Quotes of the day

posted at 10:01 pm on June 17, 2013 by Allahpundit

All those Americans who were worried that the NSA could be abusing its alarmingly wide discretion to collect telephone data to track their locations can now rest easy. The Wall Street Journal reports that, while NSA officials are legally allowed to use data ”that can pinpoint the location of callers,” they choose not to.

Because of concerns about intruding on Americans civil liberties? Nah. Mainly because “the data doesn’t provide sufficient intelligence value to justify the resources that would be required to use it.”…

As Locke labored to point out, much of the task of governance is ultimately a matter of prudence. But saying, ‘Trust us, we’re good guys” is not a particularly reassuring defense — especially from this administration.

***

Question:

Why did you wait to release the documents if you said you wanted to tell the world about the NSA programs since before Obama became president?

Answer:

Obama’s campaign promises and election gave me faith that he would lead us toward fixing the problems he outlined in his quest for votes. Many Americans felt similarly. Unfortunately, shortly after assuming power, he closed the door on investigating systemic violations of law, deepened and expanded several abusive programs, and refused to spend the political capital to end the kind of human rights violations like we see in Guantanamo, where men still sit without charge…

This disclosure provides Obama an opportunity to appeal for a return to sanity, constitutional policy, and the rule of law rather than men. He still has plenty of time to go down in history as the President who looked into the abyss and stepped back, rather than leaping forward into it. I would advise he personally call for a special committee to review these interception programs, repudiate the dangerous “State Secrets” privilege, and, upon preparing to leave office, begin a tradition for all Presidents forthwith to demonstrate their respect for the law by appointing a special investigator to review the policies of their years in office for any wrongdoing. There can be no faith in government if our highest offices are excused from scrutiny – they should be setting the example of transparency.

***

Charlie Rose: But there is a balance here.

Barack Obama: But there is a balance, so I’m going to get to your — get to your question. The way I view it, my job is both to protect the American people and to protect the American way of life, which includes our privacy. And so every program that we engage in, what I’ve said is “Let’s examine and make sure that we’re making the right tradeoffs.” Now, with respect to the NSA, a government agency that has been in the intelligence gathering business for a very long time —…

Barack Obama: It is transparent. That’s why we set up the FISA court…. The whole point of my concern, before I was president — because some people say, “Well, you know, Obama was this raving liberal before. Now he’s, you know, Dick Cheney.” Dick Cheney sometimes says, “Yeah, you know? He took it all lock, stock, and barrel.” My concern has always been not that we shouldn’t do intelligence gathering to prevent terrorism, but rather are we setting up a system of checks and balances? So, on this telephone program, you’ve got a federal court with independent federal judges overseeing the entire program. And you’ve got Congress overseeing the program, not just the intelligence committee and not just the judiciary committee — but all of Congress had available to it before the last reauthorization exactly how this program works.

Now, one last point I want to make, because what you’ll hear is people say, “Okay, we have no evidence that it has been abused so far.” And they say, “Let’s even grant that Obama’s not abusing it, that all these processes — DOJ is examining it. It’s being renewed periodically, et cetera — the very fact that there is all this data in bulk, it has the enormous potential for abuse,” because they’ll say, you know, “You can — when you start looking at metadata, even if you don’t know the names, you can match it up, if there’s a call to an oncologist, and there’s a call to a lawyer, and — you can pair that up and figure out maybe this person’s dying, and they’re writing their will, and you can yield all this information.” All of that is true. Except for the fact that for the government, under the program right now, to do that, it would be illegal.

***

The three-page document regarding the NSA programs was released to congressional intelligence committees and states the plots were thwarted in the U.S. and more than 20 other countries. The data is destroyed every five years, according to the document.

The officials also said the NSA checked just 300 phone numbers last year against its database of millions of U.S. phone records gathered daily, an attempt to argue the surveillance programs are less sweeping than alleged.

They also said they are working to declassify information on the dozens of plots NSA chief Gen. Keith Alexander said were disrupted, to show Americans the value of the programs, but said they want to make sure they don’t inadvertently reveal parts of the U.S. counterterrorism playbook in the process.

***

Asked whether Obama feels he has violated the privacy of Americans, McDonough said, “He does not.”…

McDonough said Congress authorized the programs as a way to thwart plots against Americans and that lawmakers should stay up to date on how they are run. The administration has said the program collected only “metadata” – raw information that does not identify individual telephone subscribers and did not monitor calls.

The president is not saying ‘trust me.’ The president is saying I want every member of Congress, on whose authority we are running this program, to understand it, to be briefed about it, and to be comfortable with it,” he said.

***

When first asked about the program by a reporter June 7, Obama said he trusts in the oversight system in place, and gave assurances that the system involves all three branches of government. “In the abstract, you can complain about Big Brother and how this is a potential program run amok,” he said, “but when you actually look at the details, then I think we’ve struck the right balance.”

But the ordinary citizen can’t look at the details.

In the same answer, the president said, “I welcome this debate. And I think it’s healthy for our democracy.”

But we wouldn’t be having this debate if everyone followed the law and there was no leak.

