New initiative from conservative activists in Florida: Recall Rubio

posted at 3:21 pm on July 17, 2013 by Allahpundit

Just show me where to sign, pal.

No, no, I’m kidding. This is the “Sharknado” of anti-Rubio protests: Silly, yet irresistible.

KrisAnne Hall, a radio host who teaches seminars on the Constitution, tells National Review Online that she and a number of other Florida-based conservative activists hope to recall Senator Marco Rubio. But there’s one catch: You can’t recall U.S. senators in Florida. But that isn’t stopping them. Hall says she and others are working to draft state legislation that would allow for senators to face recall votes. She says that once they put the legislation together, they plan to muster support from grassroots activists, get the Florida state legislature to pass the bill, and then recall the senator, who next faces reelection in 2016.

Hall tells me that the tea-party voters who put Rubio in office are frustrated with his career thus far, especially his support for the Gang of Eight’s immigration legislation.

“They’re done with him,” she says of Florida’s tea-party activists. “They’re not voting for him and they’re angry. They’re angry because they feel they’ve been deceived.”

That’s from Betsy Woodruff, who notes that there’s already a “recall Rubio” petition floating around that was, apparently, put together by the, er, DCCC. Am I misjudging when I say that the balance of conservative opinion on recalls of federal officeholders is that they’re unconstitutional? Pretty straightforward: “The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each state, elected by the people thereof, for six years…” Rubio’s in year three. Even if there’s a wrinkle somewhere in Article I that would theoretically permit this, I can’t believe anyone wants a system where Senate/House recall elections in various states are happening every few weeks yearlong. What am I missing here?

Beyond that, more philosophically, what’s the argument for recalling him or anyone else instead of voting him out when his term is up? True, he lied shamefully about his position on immigration to get elected, but he’s not the first pol to have run as something he’s not. Obama ran as an opponent of gay marriage in 2008 and was obviously, transparently, and brazenly lying about it even then. Where’s his recall? Where was the recall for Arlen Specter when he switched parties, a far more comprehensive rejection of the voter base that elected him than what Rubio’s guilty of? It’s hard for me to imagine any scenario in which a pol is doing a terrible enough job that he shouldn’t be allowed to finish his term but not so terrible that he shouldn’t be impeached or expelled from the legislature. Which makes me think I’m missing the point here and that the goal isn’t really to recall Rubio at all. It’s simply to extend a middle finger in a showy way to emphasize just how much the base hates his betrayal on amnesty. Like I say: Where do I sign?


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Six of the ten companies with the greatest number of H1B workers are headquartered in India:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-1B_visa

bw222 on July 17, 2013 at 7:00 PM

So?

jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013 at 7:00 PM

jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013 at 6:51 PM

It’s hardly tongue in cheek. Rubio wants to be the first Hispanic President and much of the GOP grass roots would never vote for him for President. If Jeffords, Chaffee and Snarlin’ Arlen can leave the GOP, why not Rubio? Marco is no more principled than Specter was.

bw222 on July 17, 2013 at 7:06 PM

We used migrant (illegal) workers – they were great men and women – I love them like my own children. I paid them – I took care of their families and I would do it again – 100 times.
jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013

This is so messed up, I had about 8 employees at the peak of my retail business. I paid them, some were my friends, I gave them incentives, discounts and raises, but NEVER did I love them like my children.
They were adults on their own and they were responsible for taking care of their own families.
I was not their mama.

MontanaMmmm on July 17, 2013 at 7:09 PM

You couldn’t recruit programmers from a US university? There are a lot of unemployed college graduates out there, Jake.

Punchenko on July 17, 2013 at 5:19 PM

He would have to pay them a decent wage and be forced to contribute to Social Security, etc. H1B workers are like indentured servants. And, it’s very difficult for them to quit and stay in the U.S. They usually live four to an apartment and most of their money is sent to their home countries.

bw222 on July 17, 2013 at 7:12 PM

Great reply – made me smile – and you’re right.

Never worked hay – so I (shh) — tip my hat to you.

jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013 at 6:58 PM

Yep, if you leave it out in the rain, the unexpected result is that wet small-bale hay can cause barn fires:

http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/AgAnswers/story.asp?storyID=1741

We typically would try to work in as cool a situation as we could but, if rain was expected, it was all hands on deck. If it was 90-100 degrees and 90% humidity, that was just too tough.

