Uh oh: Solar panels are having more quality-control problems, and we just installed a whole bunch

posted at 5:31 pm on June 1, 2013 by Erika Johnsen

President Obama has many times insisted that we need to relentlessly continue making the renewable-energy “investments” that will help the United States create “green jobs” and give us a competitive edge against countries like China and help us “win the future” — but whatever miraculous future he’s referring to is unclear, since China’s policies are so often an example of precisely what not to do. China’s solar-panel industry is a hot mess of overcapacity right now, with too many firms and way too many panels thanks to their many wildly generous subsidy programs.

The resulting flood of solar panels on the global market means plummeting prices, which in turns means that solar panel companies are losing money and are looking for ways to pinch their pennies. Hence, even some of the biggest solar companies in the world are using cheaper, even untested substitute materials in their manufacturing, causing an emerging and alarming problem of quality control, via the NYT:

The solar panels covering a vast warehouse roof in the sun-soaked Inland Empire region east of Los Angeles were only two years into their expected 25-year life span when they began to fail.

Coatings that protect the panels disintegrated while other defects caused two fires that took the system offline for two years, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenues.

It was not an isolated incident. Worldwide, testing labs, developers, financiers and insurers are reporting similar problems and say the $77 billion solar industry is facing a quality crisis just as solar panels are on the verge of widespread adoption. …

The quality concerns have emerged just after a surge in solar construction. In the United States, the Solar Energy Industries Association said that solar panel generating capacity exploded from 83 megawatts in 2003 to 7,266 megawatts in 2012, enough to power more than 1.2 million homes. Nearly half that capacity was installed in 2012 alone, meaning any significant problems may not become apparent for years. …

Read: The Obama administration and states like California have just spent a bunch of taxpayer money on incentivizing people to build solar installations, and now it sounds like a lot of these solar panels are of ruinously questionable quality. Great.

As I’ve said many times before, I have zero problems with the idea of solar energy in and of itself. The only problem here is governments that relentlessly subsidize the bejeesus out of their politically-favored pet projects, recklessly “investing” with money that isn’t theirs so they can win votes by pointing to all of the vague ways in which they’re “doing something” about climate change.

It isn’t because solar might not have a legitimate, affordable, and helpful place in our energy scheme — but as long as we keep throwing artificial top-down faux-market signals into the mix, we’ll never really be able to know. All of this subsidizing and cashing out and cronyism is nothing short of an egregious disservice to the renewable energy industries that eco-radicals claim to love so much, because in the long run it discourages price efficiency and competitiveness. If green progressives want these fledgling technologies to succeed, they need to push them out of the nest and see if they can fly on their own.


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…put them all on the White House!

KOOLAID2 on June 1, 2013 at 5:34 PM

Perfect. I smell a bailout program for the morons thieves who installed this $hyte, with subsidies no less.

Western_Civ on June 1, 2013 at 5:36 PM

you also never hear about the cost to clean those things and the reduced yield over time of those panels

Especially those panels conveniently located at roofs and they will not be cleaned by the low pay cleaning person…

huntingmoose on June 1, 2013 at 5:39 PM

The solar panels covering a vast warehouse roof in the sun-soaked Inland Empire region east of Los Angeles were only two years into their expected 25-year life span when they began to fail.

Coatings that protect the panels disintegrated while other defects caused two fires that took the system offline for two years, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenues.

Not sure whether to with my shocked face o_o or lol.

VegasRick on June 1, 2013 at 5:40 PM

My Kyocera, (Japan made, self installed, non subsidized, non-tax incentivized, completely off grid at the ‘gulch’), panels have been performing flawlessly for several years.

In fact, they regularly exceed their rated output by 20%.

LegendHasIt on June 1, 2013 at 5:44 PM

Coatings that protect the panels disintegrated while other defects caused two fires that took the system offline for two years, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenues.

Maybe they should have left that Big, greedy oil/gas electric company to keep their circuit breaker active at this site..
Just sayin’

Electrongod on June 1, 2013 at 5:44 PM

Not much of a surprise, “coatings” of any kind don’t last long when exposed to sun like that everyday. I would hope they did some long term or at least simulated long term testing on the coatings, but who knows.

major dad on June 1, 2013 at 5:46 PM

Coatings that protect the panels disintegrated while other defects caused two fires that took the system offline for two years, costing hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost revenues.