***

As much as the conspiratorial left and right would like to believe that big super-secret bureaucracies like the NSA are easily capable of violating our constitutional rights, the truth is surely the other way round: Civil liberties are much more likely to be in danger when smaller organizations—the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the CIA, or the Secret Service—with specific, highly selective targeting requirements, abuse their surveillance authority or, in the case of Langley with its drones, their war-related authority. And it’s doubtful that the national-security institutions since 9/11 have engaged in practices that fundamentally challenge anyone’s constitutional rights—the possible big exceptions would be the FBI’s counterterrorist practices against militant Muslim Americans that have occasionally tiptoed close to entrapment and the bureau’s extensive use of national-security letters that can allow curious minds to wander freely through the personal lives of targeted individuals. If the government sensibly gives the Secret Service the capacity to intercept cellular telephone calls as a means to protect preemptively American VIPs, its officers may well monitor the salacious conversations of Washington celebrities or sexually adventurous co-eds at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland. Adults are always required to ensure that such practices don’t become anything more than bad-boy behavior. All organizations run amok unless adults are present.

The huge high-tech intelligence bureaucracies, like smaller outfits such as the operations and technology directorates within the CIA, are extremely difficult for senior government officials to manipulate and abuse because of the many overlapping and checking authorities in these institutions. Unlike the IRS, intelligence agencies are not designed to interact with the citizenry, nor do they have or want prosecutorial power. The intelligence agencies grow uneasy, sometimes even too cautious, when foreign threats develop a domestic dimension…

This is the better question provoked by Snowden’s paranoia: How much money has Congress spent on these data-collection projects? We are told, both by administration officials and by congressmen, that the NSA’s PRISM project, marrying Ft. Meade with Silicon Valley, has stopped numerous terrorist attacks. Perhaps. But it would behoove us all to question that assertion.

***

Worst of all, the cult of the whistleblower reveals the mainstreaming of conspiratorial thinking, of the belief that dark forces rule over a weak and emaciated public that is kept in blissful ignorance. The crossover between respectable worshippers of whistleblowers and irrational purveyors of crank theories is great. So Alex Jones, infamous conspiracy theorist, is naturally a massive fan of Snowden. Today’s Guardian has a list of ‘brave whistleblowers’, which includes Annie Machon, formerly of MI5 and now a notorious ‘9/11 Truther’. That former icon Assange has written cranky essays with titles like ‘Conspiracy as Governance’. Meanwhile, a top Guardian columnist says the Snowden revelations ‘seem to confirm all the old bug-eyed conspiracy theories about governments and corporations colluding to enslave the rest of us’.

That’s the real impact of the cult of the whistleblower – the further promotion, among polite society as well as impolite, of the idea that evil networks control the unenlightened horde. It isn’t true. Yes, there are numerous attacks on our civil liberties today, but you know what? We are more than capable of seeing who is carrying them out, and of doing something about them, without needing a secular icon of ‘truth’ to hold our hands or massage our allegedly tiny minds.

***

If this poll is part of a trend, Obama still may be able to recover. But he would need to take immediate steps to show accountability, transparency, and credibility.

No more slow-walking the truth as the White House did with the cause of the Benghazi attacks and with the names of West Wing officials notified about IRS targeting.

No more lies, such as the IRS claiming for months that the targeting did not take place, and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper denying the existence of the NSA programs weeks before they were revealed.

No more doublespeak such as the president earnestly claiming, “Your duly elected representatives have consistently been informed” of the NSA programs. He knew that wasn’t quite true, or should have known…

There is no time to waste. Obama already has earned the ignominious distinction of running against Bush’s surveillance programs, then adapting it as president, and expanding it. Does he also want to repeat his predecessor’s credibility crisis?

***

***

He explained, “I once asked a collective group, the big nine [congressional leaders], in the spring of ’04, in the briefing when we first briefed them and said, ‘Do you think we ought to continue the program,’ and they said absolutely yes. I said, ‘Do you think we ought to go back to Congress to get additional authorization,’ and they said absolutely not. It’ll leak.”

***



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Comment pages: 1 2 3

Am I the first one here?

KCB on June 17, 2013 at 10:05 PM

Transparency

RickB on June 17, 2013 at 10:05 PM

yes you are!

KOOLAID2 on June 17, 2013 at 10:06 PM

He just loves that picture of Obama talking with Reggie.

Cleombrotus on June 17, 2013 at 10:07 PM

Trust.

No…

Seven Percent Solution on June 17, 2013 at 10:08 PM

I watched one of my cats climb up on one of the desks, reach her paw up…and flick off a LIGHT SWITCH!!!
#twerpscatsarepossessed.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:09 PM

The fundamental transformation Bark’s administration will be remembered for is the massive erosion of trust in all facets of the federal government that they engineered.

Say what you will about Boosh, there was never a doubt his administration had the best interests of the vast majority of Americans at heart,

Bark’s Chicago-style ward-heeling corrosiveness writ large has done in 5 years what no other, including Nixon, managed in their administrations.

There is a hardening of the body-politic occurring like I have never seen, counting the 60′s.

I guess this was the change Bark and his minions were looking for.

Sad days ahead, friends. Sad days.

Bruno Strozek on June 17, 2013 at 10:11 PM

I watched one of my cats climb up on one of the desks, reach her paw up…and flick off a LIGHT SWITCH!!!
#twerpscatsarepossessed.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:09 PM

Your cats have something planned for later and want you to go to bed early instead of being on HA half the night.