Don’t get me wrong, I understand that we need guest worker programs for certain areas of the economy that are under-served, ones that are better run and policed than the Bracero program was from 1942-64. What we -can’t- have is a situation where there is differential enforcement of immigration laws for political and economic reasons and thus a deliberate ENCOURAGEMENT of law-breaking. I’m all for an increase in -legal- immigration, if it’s necessary.

ebrown2 on July 17, 2013 at 7:13 PM

Marco is no more principled than Specter was.

bw222 on July 17, 2013 at 7:06 PM

Wow – Ok – my eyes clearly have to shaper

jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013 at 7:15 PM

ebrown2 on July 17, 2013 at 7:13 PM

Well sir – I have get into making dinner for the family.

First – my respect goes out to you – it really does.

I teach my kids to debate like crazy – with passion – most of all with belief — but when it’s time to end the debate – thank those you engaged with – and pray that you learned something from them.

I do so tonight – I thank you.

Immigration is a passionate issue – I hope our side – the RIGHT – finds a way to position the argument, and our solutions into ones we can all rally around.

Thank you HotAir – once again – I come away better at the end of the day.

jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013 at 7:19 PM

Well sir – I have get into making dinner for the family.

First – my respect goes out to you – it really does.

I teach my kids to debate like crazy – with passion – most of all with belief — but when it’s time to end the debate – thank those you engaged with – and pray that you learned something from them.

I do so tonight – I thank you.

Immigration is a passionate issue – I hope our side – the RIGHT – finds a way to position the argument, and our solutions into ones we can all rally around.

Thank you HotAir – once again – I come away better at the end of the day.

jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013 at 7:19 PM

I did all that on my uncle’s farm. They made sure the old city boy would pull his fair share of pitching the bales into the truck. I’d still make the effort today, but the years take a toll on ya. :)

Take care.

ebrown2 on July 17, 2013 at 7:23 PM

Dems pin hopes on the House’s traitor now.

Schadenfreude on July 17, 2013 at 7:24 PM

Six of the ten companies with the greatest number of H1B workers are headquartered in India:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-1B_visa

bw222 on July 17, 2013 at 7:00 PM

So?

jake-the-goose on July 17, 2013 at 7:00 PM

What this means is that when it becomes clear California is no longer worth the headache, which will be about two minutes after Nancy Pelosi dies, Silicon Valley is gone.

Sekhmet on July 17, 2013 at 7:28 PM

Good. His opponents will get my dough.
But not him. Worst scum liar in the GOP caucus.

james23 on July 17, 2013 at 7:31 PM

Valkyriepundit on July 17, 2013 at 5:45 PM

:) Illegally at that. The land deserves to be a 3rd world shithole, soon, just like the rest of the Earth.

Schadenfreude on July 17, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Lawless traitors, have you no shame?

Schadenfreude on July 17, 2013 at 7:34 PM

This is weapons grade stupid. Who started this, s Democrat or some “true conservative” crypto-democrat?

crosspatch on July 17, 2013 at 8:31 PM

Beyond that, more philosophically, what’s the argument for recalling him or anyone else instead of voting him out when his term is up?

You seem to have answered your own question:

True, he lied shamefully about his position on immigration to get elected, but he’s not the first pol to have run as something he’s not

As long as they can lie to get elected then govern how they want without any fear for 3 ,4 or 5 years.

I think a better way then recalls will be to cut in half the time our politicians have between elections.

1 year for congress 3 for senate and 2 for POTUS. After all the terms were put in place in the days of horse transportation. It took weeks sometimes months to travel back and forth from your district to DC. Now with plane travel and autos it takes hours to a day to get anywhere in the USA. We don’t need our servants to be running around unsupervised for 6 years.

unseen on July 17, 2013 at 8:32 PM

Repeal the 17th and you fix this problem.

ButterflyDragon on July 17, 2013 at 9:02 PM

Darn skippy! What took so long???? They all look good on the outside, then they get into office and the real criminal, anti American, anti taxpayer, anti Constitution comes out in them.

