OK tornado devastation: 51 dead, including 20 children; Update: Lower?

posted at 8:01 am on May 21, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

The town of Moore has been all but demolished by a horrifically strong tornado that stayed on the ground for more than 40 minutes, chewing up buildings and spewing debris throughout the area.  The confirmed death toll is bad enough, but it’s expected to rise as rescuers sweep what remains of Moore:

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Rescue teams combed through pulverized buildings and splintered homes early Tuesday after one of the deadliest tornadoes in U.S. history blasted through the suburbs of Oklahoma City, killing at least 51 people — including 20 children.

Officials warned that the death toll from Monday’s mid-afternoon twister was almost certain to rise significantly when dawn broke in the devastated city of Moore, and as more bodies were taken to the medical examiner.

Children were among the many missing after the tornado delivered a direct hit to two elementary schools. Seven children drowned in a pool of water at Plaza Towers Elementary School, which was all but leveled.

Be prepared for the number to go up:

“It is going to go higher,” Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., said Tuesday morning on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” of the death toll.

The New York Times puts the death toll higher already:

Emergency crews and volunteers continued to work through the early morning hours Tuesday in a frantic search for survivors of a huge tornado that ripped through parts of Oklahoma City and its suburbs, killing at least 91 people, 20 of them children, and flattening whatever was in its path, including at least two schools.

While the town got some good news from schools in the immediate aftermath, “dozens” were still trapped in one by late last night:

Plaza Towers Elementary School in Moore was reduced to a pile of twisted metal and toppled walls. Rescue workers were able to pull several children from the rubble, but on Monday evening crews were still struggling to cut through fallen beams and clear debris amid reports that dozens of students were trapped. At Briarwood Elementary School in Oklahoma City, on the border with Moore, cars were thrown through the facade and the roof was torn off.

The Tulsa World has a more pessimistic take on Plaza Towers:

In a drizzle under hastily erected bright lights, dozens of emergency workers searched into the night Monday for the missing children at the flattened Plaza Towers Elementary School.

“They’re looking for life, but they have not had any hits recently, so they’re in recovery mode now,” Gov. Mary Fallin said late Monday after touring the devastation.

About half of the injuries, CNN reports, probably came from flying wood in the storm:

If you want to know how to help the victims of the disaster, KSDK and USA Today give the information:

American Red Cross

The American Red Cross has several shelters open in Oklahoma and Red Cross Emergency Response Vehicles have begun delivering hot meals throughout the affected areas. The Red Cross is also working to link loved ones in Moore who are OK through a website called Safe and Well. Text REDCROSS to 90999 to give $10 to American Red Cross Disaster Relief, donate online, or donate by phone at 1-800-RED CROSS.

Salvation Army

The Salvation Army is activating disaster response teams and mobile feeding units to help residents and rescuers in Moore, Okla., as well as in other locations in the Plains and the Midwest that were impacted by tornadoes. Donate online or text STORM to 80888 to contribute $10 to the Salvation Army’s relief efforts or make a donation by phone at 1-800-SAL-ARMY. If you’re sending a check make sure you put the words “Oklahoma Tornado Relief” on the check, and mail it to: The Salvation Army, P.O. Box 12600, Oklahoma City, OK., 73157.

Operation USA

Los Angeles-based international relief agency Operation USA announced it’s providing emergency aid where needed to community-based health organizations across Oklahoma. Donate online, by phone at 1-800-678-7255, or by check made out to Operation USA, 7421 Beverly Blvd., PH, Los Angeles, CA 90036. You can also donate $10 by texting AID to 50555. Corporate donations of bulk quantities of disaster-appropriate supplies are also being requested.

Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief

Oklahoma Baptist Disaster Relief says it has deployed at least 80 volunteers to respond to severe weather in Oklahoma. Those interested in helping can make a tax-deductible donation to the BGCO’s Disaster Relief ministry online or call (405) 942-3800. You may also send checks to: BGCO Attn: Disaster Relief 3800 N. May Ave. Oklahoma City, OK 73112.

And pray for all those in Oklahoma — the victims, their families, the physicians and their staffs, and the first responders who will have a horrible, horrible task ahead of them.

Update, 9:28 am ET: Possibly some good news — the toll has actually gone down considerably, at least for now:

That’s still going to go up as rescuers go through the town, but at least it won’t be quite as bad as feared.

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Comment pages: 1 2

I wouldn’t move there in the first place, to be honest with you.