RickB on June 17, 2013 at 10:12 PM

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:09 PM

Keep your threads straight.

cozmo on June 17, 2013 at 10:15 PM

The only debate the State Run Media is having is whether or not Snowden is a traitor. Nevermind those behind the curtain. This could hurt our Dear Leader.

d1carter on June 17, 2013 at 10:15 PM

Keep your threads straight.

cozmo on June 17, 2013 at 10:15 PM

MYOB weirdo.
*glares*

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:17 PM

Am I the first one here?

KCB on June 17, 2013 at 10:05 PM

Two days in a row master. Good job. Got any stock tips—solar, wind, agribusiness, layabout material?

arnold ziffel on June 17, 2013 at 10:17 PM

Has Dear Leader made any statements about the IRS or NSA other than in pre planned Q&A? Oh, when will that FBI investigation into Benghazi be completed?

d1carter on June 17, 2013 at 10:18 PM

I’m gonna be visiting the Peoples Republic of CO next week.
Anyone got a message or hickenjerk?

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:18 PM

I watched one of my cats climb up on one of the desks, reach her paw up…and flick off a LIGHT SWITCH!!!
#twerpscatsarepossessed.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:09 PM

I hope it hasn’t got an itchy trigger paw. Bang.

SparkPlug on June 17, 2013 at 10:19 PM

Preemptive strike:

Despite what the Left has said, Arizona v Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona has NOTHING whatsoever to do with Voter ID laws. In fact, Arizona’s Voter ID law is still in effect and the Supreme Court has previously upheld the constitutionality of Voter ID laws in Crawford v Marion County Election Board, 553 U.S. 181 (2008).

THE CASE IS SOLELY APPLICABLE TO VOTING REGISTRATION AND THEN ONLY IN CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.

The issue in this case was whether the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 a/k/a The Motor Voter Act preempted Arizona’s requirement of proof of citizenship before one may register to vote. It does. Under the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution, Federal law trumps state law.

BUT – and this is important: As its name implies, the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 only regulates voter REGISTRATIONNOT VOTING.

There is NO Federal law that preempts voter ID laws; thus Federal law CANNOT preempt state laws requiring proper identification before individuals are permitted to vote.

The Court did NOT overrule Crawford…and, as Attorney General Eric Holder’s recent white flag-waving after he lost his challenge to South Carolina’s Voter ID law wherein he declined to file cert asking the Supreme Court to rule on its constitutionality, there is no likelihood of it being overturned any time soon. Further, if Holder wasn’t embarrassed enough in his challenge of the South Carolina law, a three-judge panel of the District of Columbia federal court declared that South Carolina was the ‘prevailing party’ under an applicable Federal statute that allows the state to obtain reimbursement for its litigation costs from not only the Justice Department, but the so-called civil rights organizations like the NAACP and the South Carolina Progressive Network that intervened in the lawsuit to stop the state’s voter ID statute.

As Justice John Paul Stevens, an uber Progressive, wrote for the 6-3 majority in Crawford:

‘The relevant burdens here are those imposed on eligible voters who lack photo identification cards that comply with SEA 483. Because Indiana’s cards are free, the inconvenience of going to the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, gathering required documents, and posing for a photograph does not qualify as a substantial burden on most voters’ right to vote, or represent a significant increase over the usual burdens of voting. The severity of the somewhat heavier burden that may be placed on a limited number of persons—e.g., elderly persons born out-of-state, who may have difficulty obtaining a birth certificate—is mitigated by the fact that eligible voters without photo identification may cast provisional ballots that will be counted if they execute the required affidavit at the circuit court clerk’s office. Even assuming that the burden may not be justified as to a few voters, that conclusion is by no means sufficient to establish petitioners’ right to the relief they seek.’

As I have said on previous occasions, good luck getting the United States Supreme Court to overturn Crawford v Marion County Election Board.

For the record, Arizona’s Voter ID law is still in effect.

For those that won’t take my word for it, let’s look at what others have written, shall we?

Understanding Arizona v Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona

Resist We Much on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago and now the Blackhawks are losing. I feel sad. :(

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

while NSA officials are legally allowed to use data ”that can pinpoint the location of callers,” they choose not to.

They are saving it for when the Obama Reich gets full delivery of 1,000,000 armed drones.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:22 PM

Or was it 10,000,000 ? I forget.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:23 PM

arnold ziffel on June 17, 2013 at 10:17 PM

Anything woth the word “renewable” in it. Lots of Gubmint money in that!

KCB on June 17, 2013 at 10:23 PM

I had blood pressure issues bad today. All day in the ER.

Let me tell ya. No insurance? You are screwed. I pay my bills. The only person that even pretended to give a crap was the bill collector.

I thought I was checking out of this world. Thought it was over. Doctor never visited after I can’t hit a vein sucked my blood. I have veins mississippi sized.

At the end of the day, I get a script that cost me $900.

Lovely.

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:24 PM

[Cheney] explained, “I once asked a collective group, the big nine [congressional leaders], in the spring of ’04, in the briefing when we first briefed them and said, ‘Do you think we ought to continue the program,’ and they said absolutely yes. I said, ‘Do you think we ought to go back to Congress to get additional authorization,’ and they said absolutely not. It’ll leak.”