F_This on July 17, 2013 at 9:02 PM

Recall?
What’s the biggie?
I recall Rubio as the Judas that trashed his career by joining forces with the rodents, Schumer, Graham, McCain, et. al., in their ongoing attempts to gnaw away the foundations of the nation.

justltl on July 17, 2013 at 9:27 PM

Personally, my disgust at Rubio has softened a bit.
I’ve decided that I would piss on him if he were on fire.
That’s about as far as I’m willing to go, however.

justltl on July 17, 2013 at 9:32 PM

I think this is a waste, except for a none to subtle message to Mr. Rubio that his constituency is a bit p.o.’d. And guess what? I don’t think he cares.

Cindy Munford on July 17, 2013 at 9:39 PM

crosspatch on July 17, 2013 at 8:31 PM

I think the name you might be looking for is Rubio. Orubio if you prefer.

Bmore on July 17, 2013 at 9:46 PM

I was about to enquire where I could sign…..

Tangerinesong on July 17, 2013 at 10:17 PM

Recall Orin Hatch, fools.

Schadenfreude on July 17, 2013 at 3:26 PM

Exactly, but is there a recall law in Utah? If so I’ll gladly take the clip board around! And I voted for him. I’m so disgusted with him.

Bambi on July 18, 2013 at 12:45 AM

Marco doesn’t really care that his supporters are upset. He’s discovered there are more votes in the low information center then there are on the right. He will run as the lesser of two evils in 2016 just like presidents McCain, Dole and Romney did. Ok, so it didn’t work all that well for them, but it might have and that’s the path Marco has decided to take.

Fred 2 on July 18, 2013 at 12:57 AM

So, so stupid.

It absolutely amazes me how blind some of us can be. I saw some commenters in the Headlines thread pitch Allen West for the seat. Notwithstanding the fact that he can’t win statewide – and he can’t, make no mistake about it – these are the same folks who were calling for West’s blood during the debt-ceiling debate of 2011.

Are conservatives such spoiled little children that if politicians don’t agree with them on absolutely every issue in the damned book, they’re RINOs who deserve to be chased out of office?

Moronic bluster like this embarrasses me. Conservatism, and Republicanism in general, is not about eternal gratification, and neither is politics in general. One sad side effect of the Tea Party’s rise to prominence is the propagation of people who think that politicians are angels, and that politics is about getting everything you want always.

KingGold on July 17, 2013 at 3:30 PM

So, so stupid.

That people like this propagate the GOP even as the GOP stabs its base in the back

Don’t you know, you’re supposed to just bend over and take it

Besides, you’re used to it, its not its anything new right?

Its people like KingGold that are destroying this nation, and he’s a perfect example of how they rationalize insanity

Keep doing the same thing you fools, its the only way things are going to get better

The GOP will betray you

True_King on July 18, 2013 at 6:23 AM

“The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each state, elected by the people thereof, for six years…” Rubio’s in year three. Even if there’s a wrinkle somewhere in Article I that would theoretically permit this, I can’t believe anyone wants a system where Senate/House recall elections in various states are happening every few weeks yearlong. What am I missing here?

You’re missing the reality that the constitution is whatever a handful of politically appointed lawyers in robes say it is. Roe vs Wade–responsible for 55 million slaughtered humans–was totally created out of imaginary emanations from penumbras and if they wish to allow a senator dumped, I’m certain they can just find more of those mysterious emanations hanging around somewhere in that now corrupted document.

Don L on July 18, 2013 at 7:57 AM

Hmmmm…

“Todd Harris, the usually gregarious consultant to Sen. Marco Rubio, uncharacteristically resisted eight days of calls and emails seeking his thoughts for this column. When he finally did reply, the answer was: “to be honest, another story about Marco and immigration is not high on Christmas list!!”

No wonder. The very issue Rubio (and Harris) thought would be a game-changing, legacy-builder looks like a big liability for the Florida senator, at least right now. In the process, the self-confident presidential hopeful suddenly looks wobbly, even a little weak, as he searches for what’s next.

Rubio spent six months working over Senate Republicans only to get stiffed by 70 percent of them. He has gone underground on the issue ever since, ducking reporters on Capitol Hill.

His poll numbers in Iowa and nationally are falling among conservatives. And he clearly feels intense pressure to start acting more conservative — and quick.

One of his new, non-immigration pushes: Warning he won’t vote to fund the government unless Obamacare is thrown out. His latest speeches have made fiscal responsibility his new signature issue, including opposition to raising the debt limit unless Congress can pass a budget that balances within 10 years. And he plans to join other Republican senators in a push on abortion restrictions that will please the base, but has no chance of becoming law.

