Quotes of the day

posted at 8:41 pm on June 14, 2013 by Allahpundit

In a secret court in Washington, Yahoo’s top lawyers made their case. The government had sought help in spying on certain foreign users, without a warrant, and Yahoo had refused, saying the broad requests were unconstitutional.

The judges disagreed. That left Yahoo two choices: Hand over the data or break the law.

So Yahoo became part of the National Security Agency’s secret Internet surveillance program, Prism, according to leaked N.S.A. documents, as did seven other Internet companies…

FISA requests can be as broad as seeking court approval to ask a company to turn over information about the online activities of people in a certain country. Between 2008 and 2012, only two of 8,591 applications were rejected, according to data gathered by the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a nonprofit research center in Washington.

***

Emerging from a hearing with NSA Director Gen. Keith Alexander, Reps. Mike Rogers (R-Mich.), chairman of the Intelligence Committee, and Dutch Ruppersberger (Md.), the senior Democrat on the panel, said Edward Snowden simply wasn’t in the position to access the content of the communications gathered under National Security Agency programs, as he’s claimed.

“He was lying,” Rogers said. “He clearly has over-inflated his position, he has over-inflated his access and he’s even over-inflated what the actually technology of the programs would allow one to do. It’s impossible for him to do what he was saying he could do.”

“He’s done tremendous damage to the country where he was born and raised and educated,” Ruppersberger said…

“There should be no [question] in anyone’s mind that this person is a traitor to the United States of America, and he should be punished,” Rogers said.

***

Unlike other leading Democrats and his former allies, Gore said he was not persuaded by the argument that the NSA surveillance had operated within the boundaries of the law.

“This in my view violates the constitution. The fourth amendment and the first amendment – and the fourth amendment language is crystal clear,” he said. “It is not acceptable to have a secret interpretation of a law that goes far beyond any reasonable reading of either the law or the constitution and then classify as top secret what the actual law is.”

Gore added: “This is not right.”

***

A Communist Party-backed newspaper in China is urging that country’s leadership to obtain more information from the former CIA employee who leaked information about the U.S. surveillance programs before fleeing to Hong Kong…

“Snowden took the initiative to expose the U.S. government’s attacks on Hong Kong and the mainland’s Internet networks. This concerns China’s national interest,” the commentary said. “Maybe he has more evidence. The Chinese government should let him speak out and according to whether the information is public, use it as evidence to negotiate with the United States openly or in private.”…

“We have realized the United States’ aggressiveness in cyberspace, we have realized that nine Internet companies have assisted the U.S. government in intelligence outsourcing,” said the paper known for a nationalist stance. “We have realized their hypocrisy in saying one thing and doing another, and we have realized their ruthlessness in doing what they please with no regard for other people.”

***

Jeremy Bash told Politics Confidential that Snowden had access to “very sensitive information” in his job as a government contractor and could do “tremendous damage.” He said the government’s concern goes beyond the documents that were leaked – extending to the knowledge that Snowden still stores in his head.

“If a foreign government learned everything that was in Edward Snowden’s brain, they would have a good window into the way we collect signals intelligence,” Bash said.

“He has information in his head, he’s making threats, he’s on the loose,” Bash added. “We don’t know what other documents he copied, and we don’t know who else he’s talking to.”

While Bash said that Snowden is “very dangerous,” he also describes him as “delusional.”

***

Apparently we are supposed to “respect institutions” so much that we never feel entitled to information about how they operate, even when it involves our private communications. Only because of Snowden do we know that our government is storing records of our phone data that can be mined for God only knows how long. This same government opted to not prosecute its workers who destroyed CIA interrogation records that might have implicated the government in law breaking. Does this seem right?

In his 2003 book, Why Societies Need Dissent, liberal law professor Cass Sunstein pointed out that, in society, “a single dissenter or voice of sanity is likely to have a huge impact.” But the problem for dissenters is that they “have little incentive to speak out, because they would gain nothing from dissenting” and in fact might be punished.

Snowden knew this and he did it anyway. He clearly understands something that those screaming “traitor” do not: the allegiance we have as Americans is to the Constitution, not the institution of government. Snowden summed it up best when he told a South China Morning Post reporter this week, “I’m neither a traitor nor a hero. I’m an American.”

