Silence and Respect

posted at 8:01 am on May 27, 2013 by Jazz Shaw

Today much of the nation will be celebrating the “unofficial start to summer” with cookouts, parties, or just a chance to enjoy an extra day off. But for many of you, the true meaning of the day will not be forgotten, as we pause to once again pay honor to the men and women, the Honored Dead, who have given everything in service to our nation. It’s a tradition which we should be proud to note has remained strong across generations, even during times of protest and unrest when respect seemed to be in short supply. But we should also be careful to remember precisely who it is we are honoring, and why it remains more important than ever to stay vigilant, pledging that the sacrifice they made will never prove to have been in vain.

We regularly highlight our returning veterans, as is proper, and work to ensure that we fulfill our obligations to them. But while we do that, it’s equally important to focus on those family members and friends who didn’t get that opportunity. I was given a stark reminder of that this year as our family welcomed home my nephew Danny from his first full tour in Afghanistan with the US Army Rangers. Given his position, he was frequently in the most dangerous territory over there, and the entire family was understandably worried about his safety the whole time he was gone. So I was jolted with a bit of guilt over the rush of relief and joy we all experienced when he finally made it safely back to the United States. He brought some much needed perspective to us as he recounted the list of his friends and fellow warriors who did not survive to experience their own family reunions, and they were numerous indeed.

For the other families you may know or encounter, the wounds may not be as fresh, but they never go away and carry on from generation to generation. While nearly all the men in my family have served, we were blessed in that none of my immediate family fell in battle, but two of my cousins were lost in Vietnam and two uncles in World War 2. You probably know a lot of people with similar stories – or are a member of such a family yourself – and it might be long past time for you to offer them a kind word of thanks and a reminder that we have not forgotten the debt we owe them, now and for as long as the nation stands.

I would close with what is possibly one of the most appropriate bits of verse ever written on such an occasion, from Robert Louis Stevenson.

UNDER the wide and starry sky
Dig the grave and let me lie:
Glad did I live and gladly die,
And I laid me down with a will.

This be the verse you ‘grave for me:
Here he lies where he long’d to be;
Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
And the hunter home from the hill
.

Be well, and safe travels to all of you who are traveling today to pay your respects.

UPDATE: From the comments.

In memory of AT2 Gary Nesbitt, and AW2 Jim Piepkorn, lost in the service of their country. Navy Aircrew, my shipmates, my friends.

On eternal patrol

TKindred on May 27, 2013 at 8:17 AM

PFC Harry A. Goldenberg
K Co., 105th Inf. Reg., 27th Inf. Div.
KIA Saipan, 7/1/44

Rixon on May 27, 2013 at 9:03 AM

In Memory
Staff Sgt. Irby Dyer…
The identifiable remains of three of the crew were recovered, but those of Daniel Sulander and Irby Dyer were not.”

http://www.pownetwork.org/bios/d/d396.htm

Viator on May 27, 2013 at 9:18 AM

In memory of:

Don Charles Wood
Colonel
354TH TFS, 355TH TFW, 13TH AF
United States Air Force

Love you.

sisterchristian on May 27, 2013 at 10:34 AM

In memory of Lance Corporal Philip E Charte USMC
KIA Sept 7th 2010 Helmand Pr. Afghanistan.
God be with you and your family,

Thicklugdonkey on May 27, 2013 at 10:52 AM


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Obama has just issued an statement that he and members of his staff did not know it was Memorial Day until they read about it in the paper today.

SC.Charlie on May 27, 2013 at 8:09 AM

May all of you at Hot Air have a safe and sane Memorial Day and remember those who have fallen for us.

TooTall on May 27, 2013 at 8:13 AM

UNDER the wide and starry sky
Dig the grave and let me lie:
Glad did I live and gladly die,
And I laid me down with a will.

This be the verse you ‘grave for me:
Here he lies where he long’d to be;
Home is the sailor, home from the sea,
And the hunter home from the hill.

Saw John Wayne recite this in “They Were Expendable” on TCM yesterday. A very touching moment of the movie.

God rest the souls of all who have died for our country.

Brat on May 27, 2013 at 8:15 AM

In memory of AT2 Gary Nesbitt, and AW2 Jim Piepkorn, lost in the service of their country. Navy Aircrew, my shipmates, my friends.

On eternal patrol

TKindred on May 27, 2013 at 8:17 AM

God bless all who protect us.

All gave some.

Some gave all.

itsspideyman on May 27, 2013 at 8:20 AM

Thoughts and prayers with our Gold Star families for whom every day is Memorial Day.

And for my cousin, John. KIA Viet Nam, just days after his 19th birthday.

God bless them all.

IrishEi on May 27, 2013 at 8:21 AM

Salute.

Grunt on May 27, 2013 at 8:21 AM

I was given a stark reminder of that this year as our family welcomed home my nephew Danny from his first full tour in Afghanistan with the US Army Rangers.

RLTW!!

ted c on May 27, 2013 at 8:33 AM

Take a listen to Mansions of the Lord…from the movie We Were Soldiers…..check out the lyrics…..May the Lord hold in His arms all that have given their all….

crosshugger on May 27, 2013 at 8:34 AM

But we should also be careful to remember precisely who it is we are honoring, and why it remains more important than ever to stay vigilant, pledging that the sacrifice they made will never prove to have been in vain.