Liam on May 21, 2013 at 9:52 AM

Try telling the Military you won’t move there. Sometimes you have to do what you have to do. Like live in places like the Midwest with tornados and blizzards, or South Carolina with hurricanes and tornados or Colorado with the wildfires or California with wildfires an earthquakes. No where is totally safe. It’s life and you deal with it.

Jomama on May 21, 2013 at 9:58 AM

Way to kick off a civil discussion.

verbaluce on May 21, 2013 at 9:56 AM

In other words, Happy Nomad just kicked your @ss!

right2bright on May 21, 2013 at 9:58 AM

The problem is not an increased amount of tornadoes, it is the increased population in the areas where the tornadoes touched down.

Sekhmet on May 21, 2013 at 9:17 AM

YUP !!!

But never forget, we MUST adjust earth to accommodate us ! /

Jabberwock on May 21, 2013 at 9:24 AM

Obviously sekhmet thinks we should de-populate “Tornado Alley” which extends from North Central Texas straight up into South Dakota…Is that it? Of course that’s also the nations Breadbasket, and Cattle Ranching…It’s also the Oil Rich region of the Oklahoma and the Texas Panhandle.

http://www.livescience.com/25772-tornado-alley-map-stats.html

Technology has improved greatly since I was a kid (Lived in either Hurricane Gulf Coast or Tornado Alley most of my life) with early warning and construction…We need to continue our efforts at re-enforced construction and safe room shelters…These efforts are saving lives.

These efforts are as worthy of citizen support as earthquake technologies in architecture,early warning and quick response.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 9:59 AM

I wouldn’t move there in the first place, to be honest with you.

Liam on May 21, 2013 at 9:52 AM

As I posted above, you pretty much pick your risks by where you live. Not a few people have been killed by blizzards in NY. Either directly or by things like having a heart attack shoveling heavy snow.

Personally, I don’t think I’d ever move back to the Gulf Coast because having to pack up every year to evacuate ahead of a hurricane is miserable.

Happy Nomad on May 21, 2013 at 9:59 AM

Try telling the Military you won’t move there.

Jomama on May 21, 2013 at 9:58 AM

Well, you got me there. :-)

Liam on May 21, 2013 at 10:01 AM

Mid-day, 16 minutes of warning, that means you can never be more than 16 minutes from your home…and every warning you are dashing home to your “safe room”…

right2bright on May 21, 2013 at 9:57 AM

And in the spring, it’s a rare day in Oklahoma without a tornado watch or warning. 99% of the time, nothing happens, and if something does happen, it’s miles away from where you are. And most tornados are survivable even if you get hit, if you get into a small enclosed room with no windows in the center of your house. People get complacent, I think, at least I have. In reality, the risk is very low. But then we have one like this, or like the one in 1999, that are not survivable unless you are underground.

mbs on May 21, 2013 at 10:05 AM

Miscounting dead bodies again. They don’t move around a lot and are easy to count. I don’t know why this keeps happening but I don’t think it’s accidental.

Buddahpundit on May 21, 2013 at 10:05 AM

kingsjester on May 21, 2013 at 9:47 AM

Just seems odd that schools wouldnt have them.

Bishop on May 21, 2013 at 10:07 AM

Bishop on May 21, 2013 at 10:07 AM

I know.

kingsjester on May 21, 2013 at 10:08 AM

Why aren’t there more storm shelters? Simple affordability especially in already cash strapped communities. Also, the law of averages “logic”, i.e., you don’t get hit every season every time. We lived out in the Midwest (both Dakotas and Nebraska) for a lot of my husband’ military career in homes on Air Force bases. We had basements in our homes and shelters available on base. But most of the time the if we knew a tornado was coming we couldn’t have made it to them anyway, it wouldn’t have been safe to get on the roads. So, we went in the basements. We retired to AL and live in a large city. We have no basements and no local storm shelters close by in the neighborhood, We go into a first floor inner hall bathroom with pillows and blankets. My husband works on a military post here. Two years ago during the April 27 outbreak, they sent everyone home. Out on the roads. The tornados were bearing down and all around and I was on my cell trying to tell him where they had been spotted. There are supposedly now community shelters in most small towns and rural areas. Once again, even if we had them, unless we stayed in the shelter the whole time, it is a matter of getting there. We do have several friends who in the last two years have made the investment and have put in tornado shelters in the sub flooring of their garages. Very expensive and again, unless you are at home and run to it and stay there it does you no good.

Jomama on May 21, 2013 at 10:10 AM

Here’s a question for you flyover conservative losers who live in Tornado Alley down there: Why don’t the schools have deep shelters considering the preponderance of such weather events?