Maybe they should have left that Big, greedy oil/gas electric company to keep their circuit breaker active at this site..
Just sayin’

Electrongod on June 1, 2013 at 5:44 PM

I remember when the mob use to “torch” buildings to collect on the insurance – just sayin’

VegasRick on June 1, 2013 at 5:48 PM

I remember when the mob use to “torch” buildings to collect on the insurance – just sayin’

VegasRick on June 1, 2013 at 5:48 PM

Hmmmm….

Electrongod on June 1, 2013 at 5:49 PM

We obviously need to invest more money in green technology.

myiq2xu on June 1, 2013 at 6:04 PM

You know what we need? A set of laws regulating the solar energy trade and providing certification of solar panels. Installed only by properly licensed and certified personnel. … and probably a new federal bureau to oversee all of this. With its own building of course, and offices across the country.

Yep, that’s what we need. That will fix the problem.

/s

AZfederalist on June 1, 2013 at 6:14 PM

Solar-powered windmills, that’s what we need.

whatcat on June 1, 2013 at 6:18 PM

The solar panels covering a vast warehouse roof in the sun-soaked Inland Empire region east of Los Angeles were only two years into their expected 25-year life span when they began to fail.

Wait … didn’t Al Gore’s second chakra burst full of green energy in relatively nearby Portland one night in 2006, only six years into the solar panels’ expected 25-year life span?

Coincidence or cause — you be the judge …

Rhetorical Joke (in more ways than one): How many faux U.S. President’s does it take to screw in a solar panel America?

ShainS on June 1, 2013 at 6:19 PM

Small solar installs work real well and you don’t always have to buy the system. Solar City leases systems as installed and warranties the performance as well as insures for theft and damages. I’m in the third year of a 15 year lease here in Texas. My electric bills last summer for the four months of summer, June through September was only $369.00 total. My last three bills were for around $25 per month. I’m up for some more, another 8 panels to get me past the 50% level. It helps to have a buy back agreement in place for surplus production.

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 6:22 PM

My electric bills last summer for the four months of summer, June through September was only $369.00 total. My last three bills were for around $25 per month. I’m up for some more, another 8 panels to get me past the 50% level. It helps to have a buy back agreement in place for surplus production.

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 6:22 PM

Does that include the lease cost?

AZfederalist on June 1, 2013 at 6:32 PM

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 6:22 PM

How long before you’ll have material and installation costs paid off?

15 year lease? Warranties are meaningless if the company goes belly up.

whatcat on June 1, 2013 at 6:37 PM

If green progressives want these fledgling technologies to succeed, they need to push them out of the nest and see if they can fly on their own.

I agree!

Same thing is happening in Australia.

Crux Australis on June 1, 2013 at 6:40 PM

Close enough for $66 billion gub’mint subsidized work.

locomotivebreath1901 on June 1, 2013 at 6:41 PM

Small solar installs work real well and you don’t always have to buy the system. Solar City leases systems as installed and warranties the performance as well as insures for theft and damages. I’m in the third year of a 15 year lease here in Texas. My electric bills last summer for the four months of summer, June through September was only $369.00 total. My last three bills were for around $25 per month. I’m up for some more, another 8 panels to get me past the 50% level. It helps to have a buy back agreement in place for surplus production.

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 6:22 PM

369/4 = 82 ish. And you not even at 50% on your generating capacity. How many square feet is your house? And how many kilowatts generating capacity do you have?
Who pays the installation costs? And does Texas have a “net metering” Law. And if so, do you get a sucharge for maintainance of the transmission lines?

WryTrvllr on June 1, 2013 at 6:41 PM

Way too much info not provided. Cost per kilowatt hour, typical usage by your home, etc, etc.

WryTrvllr on June 1, 2013 at 6:43 PM

We have a great brain in the WH…..after the revision, that is.

Soros most likely planted a chip.
http://weeklyworldnews.com/politics/31663/obama-had-brain-surgery/

Without any medical records, how can he prove the speculators wrong?

Heh!

avagreen on June 1, 2013 at 6:47 PM

It’s good the story’s getting out but anyone who seriously researched the life cost of solar would have found this out. Replacement costs are high. The quality, especially of all the Chinese crap, is poor. Especially for a product that by it’s nature is subject to the worst nature can throw at it.