***

There is a tradition of whistleblowing in the United States, even among people who work with classified information — and there are long-established ways to do it. Snowden might have approached a member of Congress, perhaps one of those with intelligence oversight. He might have written to his organization’s lawyers, to clarify the legality of his work. He might have argued his case from within. Jack Goldsmith, a legal expert then working in the Justice Department, fought against the use of torture by the Bush administration. Eventually he resigned and wrote about it. There were setbacks, but ultimately, Goldsmith was successful: The policy was reversed.

Snowden chose a different path. He stole a hoard of documents and fled to Hong Kong. Thus did he place his fate in the hands of a government that exerts total control over its nation’s Internet and spares no expense in its attempts to penetrate ours. His decision to speak from there, in public, is also noteworthy: It means his interest in publicity trumps his stated fear of arrest.

Nothing about the context, in other words, tells us that Snowden is interested in anything other than martyrdom and a perverse sort of fame. Nothing tells us that his primary interest is the welfare of his fellow Americans. Nothing about his actions, so far, seems likely to help him achieve his stated goals.

***

Kevin Egan, a former prosecutor here who has represented people fighting extradition to the United States, said that Mr. Snowden’s latest disclosures would make it harder for him to fight an expected request by the United States for him to be turned over to American law enforcement. “He’s digging his own grave with a very large spade,” he said.

But a person with longstanding ties to mainland Chinese military and intelligence agencies said that Mr. Snowden’s latest disclosures showed that he and his accumulated documents could be valuable to China, particularly if Mr. Snowden chooses to cooperate with mainland authorities.

“The idea is very tempting, but how do you do that, unless he defects,” said the person, who insisted on anonymity because of the diplomatic sensitivities in the case. “It all depends on his attitude.”

***

What’s not clear is why Snowden thought that revealing the NSA’s surveillance methods would change very much in our government or society, except to make it much harder for the NSA, the CIA, and defense and intelligence contractors to hire anyone like him in the future…

Other than tightened security clearances, though, the startling revelations of the past several days will probably alter very little in the lives of Americans or the way the government works in a data-driven world. That’s not just because, apart from a few outraged senators—Democrats Ron Wyden of Oregon and Mark Udall of Colorado and libertarian Republican Rand Paul of Kentucky—almost the entire U.S. government, from the White House to Congress to the judiciary, has come out in support of the NSA program of collecting troves of telephone data and personal Internet information, using the servers and telecommunications systems of America’s biggest companies. If the mandarins of official Washington don’t amend their conduct, it’s because Americans aren’t asking them to

Most Americans, based on the polls, seem willing to make the trade-off between what President Obama called “modest encroachments on privacy” and safety from terrorists. “There is a lot of authoritarian overreach in American society, both from the drug war and the war on terror,” David Simon, the writer and producer of the hit HBO shows The Wire and Treme, wrote in his blog this week, in a scathing blast at Snowden and the pundits who have lionized him. “But those planes really did hit those buildings. And that bomb did indeed blow up at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. And we really are in a continuing, low-intensity, high-risk conflict with a diffuse, committed, and ideologically motivated enemy. And for a moment, just imagine how much bloviating would be wafting across our political spectrum if, in the wake of an incident of domestic terrorism, an American president and his administration had failed to take full advantage of the existing telephonic data to do what is possible to find those needles in the haystacks.”

***

If—again, if—what Snowden says is substantially true, the surveillance state will in time encourage an air of subtle oppression, and encourage too a sense of paranoia that may in time—not next week, but in time, as the years unfold—loosen and disrupt the ties the people of America feel to our country. “They spy on you here and will abuse the information they get from spying on you here. I don’t like ‘here.’”…

I feel that almost everyone who talks about America for a living—politicians and journalists and even historians—is missing a huge and essential story: that too many things are happening that are making a lot of Americans feel a new distance from, a frayed affiliation with, the country they have loved for half a century and more, the country they loved without every having to think about it, so natural was it. This isn’t the kind of thing that can be quantified in polls—it’s barely the kind of thing people admit to themselves. But talk to older Americans—they feel they barely know this country anymore. In governance its crucial to stay within parameters, its important not to strain ties, push too far, be extreme. And if you think this does not carry implications for down the road, for our healthy continuance as a nation, you are mistaken. Love keeps great nations going.

***

Pelosi, a former head of the House Intelligence Committee, seemed to defend the PRISM program Thursday, suggesting that it might have helped national security officials gather more information prior to the 911 attacks.