I had the impression that Obama expanded the computerized surveillance program by beginning to gather information about all citizens rather than just those who called out of country to terrorist destinations.

However, Cheney seems to suggest that this massive, universal electronic dragnet that’s going on now has been in existence since 2004. Is that really true?

Did or did not Obama expand the program?

Burke on June 17, 2013 at 10:25 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago ……..

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Were they Democrats? Or is that a redundant question?

williamg on June 17, 2013 at 10:25 PM

He explained, “I once asked a collective group, the big nine [congressional leaders], in the spring of ’04, in the briefing when we first briefed them and said, ‘Do you think we ought to continue the program,’ and they said absolutely yes. I said, ‘Do you think we ought to go back to Congress to get additional authorization,’ and they said absolutely not. It’ll leak.”


Take this example and make it about ANYTHING somebody might not want to get out.

Go to a small number of people, tell them THEY get to have oversight and a “measure of control” of the effort.

Then ask them, “Do you think we need a larger group’s authorization?”

100 out of 100 times they will tell you, “NO”

How sad … Dick Cheney reduced to using “Obama straw man” arguments.

PolAgnostic on June 17, 2013 at 10:26 PM

I hope it hasn’t got an itchy trigger paw. Bang.

SparkPlug on June 17, 2013 at 10:19 PM

There are no ‘its’ in my home. HER name is Penny.
*Yeah-we’ve also got a Sheldon…and a Sasha.*

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:27 PM

Am I the first one here?

KCB on June 17, 2013 at 10:05 PM

Never. NSA is always here first. Sometime the will let you think you were here first, but that’s just because they are all nice guys and don’t want to abuse their powers … … or at least not get caught at it … at least until they get all those nice new shiny armed drones.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:28 PM

Wow, that pic of Obama sets off the gaydar bells, doesn’t it?

Not that there’s anything wrong with that, butt…

Fallon on June 17, 2013 at 10:28 PM

Your cats have something planned for later and want you to go to bed early instead of being on HA half the night.

RickB on June 17, 2013 at 10:12 PM

They’re planning their Jellicle Ball.

The Song of the Jellicles

Jellicle Cats come out tonight,
Jellicle Cats come one come all:
The Jellicle Moon is shining bright–
Jellicles come to the Jellicle Ball.

Jellicle Cats are black and white,
Jellicle Cats are rather small;
Jellicle Cats are merry and bright,
And pleasant to hear when they caterwaul.
Jellicle Cats have cheerful faces,
Jellicle Cats have bright black eyes;
They like to practise their airs and graces
And wait for the Jellicle Moon to rise.

Jellicle Cats develop slowly,
Jellicle Cats are not too big;
Jellicle Cats are roly-poly,
They know how to dance a gavotte and a jig.
Until the Jellicle Moon appears
They make their toilette and take their repose:
Jellicles wash behind their ears,
Jellicles dry between their toes.

Jellicle Cats are white and black,
Jellicle Cats are of moderate size;
Jellicles jump like a jumping-jack,
Jellicle Cats have moonlit eyes.
They’re quiet enough in the morning hours,
They’re quiet enough in the afternoon,
Reserving their terpsichorean powers
To dance by the light of the Jellicle Moon.

Jellicle Cats are black and white,
Jellicle Cats (as I said) are small;
If it happens to be a stormy night
They will practise a caper or two in the hall.
If it happens the sun is shining bright
You would say they had nothing to do at all:
They are resting and saving themselves to be right
For the Jellicle Moon and the Jellicle Ball.

–T. S. Elliot

INC on June 17, 2013 at 10:29 PM

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:24 PM

I also have medicated hypertension. Because it’s genetic-I’ll always need to take meds. I’ve also got decent insurance. You’ve got my sympathies.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:29 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago ……..
GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM
Were they Democrats? Or is that a redundant question?
williamg on June 17, 2013 at 10:25 PM

I think they were all black males raised by single mothers and not a daddy in sight. I could be wrong though.

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:30 PM

I hope it hasn’t got an itchy trigger paw. Bang.

SparkPlug on June 17, 2013 at 10:19 PM

Sparky. My Dachshund has a leather fetish. He was two when we got him. One day he drug my Glock 22 and holster all the way from the bedroom to the living room and tried to hide it in a corner for further review and action.

arnold ziffel on June 17, 2013 at 10:30 PM

Never. NSA is always here first. Sometime the will let you think you were here first, but that’s just because they are all nice guys and don’t want to abuse their powers … … or at least not get caught at it … at least until they get all those nice new shiny armed drones.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:28 PM

No doubt they are here, and they know who we are.

KCB on June 17, 2013 at 10:30 PM

The script cost $16. $900 to get it.

The EKG nurse was of the immaculate defacation crowd. Her scat has no smell. Doesn’t like her job.

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:31 PM

No trust.

Never.

Ever.

BuckeyeSam on June 17, 2013 at 10:31 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago and now the Blackhawks are losing. I feel sad. :(

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Ugh…….

