North Korean army: We have final approval to launch nuclear strikes on the U.S.

posted at 6:01 pm on April 3, 2013 by Allahpundit

I blame Dennis Rodman.

Suicide by (global) cop?

In a statement published by the official KCNA news agency, the General Staff of the Korean People’s Army (KPA) said it was formally informing Washington that reckless US threats would be “smashed by… cutting-edge smaller, lighter and diversified nuclear strike means”.

“The merciless operation of (our) revolutionary armed forces in this regard has been finally examined and ratified,” the statement said…

“The moment of explosion is approaching fast,” Thursday’s statement said, adding that a war could break out on the Korean peninsula “today or tomorrow”.

“In view of this situation, the KPA General Staff in charge of all operations will take powerful practical military counteractions in succession,” it said.

Under normal circumstances this is gag material for “Team America 2″ but Ed’s right about the significance of the North kicking South Koreans out of the Kaesong industrial complex. That shows greater seriousness of purpose than usual. Question: Is there any way to deter them short of cataclysmic war? The Pentagon’s sending missile defenses to Guam to show Kim that his chance of hitting U.S. territory is even lower than he thinks, but that’s not really deterrence. If Kim fires something off, it’ll be in the course of fully committing to war with South Korea. He’ll have nothing to lose at that point by taking an extra potshot at America. Typically I’d assume that the way to rein in North Korea is to put pressure on China, but Chinese pressure on NK and Kim’s resulting insecurity probably contributed to the recent escalation. China won’t double down for fear of what Kim might do next. And if Japan and South Korea try to make them double down by declaring that they’ll go nuclear, that might spook Kim into an invasion of the South that he otherwise wouldn’t undertake.

At a minimum, you’d think that the saber-rattling of the last few weeks would put an end to negotiations with NK once and for all, but that could have the same “nothing left to lose” effect on the North Korean leadership’s war plans as regional proliferation would. What now except paying the danegeld again once they ask for it? Is there any sort of preemptive attack (short of a comprehensive nuclear one, which would never happen) that might take out North Korean artillery, at least, before it can do major damage to Seoul? I’m guessing no, and even if there was that wouldn’t stop a North Korean invasion of the South. What’s the game plan now, coach?

Update: Another X factor: What if Kim’s lost control of the military?

There have been defections of small units of North Korean soldiers to China – soldiers who were subsequently turned around and sent back to North Korea, says retired Brig. Gen. Russell Howard, former commander of the 1st Special Forces Group, which has an Asia Focus.

This may seem like a positive development, but it is a problem because it means that Kim may feel the need to reassert his control over the military, by beating the war drum and trying to get his troops to rally around it. The more he needs their support, the harder he might beat the drum.

That assumes that this is all for show. If Kim himself or his handlers fear that the military’s at risk of falling apart, whether through defections, deterioriating materiel, or for other reasons, then they may conclude that they have to attack South Korea now before they lose the capability altogether. And then there’s this:

The concern is that as a favored, privileged son, perhaps he doesn’t realize the seriousness of his actions. “This kid who they have as a leader now is perhaps starting to believe his own press,” Howard says.

“I was fairly certain that his father was rational – or at least had people around him that wouldn’t let him carry out these threats. His grandfather played it to the hilt successfully,” he adds. “I just don’t know with this young Kim.”

He’s young, quite possibly stupid, and also quite possibly drunk on the compulsory adulation he’s getting. All bets are off.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2

Well, Japan does have that hollowed out volcano with the fake steel lake that was used to snatch U.S. and Russian space capsules back in the sixties. They could easily use that to build some of them there nukies. My father and my uncles used to say long ago that the only good Jap… /

HiJack on April 3, 2013 at 8:44 PM

LOL. You have to have a really bad japanese make-up kit to infiltrate that secret facility……

dddave on April 3, 2013 at 9:03 PM

When you take a position, you just dig in, don’t you? You throw up that ‘We’ve got 10 times the nuclear arsenal they do’. When your statement is refuted–or at least its absolute certainty is thrown in doubt, then you come back with, ‘Oh yeah? Well, we’ve still got them almost doubled’.