What the heck, they’ll probably sell anyway. Americans now days don’t have the slightest understanding of value.

rcl on June 1, 2013 at 6:48 PM

A simple Feed-In-Tariff, no barriers by big power, and required purchase of distributed power. Done.

Our government at every level has made this way too complicated.

MarkT on June 1, 2013 at 6:55 PM

Poor quality is a feature of every product controlled by the EPA. Stoves, dishwashers, washing machines, hot water heaters–most are of dubious quality and last only a few years.

I have had two breakdowns of a new stove and four of a dishwasher in the first year and a half!

PattyJ on June 1, 2013 at 7:01 PM

“If green progressives want these fledgling technologies to succeed, they need to push them out of the nest and see if they can fly on their own.”

For ‘progressives’, it has nothing to do with seeing green energy work…they want the industrialized west to disintegrate…that’s all. So the fact that green energy technologies don’t work doesn’t bother them at all…probably a feature…as long as all energy and the economic growth which it fuels is reduced to the lowest level.

AUINSC on June 1, 2013 at 7:02 PM

Soros most likely planted a chip.
http://weeklyworldnews.com/politics/31663/obama-had-brain-surgery/

Without any medical records, how can he prove the speculators wrong?

Heh!

avagreen on June 1, 2013 at 6:47 PM

I think they just removed his brain. It’s stored in a secret location along with his real birth certificate.

The Rogue Tomato on June 1, 2013 at 7:03 PM

I live in Mn and the total house, Senate and Governor are Liberal fascists.They voted that 5 to 10% of all energy revenue must be dedicated to solar type technology. Before you say I’m a loser for living in MN, may I say I stay to fight, and fight and fight. I was a delegate for the Republican Party for years but have left their ranks because of their RINO philosophy. I will vote for principle not so called political logic.

MNDavenotPC on June 1, 2013 at 7:09 PM

I just remembered I wrote a report about solar energy in the 8th grade – and that was in 1959. People have been predicting flying cars since the 1920s.

Throwing government money at these schemes is great for redistribution – and for enriching the guys getting the subsidies – but I’d prefer to let the market work, even if it takes longer.

Drained Brain on June 1, 2013 at 7:18 PM

Read: The Obama administration and states like California have just spent a bunch of taxpayer money on incentivizing people to build solar installations, and now it sounds like a lot of these solar panels are of ruinously questionable quality. Great.

This is the exact same thing that happened with wind power in the previous two decades.

If you should happen to look out and see a wind farm that has been there for a long time, odds are it is completely abandoned and hasn’t produced a single watt in years. Crappy turbines, expensive to replace, and don’t pay for themselves.

Sounds like a government program to me!

BobMbx on June 1, 2013 at 7:22 PM

when solar panels can power airforce one, let me know……….

Til then, dead dinosaur is IT.

RealMc on June 1, 2013 at 7:22 PM

Soros most likely planted a chip.
http://weeklyworldnews.com/politics/31663/obama-had-brain-surgery/

Without any medical records, how can he prove the speculators wrong?

Heh!

avagreen on June 1, 2013 at 6:47 PM

Dr. Thomas Yablonski, a top neurologist at Houston’s The Methodist Hospital, carefully. examined high-resolution photographs and high-powered, long-distance brain scans.

Ok, I had an open mind until I got there.

BobMbx on June 1, 2013 at 7:27 PM

You could fill the Grand Canyon on all the BS about green energy.

Incredible the amount of theft you can commit when you have the left and media helping you on a scare.

This is going to be worse than President Bush’s goofy wars if it keeps up.

IlikedAUH2O on June 1, 2013 at 8:08 PM

…they need to push them out of the nest and see if they can fly on their own.

Eventually, one or several will fly on their own. But it won’t be because of government subsidies: it will be because someone will figure out a strategy that actually works.

ss396 on June 1, 2013 at 8:26 PM

All of this subsidizing and cashing out and cronyism is nothing short of an egregious disservice to the renewable energy industries that eco-radicals claim to love so much, because in the long run it discourages price efficiency and competitiveness.