You mean it isn’t about pre-summer sales at the local car dealer?

Seriously, I sometimes question if Memorial Day really is ‘a tradition which we should be proud to note has remained strong across generations.’ Because I’m not seeing the younger generations showing any appreciation for the sacrifices that have allowed them so much freedom. I’m not seeing society showing anything but a cursory appreciation. It’s to the point where this time every May it is a guessing game if the President will even take time away from his golf game to bother and cross Memorial Bridge to place a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns.

Happy Nomad on May 27, 2013 at 8:35 AM

One of the most beautiful examples I was given of a compelling novel’s possible beginnings is:

My grandfather died at sea.
My father died at sea.
I am a sailor.

Sgt. Vulcha

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 27, 2013 at 8:37 AM

God Bless those that serve and came home…and God Bless those that gave their lives to protect our nation…And God Bless their families.

workingclass artist on May 27, 2013 at 8:44 AM

They were and are our Brightest and Best.

May God Bless them and all who love and honor them today.

And, may God Bless America.

kingsjester on May 27, 2013 at 8:47 AM

It’s to the point where this time every May it is a guessing game if the President will even take time away from his golf game to bother and cross Memorial Bridge to place a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns.

Happy Nomad on May 27, 2013 at 8:35 AM

Why would he do that? They’re unknowns after all, some of them might have been Tea Party-ites. Besides, it’s not as if he can get any money out of them….

ScottG on May 27, 2013 at 8:55 AM

Fair winds and following seas, Brothers.

And you jarheads quit picking on us squids. It’s not like you coulda walked there. ;)

Salute.

wolly4321 on May 27, 2013 at 9:00 AM

Our best never die, they’re just missing in action. God bless them.

nobar on May 27, 2013 at 9:02 AM

PFC Harry A. Goldenberg
K Co., 105th Inf. Reg., 27th Inf. Div.
KIA Saipan, 7/1/44

Rixon on May 27, 2013 at 9:03 AM

Staff Sargent Alonzo Gatten.. my Uncle Al..

He served beginning in 1951, US Navy, aboard a Destroyer screening a Carrier Battle Group off the Korean coast. His hitch up, he re-enlisted in the US Army, serving in an Armored Division out of Ft. Knox.. Then Vietnam,.. his first tour, then second.. then almost a complete third year, sent to Japan for rehab, then home. He left the Army then..

and when his wide eyed nephew sat with him on a summer’s night, as he drank beer after beer,.. he recounted to me the events of that last engagement..

He didn’t die with his crew only by the sheerest dumb luck, he had survived in three years hundreds of firefights, during TET, his armored Platoon held the LZ till the last of the infantry had been flown out, then they made a breakout, punching through the VC encirclement of the firebase, making a break down the single highway south. As they moved through the tree line to breach the enemy line, sappers with satchel charges, some with grenades, some just crazy with rage scrambled up onto their M-48′s. He told me, they swept each other down with the commander’s gun cupola on top of the turrets, the rounds just bouncing of the steel as they desperately cleaned each other off of VC sappers. They made it to Highway One, and put everything they had into speed, leaving the VC well behind them..

on his last tour,.. after a minor firefight, he was sitting on the turret writing out something, when an NVA RPG hulled his tank.. blown clear, wounded, he scrambled back to pull his crew, his brothers from the burning wreck.. I won’t share what he found, not today.. this is the soldiers soldier, the only man besides my father I respected down to my bones.. and he cried, holding onto me, at 12.. all I could do was hold onto him back.. I didn’t have the words, still don’t..

I became an airman in time, but there never was any romance, or glory in it.. just a job that needed done.

He passed away, three years ago.. a life time of hard drinking to forget destroyed his liver, and even as a civilian, he couldn’t walk away,.. working the years after, as a maintenance man at a California VA Hospital. He never got over the guilt.. always the guilt, that he had not died with his men.

This day maybe means a little more to me, than my family can understand.. another grilling day,.. but “dad”? my hearts not in it, not today.

SSGT. Gatten may have returned to the US in 71, but he never really came home.. not where it matters. A piece of him died that day, and all the others where men he knew, served with, liked.. was like a brother too… he lost a piece with them as well.

Enjoy the day.. but please, if you know someone who has born this burden,.. talk to them.. let them know how much you need them. That you will always need them.. maybe it will make the difference in helping them come all the way home..

mark81150 on May 27, 2013 at 9:18 AM

In Memory
Staff Sgt. Irby Dyer

“In late November 1966, Russell Bott and Willie Stark were inserted
about 1 1/2 miles into Laos west of the DMZ along with a number of
Vietnamese Special Forces (LLDB) “strikers”. The team, a long-range
reconnaissance patrol (LRRP), was soon discovered by a superior NorthVietnamese force, members of the 325B NVA Division. A TWO DAY running battle ensued.

Near the end, Bott radioed that he was down to one grenade ond one magazine of ammunition. He also stated that several of the Vietnamese members of his team were dead or wounded. Willie Stark was wounded in the chest and leg, but was alive. Bott requested exfiltration at that time. He refused to leave his wounded teammate to seek safety, and in his last radio message, Bott indicated that he was going to destroy his radio, that he felt capture was imminent.

