Wyden: I gave Clapper that question a day in advance of his untruthful answer

posted at 12:01 pm on June 11, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

This puts quite a different spin on last week’s question about possible perjury by the Director of National Intelligence after the exposure of the NSA’s PRISM and BLARNEY programs, doesn’t it?  While we didn’t necessarily assume that Senator Ron Wyden’s question came out of the blue to James Clapper in March – Wyden has long professed public concern about the NSA and its activities — we didn’t know that Wyden had in fact warned Clapper a full day in advance that it would be asked.  Not only that, but Wyden also offered Clapper an opportunity to amend the answer for the record afterward:

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) issued the following statement regarding statements made by the Director of National Intelligence James Clapper about collection on Americans. Wyden is a senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

“One of the most important responsibilities a Senator has is oversight of the intelligence community.  This job cannot be done responsibly if Senators aren’t getting straight answers to direct questions. When NSA Director Alexander failed to clarify previous public statements about domestic surveillance, it was necessary to put the question to the Director of National Intelligence.  So that he would be prepared to answer, I sent the question to Director Clapper’s office a day in advance.  After the hearing was over my staff and I gave his office a chance to amend his answer.  Now public hearings are needed to address the recent disclosures and the American people have the right to expect straight answers from the intelligence leadership to the questions asked by their representatives.”

Wyden suggests strongly that he will pursue an investigation into possible perjury and/or obstruction, perhaps involving both Clapper and Keith Alexander, based on Alexander’s similar denial given the year before.  Clapper tried to defend himself yesterday, but if this is the best he can do, he’s going to need a really good attorney:

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is really struggling to explain why he told Congress in March (see video above) that the National Security Agency does not intentionally collect any kind of data on millions of Americans. His latest take: It’s an unfair question, he said, like “When are you going to stop beating your wife?” And it seems to depend on the meaning of “collect.”

“I responded in what I thought was the most truthful, or least untruthful, manner by saying ‘no,’” Clapper told NBC News on Sunday.

A newly revealed NSA program, however, in which the agency secretly vacuumed up the telephone records of millions of Verizon customers seems to fit the definition of both “data” and “millions of Americans.”

Last week, Clapper said his “no” meant that NSA analysts don’t read Americans’ emails. Some have noted that could explain his earlier answer because “collect” has a precise meaning in intelligence-gathering circles, and it’s along those lines.

On Sunday, Clapper elaborated: “This has to do with of course somewhat of a semantic, perhaps some would say too cute by half. But it is—there are honest differences on the semantics of what—when someone says ‘collection’ to me, that has a specific meaning, which may have a different meaning to him.”

Frankly, that’s bunk.  Wyden’s question was plain, and the meaning clear — and Clapper had a 24-hour head start to clarify the meaning of any terms used.  That appears to be the point of Wyden’s statement today.  Clapper could just as easily have said, “That question touches on NSA capabilities that should be discussed in closed session, and I would be glad to answer your questions at that point.”  Eric Holder managed to give that answer to Mark Kirk on an unrelated manner, and even though it raised eyebrows, it didn’t amount to lying to Congress — which is still a felony even if no oath was taken at the testimony.

Wyden has also joined a bipartisan coterie of Senators proposing a new law that forces FISA court decisions to be released publicly, in order for Americans to have some check on the surveillance state:

Today, Oregon’s Senator Jeff Merkley and Senator Mike Lee (R-UT), accompanied by Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Dean Heller (R-NV), Mark Begich (D-AK), Al Franken (D-MN), Jon Tester (D-MT), and Ron Wyden (D-OR), introduced a bill that would put an end to the “secret law” governing controversial government surveillance programs.  This bill would require the Attorney General to declassify significant Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) opinions, allowing Americans to know how broad of a legal authority the government is claiming to spy on Americans under the PATRIOT Act and Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

“Americans deserve to know how much information about their private communications the government believes it’s allowed to take under the law,” Merkley said. “There is plenty of room to have this debate without compromising our surveillance sources or methods or tipping our hand to our enemies.  We can’t have a serious debate about how much surveillance of Americans’ communications should be permitted without ending secret law.”

