Snowden still in Hong Kong — and talking to the press

posted at 12:01 pm on June 12, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

But, er, not really saying all that much, at least not yet.  Despite speculation that arose after Edward Snowden disappeared from his hotel, he hasn’t exited Hong Kong.  Speculation ran so high that the AP issued a breaking news alert when Snowden resurfaced this morning … still in Hong Kong:

In fact, Snowden told the South China Morning Post that he trusted in Hong Kong’s rule of law, and wants to leave his fate in the hands of its citizens:

Edward Snowden says he wants to ask the people of Hong Kong to decide his fate after choosing the city because of his faith in its rule of law.

The 29-year-old former CIA employee behind what might be the biggest intelligence leak in US history revealed his identity to the world in Hong Kong on Sunday. His decision to use a city under Chinese sovereignty as his haven has been widely questioned – including by some rights activists in Hong Kong.

Snowden said last night that he had no doubts about his choice of Hong Kong.

“People who think I made a mistake in picking Hong Kong as a location misunderstand my intentions. I am not here to hide from justice; I am here to reveal criminality,” Snowden said in an exclusive interview with the South China Morning Post.

“I have had many opportunities to flee HK, but I would rather stay and fight the United States government in the courts, because I have faith in Hong Kong’s rule of law,” he added.

Snowden says he has committed no crimes in Hong Kong and has “been given no reason to doubt [Hong Kong’s legal] system”.

“My intention is to ask the courts and people of Hong Kong to decide my fate,” he said.

Snowden doesn’t have much to fear.  Hong Kong has an extradition treaty with the US, but Beijing can veto those decisions.  With the American intel community in an uproar over Snowden, why would they hasten to end the crisis, even if Hong Kong really did decide to extradite Snowden?  Not that there’s much chance of that:

A march from Chater Garden to the US Consulate in support of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has been set for this Saturday at 3pm, the organiser said on Wednesday.

In-media, a website supporting freelance journalists, that organised the march urged people voice their concerns because Snowden had sacrificed his personal safety and freedom to defend internet freedom and the right to free speech. …

Some prominent local pro-democracy politicians have agreed to join the rally. They include legislators Albert Ho Chun-yan, Claudia Mo and Charles Mok, Director of Hong Kong Human Rights Monitor Law Yuk-Kai, and In-Media’s Ip Iam-chong.

“We call on Hong Kong to respect international legal standards and procedures relating to the protection of Snowden; we condemn the US government for violating our rights and privacy; and we call on the US not to prosecute Snowden,” the group said.

I doubt that the Hong Kong semi-autonomous government will go out of its way to extradite Snowden, not unless Beijing pressures them to do so, and that seems very unlikely.  The path of least resistance, politically speaking, is de facto asylum through inaction; it keeps the pro-democracy activists focused on the US instead of Beijing, and it doesn’t require any extraordinary action in either direction.  That also bolsters their credibility on free speech while not challenging Beijing’s authority.

So Snowden will probably stay put while the rest of us back home focus on the meaning of the leaks.  Ron Fournier at National Journal argues that we should ignore Snowden as a distraction — one which benefits Barack Obama:

Is Edward Snowden a hero or a traitor? I don’t care. You read right: I don’t give a whit about the man who exposed two sweeping U.S. online surveillance programs, nor do I worry much about his verdict in the court of public opinion.

Why? Because it is the wrong question. The Snowden narrative matters mostly to White House officials trying to deflect attention from government overreach and deception, and to media executives in search of an easy storyline to serve a celebrity-obsessed audience. …

But before perpetuating and immortalizing the Surveillance State, we need to remember that the precedents set today apply to the next president — and the ones that follow, perhaps men and women who aren’t as dedicated to democratic institutions as both Bush and Obama are.

It would help if the Obama administration would stop misleading the public, eroding trust in government that is already at record lows.

Let the Department of Justice deal with Snowden.  We should be demanding more transparency and more accountability from the federal government — and not just at the NSA.

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Sideshow – who cares?