Two gunships working the area were hit by enemy fire. Also, the exfiltration helicopter from 281st Assault Helicopter Company was hit, and crashed and burned, killing the crew of four and Irby Dyer, a medic from Det. B-52 Delta who had volunteered to go in to help treat the wounded.

The identifiable remains of three of the crew were recovered, but those of Daniel Sulander and Irby Dyer were not.”

http://www.pownetwork.org/bios/d/d396.htm

Viator on May 27, 2013 at 9:18 AM

One of the most beautiful examples I was given of a compelling novel’s possible beginnings is:

My grandfather died at sea.
My father died at sea.
I am a sailor.

Sgt. Vulcha

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 27, 2013 at 8:37 AM

I agree.. that made me smile, son of a soldier, descendent of soldiers.. all the way back to Shiloh.. so I know what you mean.

mark81150 on May 27, 2013 at 9:25 AM

In a wood they call Rouge Bouquet
There is a new-made grave today,
Built by never a spade nor pick
Yet covered with earth 10 meters thick.
There lie many fighting men,
Dead in their youthful prime,
Never to laugh nor love again
Nor taste the Summertime.
For Death came flying through the air
And stopped his flight at the dugout stair,
Touched his prey and left them there,
Clay to clay.
He hid their bodies stealthily
In the soil of the land they fought to free
And fled away.
Now over the grave abrupt and clear
Three volleys ring;
And perhaps their brave young spirits hear
The bugles sing:
Go to sleep!
Go to sleep!
Slumber well where the shell screamed and fell.
Let your rifles rest on the muddy floor,
You will not need them any more.
Danger’s past;
Now at last,
Go to sleep!”

GarandFan on May 27, 2013 at 9:30 AM

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/rbrippetoe.htm

A friend. His uniform hangs in the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

ted c on May 27, 2013 at 9:41 AM

http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/jecahill.htm

another friend.

He left behind a wife and 3 young children.

ted c on May 27, 2013 at 9:42 AM

Happy Nomad on May 27, 2013 at 8:35 AM

When my oldest son was 2 and my marriage was falling apart i took refuge in the U.S. Army. The Army gave me back my life and healed my heart.Service has ALWAYS been the way of my family. We came here to escape Benito Mussolini, my family escaped with only the clothes on their backs just a few steps ahead of the squadristi, my father tells me that Nano would not speak of the violence ecept to say that America had opened her arms to us, and because of that welcoming acceptance we should live our lives to the fullest and always strive to be the best Americans we could possibly be. He banned speaking our native language in his home and demanded that his family leave Italy behind and become Americans. My father went on to enlist in the Air Force voluntarily during Viet Nam and served as a huey mechanic. My Uncle became a Green Beret.Both fortunately made it home from the warand went on to have their own families although neither of them was ever the same again. My Mother served in the Air Force for 30 years from the time i was 3 until she retired not so very long ago. Now my sons are doing their part. My oldest tried to enlist on his 18 th but was turned down for medical reasons and my 17 year old is already talking to recruiters, he plans to make a career of service to his nation a priority. He plans to enlist and do a minimum of 4 years , but does not plan to leave the service until he is accepted at Quantico. So yes in answer to your statement , the meaning of this day HAS survived the generations , some of us just understand it a little better than others. There will always be those in this country that are blind to the freedoms that families like ours defend , but i know in my heart that as a country as a whole , even though we have our differences politically and we never really agree on anything there is one thing as Americans that our country has ALWAYS done , We Protect and Defend. That is the American way and there will come a time when even the blindest of the blind will stand with pride and salute our flag with tears in their eyes , i only hope that we have the courage to forgive them and welcome them back into the fold.

katee bayer on May 27, 2013 at 9:43 AM

My brother died under arms. He is unknown to world at large in his individual sacrifice, even as the world knows little of your fallen. But he is not forgotten. Oh no, he is not forgotten.

ss396 on May 27, 2013 at 9:44 AM

http://www.1stbn75thrgrregtmemorial.com/RangerMemorialMemoryMiller.htm

a young Ranger, tragically killed during a parachuting mishap at Ft Stewart GA in May 2003.

ted c on May 27, 2013 at 9:44 AM

May God rest them all, and let them know that they are loved, honored, and remembered.

Midas on May 27, 2013 at 9:46 AM

I Remember;

SSG Kimberly A. Voelz, KIA, December 14, 2003 – Iskandariyah, Iraq

SSG Richard P. Ramey, KIA, February 8, 2004 – Mahmudiyah, Iraq

Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team Leaders
Serving with the 703rd Ordnance Company (EOD) Ft Knox, KY

Rest easy my friends, I will never forget you. I am honored to have served with you both. Warriors, Family, Friends.

Initial Success or Total Failure – It’s About the Mission, not the Warrior.
If you’re not EOD you won’t understand.

Remember the all of the Fallen on this and every Memorial Day and say a prayer for the Gold Star Families.

D-fusit on May 27, 2013 at 9:50 AM

Just adding a few of your personal remembrances to the post. I won’t bother with mine, as I tend to yack about them all year.