“This bipartisan amendment establishes a cautious and reasonable process for declassification consistent with the rule of law,” Lee said. “It will help ensure that the government makes sensitive decisions related to surveillance by applying legal standards that are known to the public. Particularly where our civil liberties are at stake, we must demand no less of our government.” …

“It is impossible for the American people to have an informed public debate about laws that are interpreted, enforced, and adjudicated in complete secrecy,” Wyden said. “When talking about the laws governing Intelligence operations, the process has little to no transparency. Declassifying FISA Court opinions in a form that does not put sources and methods at risk will give the American people insight into what government officials believe the law allows them to do.”

Especially when high-ranking executive branch officials lie to Congress about their activities.

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Interesting how a bunch of people we’ve never heard of a few months ago are suddenly household names.

It’s raining fall guys.

CurtZHP on June 11, 2013 at 12:06 PM

Stand down, Citizens, this is all being done for your own good. Please report back to your jobs at the broom factory or you will be punished.

Bishop on June 11, 2013 at 12:06 PM

Clinton: I don’t know what “is” means

Holder:” I don’t know what “a while ago” means

Clapper: I don’t know what “collect” means

I sense a theme.

BobMbx on June 11, 2013 at 12:08 PM

Is it normal procedure for Senators to give officials questions in advance of testimony?

weaselyone on June 11, 2013 at 12:08 PM

I mean, after all, it’s only a Constitutional Amendment.

kingsjester on June 11, 2013 at 12:09 PM

So for Clapper to have not lied to Congress and the American people:

We have a new definition of truthful and collect has nuanced meanings that doesn’t include recording metadata on every phone call made in America. The man should be fired on the spot after such blatant perjury. The subsequent trial should strip him of his military retirement and benefits. He is a felon.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 12:10 PM

Clapper’s boss is the Liar of the World.

Clapper lied, brazenly.

The entire administration lies to the people of the US and the world.

I’m schadenfreudig against the world – I told you what Obama would do to all of you, fools.

It pains to be right, because it’s so wrong, all of it.

Schadenfreude on June 11, 2013 at 12:12 PM

Mmm’kay.

I’m not the first person to say it, and initially I wasn’t convinced.

Now I am.

This eavesdropping leak is engineered to take the heat off of Obama vis-a-vis controversies one through five. The Dems are eager to get the other controversies wrapped up and off the books while everybody is looking at the biggest dang squirrel they could produce.

ElectricPhase on June 11, 2013 at 12:13 PM

It’s raining fall guys.

CurtZHP on June 11, 2013 at 12:06 PM

Makes it worse when one of them has a last name that reminds you of a stupid light fixture product they sell on TV every Christmas!

And NO, I am not going to repeat the theme song! Someone else can do it this time!

pilamaye on June 11, 2013 at 12:13 PM

Wyden suggests strongly that he will pursue an investigation into possible perjury and/or obstruction, perhaps involving both Clapper and Keith Alexander

And yet, ‘Scooter’ Libby was convicted of a PROCESS CRIME! What does it take for Democrats (read: Leftist) to be held accountable?
ANSWER: The fumigation of the Dark House.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on June 11, 2013 at 12:13 PM

Topsy turvy world.

Telling Americans that a program does not collect data on American citizens does not lead to charges of perjury. Even when it is a lie.

Telling Americans that a program does collect data on American citizens leads to calls of treason. Even when it is the truth.

weaselyone on June 11, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Is it normal procedure for Senators to give officials questions in advance of testimony?

weaselyone on June 11, 2013 at 12:08 PM

Yes. Or at least an idea of what issues they intend to discuss. Especially important when an unclassified discussion could well evolve into one that isn’t. Ed had the right response if Clapper didn’t want to lie to Congress- “That question touches on NSA capabilities that should be discussed in closed session, and I would be glad to answer your questions at that point.”

When Alexander testifies about the NSA Stasi tomorrow (I think) it will be in closed session.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 12:14 PM

In the next administration, the general can be recalled to active duty and prosecuted for his untruths under the UCMJ Article 133: Conduct Unbecoming to an Officer and a Gentleman.