Now about that NSA snooping program …

HondaV65 on June 12, 2013 at 12:04 PM

I voted for Obama
 
HondaV65 on March 11, 2013 at 12:26 PM

rogerb on June 12, 2013 at 12:08 PM

rogerb on June 12, 2013 at 12:08 PM

That wound will never heal.

portlandon on June 12, 2013 at 12:10 PM

Is Edward Snowden a hero or a traitor? I don’t care. You read right: I don’t give a whit about the man who exposed two sweeping U.S. online surveillance programs, nor do I worry much about his verdict in the court of public opinion.

Why? Because it is the wrong question. The Snowden narrative matters mostly to White House officials trying to deflect attention from government overreach and deception, and to media executives in search of an easy storyline to serve a celebrity-obsessed audience. …

This. This, this, and more this. Did I mention this?

I’m talking to all of your “National Security” fetishists who keep accusing others of calling Snowden a “hero”, when few are saying any such thing.

MadisonConservative on June 12, 2013 at 12:10 PM

Fournier’s comment may be the most insular I’ve ever read. (“Ignore the whistleblower who’s ripping the lid off this major story!! Paying attention him might help Obama!!”) Talk about parochial.

This is bigger than “getting” Obama, and constantly discussing it in those terms aids the Left, which has its own paranoid take on this. (“It’s all about Obama! Black man in the Whitehouse!! Black man in the Whitehouse!!!”)

Both sides are trying to play small ball with the biggest story of our lives.

Hucklebuck on June 12, 2013 at 12:11 PM

rogerb on June 12, 2013 at 12:08 PM

Heh. Pithy!

a capella on June 12, 2013 at 12:11 PM

Agree 100%. Snowden’s motives are a sideline, albeit an interesting one. The issue is our government.

petefrt on June 12, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Fournier’s comment may be the most insular I’ve ever read. (“Ignore the whistleblower who’s ripping the lid off this major story!! Paying attention him might help Obama!!”) Talk about parochial.

This is bigger than “getting” Obama, and constantly discussing it in those terms aids the Left, which has its own paranoid take on this. (“It’s all about Obama! Black man in the Whitehouse!! Black man in the Whitehouse!!!”)

Both sides are trying to play small ball with the biggest story of our lives.

Hucklebuck on June 12, 2013 at 12:11 PM
—–

I agree completely.

Can any one name one time in history where Government has “given up” power once they have had a foot hold? I dont think it matters “who” the President is. I think it’s obvious these types of programs are bigger then any one man or one party.

I think its scary how much power these people are attempting to wield over our lives.

Politricks on June 12, 2013 at 12:17 PM

A march from Chater Garden to the US Consulate in support of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden has been set for this Saturday at 3pm, the organiser said on Wednesday.

This is exactly why Snowden went to Hong Kong. From his interview with The Guardian:

Additionally, Hong Kong has a strong tradition of free speech. People think ‘Oh China, Great Firewall.’ Mainland China does have significant restrictions on free speech but the people of Hong Kong have a long tradition of protesting in the streets, of making there views known. The internet is not filtered here more so then any other western government and I believe that the Hong Kong government is actually independent in relation to a lot of other leading western governments.

HarryBackside on June 12, 2013 at 12:19 PM

Is Edward Snowden a hero or a traitor? I don’t care. You read right: I don’t give a whit about the man who exposed two sweeping U.S. online surveillance programs, nor do I worry much about his verdict in the court of public opinion.

No intellectual curiousity. If it truly doesn’t matter, then why is there such a concerted effort to discredit this guy? Note there are many more declaring him “Traitor” then there are declaring him “Hero”.

If he is allowed to be discredited in a one-side attack, we lose. If his credibility is damaged it is easier to dismiss the claims against the NSA, regardless of evidence. While it is sad, it is still true. It shouldn’t be this way, but it is.

weaselyone on June 12, 2013 at 12:21 PM

sounds oddly like weasel-speak .. “what might be the biggest intelligence leak” — not that there’s any reported details or proof, of course, but it gives the LSM something to spew ..

Didn’t someone in the O’Barky ‘hood express an interest in having Snowden “just disappear” ??
/.

CaveatEmpty on June 12, 2013 at 12:21 PM

I think it’s obvious these types of programs are bigger then any one man or one party.

Politricks on June 12, 2013 at 12:17 PM

Which begs the question; can any one man control these programs, or the agencies that control them?

