Independence Day, 2013

posted at 8:57 am on July 4, 2013 by Jazz Shaw

Happy birthday, America.

On this date in 1776, some wiseacres on the east coast got together and penned a letter to the King of England, declaring that we were no longer enamored of his management style and would be taking charge of the franchise ourselves, thank you very much. The records show that Congress actually voted for the resolution of independence on July 2nd, but it took a couple of days to get the announcement in order and signed. Actually, even that has been the subject of some debate, with various historians claiming that the declaration wasn’t actually signed until August. But in any event, this is the day we settled on eventually. As to its meaning, I think John Adams summed it up nicely in this letter to his wife.

The second day of July, 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more.

Old John had a way with words. This was not intended to be just a solemn day, but a day of bold, brash strutting and an affirmation of the rejection of tyranny and dedication to God, nation and freedom. I will be spending the day up in the mountains with family. There are traditionally cookouts around the lake, live musical performances and boating events, capped off by a fireworks display launched from a barge floating on the lake. (There may be fishing involved also.) I hope that you have the opportunity to celebrate as you see fit as well.

From all of us here at Hot Air to all you readers out there, we wish you the best on this Independence Day. If you’re an American, you still have plenty of reasons to be proud, so get out there and make with the shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations. You deserve it.


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From a rainy South, Happy 4th to all my HA friends! Wishing for you some spectacular fireworks!

MustLoveBlogs on July 4, 2013 at 3:41 PM

Reuters Top News ‏@Reuters 7h

U.S. enjoys July 4 parades, picnics under watchful eyes of police http://reut.rs/11jH1Er
======================

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/04/us-usa-julyfourth-idUSBRE9630EG20130704?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter&dlvrit=992637

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 4:34 PM

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 1:17 PM

Glad you like the link. Thank you for all your news links!

PatriotGal2257 on July 4, 2013 at 4:44 PM

In response to libfreeordie’s comments:

Slavery was a misguided, tragic blunder by the Founding Fathers. The notion that a man or woman can be owned by another is in sharp contradiction to the ideals of freedom otherwise stated in the document. The original Constitution was definitely not perfect. Pretending it was perfect doesn’t make it so.

If we can, though, look beyond the affirmation of slavery that was made in the original Constitution–an affirmation which I would agree was tragic and not insignificant–the rest of the document points to a radically different and more enlightened course for humanity. That radically enlightened part was truly something worth celebrating. It was unique in the world, and it was amazing.

Burke on July 4, 2013 at 3:12 PM

The stage-play “1776″ contains some of the most enlightening commentary on the debate regarding slavery, which essentially boiled down to “don’t let the perfect become the enemy of the good.” The coalition with the south was needed to obtain freedom for all of the colonies; the founder’s chose to defer the fight over slavery to another day — I would like to believe that most of them hoped it could be won without violence, but, if so, they were wrong.

Douglass’s speech pre-dated the Civil War, and may have helped persuade some Americans to become abolitionists, because he was correct at that time.

However, because Americans, at great cost, amended the defects of the original Constitution, the speech is only applicable to those who choose to make themselves slaves to their own prejudices.

AesopFan on July 4, 2013 at 5:10 PM

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 1:17 PM

Glad you like the link. Thank you for all your news links!

PatriotGal2257 on July 4, 2013 at 4:44 PM

PatriotGal2257:You have a Great Day,anytime on da linkys!:)

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 5:51 PM

In response to libfreeordie’s comments

Slavery was first established in the Colonies when a man sued in court claiming that his servant, Jon Castor, a black man, was his ‘for life.’

The court agreed and the man was recognised as the owner of his servant ‘for life.’

This ruling established slavery in the Colonies.

Thus, this man was the first individual in the Colonies to own slaves.

The man, the first slave owner in the Colonies, was a very successful property owner and tobacco farmer.

He had been an indentured servant in Jamestown after being captured and sent to Virginia.

He had been born in Angola.

His name was Anthony Johnson…and he was black.

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM

Still trying to make liberal heads explode, I see. LOL Well, this is a day for fireworks…

Liam on July 4, 2013 at 6:18 PM

PatriotGal2257:You have a Great Day,anytime on da linkys!:)

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 5:51 PM

Thanks, Canopfor! :)

PatriotGal2257 on July 4, 2013 at 6:20 PM

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM

I’m sure this really messes up the liberal meme to know this, as well as the fact that some blacks in Africa sold their own countrymen into slavery.

Just a little inconvenient truth that gets denied anytime liberals want to bludgeon us average citizens over the head with their “America-the-oppressive” schtick.