Our new school built just a few years ago up here in MN has a state of the art basement complete with emergency supplies, medical kits, and comm systems, and we don’t get nearly the rate or size of tornadoes as people down south get.

Bishop on May 21, 2013 at 9:24 AM

Soil.

I live in North Central Texas…Black Prairie Cotton Country.

Not especially good for basements…

The Prairies are flat with lots of running room for twisters to develop…buildup and finally putter out. Farmers used to have small root cellars they used for shelters (Like Dorothy’s in Oz)

Most went the way of the Trolley but…Maybe these will come back?

Re-enforcement technology saves lives…But the occasional mile wide twister is devastating in area of the carnage. These wedge twisters don’t skip around they just plough through slowly and deliberately over a wide area until they are spent.

In any event…Prayers for Sooners today & the rescue/relief workers.

It’s gonna be another watch/warning weather day for the southern end of the alley…especially the Red River region.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 10:11 AM

Storms approching Memphis Area and the big ones between OK Border and Little Rock, ARK.

kingsjester on May 21, 2013 at 10:15 AM

In case you haven’t seen it yet: http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=50147264n

changer1701 on May 21, 2013 at 10:15 AM

Sorry…the vid is of a woman being reunited with her dog.

changer1701 on May 21, 2013 at 10:16 AM

And, here we go again. Severe thunderstorms moving into southern Oklahoma. Very large hail and 70 mph winds expected. “Severe thunderstorms can and occasionally do produce tornados.” To the south of where I am, the sky is black and lots of lightening.

mbs on May 21, 2013 at 10:18 AM

Heavenly Father,
We may not always understand your plan but we accept and honor it.
We offer these prayers for all those effected by the tornados in the mid west.
We pray that the dead are lifted to heaven in your loving embrace.
We pray their families are comforted by your presence.
We pray the injured are healed quickly and completely.
We pray that all your children are able to come together and help one another through these tribulations with love and empathy.
We humbly offer these prayers to you on bended knee.
AMEN

JKotthoff on May 21, 2013 at 10:20 AM

Try telling the Military you won’t move there.

Jomama on May 21, 2013 at 9:58 AM

Well you can try but the military may have something to say in response!

Happy Nomad on May 21, 2013 at 10:21 AM

I wouldn’t move there in the first place, to be honest with you.

Liam on May 21, 2013 at 9:52 AM

As I posted above, you pretty much pick your risks by where you live. Not a few people have been killed by blizzards in NY. Either directly or by things like having a heart attack shoveling heavy snow.

Personally, I don’t think I’d ever move back to the Gulf Coast because having to pack up every year to evacuate ahead of a hurricane is miserable.

Happy Nomad on May 21, 2013 at 9:59 AM

True.

Blizzards and loss of power during cold winters in the North.

Rockslides,Mudslides,wild fires etc. in the mountain regions.

Floods and hurricanes on the coasts.

Earthquakes,Mudslides & wildfires on the west coast.

River flooding where the Great rivers and large lakes are.

Twisters on the Plains.

Droughts and wildfires in the desert regions.

And these are just the natural risks endemic to any region.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 10:22 AM

JKotthoff on May 21, 2013 at 10:20 AM

AMEN.

kingsjester on May 21, 2013 at 10:23 AM

And, here we go again. Severe thunderstorms moving into southern Oklahoma. Very large hail and 70 mph winds expected. “Severe thunderstorms can and occasionally do produce tornados.” To the south of where I am, the sky is black and lots of lightening.

mbs on May 21, 2013 at 10:18 AM

God Bless you and your neighbors…Stay safe!

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 10:23 AM

South central sector weather radar links:

http://www.accuweather.com/en/us/south-central-region/weather-radar

God Bless Sooners this morning…

http://www.nctcog.org/weather/radar/nctradar.asp?v=5

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 10:28 AM

God Bless folks in the Mississippi River Valley region as well anyone in the path of these storms…

http://www.nctcog.org/weather/radar/nctradar.asp?v=14

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 10:30 AM

Well, great. It’s seems I’m smack in the middle of the forecast area today. Nothing happening, yet.

trigon on May 21, 2013 at 10:33 AM

Here’s a question for you flyover conservative losers who live in Tornado Alley down there: Why don’t the schools have deep shelters considering the preponderance of such weather events?

Bishop on May 21, 2013 at 9:24 AM

New construction techniques and very rapid growth. Plus, this was one of those “finger of God” huge tornadoes. Have yet to see pictures of what survived.