Jazz Shaw on May 27, 2013 at 9:51 AM

Thank you to all who have served and are serving.

gophergirl on May 27, 2013 at 9:55 AM

Thank you, to everyone sharing stories today.

Midas on May 27, 2013 at 9:55 AM

We are going to watch “Act of Valor” this morning..

ted c on May 27, 2013 at 9:58 AM

katee bayer on May 27, 2013 at 9:43 AM

Very moving. Thank you.

This is the America I defend.

The one obama and his sewer dwelling friends are destroying.

davidk on May 27, 2013 at 10:08 AM

Today is not a day for celebration — it’s a day for contemplation and commemoration.

However you choose to spend the day — picnicking, grilling, partying, visiting the honored dead, or simply having a day off from work — please take some time to think of those who threw themselves into harm’s way in order to defend this great nation. We should not celebrate the deaths of such men and women — rather we should thank them for their sacrifice and honor their memory by living the best lives we can.

So, DON’T have a “happy” Memorial Day. Have a GOOD and SAFE Memorial Day and remember the reason for the holiday — to remember.

clayj on May 27, 2013 at 10:12 AM

One of my favorites:

Death is nothing at all.
It does not count.
I have only slipped away into the next room.
Everything remains as it was.
The old life that we lived so fondly together is untouched, unchanged.
Whatever we were to each other, that we are still.
Call me by the old familiar name.
Speak of me in the easy way which you always used.
Put no sorrow in your tone.
Laugh as we always laughed at the little jokes that we enjoyed together.
Play, smile, think of me, pray for me.
Let my name be ever the household word that it always was.
Let it be spoken without effort
Life means all that it ever meant. It is the same as it ever was.
There is unbroken continuity.
Why should I be out of mind because I am out of sight?
I am but waiting for you, for an interval, somewhere very near, just around the corner.
All is well. Nothing is hurt; nothing is lost.
One brief moment and all will be as it was before.
How we shall laugh at the trouble of parting, when we meet again.

**A heartfelt ‘thank you’ to all of our noble and brave service members.

lynncgb on May 27, 2013 at 10:18 AM

It’s very odd, I knew, personally, a lot of men who went to war but I was lucky to have them all return safely home. I am eternally grateful and pray for those who lost loved ones. Thank all for their service and God Bless all who died and the families and friends they left behind.

Cindy Munford on May 27, 2013 at 10:23 AM

…God Bless!…Everyone!

KOOLAID2 on May 27, 2013 at 10:23 AM

Today we honor all that have given their life in military service to this nation we love and I offer this prayer.
Heavenly Father,
We ask you to allow us to always honor the fallen, Not just on this day but every day.
We ask that you keep them always in your loving embrace and honor them as we do.
We ask that we can live up to the examples of love and honor they set by their sacrifice.
We ask that if we are ever called upon we are able to follow that same path with honor and dignity.
Amen

JKotthoff on May 27, 2013 at 10:25 AM

In 02, I met an Army recruiter, he was my age, nearing retirement, and we would often grab a few minutes to speak about our families, Gary was a personable guy, easy in manner, in speech, but you could tell he had the same fire we all did, when in uniform..

after 911, and all that was coming, I asked him for advice on what to tell the young men at work who knowing I’m a vet, would ask, should I enlist?.. we talked about him trying to get back to the 4th Infantry Division before the start of Iraq,.. he had two kids, three grandkids.. and I knew how he felt, the same urge was in me to go.. even if it was no longer possible.

Before he left to catch up to the 4th in route to Iraq.. he gave me an Army retirement pin to wear.. I pointed out I was Air Force, and had only done one hitch.. but he just laughed, and said he forgave me.. I wore that pin everyday at work, frightened that if I ever took it off, he wouldn’t make it home.. a superstition like the kind a lot of vets have. He did make it back.. and a couple of years later, I was retired.. we lost touch, and I had thought he was going to retire as he had planned..

then a couple of months ago,.. my sister in law heard me speak about him,.. and she asked if I knew him well…. I said he was probably enjpying the fishing he spoke of, but..

she said.. Mark,.. I’m sorry, he went back to Iraq and was killed there..

It was like the room moved around me..

He had grandkids.. was SUPPOSED to retire.. the pit of my stomach felt like a lead weight,.. and if his lass would do this to me, God.. please be with his family right now. I knew in all, 6 men who went,.. 4 were friends, two, my wife’s family.. My wife’s uncle had died a Marine in Vietnam.. one of her cousins was killed in the Iraq Invasion in 03..

There is no pleasure in sending our best of to war, God that I could take their place if I could. Guilt is a common theme among those who served,.. guilt that you were luckier.. not better than someone else,.. guilt that a stupid accident damaged my hearing too much to serve any longer.. guilt that other men go in your place.. Maybe that, in a funny way, is why vets are really only completely at ease with other vets.. we don’t have any axes to grind, no family issues.. just brothers and sisters who look out for each other as best we can..

would that civilian life were that easy.. where everyone had each others back.

mark81150 on May 27, 2013 at 10:27 AM

I remember Spec. Hector Sandoval, KIA, August 26, 1970 LZ Judy.
I graduated from high school w/ his daughter, Sandi.
His helicopter was shot down several months before Sandi was born.
RIP Spec. Sandoval.

annoyinglittletwerp on May 27, 2013 at 10:27 AM

Tried to post and, instead, time travelled to another thread. Came back here, didn’t see it and tried to post again and got “duplicate post.” I still don’t see it so, hopefully, three’s a charm. Apologies if this truly is a duplicate:

He brought some much needed perspective to us as he recounted the list of his friends and fellow warriors who did not survive to experience their own family reunions, and they were numerous indeed.