PatriotGal2257 on July 4, 2013 at 6:26 PM

One of the first people to write about the history of black ownership of slaves in America was Carter G Woodson, whose grandparents and father had been slaves. His book, Free Negro Owners of Slaves in the United States in 1830, was published in 1924. In it, Woodson provides the names and numbers of slaves owned by black freemen according to the United States Census of 1830.

According to the Census, there were 965 free black slave owners in Louisiana, owned 4,206 slaves. In South Carolina, there were 464 black freeman, who owned 2,715 slaves. All told, there were 3,775 free blacks, who owned 12,740 black slaves, in 1830.

A portrait of the first slaveholder in the Colonies, Anthony Johnson.

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:37 PM

One of the first people to write about the history of black ownership of slaves in America was Carter G Woodson, whose grandparents and father had been slaves. His book, Free N3gro Owners of Slaves in the United States in 1830, was published in 1924. In it, Woodson provides the names and numbers of slaves owned by black freemen according to the United States Census of 1830.

According to the Census, there were 965 free black slave owners in Louisiana, owned 4,206 slaves. In South Carolina, there were 464 black freeman, who owned 2,715 slaves. All told, there were 3,775 free blacks, who owned 12,740 black slaves, in 1830.

A portrait of the first slaveholder in the Colonies, Anthony Johnson.

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:37 PM

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM

Still trying to make liberal heads explode, I see. LOL Well, this is a day for fireworks…

Liam on July 4, 2013 at 6:18 PM

I’m sure libfree would be happy to explain this bit of racism in the tolerant progressive state of Wisconsin…

A saxophone player has claimed that she was assaulted as she played a jazz song in the street by three African American women who said a white girl shouldn’t play that sort of music.

Cassandra Struve, 26, was performing in the street outside the Summerfest grounds in Milwaukee, Wisconsin around 11pm on June 26 when the three women approached her.

‘I was playing Minnie the Moocher, classic Blues Brothers song,’ Struve told WITI. ‘A lady with a child in her hand came up to me, smacked me in my face and said, “Don’t play that”.’

They added that a white girl could not play the song, she said.

-snip-

‘As they walked away, they were saying” white saxophone playing B word”,’ said Struve. ‘I was upset and crying instantly because I knew that when she hit me, she hit me with only racial hate.’

The saxophone player is white. And this story was only reported by news outlets in the UK.

But I did find one bit of coverage from the Milwaukee Sentinel. They “report” that the Milwaukee cops originally thought she was lying, but later changed their minds and said they believed her story.

But since this attack doesn’t fit the agenda of the American Democrat Media, they’re simply pretending it never happened. Dr. Goebbels would heartily approve.

Del Dolemonte on July 4, 2013 at 6:59 PM

Del Dolemonte on July 4, 2013 at 6:59 PM

I saw that piece about the sax player. I was always told it’s racist to not ‘embrace black culture’. Now, all of a sudden, us whites aren’t allowed?

TFB for liberals, but I’ll meet them half way. I like Jazz and Blues, but can’t stand Rap and Hip-Hop.

I don’t blame Obama for this mess, per se. Most of my disdain is aimed at the white liberals of the alphabet networks, CNN, and the biggest offender of them all: lily-white MSNBC. They’re the real purveyors of strife and animosity in this country.

Liam on July 4, 2013 at 7:15 PM

The coalition with the south was needed to obtain freedom for all of the colonies.

Douglass’s speech pre-dated the Civil War, and… because Americans, at great cost, amended the defects of the original Constitution, the speech is only applicable to those who choose to make themselves slaves to their own prejudices.

AesopFan on July 4, 2013 at 5:10 PM

Wise words, AesopFan. Thanks for commenting.

You’re right that the inclusion of slavery in the Constitution probably wasn’t a “tragic blunder” as I labeled it. It could more accurately be described as a pragmatic compromise, the best that could be accomplished under the circumstances. In any case, it was a serious imperfection.

I’m a fan of Aesop, too, by the way (and so is Thomas Sowell, the only philosopher I’ve ever read who uses his fables to illustrate points in a regular way).