There is something to be said about the depression era PWA school construction projects. Though I wonder how some of those would have fared.

pambi on May 21, 2013 at 9:32 AM

So far, it appears our turn will be today.

Though going by history of storms in this area, they seem to most often split north and south of us. Exceptt those that form right on top of us.

I see the scumbag trolls are evangelizing the sermons of their messiahs; never let a crisis go to waste.

Drinkers of dirty douche bags.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 10:42 AM

Thoughts and prayers and donation to this natural disaster. As the Salvation Army says, “We respond to disasters with Acts of God”. God bless all.

I just took a first responder course last month. Hope I never have to use it, but always prepare for the worst.

kirkill on May 21, 2013 at 10:56 AM

The Prairies are flat with lots of running room for twisters to develop…buildup and finally putter out. Farmers used to have small root cellars they used for shelters (Like Dorothy’s in Oz)
workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 10:11 AM

My grandparents had one of those. Basements in this area seem to flood, I think that’s why reinforced “safe rooms” inside the house are more popular here. Although there is some dispute whether those will hold up in an F4-5 tornado, I guess we may find out more about that after yesterday. After the 1999 tornado, a lot of people started putting those little shelters under the floor of their garages, not sure if those are prone to flooding or not. People do get trapped in those shelters, maybe one of the old-fashioned ones out in the yard would be better.

mbs on May 21, 2013 at 11:00 AM

Still waiting on that heart-felt comdemnation of Sen. Whinehouse.

Well?

kingsjester on May 21, 2013 at 9:32 AM

I haven’t seen it –

verbaluce on May 21, 2013 at 9:36 AM

Ah, the Obama excuse.

Gelsomina on May 21, 2013 at 11:00 AM

These storms were predicted for days yet the state still required children to attend schools with no adequate storm shelters. Is that child endangerment?

meci on May 21, 2013 at 11:11 AM

meci on May 21, 2013 at 11:11 AM

Huh?

Are you being serious?

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 11:12 AM

These storms were predicted for days yet the state still required children to attend schools with no adequate storm shelters. Is that child endangerment?

meci on May 21, 2013 at 11:11 AM

No guarantee they would have been safe at home.

mbs on May 21, 2013 at 11:17 AM

You got it. Mr. Jomama simply saluted smartly and asked how fast we needed to be there. 12 moves in 24 years plus the bonus of 3 tours in the Dakotas when all of our friends were whining about how hot Florida is. ;-)

Jomama on May 21, 2013 at 11:22 AM

Four Reasons Texas (and I’m guessing Oklahoma) does not have basements or storm shelters:

1) The Frost Line

In the north, housing regulations require home foundations to be dug below the frost line, which may be 5 to 6 feet down. Builders must sink the pipes that far down so they won’t freeze and break. At that point, one might as well build a basement. In the south, the frost line tends to be less than a foot, so digging down is an unnecessary expense.

2) Expansive Clay Soils of Texas Shrink and Swell

Texas was formerly under the Gulf of Mexico, and a lot of the eastern half of the state has what are called “expansive soils,” a kind of clay that heaves and flexes and plays havoc even when houses are placed on slab foundations. These clays expand up to 30% when wet, and dry quickly. Texas homeowners are known to water their lawns on hot, dry days to try and prevent their foundations from cracking. The pressure exerted by these swelling soils can exert up to 15,000 pounds of pressure per square foot! (Source: “Soil Issues and Residential Construction in Texas” from this site.)

That makes it very difficult and expensive to engineer basements for Texas houses.

3) High Water Table in Eastern Half of State

Historically, the water table in half of Texas has been very close to the surface, because the state is not that high above sea level. In Houston, for example, you can strike water just ten feet down in many areas. Basements too near the water table are often flooded. Recent droughts have pushed the water table lower, but homebuilding construction has to account for ordinary and wet years, not just drought.

4) Limestone Bedrock Is Difficult to Dig

This may be an excuse rather than a valid reason, but there are widespread complaints about the limestone (old seabed) in central and western parts of the state making it hard to dig, even to plant trees in the back yard. Limestone is the same kind of rock that forms the Alps! In many parts of Texas, there’s only a thin layer of dirt above limestone.

http://greekgeek.hubpages.com/hub/Why-Dont-Homes-in-Texas-Have-Basements

We lived in a suburb of Dallas about 10 years ago and I remember being told to run the sprinkler system in the summer, so the ground/foundation would not crack. There were some homes that still shifted and had to have long posts (“piers”) drilled into the ground to secure them.