Another Drew on June 11, 2013 at 12:18 PM

good Grief…Tim Kaine D VA is delivering his floor speech in the Senate on Immigration in Spanish………………..oivey

CoffeeLover on June 11, 2013 at 12:23 PM

“I responded in what I thought was the most truthful, or least untruthful, manner…”

SOP for The Regime. What exactly is the problem? /s

Drained Brain on June 11, 2013 at 12:23 PM

Are you sure that such metadata was “recorded” and not simply “reviewed” or “processed”?

blink on June 11, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Are you sure it wasn’t? That really is the point here. We’re being told to trust the FISA courts (which have no public visibility) and the NSA who openly lied to Congress about spying on Americans.

And don’t forget that the OFA hasn’t been exactly clear where that fabulous database came from. They are very proud of their data mining capability. It is almost as if they had help from the NSA and not grassroots activiists.

Bottom line, I don’t trust the government to collect this data. They’ve betrayed Americans enough that they don’t deserve the benefit of the doubt. And it isn’t the first time. There were privacy concerns over TSA scanners and we were told that no images were recorded in those devices (they were). The IRS leaked confidential documents to political allies of the administration- a felony- and then stonewalled any investigation. Operation Fast and Furious is still a mystery because of a claim of executive privilege. So forgive me if Clapper and the whole PRISM program can go to hell until there have been demonstrable safeguards put in place to protect our Fourth Amendment rights from snooping.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 12:23 PM

This is OT and infuriating: the Senate is speechifying about the immigration bill and Sen. Tim Kaine is reading his entire speech in Spanish! WTF!! I’m about as angry as I get, and more than ready to grab a pitchfork.

I’m going to be calling and emailing these jerks again today.

MustLoveBlogs on June 11, 2013 at 12:24 PM

Don’t worry, Republicans have already determined Snowden is the problem. Nobody is going to go after Clapper for lying to Congress. Sadly some of the so-called “Conservative” pundits have made this about Snowden too. You should all burn in hell.

echosyst on June 11, 2013 at 12:25 PM

And yet, ‘Scooter’ Libby was convicted of a PROCESS CRIME! What does it take for Democrats (read: Leftist) to be held accountable?
ANSWER: The fumigation of the Dark House.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on June 11, 2013 at 12:13 PM

THIS

dem….meh
gop….throw the book at ‘em

cmsinaz on June 11, 2013 at 12:26 PM

Anyone know the definition of perjury? Have seen many recenty commit what looks and sounds like perjury. Thinking of Holder and Clapper. Now what?

Amazingoly on June 11, 2013 at 12:26 PM

CoffeeLover on June 11, 2013 at 12:23 PM

cripe….assimilation in action

cmsinaz on June 11, 2013 at 12:27 PM

I think we might be seeing a pattern developing…

d1carter on June 11, 2013 at 12:28 PM

This eavesdropping leak is engineered to take the heat off of Obama vis-a-vis controversies one through five. The Dems are eager to get the other controversies wrapped up and off the books while everybody is looking at the biggest dang squirrel they could produce.

ElectricPhase on June 11, 2013 at 12:13 PM

I care about that other stuff. But I care about this, too. Even if the NSA didn’t break any rules, it’s clear that the rules need to be tightened.

hawksruleva on June 11, 2013 at 12:29 PM

cripe….assimilation in action

cmsinaz on June 11, 2013 at 12:27 PM

I am not surprised but still spitting bullets!

CoffeeLover on June 11, 2013 at 12:30 PM

*One clap*

The United States Constitution is created.

*Two claps*

The lights go out and it disappears.

“Clap-on – clap-off.”

Fallon on June 11, 2013 at 12:32 PM

Servant or master; no government can be both.

chimney sweep on June 11, 2013 at 12:32 PM

What a cluster fark of a summer, eh?

jake49 on June 11, 2013 at 12:33 PM

When (if) Clapper goes to church, what does ‘pass the collection plate’ mean to him?

madmonkphotog on June 11, 2013 at 12:34 PM

I sense a theme.

BobMbx on June 11, 2013 at 12:08 PM

I know NOTH-ING! — Sgt. Schultz

Paul-Cincy on June 11, 2013 at 12:34 PM

Now I know this is what we are paying our public servants for. One giant massive CYA mobilization of the government

jake49 on June 11, 2013 at 12:35 PM

This all ties back to the non-prosecution of Clinton. Sure he got impeached, but nothing really happened. Once the Federal Government refused to cross the line with Clinton and his lies, it is now OK to lie to Congress because nothing will happen.