Jackalope on June 17, 2013 at 10:33 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago and now the Blackhawks are losing. I feel sad. :(

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Good thing we don’t have concealed carry./

I’m letting the dogs out and going to bed… :(

Fallon on June 17, 2013 at 10:33 PM

Anything woth the word “renewable” in it. Lots of Gubmint money in that!

KCB on June 17, 2013 at 10:23 PM

We are so screwed my friend, and not in a good way. The GOP cavalry has been found lacking and worthy of being stripped, strapped and sent packing.

arnold ziffel on June 17, 2013 at 10:33 PM

I had the impression that Obama expanded the computerized surveillance program by beginning to gather information about all citizens rather than just those who called out of country to terrorist destinations.

However, Cheney seems to suggest that this massive, universal electronic dragnet that’s going on now has been in existence since 2004. Is that really true?

Did or did not Obama expand the program?

Burke on June 17, 2013 at 10:25 PM


Courtesy of the A C L U on September 27, 2012

http://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/new-justice-department-documents-show-huge-increase

Justice Department documents released today by the ACLU reveal that federal law enforcement agencies are increasingly monitoring Americans’ electronic communications, and doing so without warrants, sufficient oversight, or meaningful accountability.

The documents, handed over by the government only after months of litigation, are the attorney general’s 2010 and 2011 reports on the use of “pen register” and “trap and trace” surveillance powers. The reports show a dramatic increase in the use of these surveillance tools, which are used to gather information about telephone, email, and other Internet communications. The revelations underscore the importance of regulating and overseeing the government’s surveillance power.

The reports that we received document an enormous increase in the Justice Department’s use of pen register and trap and trace surveillance. As the chart below shows, between 2009 and 2011 the combined number of original orders for pen registers and trap and trace devices used to spy on phones increased by 60%, from 23,535 in 2009 to 37,616 in 2011.

During that same time period, the number of people whose telephones were the subject of pen register and trap and trace surveillance more than tripled. In fact, more people were subjected to pen register and trap and trace surveillance in the past two years than in the entire previous decade.


Bold text
is in original ACLU online document.

PolAgnostic on June 17, 2013 at 10:33 PM

***

For those that won’t take my word for it, let’s look at what others have written, shall we?

Understanding Arizona v Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona

Resist We Much on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

This is a voter registration case–not a voter ID case–as you say.

As I heard it explained, it was a preemption case in which a bogus federal statute was not surprisingly allowed to control. You have to ask yourself, why the heck did the drafter’s rely on a penalty and perjury statement as proof of citizenship? I guess the GOP was as stupid then as they are now. Liberals specialize in violating penalty and perjury statements.

BuckeyeSam on June 17, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Thanks ALT. I appreciate it. Woke up all dizzy.
What they had me on was a diuretic. That don’t fly in the desert.

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Obama would never spy on me this I know
For my telephone repeatedly tells me so

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:37 PM

I watched one of my cats climb up on one of the desks, reach her paw up…and flick off a LIGHT SWITCH!!!
#twerpscatsarepossessed.
annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:09 PM

I’m sure the democrats would tell you that’s how the reporter from CBS’ computer turned on and off during the night. It was her cat!

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:39 PM

I HATE that picture of the One all smug.

thebrokenrattle on June 17, 2013 at 10:39 PM

However, Cheney seems to suggest that this massive, universal electronic dragnet that’s going on now has been in existence since 2004. Is that really true?

Did or did not Obama expand the program?

Burke on June 17, 2013 at 10:25 PM

Obama is apparently the son Cheney wished he had.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:39 PM

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:31 PM

When I was diagnosed…my blood pressure had gotten so high that it was messing with my mind…a lot. On a hunch, the clinic dr. checked my bp. I was petite and a non-smoker. There was no WAY that I could’ve had dangerously-high blood pressure.
Well…
Turns out that 8 years earlier-I had suffered from toxemia…that had also be mis-diagnosed.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:40 PM

As soon as I said I didn’t have insurance,, they were gone. Bugged out.

Foxnews was a blocked channel. Could get cnn though.

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:40 PM

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:36 PM

I think that I’m on a diuretic. Whatever it is-it works.
My last reading was 116/64. Yea!

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:42 PM

When I was diagnosed…my blood pressure had gotten so high that it was messing with my mind…a lot. On a hunch, the clinic dr. checked my bp. I was petite and a non-smoker. There was no WAY that I could’ve had dangerously-high blood pressure.
Well…
Turns out that 8 years earlier-I had suffered from toxemia…that had also be mis-diagnosed.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:40 PM

Cheer up. As soon as ObamaCare is fully implemented, you will fondly look back on all this as the Good Old Days.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:42 PM

You have to ask yourself, why the heck did the drafter’s rely on a penalty and perjury statement as proof of citizenship? I guess the GOP was as stupid then as they are now. Liberals specialize in violating penalty and perjury statements.

BuckeyeSam on June 17, 2013 at 10:36 PM

But when it comes to guns leftists don’t think penalty and perjury statements are proof of anything. For guns – a Constitutional right, and not just for guns but for gun frames – they demand an un-Constitutional and intrusive feral government background check. So … the SCOTASS says that perjury statements are good enough to vote but not good enough to buy a gun. Yep.