Could probably lose that. It’s sort of a pinky-out thing. And you don’t need it, because of your bam, bam, bam, I’ve actually got the goods writing. :)

Axe on June 1, 2013 at 8:34 PM

Solar City has received positive feed back from all four Fox Business block shows for a good business model. My lease payment was all up front(at big savings), it ended up averaging $15 a month. 1200 sq ft. And I have a signed buy back agreement. I’m paying 8.5 cents for consumption and they pay me 7.5 cents for my surplus. Oncor, our local electric provider had a big incentive of 2.46 per watt. I got a 3.78 kWt. system installed. For my additional install, Oncor has another incentive of .53 cents per watt, not much, but this lease is for 20 years and my cost will average out to be around $7.00 per month for the additional 1.96 kWt. system. They provide top notch panels and a nice German inverter and they price it installed. Look them up at SolarCity.com I can tell you this too. When my system is finished, my net electric bill will be less than $500 for the year, with many months without a bill.

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 9:00 PM

From what I’ve read in the technical literature, purchasers should count on replacing a solar panel in 5 years or less…even if there are no quality problems.

Sun degrades solar cells. This was known 40 years ago. Why do the eco-wackos and the politicians continue to ignore this basic fact??? Do they think they can repeal physics if they wish hard enough???

landlines on June 1, 2013 at 9:11 PM

When my system is finished, my net electric bill will be less than $500 for the year, with many months without a bill.

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 9:00 PM

…and I’ll bet you’re still telling your wife how great your wedding night is going to be…

Good luck getting a buy back from a company which is out of business. The solar industry standard business plan is to start a company, collect subsidies, promise customers anything, ….and then file bankruptcy. A 20+ year commitment from anyone in this industry is a joke.

landlines on June 1, 2013 at 9:18 PM

why u think obumbles drives up energy costs to make his solar cronies rich
the chicago way. following detroit.

losarkos on June 1, 2013 at 9:33 PM

Anyone else getting the Mega Deal ad for electric solar panels?

Fallon on June 1, 2013 at 9:50 PM

Solar City has received positive feed back from all four Fox Business block shows for a good business model. My lease payment was all up front(at big savings), it ended up averaging $15 a month. 1200 sq ft. And I have a signed buy back agreement. I’m paying 8.5 cents for consumption and they pay me 7.5 cents for my surplus. Oncor, our local electric provider had a big incentive of 2.46 per watt. I got a 3.78 kWt. system installed. For my additional install, Oncor has another incentive of .53 cents per watt, not much, but this lease is for 20 years and my cost will average out to be around $7.00 per month for the additional 1.96 kWt. system. They provide top notch panels and a nice German inverter and they price it installed. Look them up at SolarCity.com I can tell you this too. When my system is finished, my net electric bill will be less than $500 for the year, with many months without a bill.

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 9:00 PM

I don’t doubt you. But we’re not getting the whole picture here.

I have, as yet uninstalled, 3.05 KW of generating capacity. That would be 2 large arrays. Nothing you can fit on a 1200 sq foot home roof. I live in a non – Net Meter state, which means I can only recoup my investment if I invest in a 24 volt battery bank (840 amp hours of Golf Cart batteries) which increases my investment, and is the weak link in the whole system, with a limited life span of 5 years or so. I live in an area with 4 hours average sunlight per day.

I bought into solar because I live ALMOST outside reliable grid. But I have never been under the delusion of it being a gold mine.

It may be, in Texas. But like CFL’s, a one size fits all solution rarely fits the majority.

Sounds more like this company is leasing out your ground for their arrays, a la cell towers. Good deal down south. There’s a reason noone knows them up here.

WryTrvllr on June 1, 2013 at 9:59 PM

And it doesn’t sound like you use your AC much. How many Kilowatt hours per month do you use?

WryTrvllr on June 1, 2013 at 10:00 PM

high-powered, long-distance brain scans.

Ok, I had an open mind until I got there.

BobMbx on June 1, 2013 at 7:27 PM

Did you get a peek at the story lines on the right?

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BAT BOY: GOING MUTANT
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FACEBOOK WILL END ON MAY 15th, 2013!

avagreen on June 1, 2013 at 10:16 PM

Wry Trvllr, yes, two arrays of nine panels each, fit easily. Panels are Kyocera KD210GX-LP 210 and measure 60 by 40 inches and weigh about 40 pounds. I’m attached to the grid, not using batteries. My friend, this is a lease not an investment. It slows my meter down at the same time provides a credit for surplus. Here’s how it works: I consumed 368 kWh’s at a cost of $31, I sent $20 worth up the wire for a net bill of $11 plus TXU’s taxes and fees this bill came up to $21.11. I have 9 panels facing due south and 9 facing due west. They told me that Dallas is rated at 5 hours peak. My configuration gets me up to 7 hours at 2000 watts. From 11 to 3 I don’t consume off the grid at all. Winter production of about 300 kWh’s for each month, summer over 500 with one month at like 660 kWh’s. As to getting my cost back, I expect to be level in my fourth maybe fifth year with at least 9 years of gravy.