Burke on July 4, 2013 at 7:36 PM

Obama at White House Independence Day celebration for members of US military:

‘People in scattered corners of the world live in peace today (and) are free to write their own futures because of you’

– @Reuters

36 mins ago by editor
==========================

https://twitter.com/Reuters

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 7:38 PM

Compare and Contrast Obama: Egypt v Benghazi (Pics)

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 7:20 PM

Resist We Much:

Thought you might get a kick,out of Hopeys second chance thingy:)
=================================================================

Reuters Top News ‏@Reuters 56m

Analysis: Cautious toward Middle East, Obama gets second chance in Egypt http://reut.rs/1cWyPcZ
=============================

WASHINGTON | Thu Jul 4, 2013 6:44pm EDT

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/04/us-egypt-usa-obama-idUSBRE9630SC20130704?feedType=RSS&feedName=topNews&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter&dlvrit=992637

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 7:49 PM

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 7:56 PM

You always have the coolest photo collections.

It’s a shame liberals nowadays equate patriotism with racism.

Liam on July 4, 2013 at 8:08 PM

In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free people.

During my annual reading of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, today the above passage caught my attention. It’s the paragraph after the list of grievances against KGIII. Note the final line, to which I have added the emphasis. Remind you of anybody?

stukinIL4now on July 4, 2013 at 8:09 PM

Del Dolemonte on July 4, 2013 at 6:59 PM

I saw that piece about the sax player. I was always told it’s racist to not ‘embrace black culture’. Now, all of a sudden, us whites aren’t allowed?

TFB for liberals, but I’ll meet them half way. I like Jazz and Blues, but can’t stand Rap and Hip-Hop.

I don’t blame Obama for this mess, per se. Most of my disdain is aimed at the white liberals of the alphabet networks, CNN, and the biggest offender of them all: lily-white MSNBC. They’re the real purveyors of strife and animosity in this country.

Liam on July 4, 2013 at 7:15 PM

The same stuff was going on long before he came along. But he certainly hasn’t improved things in that area.

Del Dolemonte on July 4, 2013 at 8:14 PM

Fireworks, parades and family fun: Glorious photographs of how Americans marked Independence Day over the last two centuries

Photos show July 4 celebrations from 1900s to 1960s
Costume parties, picnics and Hollywood stars are pictured

PUBLISHED: 15:17 GMT, 4 July 2013 | UPDATED: 16:17 GMT, 4 July 2013
*******************************************************************

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2355974/Fourth-July-celebrations-Glorious-photos-Americans-marked-Independence-Day-past.html

canopfor on July 4, 2013 at 8:18 PM

Dear Lord,
I pray you continue to bless America.Even though we seem to have lost our way.Even though legalizing drugs takes priority over protecting the innocent unborn.Even though marriage has become a civil right based on the sexual preferences of a tiny minority,while the overwhelming majority of Americans who are Christians find their religious beliefs under attack by a government intent on changing our Constitution from “freedom of religion” to “freedom from religion”.Please Lord, help us find ways to deserve your blessings once again.

redware on July 4, 2013 at 8:53 PM

jus sittin here with the Yung uns poppin fireworks in disobedience of the city ban on it!!

Viva Independence ya stinkin Progressives!

PappyD61 on July 4, 2013 at 9:59 PM

an two of the peoples poppin them farcrackers are police officers in charge of enforcing the ban!!

Take that ya Progressive filth tryin to control us.

PappyD61 on July 4, 2013 at 10:03 PM

from one end of this continent to the other

Wow. I had no idea they had such manifest destiny ambitions so early on.

John the Libertarian on July 4, 2013 at 10:34 PM

HEY … FAT GEORGE AMERICAN PROGRESSIVES ….. UP YOURS !

listens2glenn on July 4, 2013 at 11:17 PM

Dear Lord,
I pray you continue to bless America.Even though we seem to have lost our way.Even though legalizing drugs takes priority over protecting the innocent unborn.Even though marriage has become a civil right based on the sexual preferences of a tiny minority,while the overwhelming majority of Americans who are Christians find their religious beliefs under attack by a government intent on changing our Constitution from “freedom of religion” to “freedom from religion”.Please Lord, help us find ways to deserve your blessings once again.

redware on July 4, 2013 at 8:53 PM

God to America:

Sorry. Begging my mercy won’t work unless you actually intend to change your behavior in the bargain. Try again when you’re ready.

gryphon202 on July 4, 2013 at 11:51 PM

Wow. I had no idea they had such manifest destiny ambitions so early on.

John the Libertarian on July 4, 2013 at 10:34 PM

Only a few, and their ambitions didn’t become realistic until 1812 when we sent the tea-sippers packing for the second and final time. Large-scale western expansion had to wait until we showed the old powers of Europe that we could do more than just win a long-distance colonial war.

MelonCollie on July 5, 2013 at 12:05 AM

I love this post… thank you, Jazz…

On this date in 1776, America unfollowed England.