Johnnyreb on June 11, 2013 at 12:36 PM

On Sunday, Clapper elaborated: “This has to do with of course somewhat of a semantic, perhaps some would say too cute by half. But it is—there are honest differences on the semantics of what—when someone says ‘collection’ to me, that has a specific meaning, which may have a different meaning to him.”

“Collection” means to me the same thing it’s meant to men in my family going back nigh 200 years now. First you start with tourists trying to take a shortcut, and you’ll need a strip to blow out their tires . . .

“Collection” to my aunt means obsessively surrounding herself with bells with cats on them.

“Collection” to Bill Clinton — wait, we’ve been over that.

“Collection” to the IRS means a strange public servant reaches into your pockets and takes what’s in them without so much as a “hi, how’s your father.”

“Collection” to the EPA means seizing parcels of land and arranging them into states.

So, as you can see, he has a valid point.

Now, “valid” had different meanings for different people –

Axe on June 11, 2013 at 12:36 PM

Today, Oregon’s Senator Jeff Merkley and Senator Mike Lee (R-UT), accompanied by Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Dean Heller (R-NV), Mark Begich (D-AK), Al Franken (D-MN), Jon Tester (D-MT), and Ron Wyden (D-OR), introduced a bill that would put an end to the “secret law” governing controversial government surveillance programs. This bill would require the Attorney General to declassify significant Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC) opinions, allowing Americans to know how broad of a legal authority the government is claiming to spy on Americans under the PATRIOT Act and Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Interesting that 7 Democrats and 2 Republicans are signing on to this bill. But if the bill would “require” the Attorney General to declassify FISC opinions, we all know what Eric Holder does to what the law requires. He’ll just claim Executive Privilege and National Security implications and thumb his nose at the “requirement”.

Steve Z on June 11, 2013 at 12:39 PM

Sorry to inform Mr. Clapper but “least untruthful” is not a category. There is no “little bit of perjury,” “medium perjury,” or “really bad perjury,” the latter category also known as “The Whopper.”

IndieDogg on June 11, 2013 at 12:39 PM

CoffeeLover on June 11, 2013 at 12:30 PM

oh yeah

cmsinaz on June 11, 2013 at 12:42 PM

“I responded in what I thought was the most truthful, or least untruthful, manner by saying ‘no,’” Clapper told NBC News on Sunday.

IOW, “I told the smallest lie I could.”

Are you sure that such metadata was “recorded” and not simply “reviewed” or “processed”?

blink on June 11, 2013 at 12:14 PM

*points to the really big building in Utah*

In the next administration, the general can be recalled to active duty and prosecuted for his untruths under the UCMJ Article 133: Conduct Unbecoming to an Officer and a Gentleman.

Another Drew on June 11, 2013 at 12:18 PM

Not unless those untruths occurred in his capacity as an officer.

GWB on June 11, 2013 at 12:45 PM

Current ethical standard for government employees: Answer in the least untruthful manner possible.

Can’t wait until that is the universal standard for all.

Forward!

Hucklebuck on June 11, 2013 at 12:45 PM

Blah, blah, blah. So, whatever happened to the Benghazi hearings? Seems that all these “scandals” that were basically released by the administration have served to make us forget about four dead Americans in a foreign land and our State Department’s coverup of their role in it. Or maybe that’s just a coincidence… Squirrel! Stupid conservatives.

HiJack on June 11, 2013 at 12:49 PM

Again, it makes sense to be more precise with your terms.

blink on June 11, 2013 at 12:44 PM

You are not seeking precision, you’re just playing word games. It still remains the NSA Stasi is spying on Americans (illegally) whether they process, review, or record the information they collect or otherwise access.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 12:50 PM

Or maybe that’s just a coincidence… Squirrel! Stupid conservatives.

HiJack on June 11, 2013 at 12:49 PM

I think the House should start having “hearing day” where one day a week they focus in on one of the scandals and grill the hell out of the individuals involved.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 12:52 PM

I’m I’m monitoring emails then for algorithmic catch words or phrases, then I’m not “collecting” emails..

blink on June 11, 2013 at 12:12 PM

If you’re scooping up those emails and having them stored in a computer in Utah for possible future perusal…

YOU’RE COLLECTING THEM.

And that’s what they did.