http://www.wholesalesolar.com/products.folder/module-folder/kyocera/KD210GX-LP.html

To the gentleman talking about a company going bankrupt. TXU is buying back my surplus electricity, not my solar provider. If the solar provider goes bankrupt, I still have procession of the system. If there’s nobody left to re-lease from, there’s also no one left to remove them from my roof.

Hey, I’m not saying this works everywhere in the US or that it’s good for everyone. Please educate yourself about the industry. A little solar on every roof can keep the power producers from having to build more capacity, maintain what they have now and research what our next power generation is and invest in the new technology.

There’s also vertical wind turbines for power generation. A 400 watt wind turbine that around vertically and not like a propeller can generate 40 kWh’s a month. That’s enough to pay for your light usage at night and early morning. It runs whenever the wind blows.

It isn’t all Solyndra folks. Solar City doesn’t produce any of this stuff. They install and service it. The company has reached over 100k in employment and still growing.

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 11:53 PM

The quality of Chinese products is on a par with those produced by Japan after WWII and before Dr, Demming. Oh, and all it takes is one hail storm and NO solar panel will exhibit any quality at all…..because it will be in a thousand pieces!

devan95 on June 2, 2013 at 12:06 AM

Before I leased, my consumption was about 12k kWh’s a year. Last year I was down to 7800 kWh’s. With the additional generation, I expect to take another 2500 off that number. And we do cool our house, usually around 80 degrees until the wife gets hot then we inch it down till she’s comfortable. Another benefit of panels is it keeps the sun off the roof for the area it covers.

Another thing, I’m not a global warming green freak. I’m a slow the meter person. I believe it’s conservative to conserve and I’m conserving my paycheck with this stuff.

The life of a solar panel, they assure 90% performance for the first 10 years and 80% for the next 15. Inverters are a different mater. They have a 12 year lifespan.

The lease I signed states that at the end of the lease. I can re-lease what I have, upgrade to the latest and greatest, or have them remove them and restore my roof. It’s not a gold mine, but it does make some sense. My system today came on at 7 AM and went off at 8 PM. Oncur changed my smart meter to a DRG meter so it will measure the up the wire electricity. I can go out there and watch my meter go the wrong way…

peter the bellhop on June 2, 2013 at 12:27 AM

As I’ve said many times before, I have zero problems with the idea of solar energy in and of itself.

I do, it doesn’t work very well.

nazo311 on June 2, 2013 at 12:43 AM

peter the bellhop on June 1, 2013 at 11:53 PM

If the company goes bankrupt, wouldn’t the creditors come after the hardware to recoup? Granted, you might be able to strike a deal to buy them cheep so they don’t have to deal with collecting and selling them, but, still, I don’t think you would be able to walk away with them for free.

Count to 10 on June 2, 2013 at 8:25 AM

If green progressives want these fledgling technologies to succeed, they need to push them out of the nest and see if they can fly on their own.

You forgot to add that they need to put their OWN money where their mouth is, by way of investment to help these industries succeed. It’s always someone else’s money they’re ready to risk.

tpitman on June 2, 2013 at 8:29 AM

Another thing, I’m not a global warming green freak. I’m a slow the meter person. I believe it’s conservative to conserve and I’m conserving my paycheck with this stuff.

peter the bellhop on June 2, 2013 at 12:27 AM

And I wouldn’t call you one. In fact, I am grateful for the info. I WISH we had the net metering law up here so I could use the grid as a reliable battery. (sucks watering batteries)

I am surprised that the Dallas area averages 5 hours, I would have thought more than that (yes, I did double check that). That, still however, puts me at a 20% disadvantage. Also putting them on my roof would be impractical, big snow loads etc. 4 awg copper wire is an extra expense for me.

Do you manually adjust them in June and December?

Lastly, while, yes, I would love to see everyone do this, you do realize that without Gov’t subsidies, you would be paying much more for your system. Also, as so many more people do this, Your (you, individually) will see a drop in your savings. Whether this is by significant increases in KwH costs, or by line maintainance charges, or whatever they can think of, it will HAVE to happen. The utility company is still providing you a VERY needed service, whether you use 1 watt of their generation or not.

