ever by and have the chance.

Bmore on July 26, 2013 at 7:22 PM

Come on – the French are only rude to each other when it’s time for a revolution. At all other times, they save their rudeness for the non-French.

Steve Eggleston on July 26, 2013 at 6:55 PM

Coincidentally, I suffered another bout of my lifelong insomnia last night and watched two very interesting documentaries on the French Revolution.

Terror: Robespierre and the French Revolution

The French Revolution

Resist We Much on July 26, 2013 at 7:24 PM

Funny, now the Americans are forbidding it.

Schadenfreude on July 26, 2013 at 6:45 PM

…A M E N !

KOOLAID2 on July 26, 2013 at 10:22 PM

But to criticize the President François Hollande… it is le racist! It must be made le illegal.

Glenn Jericho on July 27, 2013 at 12:01 AM

Pardon!!!

WryTrvllr on July 27, 2013 at 1:36 AM

If you look to tourism for your money and to French culture for your tourism, importing Muslims (and non-French people in general) is mad.

David Blue on July 26, 2013 at 6:50 PM

True, but internationalists care little about such things.

Recognizing other cultures as having some sort of value equal to your own-I don’t have a huge problem with that. But it seems that what’s happening is that once-great peoples (especially in Europe) have gone too far in the all-inclusive belief. At some point your culture and your kind will disappear because you failed to keep your people racially and culturally pure to some extent.

But to try to preserve your race and culture amongst white westerners is a no-no. You’re a Nazi if you think that way. But it’s oh so important to maintain the racial and cultural integrity of say, American Indians and African tribes.

So, to allow your race/culture to be swamped by others is due to many factors including ignorance, laziness, and complacency of those peoples. The impetus comes from the NWO leadership that wants homogeneous societies on at least a continental scale, and from leftists who want the same homogeneity and want to destroy what they believe to be evil cultures that need to be punished for things like black slavery and imperialism.

Coherent racial/national groups with a strong sense of Patriotism are a danger to the NWO elitists and their Marxist allies.

French Patriotism, national identity, and pride in their culture often manage to tick us off. But in the grand scheme of things, that is how we need France (and other European countries) to be or else we’ll find ourselves to be quite alone.

Dr. ZhivBlago on July 27, 2013 at 4:30 AM

Oh, goodness. Francois Hollande might have thick skin, but he is not at all a much-liked figure in France right now — he’s hardly more than a year into his presidency, but his approval rating in June already dropped to yet another new low with only 31 percent of French citizens having a “good opinion” of him.

That would explain the reason why the law was modified. With 69% of the population in prison, France would fall flat like a souffle whose creator waited too long before serving…

unclesmrgol on July 27, 2013 at 2:30 PM