Anti-Constitutional cognitive dissonance. It’s where the Benedict Roberts court lives. Welcome to the American Socialist Superstate. It smells like A.S.S.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 17, 2013 at 10:43 PM

When I was diagnosed…my blood pressure had gotten so high that it was messing with my mind…a lot. On a hunch, the clinic dr. checked my bp. I was petite and a non-smoker. There was no WAY that I could’ve had dangerously-high blood pressure.
Well…
Turns out that 8 years earlier-I had suffered from toxemia…that had also be mis-diagnosed.
annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:40 PM

you’re one of my favorites one here. You had BEST take care of yourself!

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:44 PM

I think that I’m on a diuretic. Whatever it is-it works.
My last reading was 116/64. Yea!

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:42 PM

I thought women were suppose to have three measurements.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:44 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago ……..

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Were they Democrats? Or is that a redundant question?

williamg on June 17, 2013 at 10:25 PM

They were either registering to vote or requesting absentee ballots.

onlineanalyst on June 17, 2013 at 10:44 PM

I think that I’m on a diuretic. Whatever it is-it works.
My last reading was 116/64. Yea!

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:42 PM

Diuretics can cause kidney failure and premature aging of the skin.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:45 PM

I love hockey fights.

Good evening all.

gophergirl on June 17, 2013 at 10:45 PM

They didn’t even give me any jello.

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:46 PM

Check this out from the Guardian, which seems willing to publish more critical stuff about the U.S. than any media outlet here, including Fox:

kattw
13 June 2013 2:50pm
What’s sort of funny is, it SHOULDN’T decrease trust in government. Just the opposite: it should increase it. After all, the ONE thing humanity in general can be depended upon to do is use the power it has available. We elected (unfortunately) legislators who thought mass surveillance was a good idea. We then got exactly what we paid for – mass surveillance.
I trust government quite a bit. It does EXACTLY what you elect it to do. Much to our shame, no laws have actually been broken here. It’s all been constitutional to boot. Hideously unethical, but then we bred ethics out of politics long ago, so what do we expect, really?
We, the people, did this to ourselves. And there are easy ways out – but none of them involve trials and investigations. They involve electing people who will repeal stuff like the patriot act, and getting our acts together enough to add ‘privacy’ as a fundamental enumerated right in the constitution, if we think it’s that important, so that it’s no longer the judicial branch that gets to decide the law in that area.
But this really, really shouldn’t erode trust in the government. Our government did exactly what we trained it, and asked it, to do. Some of us just didn’t realize we were asking it to do that *to us* until far too late. Others realized it all along, and just don’t care for who’s doing it now.

Also, read this thread. It tells much about those who have given up their freedoms wondering why we would do the same.

ManWithNoParty on June 17, 2013 at 10:46 PM

Not to thread jack via anecdote but racial tensions are increasing in south florida. Of course journalists want to whip people up for the Zimmerman trial because the revolution must never die, but it’s still a surprise this open, unprovoked hostility I’m starting to witness from random strangers with nothing to gain from petty acts against this blue-eyed devil who holds no grudges. i’ve lived here for many years and have found it more congenial and less balkanized than the northeast of our country.

If my presence in this neighborhood is offensive to young males desperate to avenge or emulate Trayvon, they’ll not have the satisfaction of seeing me flinch to mad-dogging.

I’m taking my own advice and video recording legally my interactions in the public space to keep my potential fate out of the hands of an NBC editor in NYC who’s willing to frame John Q. Public for ratings.

derit on June 17, 2013 at 10:47 PM

Turns out that 8 years earlier-I had suffered from toxemia…that had also be mis-diagnosed.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:40 PM

I don’t think parents should let their kids drink until they are at least 12.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:47 PM

Simple. Apply Saul Alinski’s tactics against them. Flood the NSA.

End every personal email with some truth about the Kenyan Dog-Eater or is pretend Shaved-Beard of a wife.

Example:
Michele Obama: Proof Darwin was right.

RavingLunatic on June 17, 2013 at 10:47 PM

Understanding Arizona v Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona

Resist We Much on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Then why was Mark Levin losing his sh1t today?

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:49 PM

Trying again to post this link….

ManWithNoParty on June 17, 2013 at 10:49 PM

The EKG nurse was of the immaculate defacation crowd. Her scat has no smell. Doesn’t like her job.

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:31 PM

Oh, expect more of that under Obamacare.

Cleombrotus on June 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

Diuretics can cause kidney failure and premature aging of the skin.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:45 PM

Nevermind. Just googled it. Mine’s an ACE inhibitor.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

Except for the fact that for the government, under the program right now, to do that, it would be illegal.

Illegalaccording to the US Constitution
or
illegal according to the koran ?

burrata on June 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

Example:
Michele Obama: Proof Darwin was right.

RavingLunatic on June 17, 2013 at 10:47 PM

Alfred Russel Wallace would have had some very choice words about her place in the evolutionary process. He was a bit more direct and honest than Darwin.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

Then why was Mark Levin losing his sh1t today?

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:49 PM

Rubiopartis.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:51 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago and now the Blackhawks are losing. I feel sad. :(

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Whoa. This wasn’t hyperbole?