Fallon on May 21, 2013 at 11:49 AM

And your excuse is that you know some liberal who did something similar once?
 
verbaluce on May 21, 2013 at 9:22 AM

 
You mean like your post about the Newtown kids?
 

NRA Sets 1,000 Killed In School Shooting As Amount It Would Take For Them To Reconsider Much Of Anything
‘Yeah, Something Like 1,000 Dead Kids,’ Reports Spokesperson
 
verbaluce on December 21, 2012 at 2:16 PM

rogerb on May 21, 2013 at 11:50 AM

Prayers sent from PA.

ToddPA on May 21, 2013 at 8:40 AM

More prayers from PA.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 8:55 AM

Many thanks for the relief effort links.

PatriotGal2257 on May 21, 2013 at 11:51 AM

changer1701 on May 21, 2013 at 10:15 AM

Thanks for posting that. What a charming woman. Her sincere “Thank you, God,” so quiet and heartfelt warmed my heart.

JKotthoff on May 21, 2013 at 10:20 AM

Amen.

pannw on May 21, 2013 at 11:54 AM

Fallon on May 21, 2013 at 11:49 AM

Number two is more of the reason than the others combined.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 12:01 PM

rogerb on May 21, 2013 at 11:50 AM

Ouch.

Scumbag lefty trolls don’t want people to catch them.

Very good job.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 12:02 PM

All my thoughts to the people of Moore. 40 minutes, sheesh. And kids killed. Heartbreaking.

Yeah, tornados are pretty freaky things. I’ve always been grimly fascinated by them. Only seen em in person once, from a very safe distance, in Central Florida, three at one time, very little damage thankfully. In the middle of a sea of orange groves.

WhatSlushfund on May 21, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Fallon on May 21, 2013 at 11:49 AM

Xcellent data.

Texas Tech is one of many Universities in the country doing research on Reinforcement Construction Shelter Research for Weather Disasters.

link:
http://www.depts.ttu.edu/weweb/shelters/inresshelter.php

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:18 PM

It can cost an ave. $30,000 + to get a basement lot in Georgia.

Anybody interested in the historic tracking maps…

http://www.tornadohistoryproject.com/

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:26 PM

Fallon on May 21, 2013 at 11:49 AM

You are correct. Most of us do not have basements here for those very reasons. Depending on where you are in the state changes the reasons a bit. Here in the OKC metro area (Moore, Oklahoma City, Norman, Edmond, et al), the biggest is the limestone. This is why a great many of us do not have underground storm shelters–they are so incredibly expensive to install (talking upwards of $4-$5K for a six-person shelter, although if you get them at certain times of the year, the four places that sell them around here drop their prices to $2-$3K. If you have a coupon.), but technology is getting better and making the process only take about four hours, rather than what they used to.

Tornadoes are just one of those things that we have to live with here in Oklahoma. We’ve long since accepted it–but that doesn’t make it any less painful when they happen. Even amidst all this strife, I will still take a tornado over, say, an earthquake, because we can sometimes get out of the path of a tornado (they generally run southwest to northeast).

But then the earthquakes have started to hit over the last two years.

Fortunately, our weathermen are generally really, really good at predicting tornadoes. While we don’t know how bad they could be or where they will hit, we do know the things to look for. When you live in Oklahoma, that’s just kinda the way things are. You fairly quickly learn the signs. EF-5s generally only come along once in a lifetime, so this one was a shock considering we just had one in 1999.

Please continue to pray for the families of those in Plaza Tower elementary school. That’s where they found several children who had drowned when they became trapped under debris in a pool of rainwater. Reports of rescuers are saying there’s more down there. Early reports are saying that many of the missing kids are preschoolers…

Some good news is our teachers. While many were hurt by falling debris, these heroes were found laying on top of children to shield them; the kids found under the teachers were unhurt.

jedijson on May 21, 2013 at 12:29 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:26 PM

Pretty cool. But it omits the tornado that took out the old Fort Worth National bank building in 2000(?). And I have seen a picture of a tornado over Dallas from back in the 50′s that isn’t on the map either.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 12:32 PM

All my thoughts to the people of Moore. 40 minutes, sheesh. And kids killed. Heartbreaking.

Yeah, tornados are pretty freaky things. I’ve always been grimly fascinated by them. Only seen em in person once, from a very safe distance, in Central Florida, three at one time, very little damage thankfully. In the middle of a sea of orange groves.

WhatSlushfund on May 21, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Seen a few starting from when I was a kid…including a waterspout dance close to Ft. Bolivar…about 100 yards away from the beach house.