“Certainly it would have improved the chances of doing that. I can’t say with certainty that it would have, but it certainly would have improved the chance,” she said. “It did give more opportunity to surveil.” But she also suggested the administration’s blanket sweep of domestic phone records was not authorized by current law.

***


***

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Shame on you all for supporting the traitor!

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 12:43 AM

Go pound sand up your butt, Nellie.

Solaratov on June 15, 2013 at 1:20 AM

Handsome version of Billy Clyde Tuggle.

arnold ziffel on June 15, 2013 at 1:01 AM

az, you’ve been hitting the Baldwin sisters’ “recipe” too hard tonight. Granted, he’s got that prematurely grey hair thing going, but he’s not even close to Billy Clyde Tuggle. I don’t know if I’m more shocked by the analogy or that you were an All My Children fan. :-) BCT always made my skin crawl. Trey Gowdy – different story.

TxAnn56 on June 15, 2013 at 1:20 AM

Ray Davies rules.

brayam’s 2013 family reunion.

Del Dolemonte on June 15, 2013 at 1:10 AM

lol

One of my favorites by The Kinks (a little out of season…):

The Kinks – “Autumn Almanac”

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 1:22 AM

—and give me one more chance baby”?

arnold ziffel on June 15, 2013 at 1:15 AM

Oh, yeah.

Especially when that dreamy obama guy says it to her.

Solaratov on June 15, 2013 at 1:25 AM

Trey is a good man as is Cruz!

Scrumpy on June 15, 2013 at 1:03 AM

Trey is from South Carolina. As is a certain backstabbing traitorous senator up for re-election. Can you spell p-r-i-m-a-r-y o-p-p-o-n-e-n-t?

I would sell a kidney to raise funds for him to run. Grahamnesty needs to go.

TxAnn56 on June 15, 2013 at 1:26 AM

It’s nice to see that you have such blind faith in whatever the government tells you, Nellie.
I guess you feel the same blind trust about “immigration reform”/amnesty, don’t you?
Solaratov on June 15, 2013 at 1:09 AM

I understand the need to track these terrorists. We should all work together in making sure there is proper oversight. Hysterical claims of being spied on don’t help. Snowden is an exaggerating liar.

I want to make clear that I don’t mean to paint you all with a broad brush. I am directing my comments more towards those people who throw away their concern for national security for political reasons.

There are many wonderful, dear people here I consider friends, and I feel so fortunate to be able to share the comment section with many of you.

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 1:27 AM

Trey Gowdy – different story.

TxAnn56 on June 15, 2013 at 1:20 AM

Just checking to see if you were paying attention. Billy Clyde just popped into my pathetic mind. Every afternoon while I was getting ready for the afternoon shift me and my lovely girlfriend would watch that nonsense. Remember when he had Donna’s tubes tied while she was under? then Donna went on to be on the show with Tony Danza. she quit prostitutin.

arnold ziffel on June 15, 2013 at 1:28 AM

If amnesty passes. I shift modes.
I’ll give up, on politics. That’s my red line.

I’ll leave the grid.

wolly4321 on June 15, 2013 at 1:28 AM

Trey is a good man as is Cruz!
Scrumpy on June 15, 2013 at 1:03 AM

Count me in as a lover of both!

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 1:28 AM

I get those mixed up

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 12:48 AM

There are many wonderful, dear people here I consider friends, and I feel so fortunate to be able to share the comment section with many of you.

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 1:27 AM

Why don’t you take your juvenile, cliquish, cluttering chit-chat elsewhere? Say, like to your Facebook page?

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 1:35 AM

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 12:47 AM

It’s nice to see that you have such blind faith in whatever the government tells you, Nellie.

I guess you feel the same blind trust about “immigration reform”/amnesty, don’t you?

Solaratov on June 15, 2013 at 1:09 AM

: )

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 1:41 AM

Del Dolemonte on June 15, 2013 at 1:10 AM

Ray’s a Phenomenal Cat, alright.

Christien on June 15, 2013 at 1:44 AM

Ray’s a Phenomenal Cat, alright.

Christien on June 15, 2013 at 1:44 AM

One of my ex-’s favorite songs – I use it for a ringtone for calls from her! :)

Ray is one of her favorite song writers, too.