Years ago, as we looked at my father’s photo of CO “A” 19th ARMD. INF. BN. CAMP CAMPBELL KY 1944. I will never forget him looking at the photo, bending over to look at each face up close, pointing and saying, “That’s (so-and-so), from (name of town or state.) He didn’t make it. That’s (so-and-so), from (name of town or state.) He didn’t make it…” Over and over again. My family has a history of fighting in every war for the United States all the way back to the Revolutionary War, but we also have the fortunate history of having most of our soldiers returning home alive. For those who didn’t, know that their loved ones were thought of often by the survivors.

When he was dying, Pops travelled back to WWII. He asked me if I was a good soldier. I told him, “Yes. I was.” He smiled and affirmed, “Good.” I won’t forget that. He was a country kid from the North Woods who enlisted at 18 years old. Later in the war, he served as a medic. He was a humble and, at times, troubled man but he was a good man, a good soldier, a good husband and a great dad. Miss you, Pops.

Fallon on May 27, 2013 at 10:31 AM

In memory of:

Don Charles Wood
Colonel
354TH TFS, 355TH TFW, 13TH AF
United States Air Force

Love you.

sisterchristian on May 27, 2013 at 10:34 AM

To all who have served; to those who still do; and particularly to those who left the last drop on the field: May God bless you and your families, and may He provide wisdom to us all so that the need to fight is lessened, and the discernment to recognize when it is necessary so that we should not pass a greater burden to our children.
Roll Along; Anchors aweigh; Off we go; Semper Fi.

questionmark on May 27, 2013 at 10:37 AM

Here’s to the men of the original Continental Army, the dudes who faced down the most powerful military force on Earth and gave as they good as they got.

Any of you who still use Google instead of Bing need only compare today:

https://www.google.com/

http://www.bing.com/

Bishop on May 27, 2013 at 10:38 AM

The Blue And The Gray
Francis Miles Finch (1827-1907)
By the flow of the inland river,
Whence the fleets of iron have fled,
Where the blades of the grave-grass quiver,
Asleep are the ranks of the dead:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment-day;
Under the one, the Blue,
Under the other, the Gray

These in the robings of glory,
Those in the gloom of defeat,
All with the battle-blood gory,
In the dusk of eternity meet:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgement-day
Under the laurel, the Blue,
Under the willow, the Gray.

From the silence of sorrowful hours
The desolate mourners go,
Lovingly laden with flowers
Alike for the friend and the foe;
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgement-day;
Under the roses, the Blue,
Under the lilies, the Gray.

So with an equal splendor,
The morning sun-rays fall,
With a touch impartially tender,
On the blossoms blooming for all:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment-day;
Broidered with gold, the Blue,
Mellowed with gold, the Gray.

So, when the summer calleth,
On forest and field of grain,
With an equal murmur falleth
The cooling drip of the rain:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment -day,
Wet with the rain, the Blue
Wet with the rain, the Gray.

Sadly, but not with upbraiding,
The generous deed was done,
In the storm of the years that are fading
No braver battle was won:
Under the sod adn the dew,
Waiting the judgment-day;
Under the blossoms, the Blue,
Under the garlands, the Gray

No more shall the war cry sever,
Or the winding rivers be red;
They banish our anger forever
When they laurel the graves of our dead!

Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment-day,
Love and tears for the Blue,
Tears and love for the Gray.

mark81150 on May 27, 2013 at 10:45 AM

In memory of Lance Corporal Philip E Charte USMC
KIA Sept 7th 2010 Helmand Pr. Afghanistan.
God be with you and your family,

Thicklugdonkey on May 27, 2013 at 10:52 AM

Let’s not forget those currently serving, and those who will serve. And remember, for decades now all of them have done so voluntarily.

Salute!

Del Dolemonte on May 27, 2013 at 10:57 AM

A good friend flew the Angel Flight in Iraq. He did two tours. Good bless all our veterans.

txhsmom on May 27, 2013 at 11:01 AM

God, please hold those who died in Your arms and comfort their families. Please keep those safe who are in harms way.
Amen.
L

letget on May 27, 2013 at 11:02 AM

God, please hold those who died in Your arms and comfort their families. Please keep those safe who are in harms way.
Amen.
L

letget on May 27, 2013 at 11:02 AM

Amen…..and ditto.

Rovin on May 27, 2013 at 11:10 AM

Any of you who still use Google instead of Bing need only compare today:

https://www.google.com/

http://www.bing.com/

Bishop on May 27, 2013 at 10:38 AM

Well what do you expect from Google, a doodle for Rachel Carson’s birthday or something? They can’t offend every holiday but they never seem to bother doing anything for the patriotic American holidays and that does offend.

