CBS: ObamaCare a “jalopy they are trying to roll out of the driveway here at barely operational”

posted at 1:01 pm on July 3, 2013 by Erika Johnsen

They’re scrambling like chickens with their heads cut off to complete the federally-run health-insurance “exchanges” by the (currently) October 1st deadline; premiums are already getting pricier all over the place; insurers are reluctant to participate in multiple facets of the law, and in some cases have already declined to do so; they’re trying (and so far failing) to secure big-name, large-audience endorsements while practically conscripting low-level federal employees to help with “educating” the public; they know they’re going to have a tough time persuading the young, healthy people they need to subsidize the heightened risk pools to volunteer to sign up for more expensive insurance plans; and just in case you might of thought things couldn’t get any messier for them, never fear — ’cause they just did, both administratively and politically.

It sounds like the business community was in enough of an uproar over the damaging economic effects of the “Affordable” Care Act to spur the administration’s announcement last night that they’ll be delaying the employer mandate (which requires all employers with 50+ workers to provide health coverage for employees who work 30+ hours/week, or else pay a penalty of $2,000/worker over a 30-worker threshold) until 2015. It simply wouldn’t do for employers to lay off/shift workers to part-time en masse before the 2014 midterms, you see — as CBS’s John Dickerson so eloquently put it this morning, this does not look good for them.

As a political matter, this is not good. It sort of contributes to the feeling that the Affordable Care Act is a jalopy they’re trying to roll out of the driveway here at barely operational for the president. So that’s not good. The White House made the decision, though, take the pain now before the July 4th weekend rather than have all of these stories over the next year of companies that were laying off workers or having such a hard time implementing this. … The problem for Democrats running is that they’re already weighed down by the feelings people have about this, about this bill and about the opposition from small business and from businesses of all kinds. And though this delay, again, takes this story from being a chronic ailment as it gets implemented, it doesn’t really reduce the fact that in a lot of these states where Democrats are running, red states, this law is unpopular.


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With single-payer coverage, if you are not forced to partake of the healthcare system, even if your taxes are paying for it, how can it be unconstitutional? Repulsive, vile, disastrous, and awful (to mention a few mild expletives), but not unconstitutional.

DaveK on July 3, 2013 at 4:11 PM

Please find and paste the Constitutional authorization to Congress to create a health insurance/health care system or to takeover that of all the states.

Congress and the feral government are not allowed to just do any damn thing they please. There are limits placed on them. That’s the whole point of the Constitution. It doesn’t matter if they try to force me to use that stuff or not, if it is not authorized in the Constitution, Congress can’t do it.

The key argument in the Obamacare decision was about whether the government could require you to buy healthcare insurance. Even Roberts said they can’t force you to do that, but that they could tax you for not participating. They can’t, however, make those penalties so large that your are coerced into buying the coverage.

Dude … really. You have to go back and think about this some more. And the case was only about the mandate, not the whole of the legislation. There were other cases about other aspects. Just because they all didn’t show up in this one case doesn’t mean anything. And Benedict Roberts’ decision in this case was ridiculous, stupid, offensive and INDEFENSIBLE.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on July 3, 2013 at 5:34 PM

and just in case you might of thought things couldn’t get any messier for them

Dude.

Arnold Yabenson on July 3, 2013 at 5:44 PM

Please find and paste the Constitutional authorization to Congress to create a health insurance/health care system or to takeover that of all the states.

Congress and the feral government are not allowed to just do any damn thing they please. There are limits placed on them. That’s the whole point of the Constitution. It doesn’t matter if they try to force me to use that stuff or not, if it is not authorized in the Constitution, Congress can’t do it.

… They did Social Security, they did Medicare. Easy to extend programs similar to those to all medical coverage. As for authority, if they choose to set up a nationwide healthcare system, they certainly have the power to heavily regulate that as interstate commerce.

The only thing having kept us from a single-payer nationwide healthcare system is the voters, who would not tolerate their representatives enacting such a system. When Obamacare falls apart and takes down the health insurance industry with it, the government can swoop in, enact the Universal Healthcare Act, and the sheeple will be happy that they’ve been saved.

Besides, our President seems to think he can do what he darned well pleases, no matter what the law or constitution happens to say. It’s for our own good, you see.

DaveK on July 4, 2013 at 12:06 AM

Comment pages: 1 2