Yes, according to some guy’s estimate based on what he read on a couple blogs there is a non-zero chance we might only have them doubled.

It doesn’t matter that ‘we’ve still got them almost doubled.’ Concede the point: we don’t know with any certainty how many nukes the Chinese have.

Conceded. So?

Given the sorry state of our intelligence community, we will probably never know until the birds are in the air.

Assuming they put them in the air of course.

Further, the number of nukes in the Chinese arsenal is not a primary consideration here, not in this situation. MAD doesn’t apply because we’re dealing with a spectrum, ranging from cyberwar to conventional to nuclear and all points in-between.

MAD could still apply, depending on how all that played out.

My point is that there’s a strong chance the Chinese are the silent senior partner driving North Korean provocations.

Why? It doesn’t make any sense and it’s counter to what’s been known since the Wikileaks affair. See the link in my previous post.

The only major problem they face if war breaks out are an influx of North Korean refugees, which isn’t a problem at all if China is willing to let all or most of them freeze or starve.

That and the implosion of their economy and the general destruction that goes with being in a war against an enemy with carrier groups, stealth bombers and whatever else we’ve got that we’ve not told the world about yet.

You also keep claiming the Chinese wouldn’t involve themselves in a regional conflict for economic reasons, because they would lose hold over the US debt they own, etc. As others have pointed out, wars are often irrational, fought for reasons completely at odds with national self-interest.

troyriser_gopftw on April 3, 2013 at 8:47 PM

And based off those Wikileaks cables the Chinese appear to be fairly rational. Communists, but still interested in self-preservation.

alchemist19 on April 3, 2013 at 9:05 PM

•North Korean army: We have final approval to launch nuclear strikes on the U.S.

Moe, Larry, Curly,
and Shep, have spoken!

“Let’s Roll”

On Watch on April 3, 2013 at 9:08 PM

We have 10 extremely well trained Carrier Battle Goups (includes Destroyers/Frigates/Cruisers and Supply ships). Each Carrier has approximately 80 aircraft. We have 15 Amphibious Assualt Carriers each with approximately 24 aircraft. The Chinese have one newly commissioned still undergoing sea trials. We are the ONLY nation that can project MASSIVE naval power anywhere in the world…….at anytime. We did not lose the firt two years of WW2 to the Japanese. Our Aircraft Carriers decimated the Japanese Carriers at the Battle of Midway six months after Pearl Harbor and we never looked back.

dddave on April 3, 2013 at 8:38 PM

Oh MY GOD!

Look, we are not going to sail EVERY carrier, because we have fleets for Atlantic/Pacific/Middle East. Some are in downtime or drydock for refurbishment.

We have been drawing down our fleet strength for a long while, more than 7 years ago we went from “2 major wars at the same time” to 1 major conflict and peacekeeping in another. We know now that carriers in a Nuke war are a joke, once spotted by satellite the enemy EMP’s the carrier group followed closely by the kill shot. Our supply lines are too far to support any land based operations at all, we would end up getting chewed on the way there, at the site and the long crawl back.

As to history, Midway was merely the turning point, we did not pin Japan for two years more, with battles over minor Islands costing 2 or three thousand casualties each of Americans, Australians, and other allies; when Mr. and Mrs. America are used to a war where the the entire war has that many casualties.

Further, unless we want the White Guilt that goes with millions of deaths from lobbing nukes from the far side of the Pacific to support a foreign people we should avoid nuking back till we know for sure what is going on, and that knowledge may never come. This will be a non-occupational conflict as neither side can project power, other than full strength weapons, across the divide. We have done this before and it is caustic to National pride. Imagine 1,000 Vietnams. Even if NK started it by nuking an American city, the Chinese would say, “He is crazy! We told him no launches but we couldn’t stop him!” Kim would be dead by then, conveniently unable to reply and China would say she was merely defending herself.

Another thing, you assume, like the WWII that we would have all our ship yards untouched, ready to resupply. That the shipyards of San Fransisco and LA and Seattle are all up and running, not smoking hulks after an “exchange” of Heavy Metal.