Happy Nomad on May 27, 2013 at 11:15 AM

One of the most beautiful examples I was given of a compelling novel’s possible beginnings is:

My grandfather died at sea.
My father died at sea.
I am a sailor.

Sgt. Vulcha

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 27, 2013 at 8:37 AM

I agree.. that made me smile, son of a soldier, descendent of soldiers.. all the way back to Shiloh.. so I know what you mean.

mark81150 on May 27, 2013 at 9:25 AM

Poingnant though, Mark, that the sailor seems to foreshadow his own destiny—death at sea just like his ancestors.

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 27, 2013 at 11:15 AM

Any of you who still use Google instead of Bing need only compare today:

https://www.google.com/

http://www.bing.com/

Bishop on May 27, 2013 at 10:38 AM

That’s one of the first things I did this morning and as usual, Google didn’t disappoint. I knew they wouldn’t give this day the respect that it deserves. I have nothing but contempt for those who live under the blanket of freedom that was purchased with the lives of so many and never so much as feel a bit of gratitude.

TxAnn56 on May 27, 2013 at 11:18 AM

Alan Seeger. 1888–1916

121. “I Have a Rendezvous with Death”

I HAVE a rendezvous with Death
At some disputed barricade,
When Spring comes back with rustling shade
And apple-blossoms fill the air—
I have a rendezvous with Death
When Spring brings back blue days and fair.

It may be he shall take my hand
And lead me into his dark land
And close my eyes and quench my breath—
It may be I shall pass him still.
I have a rendezvous with Death
On some scarred slope of battered hill,
When Spring comes round again this year
And the first meadow-flowers appear.

God knows ’twere better to be deep
Pillowed in silk and scented down,
Where love throbs out in blissful sleep,
Pulse nigh to pulse, and breath to breath,
Where hushed awakenings are dear…
But I’ve a rendezvous with Death
At midnight in some flaming town,
When Spring trips north again this year,
And I to my pledged word am true,
I shall not fail that rendezvous.

Solaratov on May 27, 2013 at 11:27 AM

Today I’m thinking of my Great Great Uncle, Marion William Dufilho who survived the sinking of the USS Lexington, was Butch O’Hare’s wingman, keeping him safe during his infamous Medal of Honor Flight. He was shot down over the Soloman Islands in 1942 and was honored with three medals and having a ship named after him, the USS Dufilho.

71 years he’s been gone…and three weeks ago our family was contacted by the Navy with information that his remains may have been found. Testing is still being done but it sounds like they are pretty sure and if it is Marion then we are going to have him buried in Arlington with the rest of his brothers in arms. His memorial marker will be taken away and he will be given a true headstone.

My whole family is praying that after 71 years he is finally coming home.

To all the men and women who have served, God Bless You

NerwenAldarion on May 27, 2013 at 11:27 AM

TxAnn56 on May 27, 2013 at 11:18 AM

Heck, I’m surprised at the tiny flag and ribbon. They really went all out.

Cindy Munford on May 27, 2013 at 11:27 AM

To Paul J Finken

my Platoon Leader back in 90

http://projects.militarytimes.com/valor/army-lt-col-paul-j-finken/2346853

KIA Nov 2 06

RIP Sir

warren on May 27, 2013 at 11:33 AM

My Uncle, Harold Penrod, combat infantry Captain, ETO, Battle of the Bulge
My friend, Ronnie Teschendorf, Sgt, USAF, Vietnam
My friend, Norm Grant, B-24 bombardier, 493rd Bomb Group, POW, survivor of “The Long March”

Amendment X on May 27, 2013 at 11:36 AM

Turbett, Jacob H-KIA 13 FEB 2010
Lance Corporal, USMC
OEF
Aged 21

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqjpG9xYjOc

SgtSVJones on May 27, 2013 at 11:45 AM

Navy Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Mark R. Cannon. Navy posthumously honors Cannon with Bronze Star.

The sole reason, in my opionion, my son enrolled in Paramedic Class after serving 8 1/2 years in the Marines, two combat tours, serving with Mark in Afghanistan.

Corpsman Cannon was a giant amount men, who died taking care of his Marines in Afghanistan, October, 2007.

Scholarship Fund: http://www.webpages.ttu.edu/rpiercy/

BigAlSouth on May 27, 2013 at 11:49 AM

John 15:13
Greater love has no one than this, that one lay down his life for his friends.

In rememberance or our comrade in arms that gave their last drop for love of country, family and friends. God Bless

chemman on May 27, 2013 at 11:54 AM

my cousin was a Guard…he made a documentary called The Unknowns…here’s a clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sToKMDso_E

i’m so proud of him and all who serve our nation…and I am so thankful for those who gave All in order to keep this nation free…God bless them all…

janetney on May 27, 2013 at 12:16 PM

“Sleep, my sons, your duty done.
For freedom’s light has come.
Sleep in the silent depths of the sea,
Or in your bed of hallowed sod,
Until at dawn you hear,
The low, clear reveille of G-d.”