Solaratov on June 11, 2013 at 12:54 PM

What he’s essentially saying is that any answer other than “no” to the question would be generally construed as a yes (no matter what he said) so he lied and said “no”. We have word for the “least untruthful” answer – perjury.

tommyboy on June 11, 2013 at 12:55 PM

Are you sure that such metadata was “recorded” and not simply “reviewed” or “processed”?

blink on June 11, 2013 at 12:14 PM

It’s “collected”, “recorded” and “stored”.

Solaratov on June 11, 2013 at 12:58 PM

Are you sure that’s what they did?

blink on June 11, 2013 at 12:57 PM

Evidently you’ve never worked for an intelligence agency.

An intel agency’s whole raison d’etre is collecting – amassing – information.

Now, are you seriously going to try to play more games and aver that NSA’s new data processing center in Utah, which has a storage capacity of Quintillions of bytes, is not for storage of information? That emails, phone calls, credit card transactions, EZPass uses, etc., will just be “processed” for key words…and then dumped? Or will it all be “collected” and “stored” for future reference?

Solaratov on June 11, 2013 at 1:15 PM

Clapper didn’t lie. According to news reports, NSA queries a database that is provided to NSA by the phone and internet companies. The queries are passed through a review process to make sure they are within the law.

Aplombed on June 11, 2013 at 1:20 PM

I think the House should start having “hearing day” where one day a week they focus in on one of the scandals and grill the hell out of the individuals involved.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 12:52 PM

.
Sounds good to me but I insist they use American stainless steel for the grills and American Natural Gas as the fuel.

Let them start with Lois Lerner first.

;->

PolAgnostic on June 11, 2013 at 1:24 PM

On the face of it, Ron Wyden seems to be doing something right. Cynic that I am, when he starts partnering up with Pat Leahey, watch out! Something shady is going to show up…..probably soon.

tomshup on June 11, 2013 at 1:32 PM

Clapper didn’t lie. According to news reports, NSA queries a database that is provided to NSA by the phone and internet companies. The queries are passed through a review process to make sure they are within the law.

Aplombed on June 11, 2013 at 1:20 PM

If he didn’t lie why did he say he answered in the “least untruthful” way? Least untruthful is still a lie.

And we’ve got a review process where federal judges review this administration’s actions and make a determination sub rosa. You really trust Eric Holder’s DoJ to stay within the law? Hell we’ve got a whole administration-funded gun running operation that is being hidden from the public!

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 1:40 PM

Sounds good to me but I insist they use American stainless steel for the grills and American Natural Gas as the fuel.

Let them start with Lois Lerner first.

;->

PolAgnostic on June 11, 2013 at 1:24 PM

Only the finest propane and propane accessories for the likes of Lerner.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 1:41 PM

blink on June 11, 2013 at 1:23 PM

Do you work for the US govt? Because all I see here for the past week is you jumping through flaming hoops and contorting yourself into amazing positions to defend the wholesale spying of Americans and US allies. If you don’t work for the govt, perhaps you could get a job at Cirque du Soleil in Vegas!!

saus on June 11, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Here is my solution. Since they have already decided that employers can monitor their employees, and the government is our employee, all government employees will be recorded and videoed at all times when on the clock. Since elected officials are on the clock at all times, they will be recorded at all times. Any taxpayer can access this information at any time as we are all their employers.
If they are not doing anything wrong why would they care?

Corsair on June 11, 2013 at 1:45 PM

I doubt any of these people who lied to Congress will ever be prosecuted for lying. I doubt anyone ever tells the truth to Congress. Nobody knows what the rules are anymore except that most of the American people know there is a Bill of Rights that is being dismantled Amendment by Amendment. The only Amendment the Left likes is the 5th.

lea on June 11, 2013 at 1:45 PM

What has always bugged me about Clapper, beyond being a ticket-puncher in search of greater venues of pomposity, was how incapable he was of performing any real function. I could compare him to a box of rocks, but I don’t want to insult the rocks any…

ajacksonian on June 11, 2013 at 1:46 PM

I am really troubled that the knee jerk reaction from people like Rove and Bohner, and so forth. They say that the government isn’t doing what the leaker says the government are doing… that it is only foreign emails.

Yet, they are also saying he damaged national security.

So, if he leaked a bunch of lies how is that damaging?