Have we gotten to a point where the bureaucracies have become so big, and so powerful, that they can no longer be controlled by our elected representatives?

HarryBackside on June 12, 2013 at 12:21 PM

Agree 100%. Snowden’s motives are a sideline, albeit an interesting one. The issue is our government.

petefrt on June 12, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Up until a week ago he was working for said government.

weaselyone on June 12, 2013 at 12:25 PM

perhaps men and women who aren’t as dedicated to democratic institutions as both Bush and Obama are.

lulz.

the_nile on June 12, 2013 at 12:30 PM

“Snowden still in Hong Kong — and talking to the press”

In other words: “Squirrel!”

OT: Amnesty II needs to be killed.

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 12:32 PM

“Snowden still in Hong Kong — and talking to the press”

In other words: “Squirrel!”

OT: Amnesty II needs to be killed.

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 12:32 PM

That’s NOT a Squirrel!!

THIS is a Squirrel!!!

http://www.delawareonline.com/article/20130612/NEWS01/306120037/Eight-month-erection-leads-malpractice-lawsuit-by-trucker

ToddPA on June 12, 2013 at 12:34 PM

Agree 100%. Snowden’s motives are a sideline, albeit an interesting one. The issue is our government.

petefrt on June 12, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Agreed. I’ll venture to add…the issue is our government and its willingness to ignore the U.S. Constitution.

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 12:35 PM

If it truly doesn’t matter, then why is there such a concerted effort to discredit this guy? Note there are many more declaring him “Traitor” then there are declaring him “Hero”.

Obviously to distract attention from the substance of his disclosures, which virtually nobody is challenging.

tommyboy on June 12, 2013 at 12:37 PM

Hey Ed! I believe we now have THE TOP THREAD FOR YOUR SITE.

See my link above.

Competition to post on this will be….ah…STIFF.

ToddPA on June 12, 2013 at 12:38 PM

Have we gotten to a point where the bureaucracies have become so big, and so powerful, that they can no longer be controlled by our elected representatives?

HarryBackside on June 12, 2013 at 12:21 PM

Considering they’re damn near creating their own private armies, and arming them accordingly, this is very near to fact if it isn’t so already.

Think NKVD or Waffen SS.

But that could never happen here. Hey, how do you say that in German?

Bishop on June 12, 2013 at 12:39 PM

ToddPA on June 12, 2013 at 12:34 PM

Ha ha! Poor dude.

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 12:39 PM

It’s a limited hangout.

Akzed on June 12, 2013 at 12:45 PM

ToddPA on June 12, 2013 at 12:34 PM

Metzgar is suing the doctor that put it in and his wife is suing the doctor that took it out!!

Deano1952 on June 12, 2013 at 12:48 PM

Even if he were working for the Chinese, knowingly or as a dupe, just because the Chinese have an ax to grind doesn’t mean it’s not very important that the American people know. Even Forrest Gump was a hero.

How bad could knowing that our government is about to pass the final stage into irrevocable tyranny be? And if the NSA’s spying on us is not what Snowden says it is, then what really has he revealed that wasn’t surmiseable to our enemies already?

flicker on June 12, 2013 at 12:48 PM

Obviously to distract attention from the substance of his disclosures, which virtually nobody is challenging.

tommyboy on June 12, 2013 at 12:37 PM

What exactly is the substance of his disclosures, especially in light of people calling for his execution?

flicker on June 12, 2013 at 12:51 PM

ToddPA on June 12, 2013 at 12:34 PM

Ha ha! Poor dude.

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 12:39 PM

Not really…..so he had a Problem riding his motorcycle??

Seriously! He never rode with a gal straddling him?????

Must be a PA thing……oh, and we don’t have to wear
“helmets” either….

ToddPA on June 12, 2013 at 12:51 PM

It doesn’t matter what his motivation was. What matters is whether what he is saying is true or not.

flicker on June 12, 2013 at 12:52 PM

Imagine a government with a revenue collection entity that targets people based on their ideology now imaging that same government listening in on all electronic communications of the citizenry.

Now what if that government were to sell guns to drug cartels while moving to dis-able it’s own citizens from their inalienable right to keep and bear arms.

What if that same government looked the other way when an armed terrorist group stationed goons at poling places.