Either way though, good for you. Wish I could join you.

WryTrvllr on June 2, 2013 at 9:46 AM

Funny how the green sites never mention any of this.

mad scientist on June 2, 2013 at 10:10 AM

To my understanding, the majority incentive came from the private sector Oncor. Yes, there was a government subsidy in the tax break of $1500 one time, but the other $9000 came from Oncor. We have a state mandated by the legislature law that 5% should come from renewables.

Dallas is rated at 5 hours, Phoenix is rated at 7. Not much difference except the moisture or humidity.

No, my roof has a 17-18% pitch, so no touching them except to clean the surface of dust or dirt from West Texas sand. Our lease agreement doesn’t allow me to do physically with them. Solar City maintains an office in Dallas.

As to whether to roof mount or not. I believe in any mounting system should be okay. I wanted to build a structure along my fence line, like another fence with an eight foot high northern side and a six foot high southern side connected by 2×4′s and 2×6′s to mount the rails on and place some panels there. Solar City has done something like that before. They wouldn’t commit to that this time.

Your authorities or utilities don’t allow for a grid connected system? That seems short sighted. Grid connected systems allow for the protection of utility workers by the built-in electronics that turn power generation off when the power is off. There’s always finding DC appliances..

The idea that someone would want a used solar panel wouldn’t be appealing. The re-lease option that Solar City has probably won’t be too expensive. Panels would be in their 80 to 90% levels, and new ones make more sense.

Thanks for a serious discussion. I’m on Facebook and twitter and Linkedin using the same name as here…peter thebellhop/@peterthebellhop.

peter the bellhop on June 2, 2013 at 12:04 PM

First STOP IMPORTING SOLAR PANELS FROM CHINA. Next design and manufacture them here in the USA. And third don’t feed the CRONY CRAPITALISTS. Any company that builds solar panels or any other product should take pride in their work and make it the best possible. I personally make it a point not to feed the crapitalists by buying used, made in the USA products or some items at drastically reduced clearance prices.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_s-Qk07KxA&hd=1

Aaron Tippin You’ve Got to Stand For Something (Or you will fall for anything)

hamradio on June 2, 2013 at 4:59 PM

Ross Perot and others warned us about this imported garbage but most of us had stuffed peanut butter in our ears to ignore the warnings. This country is now financially reaping the whirlwind

hamradio on June 2, 2013 at 5:14 PM

Another link that says it all

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5E34pxzPlQ&hd=1

hamradio on June 2, 2013 at 5:20 PM

Ross Perot and others warned us about this imported garbage but most of us had stuffed peanut butter in our ears to ignore the warnings. This country is now financially reaping the whirlwind

hamradio on June 2, 2013 at 5:14 PM

And the storm isn’t even half over yet. Lead paint in your kids’ toys and craptacular solar panels are only two of the hundreds of problems we get from products made by near-slave labor in a Communist regime.

Not to mention we no longer make stuff ourselves because, yanno, it’s so cheap to just get it elsewhere! Manufacturing capability? Industrial self sufficiency? Long-term employment?

Pffft, who needs ‘em?

MelonCollie on June 3, 2013 at 1:03 AM

…put them all on the White House!

KOOLAID2 on June 1, 2013 at 5:34 PM

And disconnect the White House from the grid. Then we won’t have to listen to Obama all night!

Steve Z on June 3, 2013 at 10:36 AM

From what I’ve read in the technical literature, purchasers should count on replacing a solar panel in 5 years or less…even if there are no quality problems.

Sun degrades solar cells. This was known 40 years ago. Why do the eco-wackos and the politicians continue to ignore this basic fact??? Do they think they can repeal physics if they wish hard enough???

landlines on June 1, 2013 at 9:11 PM

Not only that, most photovoltaic cells (solar panels used to generate electricity) contain rare-earth metals for which 90+% of the world’s supply is in China. When the panel no longer generates much electricity, its owner is stuck with a haz waste problem.

Obama Administration: The Second Law of Thermodynamics (or Law of Entropy) wastes lots of energy. Why don’t we just repeal it, and stick with the First Law, which conserves energy?

Steve Z on June 3, 2013 at 10:42 AM

.

Bmore on June 3, 2013 at 5:55 PM