The Kinks – “Phenomenal Cat”

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 1:49 AM

Gill – you are falling in line. But letting the media do your thinking for you is crazy.

Too bad the NSA wasn’t listening in on the Chechens of Boston. I’ m sure all the bad guys use traceable modes of communication to hatch all their plans, for anyone who wants to listen in on.

First rule of Government is to conceal their ineptness.

FlaMurph on June 15, 2013 at 1:50 AM

“He’s done tremendous damage to the country where he was born and raised and educated,” Ruppersberger said…

Well … we know he can’t be talking about Barky. Barky was raised and educated in Indonesia and we’ve never seen any non-forged evidence pointing to where he was born. Heck, even Barky’s social security number has major problems along with that laughable selective service registration he provided an jpeg of. But, Barky has done more than “tremendous damage” to this country (unlike Snowden, who didn’t do any damage). Barky has done irreparable damage. Basically, Barky has killed America and the GOP sat by and watched – helping along the way. Now we all live in the American Socialist Superstate, which Snowden did do a little damage to.

Of course, Snowden was another of the idiots who thought Barky was A-okay and seems to believe that China is just honky-dory – as all the leftists have been claiming since their retarded Indonesian illegitimately slimed into office and started his beloved Sukarno impersonation that he’s longed to act out since his childhood eating dogs in Jakarta, less a couple of handfuls of IQ points.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 1:57 AM

Just put on your rock lobster oven Mitt, and nothing else. That should work.

SparkPlug on June 15, 2013 at 12:36 AM

Was this Ms. Lindsey’s gig before he was Senator?

The B-52′s – “Rock Lobster”

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 2:00 AM

Eddie Rabbit’s “Driving My Life Away

derit on June 15, 2013 at 2:02 AM

Shame on you all for supporting the traitor!

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 12:43 AM

I don’t think you’ve fully considered how much power the government has stolen for itself in violation of the Constitution by creating detailed dossiers on every American citizen, especially people in positions of power and/or influence. The Germans are wrong, the NSA isn’t Stassi because I doubt the Stassi dossiers were nearly as detailed and invasive.

Do you support Obamacare? Assuming you don’t: do you recall how odd court watchers said it was when Chief Justice Roberts switched sides at the last instant, altering the outcome? What if the IRS/NSA gestapo blackmailed him? Don’t you care that a policy that you support may be responsible? Sure, there’s no proof and may never be any, unless Snowden or another whistle-blower might have some, which I doubt, but Roberts’ strange behavior is totally consistent with what you would expect if he had been blackmailed.

I believe you are among the vast majority of us here who oppose amnesty for illegal aliens, correct me if I’m wrong. Well what if the reason some of these Republicans that were elected promising to oppose amnesty have switched sides because they’re being blackmailed by the IRS/NSA gestpo? Don’t you see how much potential for corruption, abuse and outright tyranny this policy you support enables? Do you trust the government so much?

Fascists are always among us. It is part of the human condition, like gossip. All it took to bring them to the surface was 9/11 to generate enough fear amongst the people to enable American fascists on both sides of the isle to take control. They are using the fear of terrorism to destroy our civil rights and enslave us under a technological yoke, yet at the same time they utterly refuse to protect the border and keep the bad guys out so that we won’t need their fascism. Their corruption, open borders, perpetuates more corruption, the creation of a neofascist police state.

When you consider that the government has already been found guilty of oppressing about half of the American people with the IRS, doesn’t it concern you that they are also going to have all of our medical records, decide whether or not we get treatment, not to mention our loved ones, and have dossiers on all of us that probably exceed any fascist nation in the history of Earth? Isn’t that the least bit disconcerting?

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 2:25 AM

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 2:25 AM

Well put.

BoxHead1 on June 15, 2013 at 2:48 AM

I think that the USA has lost the War on Terrorism; AL Qaeda has won! Not only is our proven-corrupt government now allied with Al Qaeda in Syria for nefarious reasons, but the 9/11 attack was exploited by American fascists, cronies at the pig trough, to destroy our freedom and liberty from within for power and profit.

Now the US government thinks that the American people are the enemy and the terrorist rebels their allies.