What if we had a government that wanted a flood of new regime supporters by not protecting its borders from foreign nationals.

What if that government actively fed, housed and paid its supporters with wealth that is confiscated from working folks that don’t support that regime.

What if the head of the government was a person with a CT SS# and a fishy forged BC and selective service card and has presented absolutely no documentation that proves he went to college.

Well that would suck.

esnap on June 12, 2013 at 12:54 PM

Snowden and his credibility matter because he’s made some extraordinary claims about the extent of government snooping that so far have not panned out. The Washington Post had to go back and edit their initial story to take out some of his more wild claims.

If Snowden greatly exaggerates the amount of info collected by the program, then that is relevant. It doesn’t let the goverment off the hook for spying on its own citizens, but if Snowden is spinning lies and truth together it makes it that much harder to figure out exactly what our government IS doing.

AngusMc on June 12, 2013 at 12:54 PM

A government that has the finest, most advance system to collect and analyse data still can’t tell us what happened in Benghazi nine months later. What happened to that FBI investigation into Benghazi?

d1carter on June 12, 2013 at 1:02 PM

H

ave we gotten to a point where the bureaucracies have become so big, and so powerful, that they can no longer be controlled by our elected representatives?

HarryBackside on June 12, 2013 at 12:21 PM

The elected reps could control them but whether they have the intestinal fortitude to cut off their funding is another thing.

chemman on June 12, 2013 at 1:03 PM

This hoopla has no meaning if amnesty passes. The focus should be on
defeating amnesty. Amnesty is going to sink this country. Amnesty should ld be the focus. Did I mention amnesty?

Mr. Arrogant on June 12, 2013 at 1:04 PM

Ok, I don’t care if he’s a hero or chump. I want to know how he went from a security guard to CIA analyst. He had no HS degree, no college degree, some computer courses. My husband says it happens all the time in the government, they hire someone who seems good at the job. Was he a hacker they gave a high security clearance and millions of dollars of computer equipment and told him to get to it? I can’t find any background on him. How could they hire a kid with no job skills except being a computer genius and not expect him to wander off the reservation.

megthered on June 12, 2013 at 1:05 PM

Have we gotten to a point where the bureaucracies have become so big, and so powerful, that they can no longer be controlled by our elected representatives?

HarryBackside on June 12, 2013 at 12:21 PM

Considering they’re damn near creating their own private armies, and arming them accordingly, this is very near to fact if it isn’t so already.

Think NKVD or Waffen SS.

But that could never happen here. Hey, how do you say that in German Spanish?

I must agree, to some degree, I think we’ve already gotten past the point of control by elected officials, it may actually be the other way around at times.

Also, gotta get up to date with the current vogue in preferred language.

hawkeye54 on June 12, 2013 at 1:06 PM

he has a G.E.D. Since when is that not a highschool degree?

RiverCocytus on June 12, 2013 at 1:08 PM

rogerb, you made Honda disappear faster than lightening.

————–

I’m neither traitor nor hero. I’m an American.” –Snowden

How long has it been that any man in the world displayed this much principle and guts?

The prospect of the Obama Eunuchy Admin. and Society going after this guy is incredibly schadenfreudig.

The prospect of them fighting for his extradition from HK, China intervening, is more than a global spectacle.

It is an hilarious day in the global history when China leaves the appearance of being more free than the USA of today.

Congratulations, idiots of the world. You cheered for Obama. You brung/kept him.

YOU got him!!!

What a wonderful mess the Obama world is!!!

One couldn’t have written this in the fiction of all fiction.

Yes, the US spooks might still kill Snowden, even by drone, but he would die for freedom, not only for America, but for the entire world to see. One couldn’t die for a better cause.

I love the pretzel he put Obama in.

Leftists, the world over, you are tyrannicall fools, never liberal and never progressive, never!

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2013 at 1:14 PM

Now about that NSA snooping program …

HondaV65 on June 12, 2013 at 12:04 PM

May the guy you voted for fluke you and yours, into oblivion. YOU dserve no less.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2013 at 1:16 PM

The South China Morning Post’s website is getting slammed and giving lots of errors.

Whine about terrorism all you like…this is bigger than anything we’ve seen before.