Some top conservatives are questioning Rubio’s judgment on immigration, arguing that he was “played” by Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and other Democrats in the Senate’s Gang of Eight immigration working group.

Rubio refused to be interviewed for this column. But POLITICO’s Senate specialist, Manu Raju, cornered him in the Capitol on Wednesday to get his take.

“The Senate bill has passed the Senate,” he said. “What’s there to advocate for?” Rubio, a leader of the Gang of Eight, refused to join the rest of that gang in a meeting Tuesday with technology industry leaders to discuss putting pressure on the House. “I don’t think the best way to get a result for immigration reform in this country is to somehow try to muscle the House,” he said. The House, Rubio said, deserves “the time and space…to come up with their ideas about how to reform immigration – and I hope they will – but that’s up to them.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), a member of the Gang of Eight, said Rubio’s silent treatment is understandable – but not the best way to pass a bill. “I have been there [in the House]: When a bunch of senators came over, it wasn’t a good news day,” Graham said. But he added: “If he’s got some influence in the House, now is a good time to use it.”

n background conversations, Rubio allies spin elaborate theories about how he might be threading the perfect political needle, getting credit for winning Senate passage without owning the responsibility for the complexities of implementation – and certain rage from some parts of the right — if it actually became law.

“The Senate passed a bill that he was essential to, and his colleagues now see him as a guy who got something important done,” said a Rubio ally who would be a key part of any presidential campaign. “The business, financial, tech and evangelical groups were for the bill – that’s all pretty good stuff. He showed political strength by not kowtowing to the … right. And if the bill fails, the only way Republicans could win the Hispanic vote in a national election would be with him on the ticket.”

Rubio appears to have miscalculated how much Republican support he could win in the Senate – and how much conservative backlash he could avoid outside of it. And now he feels stuck. Conservative intellectual leaders – notably Rich Lowry of National Review (and also a POLITICO columnist) and Bill Kristol of The Weekly Standard — are crusading against his bill, backed by the vast majority of conservatives in the House.

Lowry told us: “On Rubio’s first foray into major legislation, he was part of an effort that was a substantive debacle and handed Democrats an easy political weapon to use against the House – an amnesty bill that passed with Republican support.”

And as for Rubio’s plans on abortion and the deficit, Lowry said: “Fairly or not, everything he does now is going to be seen as an effort to make up for what he did on the immigration bill….”

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/07/behind-the-curtain-marco-rubio-stumbles-immigration-94367_Page2.html#ixzz2ZOsvPyD5

workingclass artist on July 18, 2013 at 8:42 AM

He showed political strength by not kowtowing to the … right

Rubio is gutless phony….and the people around him are not only not conservative but obviously detest conservatives.

Senators should be appointed by the States like originally stated in the Constitution…otherwise, recall should be allowed. Recall should not be used in petty ways but when a pol misrepresents his position on a major issue or changes parties without warning, i see no issue with Wisconsin type recall elections.

Maybe it would make the DC gang feel a little less secure in their criminal ways.

alecj on July 18, 2013 at 12:52 PM

In keeping with all RINO’s, Rubio will just change parties and run as a DemocRAT.

phoebe1 on July 18, 2013 at 1:13 PM

It couldn’t happen fast enough. If he can be so easily seduced by the Darkside/ Dems,, how can we ever trust him?

RdLake on July 18, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Who are Florida Republican going to replace him with? Jeb? I’m not a Floridian, but as a conservative, Allen West makes sense, which means it will never happen.

Jurisprudence on July 18, 2013 at 5:17 PM

The GOP is made up of dipsh*ts! Thanks to the current crop of slime balls the Republic is severely damaged. The GOP has no balls. Not one more penny until the leadership grows a pair.

ultracon on July 19, 2013 at 4:10 PM

This campaign, like many political acts, is symbolic and it sends a message to Rubio that the next time around may be his last.

No conservative supporter of his wanted amnesty – he had to have known that, and if he did not, then he should not be getting a higher office, lacking as he does good judgment. There were so many issues to crucify Democrats over and he chose to pander on their turf. And he lost.

virgo on July 20, 2013 at 11:59 AM

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