What if the Obama regime isn’t even the one doing the hypothetical blackmail, but somebody like one of Snowdens coworkers who instead of a hero is a neofascist working independently but on Obama’s behalf? What if one of them looked up Justice Roberts files, found some sexting photoes and somehow communicated to him anonymously that maybe he ought to vote in favor of Obamacare after all? Even worse, what if it’s not the US government that is in charge of the IRS/Gestapo but one or more multi-national corporations that assembled the spy infrastructure and aren’t loyal to America?

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 2:53 AM

Let’s tie Snowden and Obama in a gunnysack together and throw them off a cliff.

Two reckless imbeciles.

Undermining America from different angles, but cousins in ideological cretinism.

profitsbeard on June 15, 2013 at 3:02 AM

Now the US government thinks that the American people are the enemy and the terrorist rebels their allies.

To expand: I suspect that it’s basically lobbyists for various cronies and special interests, perhaps many of them foreign/multinational, that are responsible for this backwards outcome. The American people don’t have enough lobbyists. We’re supposed to have the most power, being represented against the lobbyists by our elected representatives in the federal government, but when they are nearly all corrupt and sell out to the lobbyists and their special interests and cronies that are the American people’s opponents then we have little if any representation in our government at all. I think this complaint probably belongs in the new declaration of independence, assuming the ruling class continues to carry forth down the road to tyranny.

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 3:07 AM

profitsbeard on June 15, 2013 at 3:02 AM

The founding fathers were traitors to the crown, not unlike Snowden.

It’s good to be[tray] the king! Because America isn’t supposed to be ruled by kings, not one and certainly not a whole far-away city full of them.

Don’t you think that Snowden at least deserves a break because he was serving the cause of freedom and liberty, trying to help us save our Constitutional rights before they are gone forever? Isn’t that worth something?

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 3:13 AM

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 3:13 AM

Snowden liked the Retard King and thought he was oh-so-cool and hip and would do wonders for whatever Snowden thought was America. Snowden is an idiot. He didn’t harm national security by what he did but he’s still a brain-dead idiot who liked himself some retarded Barky for Precedent. Now, he loves him some China, too, just as his pal Barky and the rest of the treasonous left do.

They are all total dogsh!t – Snowden and the treasonous rats he ratted on.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 3:19 AM

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 3:19 AM

I haven’t actually read that much about him but I’ve read he was a Ron Paul supporter who donated $500 to his campaign, but who thought that Obama was what Obama falsely claimed to be, a civil libertarian. Perhaps Obama was his second choice, but I don’t care if if voted for Obama both times, if he was motivated out of concern for the civil right so Americans then his motives are patriotic, don’t you think?

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 3:27 AM

This isn’t the kind of thing that can be quantified in polls—it’s barely the kind of thing people admit to themselves. But talk to older Americans—they feel they barely know this country anymore. In governance its crucial to stay within parameters, its important not to strain ties, push too far, be extreme. And if you think this does not carry implications for down the road, for our healthy continuance as a nation, you are mistaken. Love keeps great nations going.

As much as I don’t like Noonan, she’s right. I don’t want to be here anymore.

The Rogue Tomato on June 15, 2013 at 3:42 AM

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 3:27 AM

No one who ever supported Barky – or even failed to recognize that Barky was an idiot and an America-hater – is a patriot in any way, shape, or form. There was never a point in time when there wasn’t tons of clear information about Barky (mostly from his own dog-hole) that proved to anyone with even half a brain or any care about America, at all, that Barky was a traitor, at best.

Snowden might have given some support to Paul but I would bet it was more along the lines of the Paulites who loved the Occupoopers. There are some very decent and patriotic libertarians, but those idiots are not them. Sadly, much of Paul’s support was from those leftist twerps and always has been.

As to the idea that Snowden thought he was saving America, somehow … I find that pretty hard to believe since he ran off to China and spent his time talking about how great they were over there. That certainly had to give you some pause.

In any event, as I said, I don’t believe that Snowden revealed anything that impinged on legitimate national security in any way. I also don’t believe that his motivations for doing so had anything to do with saving a Constitutional America, as his ideas about serious threats to America (Barky being the greatest this nation has ever seen and the Chinese being no slouches in that department, themselves) show that patriotism is not even close to his number one concern.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 3:52 AM

The Rogue Tomato on June 15, 2013 at 3:42 AM

I used to generally like Noonan in the old days, then the Republican Party sort of left her with big-gov Bush, which is understandable, and again with McCain in ’08, who would have been even worse… Noonan seemed to drift left or something, (I didn’t pay that close of attention), but if she ‘wakes up’ to what’s been going on now and helps us save America from the neofascists that have taken control in both parties then perhaps she’ll redeem herself for the bad years in between.