The first one I remember seeing saw was cutting across a farmers field as we were headed out to feed horses. I was 10. It was a year of serious weather.

Watched the funnel form and touchdown from the backseat window…I said to my friends Dad “Hey that looks kinda like a tornado…doesn’t it?”

Sam (my friends Dad) looked out the rear view mirror…spit a chaw out the window, told us to hang on and floored it…We were cutting across the path but it was a sidewinder. We outran it and after about 10 minutes or so it went backup into the sky.

Sam always drove Caddies for a smoothe ride…Made it to feed and secure the horses in record time.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:36 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:26 PM

Pretty cool. But it omits the tornado that took out the old Fort Worth National bank building in 2000(?). And I have seen a picture of a tornado over Dallas from back in the 50′s that isn’t on the map either.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 12:32 PM

Well that’s weird isn’t it.

Thanks, for the heads up.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:37 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:37 PM

Oh, and the one that hit Carswell and almost all of the B-36 fleet.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 12:39 PM

jedijson on May 21, 2013 at 12:29 PM

Your Sooner weathermen Rock!

Praying for Sooners today…And your neighbors TX,MS,LA,ARK,KS are sending ya’ll Help as fast as we can.

Stay safe and Strong Sooners.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:43 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:37 PM

Oh, and the one that hit Carswell and almost all of the B-36 fleet.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 12:39 PM

Maybe they’re confused by straight line winds or something?

Kinda like Pluto no longer being a planet?

Haven’t gone through the site thoroughly yet…But glad you’re seeing the data hitches.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:47 PM

How do you go from 91 to 24? Can the media get ONE breaking news story right?

Ronnie on May 21, 2013 at 12:56 PM

These people are the backbone of this country – Rush Limbaugh

Indeed!

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:56 PM

Maybe they’re confused by straight line winds or something?

Kinda like Pluto no longer being a planet?

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:47 PM

I thought that myself at first. Looked them up

Fort Worth 2000 – F3

Dallas 1957 – F3

Fort Worth 1952 – no scale mentioned but every thing I have heard on it was that it was a tornado.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:00 PM

It’s amazing how the folks in OK don’t blame GWB or Obama. They assess, pray, mourn, thank God, and go on.

Compare this to NO and it makes you dizzy.

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:01 PM

Pretty big storm up around the scrumpy, Lawton area.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:04 PM

Either you object to anyone doing it…or you don’t.

verbaluce on May 21, 2013 at 9:23 AM

I object to ALL doing it. How often, millions of times, have leftists deflected by “it’s GWB’s fault” or “so and so did it too”. Just look in the threads of the past few years. Also, look up how often your goof in chief has done it.

To all, from the left to the right, you’re very unnerving telling grown ups what to say, here or elsewhere. May your holier than thou take you all to Heaven.

Most noble are the good folks of OK.

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:12 PM

Pretty big storm up around the scrumpy, Lawton area.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:04 PM

I hope that you and yours, Scrumpy, Jackie et all remain safe. Watching TX and OK with concern. Thanks for posting, as you can.

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:13 PM

Hell, meant to say “just look in the threads of the past few days”.

Year…was correct too.

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:14 PM

Thanks for posting, as you can.

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:13 PM

Heck, I finished things up early. Today has been predicted to be a bad day since the weekend, and I just built an awning in the back yard. Its me and two really chicken big dogs hunkered down. Me drawing, them shaking under foot.

Daughter in a big old (PWA era) school and wife working up in Richardson. Used little words explaining to her why being in a car, or under a bridge, is a bad idea. I think she listened this time.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:18 PM

trigon, stay hunkered down good.

cozmo, glad you and yours are prepared. I hope all passes over without much harm.

I feel so sorry for the people and the animals worry me too, even from yesterday in OK…so many bad stories.

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:23 PM

rogerb on May 21, 2013 at 11:50 AM

They are consistent…and consistently hypocritical.

If any of them would have said something for the 1st amendment in the last few days, I’d consider believing them, alas.

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:26 PM

Schools cancelling afternoon classes in DFW area.

Unstable weather…and looks like a squalls from Stevens co. and Palo Pinto co. heading east.
tail end of the system blowing through the Red River region.

http://www.nctcog.org/weather/

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:37 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:36 PM

Wow, that sounds like a close one. Crazy.

WhatSlushfund on May 21, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Maybe they’re confused by straight line winds or something?

Kinda like Pluto no longer being a planet?

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:47 PM

I thought that myself at first. Looked them up

Fort Worth 2000 – F3

Dallas 1957 – F3

Fort Worth 1952 – no scale mentioned but every thing I have heard on it was that it was a tornado.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:00 PM

Weird.