Rixon on May 27, 2013 at 12:28 PM

Today I’m thinking of my Great Great Uncle, Marion William Dufilho who survived the sinking of the USS Lexington, was Butch O’Hare’s wingman, keeping him safe during his infamous Medal of Honor Flight. He was shot down over the Soloman Islands in 1942 and was honored with three medals and having a ship named after him, the USS Dufilho.

71 years he’s been gone…and three weeks ago our family was contacted by the Navy with information that his remains may have been found. Testing is still being done but it sounds like they are pretty sure and if it is Marion then we are going to have him buried in Arlington with the rest of his brothers in arms. His memorial marker will be taken away and he will be given a true headstone.

My whole family is praying that after 71 years he is finally coming home.

To all the men and women who have served, God Bless You

NerwenAldarion on May 27, 2013 at 11:27 AM

Beautiful Memorial. May your loved one come home at last.

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 27, 2013 at 12:31 PM

Resist We Much on May 27, 2013 at 11:53 AM

Thank you for sharing your post. It was wonderful.
L

letget on May 27, 2013 at 12:40 PM

Quiet Day

—————

For my part it’s a day of deep reflection on how much was sacrificed to arrive at this stupid stage of the land of the ‘free’.

Schadenfreude on May 27, 2013 at 12:54 PM

PFC James Edward Patrick
Co. C, 331st Regiment, 83rd Infantry
KIA August 12, 1944
St. Malo, France

Your brothers still miss you.

BacaDog on May 27, 2013 at 1:00 PM

Executive Mansion,
Washington, Nov. 21, 1864.

Dear Madam,

I have been shown in the files of the War Department a statement of the Adjutant General of Massachusetts that you are the mother of five sons who have died gloriously on the field of battle.

I feel how weak and fruitless must be any word of mine which should attempt to beguile you from the grief of a loss so overwhelming. But I cannot refrain from tendering you the consolation that may be found in the thanks of the Republic they died to save.

I pray that our Heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement, and leave you only the cherished memory of the loved and lost, and the solemn pride that must be yours to have laid so costly a sacrifice upon the altar of freedom.

Yours, very sincerely and respectfully,

A. Lincoln

BacaDog on May 27, 2013 at 1:04 PM

janetney on May 27, 2013 at 12:16 PM

I can’t get the youtube to play. Is anyone else having trouble?

txhsmom on May 27, 2013 at 1:19 PM

May God bless those warriors who have died protecting our freedoms and may He hasten the healing of those who are suffering from physical and mental wounds.

When a Hero Dies
God stands up.
The angels sing, “Halleluia.”
“Welcome home, my child.
You’ve done enough, now rest a while.”
Even Jesus cries
When a Hero dies.
(Brian Futch)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8r6TP4ulUvU

SheVee on May 27, 2013 at 1:23 PM

Thanks to everyone for the poems and prayers, the remembrances and the respect.

Father, grandfather, father-in-law, all my uncles made it home safe, even though one was career AF through WW2, Korea, and ‘Nam — his example is one of the reasons this budding peace-nik finally bloomed in the Liberty Garden instead.

God bless all who fight for freedom, family, and faith in the values that forged and formed the United States of America.

AesopFan on May 27, 2013 at 1:26 PM

/Salute

dogsoldier on May 27, 2013 at 2:01 PM

Here’s a toast to the host
Of those who love the vastness of the sky
To a friend we send
The message of his brother men who fly
We drink to those who gave their all of old
Then down we roar, to score the rainbow’s pot of gold
Here’s a toast to the host
Of those we boast
The US Air Force

GWB on May 27, 2013 at 2:04 PM

God bless all who fight for freedom, family, and faith in the values that forged and formed the United States of America.
AesopFan on May 27, 2013 at 1:26 PM

AMEN! Spent some time this morning walking amid fallen comrades-at-arms,fixing flags and reflecting. The answer to Ms. Clinton’s “What difference does it make?”…All the difference. Honor, courage, loyalty and sacrifice MATTER.

indypat on May 27, 2013 at 2:05 PM

John McHugh, COL USA

KIA 18 May 2010, Afghanistan

RIP, my friend, my brother.

Always Ready, Sir.

I miss you.

stuclark on May 27, 2013 at 3:00 PM

Silent drill, and respect.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ka94vEmbTuY&feature=youtube_gdata_player

wolly4321 on May 27, 2013 at 3:08 PM

Taps,, at Arlington.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ_DCCFFkwA&feature=youtube_gdata_player

wolly4321 on May 27, 2013 at 3:19 PM

Whatever you do today, please DO NOT disrespect, dishonor, demean and insult our proud men and women in the US military by commanding any of them to hold an umbrella for you.

In other words, don’t be a despicable OBOZO – today or ever.

TeaPartyNation on May 27, 2013 at 3:39 PM

Taps,, at Arlington.

wolly4321 on May 27, 2013 at 3:19 PM

A couple of years ago, I had the honor of placing a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Noon on Pearl Harbor Day. I don’t think any video can truly capture the vibe of standing at that monument. The silence. The sense of reverence. The respect you don’t find from tourists in most of DC’s landmarks.

Which is why I was so sorely upset but not disappointed that the rat-eared coward phoned in a generic speech at the Arlington amphitheater which was predictably all about him even as he talked about fallen heros far better leaders, parents, and human beings than the rat-eared coward or his racist spouse will ever be. Simply disgusting.