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 3:58 AM

As to the idea that Snowden thought he was saving America, somehow … I find that pretty hard impossible to believe since he ran off to China and spent his time talking about how great they were over there. That certainly had to give you some pause.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 3:52 AM

Fixed to reflect my thought – I believe you know it’s correct, too…

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 4:04 AM

If Snowden does believe it, it’s only because he’s rationalized it to that point.

No matter what he else he is, he is a liar and a schemer, and I do not trust him (that is not to say I believe he’s lying about everything.)

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 4:10 AM

Fixed to reflect my thought – I believe you know it’s correct, too…

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 4:04 AM

Yeah … China ain’t the place you run to to complain about internet snooping. And we all know that the Chinese are going to extract much, much more from Snowden – though it’s probably stuff that Barky or any of his treasonous junta would have gladly given them, gratis, just to move along his West-killing agenda. But, I still like to give FloatingRock the benefit of the doubt, for old, old time’s sake.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 4:12 AM

No one who ever supported Barky – or even failed to recognize that Barky was an idiot and an America-hater – is a patriot in any way, shape, or form.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 3:52 AM

That’s just so ridiculous. So Snowden is a traitor worthy of smear and even persecution as a traitor by the government because, you say, every single person who voted for Obama are traitors? Oh, but wait, he didn’t even vote for Obama, according to reports, he voted for Ron Paul. But no matter to you, because even though he didn’t vote for Obama, you’re pretty sure he would have if he hadn’t voted for Ron Paul instead. So essentially what you’re saying is that Obama is so toxic and traitorous that even people who didn’t vote for him are traitors, too? That’s insane! Or maybe even astro-turf, although since there are a number of people that share your view on the right I don’t suppose that’s the case.

But why would you use such a pathetic excuse to smear and attack a patriot who is trying to help the American people save their Constitutional Rights before they are lost forever? Don’t you understand how dangerous it is for the government to have such detailed files on every American, including people in positions of power and influence?

Did you read my posts above in this thread? I realize they’re lengthy but could you read them and point out how you disagree with me?

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 4:17 AM

But, I still like to give FloatingRock the benefit of the doubt, for old, old time’s sake.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 4:12 AM

I can respect that. :)

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 4:23 AM

I just witnessed so much stupid..
Can’t.stop.laughing.

Perfect note to end on.

Gonna make like a log.

Nite y’all.

bazil9 on June 15, 2013 at 12:51 AM

I’m thinking about you, here in the wee hours, darlin’ bnmine. :)

Yesterday & Today – “Beautiful Dreamer”

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 6:02 AM

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 3:27 AM

If there’s another terrorist attack. Doesn’t that disprove the notion that they “hate us for our freedoms.”

libfreeordie on June 15, 2013 at 6:34 AM

But, I still like to give FloatingRock the benefit of the doubt, for old, old time’s sake.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on June 15, 2013 at 4:12 AM

So do I, especially when he’s right.

VorDaj on June 15, 2013 at 7:43 AM

Good Morning, Patriots!

It is unclear what national security interests we have in the civil war in Syria. It is very clear that any attempt to aid the Syrian rebels would be complicated and dangerous, precisely because we don’t know who these people are.

– Senator Rand Paul (R, KY)”Bosnia…Libya…Syria” My take.

kingsjester on June 15, 2013 at 7:57 AM

Here’s an idea. Let’s say that the neofascists catch him, try him and lock him away, couldn’t President Mike Lee or Ted Cruz pardon him in ’17?

FloatingRock on June 15, 2013 at 12:11 AM

How about President Rush Limbaugh or President Alex Jones?

HotAirLib on June 15, 2013 at 8:12 AM

kingsjester on June 15, 2013 at 7:57 AM…you are becoming part of my daily reading routine bud…when you go on vacation…warn us!
.
.
.
…someone behind you…is farting again!

KOOLAID2 on June 15, 2013 at 8:28 AM

KOOLAID2 on June 15, 2013 at 8:28 AM

Thank you! What vacation? I live under Obamanomics.

kingsjester on June 15, 2013 at 8:30 AM

There are many wonderful, dear people here I consider friends, and I feel so fortunate to be able to share the comment section with many of you.

blueball on June 15, 2013 at 1:27 AM

…go twitter your tw@t!