Surely they got feedback about it?

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:39 PM

Just watched Gov. Fallin on Fox. Very impressed with her. Calm, compassionate, organized, inclusive. Comforting to see a real leader. Don’t know anything about her; has she been a good governor?

itsacookbook on May 21, 2013 at 1:40 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:36 PM

Wow, that sounds like a close one. Crazy.

WhatSlushfund on May 21, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Yeah.

I saw a shark attack victim hauled onto a beach as a kid in Padre. Hammerhead (mating season that year). Swimmer made it to the hospital.

..so for me Tornadoes and Sharks have been a bit of sideline interest.

Probably a delayed neurotic tendency or something…But it beats fear and ignorance I guess.

You live in the Alley…You’re gonna see serious weather…and most regional natives pay proper attention.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Heck, I finished things up early. Today has been predicted to be a bad day since the weekend, and I just built an awning in the back yard. Its me and two really chicken big dogs hunkered down. Me drawing, them shaking under foot.

Daughter in a big old (PWA era) school and wife working up in Richardson. Used little words explaining to her why being in a car, or under a bridge, is a bad idea. I think she listened this time.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:18 PM

WBAP announced some area districts sending kids home early.

Dioceses of Dallas.

Check it out see if RISD is on the list?

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:49 PM

Don’t think this one will peter out before it gets here though…

http://www.nctcog.org/weather/radar/nctradar.asp?v=2

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:55 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:49 PM

Doubtful, even after what happened yesterday.

Even though the worst of it is predicted for about the time school lets out, the logistical nightmare of an unscheduled release would cause more problems than a tornado.

WBAP has the list on their site, RISD ain’t on it.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:57 PM

Stay safe, y’all. Our prayers are with you and the ones who went through ahead.

rogerb on May 21, 2013 at 1:58 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Sheesh, dude you’ve been through it all.

But it beats fear and ignorance I guess.

You don’t have to guess. It definitely does. This is what I think coward libs don’t understand. When I get bad news (which I’ve had lots of this year) I always say, ‘give it to me straight.’ I’d rather know than not know. I always respect people who are able to take it on the chin. And do it with style. You outran a tornado in a caddy dude! Does it get much cooler?

WhatSlushfund on May 21, 2013 at 2:05 PM

Doubtful, even after what happened yesterday.

Even though the worst of it is predicted for about the time school lets out, the logistical nightmare of an unscheduled release would cause more problems than a tornado.

WBAP has the list on their site, RISD ain’t on it.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:57 PM

Well I hope ya’ll are ok…and your newly installed awning isn’t shredded.

Maybe we’ll luckout and just get rain and the usual flash flooding as cars float down Turtle Creek…

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:08 PM

Maybe they’re confused by straight line winds or something?

Kinda like Pluto no longer being a planet?

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 12:47 PM

I thought that myself at first. Looked them up

Fort Worth 2000 – F3

Dallas 1957 – F3

Fort Worth 1952 – no scale mentioned but every thing I have heard on it was that it was a tornado.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 1:00 PM

They also left out the Lancaster, TX F4 tornado in 1994

Sirelyn on May 21, 2013 at 2:16 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:08 PM

Heh, all the new park equipment installed by the Trinity.

Never saw cars in turtle creek, but I have some picks of trash cans floating down my street (when the tropical storm made it all the way up here a few years back).

Well, an answer, of sorts.

Dallas ISD ‏@dallasschools 11s

#DallasISD emergency operations team is monitoring weather. School day will NOT be altered, buses will run as planned http://bit.ly/12JNCFq

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:19 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Sheesh, dude you’ve been through it all.

But it beats fear and ignorance I guess.

You don’t have to guess. It definitely does. This is what I think coward libs don’t understand. When I get bad news (which I’ve had lots of this year) I always say, ‘give it to me straight.’ I’d rather know than not know. I always respect people who are able to take it on the chin. And do it with style. You outran a tornado in a caddy dude! Does it get much cooler?

WhatSlushfund on May 21, 2013 at 2:05 PM

My stories are pretty common to kids who growup in Texas really…and in most of the plains states or hurricane zones.

My mom was thrown in a ditch and covered by her Grandpa as a twister blew right over them in Illinois…she also survived Carla in Houston with 5 little kids…Flooding was bad in that one.

Weather happens…just like anything else. Sailors,Ranchers and Farmers understand that. They have the old wisdom.