If the government isn’t doing it, then why all the panic and the statements about how he has compromised the country and is a traitor and so forth.

I would like a line by line break down of the stuff he says is true and a line by line statement from the Administration… someone who knows something, because those people are hard to find…

What is true and what is not true? Why the panic if it isn’t true?

petunia on June 11, 2013 at 1:46 PM

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper is really struggling to explain why he told Congress in March (see video above) that the National Security Agency does not intentionally collect any kind of data on millions of Americans.

The key word here is NOT “collect”, the focus should be on the word “intentionally”. They meant to say they stumbled into billions of records “accidentally”. Of course they didn’t do any of the collection on purpose; our government would never violate its citizens this way.

bigbeachbird on June 11, 2013 at 1:48 PM

They meant to say they stumbled into billions of records “accidentally”. Of course they didn’t do any of the collection on purpose; our government would never violate its citizens this way.

bigbeachbird on June 11, 2013 at 1:48 PM

Yeah that intentionally thing bugged me too. I understand that they may unintentionally collect stuff on citizens in the process of executing a specific warrant. They say oopsie, go to the FISA court, and in theory destroy what they unintentionally collected. But blanket warrants for phone records on virtually all Americans? What is unintentional about that? And even if the laws can be loosely interpreted to make it legal the fact of the matter is that the NSA Stasi are spying on America without a warrant.

Happy Nomad on June 11, 2013 at 2:05 PM

The people running the government want us to have faith that programs like PRISM won’t be abused, and that the people in charge of them are trust worthy. Meanwhile, government employees aren’t even held accountable for lying to congress.

HarryBackside on June 11, 2013 at 2:09 PM

The Government Lies To Us And Then Demands That We Trust It. Seriously?

Resist We Much on June 11, 2013 at 12:13 PM

[hmmmmmmm.......still being ignored by RWM. I know how to make her give me a profile photo.....I'll be like that guy on the interstate that comes up behind you like a bat out of hell, and then camps out on your rear bumper and does everything you do, when you do it...like you were buddies or something....yeah....]

Great post RWM. Really funny! Have you seen what Rubio said about immigration? Whoooeee…..what kind of fun shall we poke him with?

BobMbx on June 11, 2013 at 2:13 PM

Liar.

John the Libertarian on June 11, 2013 at 2:29 PM

“I responded in what I thought was the most truthful, or least untruthful, manner by saying ‘no,’” Clapper told NBC News on Sunday.

(emphasis mine)

Truthiness?

Blaise on June 11, 2013 at 2:35 PM

I am a complete novice when it comes to legal proceedings, but I simply do not understand why this is not open/shut perjury. Same goes for Holder et al. All of this is just beyond the pale and I’m ready to see the consequences for these jerks.

Jackalope on June 11, 2013 at 3:34 PM

blink on June 11, 2013 at 2:11 PM

Maybe I have your name confused with another short bl.. username, I certainly don’t have time to search through threads I’ll take your word for it you aren’t the guy on here in love with spying on Americans and allies. If so I apologize.

saus on June 11, 2013 at 3:52 PM

blink on June 11, 2013 at 1:09 PM

Data acquired by electronic means is “collected” only when it has been processed into intelligible form.

I think we need to ask, “Intelligible by whom, or what?”

44Magnum on June 11, 2013 at 5:03 PM

These attacks on Clapper and Holden for lying are most unfair. Why are they being held to a higher standard than their boss?

Basilsbest on June 11, 2013 at 6:15 PM

I must say I love the hand in the cookie jar video of Clapper scratching his chrome dome as he lies to Congress. It’s classic.

Basilsbest on June 11, 2013 at 6:18 PM

A liar and and idiot. His attempt at clean up only made it far worse, as if it could get any worse.

NealK on June 11, 2013 at 7:21 PM

Here is my solution. Since they have already decided that employers can monitor their employees, and the government is our employee, all government employees will be recorded and videoed at all times when on the clock. Since elected officials are on the clock at all times, they will be recorded at all times. Any taxpayer can access this information at any time as we are all their employers.
If they are not doing anything wrong why would they care?

Corsair on June 11, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Not a snowball’s chance in South Texas of getting that done, but I like it.

(PS Taxpayer, or citizen?)

AesopFan on June 12, 2013 at 10:23 AM