KOOLAID2 on June 15, 2013 at 8:31 AM

KOOLAID2 on June 15, 2013 at 8:31 AM

Seriously, there is something seriously wrong with her psychologically! She’s a freak!

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 8:37 AM

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 8:37 AM

No kiddin’.

kingsjester on June 15, 2013 at 8:38 AM

KOOLAID2 on June 15, 2013 at 8:31 AM
Seriously, there is something seriously wrong with her psychologically! She’s a freak!

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 8:37 AM

lol- dude’s a freakshow.

bazil9 on June 15, 2013 at 8:39 AM

– Senator Rand Paul (R, KY)”Bosnia…Libya…Syria” My take.
kingsjester on June 15, 2013 at 7:57 AM

His statement is similar to Palin’s and LTC West’s re: Libya. And true.
Good post, as usual KJ.

bazil9 on June 15, 2013 at 8:42 AM

bazil9 on June 15, 2013 at 8:42 AM

Thank you, ma’am.

Last night, I wrote a post (and a song) about the Obama’s upcoming Africa vay-cay. I may post it later…although…I don’t want to be seen as RAAACIIIST!

kingsjester on June 15, 2013 at 8:45 AM

Gill – you are falling in line. But letting the media do your thinking for you is crazy.
Too bad the NSA wasn’t listening in on the Chechens of Boston. I’ m sure all the bad guys use traceable modes of communication to hatch all their plans, for anyone who wants to listen in on.
First rule of Government is to conceal their ineptness.
FlaMurph on June 15, 2013 at 1:50 AM</blockquote

I'm just terrified thinking this massive leak will make us less safe. I keep thinking about the bloody pics from the Boston marathon.

I wish we could strike a balance. That's what I would aim for.

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 8:46 AM

No kiddin’.

kingsjester on June 15, 2013 at 8:38 AM

haha

I have a brother who’s had psychotic episodes – it’s fascinates me how people like him can get so disconnected from reality.

To add, my brother has never been diagnosed with Asperger’s, but he has too many of its symptoms for me to believe he doesn’t have it – bluegshrill’s bizarre social skills remind me of his…

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 8:48 AM

Read and learn:

http://www.zdnet.com/how-did-mainstream-media-get-the-nsa-prism-story-so-hopelessly-wrong-7000016822/

Turn off Glenn Beck and listen to some experts.

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 8:49 AM

I wasn’t speaking to you with that last comment,
Flamurph. I know you are a thoughtful and informed person.

I was speaking to people like the hopelessly ignorant koolaid and company.

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 8:50 AM

lol- dude’s a freakshow.

bazil9 on June 15, 2013 at 8:39 AM

Does your gaydar tell you that bluegshrill’s a dude? lol

Anti-Control on June 15, 2013 at 8:52 AM

Turns out the “they’re spying on all of us” refrain was a little overdone.

And you guys thought you could trust the deluded, attention-seeking boasts of an anti-American, traitorous, high school dropout fabulist,

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 8:54 AM

Best part of Noonan’s WSJ article linked above was the last paragraph…

“Some of the reaction to the NSA story is said to be generational. The young are said not to fear losing privacy, because they never knew it. The middle-aged, who grew up in peace and have families, want safety first, whatever it takes, even excess. Lately for wisdom I’ve been looking to the old. Go to somebody who’s 75 and ask, “So if it turns out the U.S. government is really spying on American citizens and tracking everything they do, is that OK with you?” They’ll likely say no, that’s not what we do in America.

The other day on Fox News Channel I saw 79-year-old Eugene Cernan, an Apollo astronaut. Mr. Cernan’s indignation about the state of things was so sincere, so there. China had just blasted into space, bringing its pride and sense of nationhood with it. America doesn’t do that anymore, said Mr. Cernan, we’re not achieving big things. Now we go nowhere.

The interviewer, Neil Cavuto, threw in a question about the spying.

Yes, we’re under attack, said Mr. Cernan, but “we can handle it,” we can go after “the bad guys” without hurting “the good guys,” you can’t give up your own liberty and your own freedom.