Ol’ Sam was both in a life where he had many occupations. He was an old school kind of guy…Merchant Marine Navigator running the North Atlantic before we entered WWII…Nothin’ scared that man…But he was cautious when it was smart to be cautious. He was a Hoot.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Aaaand Caddies are always Cool.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:21 PM

My stories are pretty common to kids who growup in Texas really…and in most of the plains states or hurricane zones.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Lived my whole life on the great plains, from Nebraska to Texas.

Never seen a tornado. Been in one tropical storm, but that was in Florida.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:24 PM

Schadenfreude on May 21, 2013 at 1:23 PM

Got the lawn furniture and other loose items outside secured. After seeing the pictures of all those people’s homes up in Oklahoma and looking at all the trees around my house, it was probably a foolish gesture.

Starting to see some popups about 30 miles NE of me on the radar. I’m not really all that worried about it. I feel worse for all those people up north in Moore.

trigon on May 21, 2013 at 2:25 PM

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:08 PM

Heh, all the new park equipment installed by the Trinity.

Never saw cars in turtle creek, but I have some picks of trash cans floating down my street (when the tropical storm made it all the way up here a few years back).

Well, an answer, of sorts.

Dallas ISD ‏@dallasschools 11s

#DallasISD emergency operations team is monitoring weather. School day will NOT be altered, buses will run as planned http://bit.ly/12JNCFq

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:19 PM

I saw it a couple of years ago.

We didn’t think it would happen sort of thing…But yeah Turtle Creek runs amok and most of that area is vulnerable…especially down hill toward the industrial area banked by the Trinity. Just kinda flows down Oak Lawn.

DISD…Well that says everything…It’s DISD afterall.

DFW Dioceses are going the better safe then sorry route.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:25 PM

My stories are pretty common to kids who growup in Texas really…and in most of the plains states or hurricane zones.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Lived my whole life on the great plains, from Nebraska to Texas.

Never seen a tornado. Been in one tropical storm, but that was in Florida.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:24 PM

Really?

I guess it was me and my friends then.

My brothers and I used to make parachutes and jump off the roof of the house during Tornado watches when we were kids…Until Mom caught us.

We got in mega trouble…My little brother was only 6.

Dad’s arm got tired swingin’ his belt on our hides.

I guess we were kinda wild kids…or lucky…or both.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:30 PM

DFW Dioceses are going the better safe then sorry route.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:25 PM

I disagree. They are protecting themselves from liability.

Even though it puts a large number of kids in one place. Most DISD schools are the best protected buildings in whatever area they are in.

Much safer than the building my wife works in, or our brick home.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:33 PM

Looks like Denton will get the worst of it so far…

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:34 PM

DFW Dioceses are going the better safe then sorry route.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:25 PM

I disagree. They are protecting themselves from liability.

Even though it puts a large number of kids in one place. Most DISD schools are the best protected buildings in whatever area they are in.

Much safer than the building my wife works in, or our brick home.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:33 PM

You could be right.

A lot of the parochial schools are smaller and older in construction.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:36 PM

You could be right.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:36 PM

As long as the theory doesn’t get tested.

Schools built in the 20′s and 30′s are still being used while newer schools, and commercial buildings, are being torn down and replaced.

They knew how to build things that last in that era.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:41 PM

You could be right.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:36 PM

As long as the theory doesn’t get tested.

Schools built in the 20′s and 30′s are still being used while newer schools, and commercial buildings, are being torn down and replaced.

They knew how to build things that last in that era.

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 2:41 PM

My daughter’s catholic school was built in 1925…and it’s still there.

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:49 PM

OK and ARK getting pounded by this weather system

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 2:52 PM

Be prepared for the number to go up

President Romney to view damage?

Nobody predicts the future based on gut feelings and other people’s work better than the Bald Avenger!

tommyhawk on May 21, 2013 at 3:14 PM

WTF?

cozmo on May 21, 2013 at 3:19 PM

Newcastle/Moore tornado now classified as EF5 with peak winds 200-210 mph.

http://kamala.cod.edu/ok/latest.nous44.KOUN.html

E-R

electric-rascal on May 21, 2013 at 4:56 PM

whoa…EF5

workingclass artist on May 21, 2013 at 5:05 PM

When I had left for work this morning the death toll was still at 51. During my drive, I prayed for the victims of the tornado in OK. By lunchtime, half of them had come back to life. In the midst of sorrow I consider that pretty good morning with my awesome God.

Buck Turgidson on May 22, 2013 at 1:57 AM

A pretty good morning, rather.

Buck Turgidson on May 22, 2013 at 1:59 AM

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