MadisonConservative on June 12, 2013 at 1:19 PM

I a convinced people who say this is a “squirrel” are either (1) stupid, or (2) actually agree what the NSA is doing.

If you think the immigration bill is bad and is going to destroy America, then you better understand that a all powerful agency collecting all your info is even more dangerous. Also as technology improves it will only get worse. No matter what you think about Snowden’s claims, one thing he was dead right about, the surveillance state if left unchecked will get better at getting your info because technology will get better. This is not a distraction or a squirrel…this is the real deal state tyranny that people always rant on about.

William Eaton on June 12, 2013 at 1:19 PM

…I wonder if CIA employs non-U.S. citizens as analysts.

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 1:19 PM

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2013 at 1:14 PM

+1

And just remember…this is the president that was going to “restore the world’s view of the United States”.

MadisonConservative on June 12, 2013 at 1:20 PM

…perhaps men and women who aren’t as dedicated to democratic institutions as both Bush and Obama are.

That’d be hilarious if he wasn’t serious.

Fenris on June 12, 2013 at 1:21 PM

William Eaton on June 12, 2013 at 1:19 PM

I agree with you.
However, I believe Snowden’s whereabouts and his personal information are a squirrel. Sorry if you didn’t get that from my post

“Snowden still in Hong Kong — and talking to the press”

In other words: “Squirrel!”

OT: Amnesty II needs to be killed.

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 12:32 PM

By the way, I’m not stupid nor do I believe that what NSA is doing is constitutional. How’s that?

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 1:25 PM

The Washington Post had to go back and edit their initial story to take out some of his more wild claims.

When the Post redacts a story it’s usually because it no longer serves the liberal talking points. And none of what he said so far hasn’t panned out. It hasn’t been responded to other than “He may sure as hell be lying about every single thing, but even that is enough that he sure as hell has to go to prison”.

If I claimed to be a spook with five medals of honor and that I was on the grassy knoll, that doesn’t quite make me a traitor or a criminal. It makes me a goof.

So something this guy is saying is true, otherwise the government wouldn’t be so very upset. Unless of course he’s an Obmama plant to distract from Benghazi, the IRS, F&F etc.

flicker on June 12, 2013 at 1:25 PM

perhaps men and women who aren’t as dedicated to democratic institutions as both Bush and Obama are.

Dedicated in different ways. Bush- uphold the United States Constitution and its associated institutions.

Obama- dedicated to the destruction of democratic institutions and the rise of perpetual Democratic institutions.

Happy Nomad on June 12, 2013 at 1:28 PM

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2013 at 1:14 PM

Good post.

flicker on June 12, 2013 at 1:30 PM

behind what might be the biggest intelligence leak in US history

Uh…. no. That would be that stale old story about Manning. But you have to fluff it up or no one will read your story.

perhaps men and women who aren’t as dedicated to democratic institutions as both Bush and Obama are

ROFLMAO

AngusMc on June 12, 2013 at 12:54 PM

This.

GWB on June 12, 2013 at 1:30 PM

Best quote is this

I’m neither traitor nor hero. I’m an American.”

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Let me say one last thing before going back to bed.

For every single commentor in the news that says Snowden is a traitor, or has done such a terrible thing to the security of the US, or should go to jail, or be executed, what do they know about the details of PRISM that would substantiate their distress? And if all these commenters know all this, how secure was the program to begin with?

And if the program was such common knowledge in the first place, why can’t the give credible details of it to the folks at home.

I think all the irate commenters in the news are just getting their own five minutes of fame. They have no idea what the program was, how it was monitored, what it’s successes are, or what dangers it presents.

They’re spouting somebody’s talking points.

flicker on June 12, 2013 at 1:39 PM

Meanwhile

DarkCurrent on June 12, 2013 at 1:41 PM

Whine about terrorism all you like…this is bigger than anything we’ve seen before.

MadisonConservative on June 12, 2013 at 1:19 PM

This guy might die, but he also might whip China and the USSR into the light. May all the mold be exposed and may it all die.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2013 at 1:42 PM

Yes, DK, Snowden is an indicment of the USSA and of China. Of course there’s little ‘support’. Who dares to support/criticize anything?