Exactly how a lot of us feel about it, rocket man…”

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324188604578543721259199626.html

workingclass artist on June 15, 2013 at 9:34 AM

Read and learn:

http://www.zdnet.com/how-did-mainstream-media-get-the-nsa-prism-story-so-hopelessly-wrong-7000016822/

Turn off Glenn Beck and listen to some experts.

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 8:49 AM

Turns out the “they’re spying on all of us” refrain was a little overdone.

And you guys thought you could trust the deluded, attention-seeking boasts of an anti-American, traitorous, high school dropout fabulist,

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 8:54 AM

I inflicted your link on myself. It’s a long argument about nothing, and the conclusion of the thing says it all:

The botched reporting by the Guardian and the Post means that millions of readers directed their anger at a handful of big companies that were unfairly accused of selling out their customers to the national security apparatus. The reality is that if NSA surveillance is indeed overstepping its bounds, those companies are victims, not willing participants.

The article is a defense of the motivations and the cooperation of big tech companies, and really nothing else. And it’s filled with “ifs.”

Based on other reports, it’s likely that the NSA has been systematically gathering and mining data by tapping into switches at Tier-1 providers on the Internet backbone. It’s been supplementing that data collection with more targeted data requests from Internet providers like Microsoft, Yahoo, and Google.

– it acknowledges flatly.

If someone thinks of the NSA story as being sold out by Facebook, then they might be able to read that article and take comfort, assuming they want to believe Facebook instead of the government.

The data mining isn’t disputed at all.

Axe on June 15, 2013 at 9:48 AM

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano weighed in on the NSA intelligence leaks on Friday, telling NY1 that fears over government surveillance were overblown.

“I think people have gotten the idea that there’s an Orwellian state out there that somehow we’re operating in. That’s far from the case,” she told Errol Louis during an appearance on Road to City Hall.

Marries up nicely with

The best political weapon is the weapon of terror. Cruelty commands respect. Men may hate us. But, we don’t ask for their love; only for their fear.

~Heinrich Himmler

BobMbx on June 15, 2013 at 10:07 AM

I love how the marginalization effort has emerged full force….. “He’s Lying” (he didnt make 200k a year), “He’s Lying” (he didnt have access to what he said he did) “He’s Lying” (Well, yes, everything he has said might be factually true and we are not just spying on, but collecting data on our citizen populace at large, and yes technically we might have lied to congress under oath) “but this guys a traitor!!!”

Koa on June 15, 2013 at 10:11 AM

Turns out the “they’re spying on all of us” refrain was a little overdone.

bluegill on June 15, 2013 at 8:54 AM

So…metadata from 30,000,000,000 (30 billion) telephone interceptions IN ONE MONTH is not enough for you? Did they miss a couple?

Btw; Your link amounts to nothing more than self-serving (and proven false) denials from the internet companies who sold us out for political favors from the state.

Nellie, you wouldn’t know an expert if one smacked you in the face (which you’d richly deserve).
To you, an “expert” is anyone who says anything that you want to believe. Everybody else is a liar and a traitor.

Solaratov on June 15, 2013 at 10:33 AM

There is a tradition of whistleblowing in the United States, even among people who work with classified information — and there are long-established ways to do it. Snowden might have approached a member of Congress, perhaps one of those with intelligence oversight. He might have written to his organization’s lawyers, to clarify the legality of his work. He might have argued his case from within. Jack Goldsmith, a legal expert then working in the Justice Department, fought against the use of torture by the Bush administration. Eventually he resigned and wrote about it. There were setbacks, but ultimately, Goldsmith was successful: The policy was reversed.

Snowden chose a different path. He stole a hoard of documents and fled to Hong Kong. Thus did he place his fate in the hands of a government that exerts total control over its nation’s Internet and spares no expense in its attempts to penetrate ours. His decision to speak from there, in public, is also noteworthy: It means his interest in publicity trumps his stated fear of arrest.

Nothing about the context, in other words, tells us that Snowden is interested in anything other than martyrdom and a perverse sort of fame. Nothing tells us that his primary interest is the welfare of his fellow Americans. Nothing about his actions, so far, seems likely to help him achieve his stated goals.

Apparently, Serpico is also a traitor who was only interested in fame and not rooting out corruption in the NYPD.

Is there any point in asking the head of a crime family if what they’re doing is legal?

BobMbx on June 15, 2013 at 11:31 AM

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