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:53 PM

I also have medicated hypertension. Because it’s genetic-I’ll always need to take meds. I’ve also got decent insurance. You’ve got my sympathies.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:29 PM

You work at Walmart. It is impossible for you to have decent insurance :p
/ (just to be sure)

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:54 PM

Nevermind. Just googled it. Mine’s an ACE inhibitor.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:50 PM

That’s good. You don’t want to die from a misprint in a medical drug book.

Enalapril ?

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:54 PM

I don’t think parents should let their kids drink until they are at least 12.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:47 PM

Ha.
My pcp while I was pregnant was this old-school idiot who considered most female symptoms to be psychological in nature.
My hypertension could’ve/SHOULD’VE been diagnosed THEN!!!

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:54 PM

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:54 PM

Lisinopril.
I’ve blessed with a naturally slow pulse-so I’ve got to avoid drugs that will slow it more.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:56 PM

Ha.
My pcp while I was pregnant was this old-school idiot who considered most female symptoms to be psychological in nature.
My hypertension could’ve/SHOULD’VE been diagnosed THEN!!!

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:54 PM

I think what he meant was that his psychological problems were all caused by women.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:56 PM

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:54 PM

LoL
My insurance is through my husband’s employer.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:56 PM

BuckeyeSam on June 17, 2013 at 10:36 PM

Read that post. I’ve included the responses of 5 people, including 4 attorneys with Supreme Court, preemption, and voting law experience. NONE of them think that the case was the victory for the Left that they think it was or the disaster that the Right believes it to be.

Just a taste from J Christian Adams:

Before the decision today, here is what the Left wanted:

Invalidation of Arizona’s requirement that those submitting a federal form provide proof of citizenship with their federal form. Mind you, the citizenship-proof requirement is NOT part of federal law and the Election Assistance Commission does NOT require it in the form they drafted.

Invalidation of state citizenship-verification requirements when a state voter registration form is used (yes, such forms exist separate from the federal requirement) on the basis of federal preemption. They wanted the Arizona case to invalidate all state citizenship-verification requirements.

Automatic registration if a registrant submits a completed federal EAC approved registration form, no questions asked.

Federal preemption on the ability for states to have customized federal EAC-approved forms that differed from the default EAC form.

Federal preemption over states, like Florida and Kansas, looking for independent information on citizenship to root out noncitizens from the voter rolls. Again, the Left wanted the federal EAC form to be the no-questions-asked ticket to the voter rolls.

So what is the score on these five goals after Justice Scalia’s opinion today?

Election-integrity advocates are batting .800; left wing groups, .200. And the most insignificant issue of the five is the one issue the Left won. Justice Scalia foiled 4 of 5 of their goals, and the 4 biggest ones.

How does it work? The decision today uncorks state power. The Left wanted state power stripped and they lost.

I have the reactions from two at SCOTUSblog.com, who are NOT known to be libertarian/conservative. One calls this decision a Pyrrhic victory.

Resist We Much on June 17, 2013 at 10:57 PM

I think what he meant was that his psychological problems were all caused by women.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 10:56 PM

whatever. There’s nothing like having major issues shortly after childbirth, and being blown off and told that you’re not sick-you’re mentally ill.
Worthless b%stard.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:58 PM

My whole point is,, I pay cash. It didn’t fly well. I paid the referring doc cash in full.

I got sh!t treament. I’ll pay thier bill in full on Thursday. That’s how long they gave me for the “cheap” price.

But my service,, I think it’s related.

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:59 PM

Doesn’t matter. Employment by Walmart means you can’t have decent insurance. Ipso facto.

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:59 PM

Then why was Mark Levin losing his sh1t today?

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:49 PM

Evidently, he either only read media reports or he stopped on page 13 of the 51-page decision, which is what most of the media, including the fools at MSNBC and Ezra Klein, did.

Resist We Much on June 17, 2013 at 11:02 PM

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:59 PM

Would you believe that it was a doctor at the now shuttered Oak Forest Hospital(it was the southwest suburban branch of Cook County Hospital) that diagnosed me? I was a charity case(no insurance)and that GOOD doctor probably saved me a possibly fatal heart attack.
I got VERY lucky there.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 11:03 PM

Trust – Prince ( Batman, Joker)

thatsafactjack on June 17, 2013 at 11:05 PM

658 people were shot this weekend in Chicago and now the Blackhawks are losing. I feel sad. :(
GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 10:20 PM
Whoa. This wasn’t hyperbole?
cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:53 PM

I think the actual number was 24 shot and 7 killed. It’s always a treat every Monday morning to hear the weekend tally here in chitcago. Always a treat!

GhoulAid on June 17, 2013 at 11:05 PM

Trust In Me – Jungle Book

thatsafactjack on June 17, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Doesn’t matter. Employment by Walmart means you can’t have decent insurance. Ipso facto.

cptacek on June 17, 2013 at 10:59 PM

It also means(if you’re a middle-aged, female associate) that you: quit school after 5th grade,because you were knocked-up by your first cousin(who also fathered your other 8 kids), are on welfare, have few teeth, and live in a single-wide in the bad part of town.
Fact.
///

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 11:08 PM

so what I say is yackety yackety yack, blah, blah, blah. Same old rhetoric from the dolt in chief. I can’t wait till we replace this clown with a real leader. Putin would do a better job.

scalleywag on June 17, 2013 at 11:10 PM

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 11:08 PM

Nuthin’ says lovin’ like marryin’ yer cuzzin.