PointnClick on July 5, 2013 at 6:18 AM

Anthony Johnson…and he was black.

Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM

I will assume that you’re not a liar, you’re just misinformed. The first man sentenced to slave status for life was John Punch, who was an indentured servant who had escaped from his bond holder along with two other white indentured servants. All three men were captured, but only Punch was made a slave for life. The Connecticut legislature passed a law legalizing chattel slavery before the John Castor case. The Castor is historically significant only because it is the first time the law recognized that non-white men could own slaves. But by no means is it the “start” of slavery in the Americas. And I’m not even going to get on you about ignoring Carribean slavery or any of the Spanish, French or Dutch outposts in the “New World.” Please do not come for me on colonial black history or the history of slavery boo. You’re out of your element.

libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 8:19 AM

Please do not come for me on colonial black history or the history of slavery boo. You’re out of your element.
 
libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 8:19 AM

 
Is that part of the minstrelsy you were telling us about yesterday, professor?
 
You’re a PhD, right?

rogerb on July 5, 2013 at 9:33 AM

Is that part of the minstrelsy you were telling us about yesterday, professor?

Why would that quoted passage be minstrelsy?

libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 9:49 AM

I will assume that you’re not a liar, you’re just misinformed. The first man sentenced to slave status for life was John Punch, who was an indentured servant who had escaped from his bond holder along with two other white indentured servants. All three men were captured, but only Punch was made a slave for life. The Connecticut legislature passed a law legalizing chattel slavery before the John Castor case. The Castor is historically significant only because it is the first time the law recognized that non-white men could own slaves. But by no means is it the “start” of slavery in the Americas. And I’m not even going to get on you about ignoring Carribean slavery or any of the Spanish, French or Dutch outposts in the “New World.” Please do not come for me on colonial black history or the history of slavery boo. You’re out of your element.

libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 8:19 AM

It is documented that John Casor was the first legally sanctioned slave in Virginia, through a court case of 1654.

While some genealogists and historians describe Punch as the first slave, he was technically still an indentured servant, as he was sentenced to serve the remainder of his life in servitude as punishment for escaping.

Casor, by contrast, was found to have been a slave since his arrival in Virginia.

Resist We Much on July 5, 2013 at 12:22 PM

Who’s up for some comprehensive fireworks reform?

BobMbx on July 5, 2013 at 12:52 PM

“About the Declaration there is a finality that is exceedingly restful. It is often asserted that the world has made a great deal of progress since 1776, that we have had new thoughts and new experiences which have given us a great advance over the people of that day, and that we may therefore very well discard their conclusions for something more modern. But that reasoning can not be applied to this great charter.

“If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable rights, that is final. If governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, that is final. No advance, no progress can be made beyond these propositions. If anyone wishes to deny their truth or their soundness, the only direction in which he can proceed historically is not forward, but backward toward the time when there was no equality, no rights of the individual, no rule of the people.

“Those who wish to proceed in that direction cannot lay claim to progress. They are reactionary. Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, than those of the Revolutionary fathers.” -Silent Cal via Instapundit

Akzed on July 5, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Resist We Much on July 5, 2013 at 12:22 PM

Casor, by contrast, was found to have been a slave since his arrival in Virginia.

Wasn’t Punch under indenture from his arrival in the colonies? Its a distinction without a difference. The more important turning point in the transition from a system of indenture which could enslave whites, blacks and Native people to black slavery is Virginia’s 1662 law which said:

Act XII

Negro womens children to serve according to the condition of the mother.

WHEREAS some doubts have arrisen whether children got by any Englishman upon a Negro woman should be slave or free, Be it therefore enacted and declared by this present grand assembly, that all children borne in this country shalbe held bond or free only according to the condition of the mother, And that if any christian shall committ ffornication with a Negro man or woman, hee or shee soe offending shall pay double the ffines imposed by the former act.38

Much more than the Casor case, this 1662 linked blackness with enslavement because it reversed one of the age old traditions in Western civilization, paternal inheritance.

libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 1:51 PM

I will assume that you’re not a liar, you’re just misinformed. The first man sentenced to slave status for life was John Punch, who was an indentured servant who had escaped from his bond holder along with two other white indentured servants. All three men were captured, but only Punch was made a slave for life. The Connecticut legislature passed a law legalizing chattel slavery before the John Castor case. The Castor is historically significant only because it is the first time the law recognized that non-white men could own slaves. But by no means is it the “start” of slavery in the Americas. And I’m not even going to get on you about ignoring Carribean slavery or any of the Spanish, French or Dutch outposts in the “New World.” Please do not come for me on colonial black history or the history of slavery boo. You’re out of your element.

libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 8:19 AM

RWM posted the historical facts.