Happy Nomad on May 27, 2013 at 3:48 PM

God protect the patriots who defend our freedom and our great country..

God bless the ones who have laid down their lives to defend this great country..

Dire Straits on May 27, 2013 at 4:19 PM

COL Brian Allgood, MD

Col. Brian D. Allgood, 46 and a 1978 graduate of Air Academy High School, was a doctor in the Army before becoming the command surgeon of Multi-National Forces Iraq, the American military command in Baghdad, his mother Cleo Allgood of Colorado Springs said.

He was one of 12 soldiers killed when a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter crashed at 3 p.m. Sunday in northeast Baghdad. The crash remains under investigation, but Iraq security forces leaders have said it was likely shot down by
insurgents.

ted c on May 27, 2013 at 4:37 PM

The 121st CSH in Korea was renamed as the Brian Allgood Army Community Hospital

ted c on May 27, 2013 at 4:40 PM

You guys serving. And who have served. M240AH, Hawk, all you guys.

Hear me loud and clear.

I didn’t vote for this asshole.

I served under Clinton, I get it.

I’m out now, but it’s my solemn promise to follow you.
Do whatever I can to make it right.

The dishonor isn’t yours. We all know that. It pains us that they don’t let you do your job.

We know you can.

Hang in there. We don’t forget ours. We never will.
We’re gonna make it right, and we’ll need you.

You are all that is good, and believe not a day goes by you don’t get my heartfelt blessing.

Thank you. And your families.

wolly4321 on May 27, 2013 at 5:30 PM

It is foolish and wrong to mourn the men who died. Rather we should thank God that such men lived.

George S. Patton

El Coqui on May 27, 2013 at 5:45 PM

You guys serving,,

We are very proud of you.

wolly4321 on May 27, 2013 at 6:09 PM

Your big brother google machine still does not understand or comprehend the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day. Of course, this is indicative of most tyrannical big government progressive entities. Please review the google search page to see what I’m referring to. Although they are finally acknowledging the fact that it is indeed Memorial Day, they still can’t seem to grasp the fact that the day is for honoring the fallen and not a day to honor veterans. Veterans have a separate and distinct holiday all their own, as is richly deserved.

I suppose that a big brother tyrannical progressive organization such as google cannot keep track of all the days it chooses to recognize, what with all the blind lesbian amputee artists and the muslim botanists, the latino scientists who all so richly deserve acknowledgement as well. A tiny yellow ribbon adorned upon a tiny American flag. We all thought the yellow ribbon meant support the troops but apparently it’s to honor the fallen. Perhaps if I clicked on the flag icon I would learn more…

long_cat on May 27, 2013 at 7:22 PM

Taps,, at Arlington.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQ_DCCFFkwA&feature=youtube_gdata_player

wolly4321 on May 27, 2013 at 3:19 PM

Three years ago I went to DC to pick up a used car I bought (Saturn GL, manual, helped me get through doctorate school). My time was short (and so was my money). I spent a day at the Mall, but I went to Arlington twice and went to the Changing of the Guard. It’s a special ceremony and it’s an honor to be there. I believe every American should visit.

The second time I noticed four men coming along with the guards, then realize with astonishment it was a Laying of the Wreath, honoring the Louisiana Guard. AND, I’m from Louisiana.

I started recording when they laid the wreath. When taps came, I was blubbering at the first note. I’m blubbering now thinking of it.

It is impossible to sufficiently express gratitude for all of you who have family who have given their ultimate expression of love for America. My dad came back and so did all my family members. Thank you seems so little, but thank you from a grateful civilian.

Wherever a serviceperson lies, there is sacred ground.

itsspideyman on May 28, 2013 at 12:05 AM

2013

Schadenfreude on May 28, 2013 at 2:11 AM

Denis Miranda, SEAL
20Sep10
Zabul, Afghanistan
Warrior, friend.

Washington Nearsider on May 28, 2013 at 11:12 AM

Jerry McGinnis
Iwo Jima
February 19, 1945
the uncle I didn’t meet – Dad and Uncle Bill were also Marines

wjmtexas on May 28, 2013 at 9:50 PM

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields. – 1919
Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae.

entagor on May 28, 2013 at 11:07 PM

There is a poem, about dogs not men. But this poem is about that truth, that those you loved and knew, will never leave you, even after they gone on to God.

Old Dogs Do Not Die
By Anonymous

We have a secret, you and I,
That no one else shall know,
For who but I can see you lie,
Each night, in fireglow?
And who but I can reach my hand
Before we go to bed,
And feel the living warmth of you
And touch your silken head?
And only I walk woodland paths,
And see, ahead of me,
Your small form racing with the wind,
So young again, and free.
And only I can see you swim
In every brook I pass…
And, when I call, no one but I
Can see the bending grass…

The unknown soldier, he never dies. The ones whom no one knows are bound to us by this sad, great, and lonely sacrifice. We owe these soldiers eternal gratitude and respect. It is their footprints in the grass at Arlington, and their young hands saluting the flags that blow in the breezes of the resting place. Bless their souls all

entagor on May 28, 2013 at 11:26 PM