Liam on June 17, 2013 at 11:11 PM

However, Cheney seems to suggest that this massive, universal electronic dragnet that’s going on now has been in existence since 2004. Is that really true?

Did or did not Obama expand the program?

Burke on June 17, 2013 at 10:25 PM

Today’s NSA Domestic Surveillance Program Began BEFORE 9/11 see here: http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2007/10/nsa-asked-for-p/ and here; http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=newsarchive&sid=abIV0cO64zJE and here; http://rawstory.com/news/2007/ATT_engineer_says_Bush_Administration_sought_1216.html

There has been a total of 5 NSA Whistleblowers to come forward since 2001. 3 NSA Whistleblowers came out in 2001/2002 and one NSA Whistleblower came out in 2005 and another NSA Whistleblower came out in 2013.

Unlike Snowden all 4 of these highly decorated senior NSA officials came forward during the Bush administration and leaked information to the press that the NSA was unlawfully conducting a Domestic spy program on its own citizens since BEFORE 9/11.

Thomas Andrews Drake is a former senior executive of the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) and a decorated United States Air Force and United States Navy veteran.

William Binney is a decorated Vietnam Veteran who worked at the Army Security Agency before going to the NSA as a former highly placed intelligence official with the United States National Security Agency (NSA) that turned whistleblower after more than 30 years with the agency.

J. Kirk Wiebe is a former NSA senior analyst who was awarded the Meritorious Civilian Service Award, NSA’s second highest distinction. Wiebe developed a revolutionary information processing system called ThinThread.

But the NSA wrongfully applied a component of the ThinThread system to illegally spy on the private communications of U.S. citizens so Wiebe became a whistleblower.

Russell D. Tice is a former intelligence analyst for the U.S. Air Force, Office of Naval Intelligence, Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA), and National Security Agency (NSA). During his nearly 20 year career with various United States government agencies, he conducted intelligence missions related to the Kosovo War, Afghanistan, the USS Cole bombing in Yemen, and Operation Iraqi Freedom.

In 2001 the leading opponents of the patriot act, (Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle and Sen. Russ Feingold), argued that the Government had already been conducting wireless surveillance, before 9/11, which did not prevent the 9/11 attack and therefore was unnecessary and unconstitutional. But then both Democratic U.S. Senators, received anthrax in their offices from (USAMRIID), Fort Detrick, Maryland.

JustTheFacts on June 17, 2013 at 11:12 PM

Say what you will about Boosh, there was never a doubt his administration had the best interests of the vast majority of Central Americans at heart,

Bruno Strozek on June 17, 2013 at 10:11 PM

Fixed it.

bw222 on June 17, 2013 at 11:12 PM

wolly4321 on June 17, 2013 at 10:59 PM

Yes…had you had insurance then they would have been paid a contracted rate. Usual and Customary % for the claim. A few 1000 at least.(so yeah..they treated you like crap)
You paying cash and no insurance..they probably decided to get what they could from you..as most wouldn’t have paid shite.
$900 ER visit is actually a bargain..even with insurance-for the member.

Take care of yourself man..take a more preventative approach. Pay cash to see a pcp..stay on it. Better for YOU and your wallet.

bazil9 on June 17, 2013 at 11:16 PM

…no trolls tonight…I can lurk or go to sleep!

KOOLAID2 on June 17, 2013 at 11:18 PM

Say what you will about Boosh, there was never a doubt his administration had the best interests of the vast majority of Central Americans and Muslims at heart,

Bruno Strozek on June 17, 2013 at 10:11 PM

Fixed it.

bw222 on June 17, 2013 at 11:12 PM

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 11:19 PM

Michelle Obama thanked a Dublin, as in Dublin, IRELAND, crowd, who welcomed her today, telling them:

‘It is good to be home.’

Huh?

Resist We Much on June 17, 2013 at 11:20 PM

Resist We Much on June 17, 2013 at 11:20 PM

Double huh???
I won’t watch..but wha…?

bazil9 on June 17, 2013 at 11:23 PM

Unlike Snowden all 4 of these highly decorated senior NSA officials came forward during the Bush administration and leaked information to the press that the NSA was unlawfully conducting a Domestic spy program on its own citizens since BEFORE 9/11.

JustTheFacts on June 17, 2013 at 11:12 PM

Bush took office 7 2/3 months before 9/11/2001, so if it started under Bush, he must have been going at warp.

VorDaj on June 17, 2013 at 11:24 PM

Benedict Roberts did much to make the Supremes appear more of a joke. Unfortunately it appears Scalia has done the same with his siding with the USSC majority against the Arizona Voting Law.

Sorta like when the Romans started putting up the “Visigoths Welcome” signs.

viking01 on June 17, 2013 at 11:42 PM

For our friends in Florida

jaime on June 17, 2013 at 11:42 PM

I watched one of my cats climb up on one of the desks, reach her paw up…and flick off a LIGHT SWITCH!!!
#twerpscatsarepossessed.

annoyinglittletwerp on June 17, 2013 at 10:09 PM

Cats can be jerks

Anti-Control on June 17, 2013 at 11:45 PM

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