Punch was bound legally as a lifelong indentured servant as a result of trying to break his contracted indentured servitude.

Indentured servitude was a form of Debt Bondage and was usually court ordered as a Penalty or sometimes voluntary as a contract. The rules and legal procedures for indentured servitude were very different from slavery.

Ben Franklin broke his apprenticeship contract with his brother and ran away from Boston to Philadelphia to escape prosecution. Although indentured servitude was different from the trades apprenticeships, there were legal similarities with regard to specific time periods of service and legal remedies for contract owners of both indentured servants and apprentices.

As usual you muddle historicity to try and justify your moonbat positions.

workingclass artist on July 5, 2013 at 2:21 PM

I posted a response, it went into moderation. Short version. The Casor case is much less significant than the 1662 Virginia law which declared that children of Negr0 women would inherit the slave/free status of the mother. That is the true beginning of black slavery in the United States. The distinction between the Punch and Casor case is merely one of interpretation since Punch also arrived in the US as an indenture. The Punch case matters more for the establishment of black slavery because it was the first case where the law recorded to different punishments for the same crime and the worse punishment “lifetime servitude” was given to the black indenture.

libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 2:28 PM

Please do not come for me on colonial black history or the history of slavery boo. You’re out of your element.
 
libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 8:19 AM

 

Is that part of the minstrelsy you were telling us about yesterday, professor?
 
You’re a PhD, right?
 
rogerb on July 5, 2013 at 9:33 AM

 
Why would that quoted passage be minstrelsy?
 
libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 9:49 AM

 
Well done, professor boo:
 

D. Minstrelsy is characterized primarily by the use of “blackface”…
 
1. Blackface served as a racial marker, suggesting that the performer would be portraying aspects of African American culture.
 
http://people.eku.edu/nelsonl/mus273/minstrel.html

rogerb on July 5, 2013 at 2:58 PM

Old/busted:
 

Anthony Johnson…and he was black.
 
Resist We Much on July 4, 2013 at 6:09 PM

 
I will assume that you’re not a liar, you’re just misinformed. The first man sentenced to slave status for life was John Punch…
You’re out of your element.
 
libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 8:19 AM

 
New six-hours-later hotness:
 

The Casor case is much less significant than the 1662 Virginia law which declared that…
 
libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 2:28 PM

 
Well done, professor.
 

I will assume that you’re not a liar, you’re just misinformed.

rogerb on July 5, 2013 at 3:07 PM

PC correctness rewrites history to the detriment of all.
Lessons in history not studied and discussed openly with honesty and frankness come back to haunt us later.

losarkos on July 5, 2013 at 3:09 PM

I will assume that you’re not a liar, you’re just misinformed.
 
libfreeordie on July 5, 2013 at 8:19 AM

 
So another dead thread (again), eh professor boo?

rogerb on July 5, 2013 at 8:35 PM

Imagine that for a bit. Imagine being consumed by your academic fetish but being constantly shown as wrong on almost every topic you introduce here outside of a laughably self-limited sort of “the influence of women professors in gay black history and how it influences future gay history of blacks and women” sphere of knowledge.
 
Now imagine knowing that the non-bubble folks you choose to congregate with care very little about your womens-/LBGT-/black-studies knowledge. And, worse, often laugh openly about its perceived value after you prove you haven’t bothered to learn much else.
 
Sadder still is knowing that he comes here and gets knocked around academically by people who probably only graduated high school but who have genuine intellectual curiousity and have educated themselves on different topics, and this forces him to return to the comfort of that little womens-/LBGT-/black-studies bubble where he knows what he’s expected to say to be told he’s smart again.
 
Lather, rinse, repeat.
 
rogerb on February 5, 2013 at 7:03 AM

rogerb on July 5, 2013 at 8:37 PM

Yep. Dead thread.
 

You actually get an enormous satisfaction from the idea that you have bested someone with a phd in U.S. history on..wait for it….Hot Air. The conservative blog. Like think about that being the place where you claim victory.
 
libfreeordie on February 5, 2013 at 9:21 AM

 
Like you said, a phd in U.S. history and you still can’t defend the topics you introduce against dumb conservatives on… wait for it… Hot Air.
 
Like think about that being the place where you constantly have to abandon threads.

rogerb on July 6, 2013 at 11:59 AM

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