“If Snowden should ask for political asylum, China should consider it,” said Guo Songmin, an editor with the business monthly ChinaSOE, after launching the online campaign.
“We can show our position towards human rights and freedom of speech,” the former People’s Liberation Army soldier said. “It is sad that China hasn’t done so already.”

Guo, who is a occasional commentator on current affairs on Chinese national television, has posted an appeal for China to grant the US citizen political asylum on Sina Weibo on Tuesday, where so far it has gained little feedback.
“We had this image of the US being the ‘bastion of freedom’ where you could go to the White House and insult the president,” said Guo. “Now we see, it’s not true. It’s like [George] Orwell says in 1984, ‘Big brother is watching you’.”

“Both leading political parties in the US have indicated that they want him persecuted for treason,” he said. “According to Article 32 of our constitution, we have the right and the duty to grant him asylum” if he applied.

Snowden is a huge pretzel for Obama. If he goes hard after him he appears to be the leader of Russia/the USSR, China or worse. I love this to no end.

Schadenfreude on June 12, 2013 at 1:45 PM

With the American intel community in an uproar over Snowden, why would they hasten to end the crisis, even if Hong Kong really did decide to extradite Snowden?

Yeah. We’ll have to wait until they’ve finished their beer and popcorn first.

kim roy on June 12, 2013 at 1:56 PM

And just remember…this is the president that was going to “restore the world’s view of the United States”.

MadisonConservative on June 12, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Hope ‘n’ Change, dude.

Hope

and

Change.

Any word on when we get to have/see any?

Solaratov on June 12, 2013 at 2:11 PM

Ok, I don’t care if he’s a hero or chump. I want to know how he went from a security guard to CIA analyst. He had no HS degree, no college degree, some computer courses
megthered on June 12, 2013 at 1:05 PM

The IT industry abounds with people with no or limited formal education. In Fact programming/software/hardware is something that one teaches one’s self.
Some notable computer folk that did not finish school are:
Bill Gates
Marl Zuckerberg
Micheal Dell
Steve Jobs

I know many multi-millionaires that either dropped out of HS or just have GEDs.

I know a very successful guy that can barely read and he owns two construction companies. He can’t even read a menu at a restaurant.

I would rather hire a smart kid and see that he masters industry specific knowledge then hire someone that has a lib arts degree in vagina studies.

esnap on June 12, 2013 at 2:50 PM

Obviously to distract attention from the substance of his disclosures, which virtually nobody is challenging.

tommyboy on June 12, 2013 at 12:37 PM

That and the big one…”immigration” reform. While this NSA thing is confusing everyone, the Gang keeps chugging along. I’ll sure they are very happy to be out of the eye of ‘the people’.
Luck of the devil.

Mimzey on June 12, 2013 at 3:42 PM

Mimzey on June 12, 2013 at 3:42 PM

Be careful…

I a convinced people who say this is a “squirrel” are either (1) stupid, or (2) actually agree what the NSA is doing.

If you think the immigration bill is bad and is going to destroy America, then you better understand that a all powerful agency collecting all your info is even more dangerous. Also as technology improves it will only get worse. No matter what you think about Snowden’s claims, one thing he was dead right about, the surveillance state if left unchecked will get better at getting your info because technology will get better. This is not a distraction or a squirrel…this is the real deal state tyranny that people always rant on about.

William Eaton on June 12, 2013 at 1:19 PM

freedomfirst on June 12, 2013 at 4:23 PM

Snowden is clearly a Chinese agent. He is living in HK on whose dime? No way he could afford it on his own. His timing also shows he is a Chinese agent. He waited until Obama was meeting with the Chinese about cyberspying to launch his attack. This may go down in history as the greatest act of treason in U.S. history.

fleiter on June 12, 2013 at 4:50 PM

Snowden is clearly a Chinese agent. He is living in HK on whose dime? No way he could afford it on his own.

fleiter on June 12, 2013 at 4:50 PM

Yeah, I’m sure he’s destitute after working for NSA contractors for several years. You’re so clever!

MadisonConservative on June 12, 2013 at 5:08 PM

1) If he is so principled why is he on the run?

2) Why is he leaking information through our enemy the Chinese?

3) What right did he have to break his oath on keeping secrets?

Not saying he is a traitor, but saying he is no hero.

Faramir on June 12, 2013 at 6:37 PM