Lastly, morale. I love this land, but the liberals have done everything to suck the love out of Patriotism and Honor in this Country. I just don’t believe that we would institute a Draft and that millions of kids are going to sign up to go save the Japanese or get revenge for Azlan, especially when the dead are going to be piled to the sky and blame is “fuzzy”.

Bulletchaser on April 3, 2013 at 9:12 PM

I wonder if the North Korean Army would turn around and go back to kick their leaders out once they find out how well the South Koreans have been living? After they grab as much food as they can carry of course.

Russ86 on April 3, 2013 at 9:15 PM

We know now that carriers in a Nuke war are a joke, once spotted by satellite the enemy EMP’s the carrier group followed closely by the kill shot.
Bulletchaser on April 3, 2013 at 9:12 PM

How do you know this?

The America sinkex is still classified. The only things about it that have snuk out is that carriers are tougher than their critics claim.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:18 PM

•North Korean army: We have final approval to launch nuclear strikes on the U.S.

And they have final approval from whom, exactly? Methinks China. Covert approval, anyway…

However, the places that they have claimed to target, how are they going to get to them, exactly? I mean, really…they’re going to reach DC, how? Not that I have any objections to LA (sorry, can’t stand liberal Hollywood types), DC, and that liberal hotbed Austin being wiped out, that if they are going to hit DC, that the Obamas be there, and most of Congress….

They don’t have long range nukes, that we know of, anyway…does China? That’s the only way I see that they can hit their intended targets.

sage0925 on April 3, 2013 at 9:21 PM

Kim was schooled outside of North Korea and may be one of the few that know how quickly his country would be utterly destroyed. If he were to attack first he would also have no allies to bale him out, war with the US is the last thing China would want.

Ellis on April 3, 2013 at 9:24 PM

How do you know this?

The America sinkex is still classified. The only things about it that have snuk out is that carriers are tougher than their critics claim.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:18 PM

Don’t waste your time arguing with him. His original statement cosisted of “conventional warfare”. He threw in the “nuke” argument after my comment. He knows little of naval capabilities and projected power. We also have considerable airpower in place in S.Korea, Japan, Okinawa, Guam and even Alaska.

dddave on April 3, 2013 at 9:28 PM

dddave on April 3, 2013 at 9:28 PM

I know, but geeze, some of the stuff spouted…

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:30 PM

Dude, we have more carrier battle groups than the rest of the world combined.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 8:53 PM

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/may/4/newsid_2504000/2504155.stm

also this: Start paying attention at the 1 minute mark

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zzs-OvfG8tE

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 9:33 PM

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 9:33 PM

Many of the deficiencies in the type 42 design were known before her sinking. many more were discovered afterwards.

Was there a point there, or just a snark?

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:39 PM

How do you know this?

The America sinkex is still classified. The only things about it that have snuk out is that carriers are tougher than their critics claim.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:18 PM

We used to war game this in the Navy. You got two major options, one is called “Pie in the Face” strategy where you bust a nuke say six miles away from a carrier group, outside their main reaction zone. The EMP and other effects cloud radar, radio and (obviously) blind and/or freak the crews as well as completely disrupt underwater sonar for hours. Following close behind that one (say two mins at mach 2) is the second nuke which detonates right in their lap. Survival is VERY low. A conventional application can be seen in the book “Red Storm Rising” where regular anti-ship missiles are used instead of nukes.

The second strategy is called Under the Umbrella where a high level nuke is set off at high altitude, followed a second (usually ballisticlly launched, with high aspect entry) at just above your position. Most radar is not designed to point nearly straight up and a nuke at 40,000 feet means you are still nearly inside its fireball. Like the other scenario, the first scrambles or disrupts everything (say blows all the planes off the deck, kills the crews and blinds half the pilots in the air and the second comes in say 2 mins later and the entire task force is in the zone of total destruction. Can you imagine this happening to say, the Nimitz and her force plus 30,000 or 40,000 marines in Troop transports on their way to defend South Korea?

Bulletchaser on April 3, 2013 at 9:41 PM

The Nork’s Dear Leader is testing out Dear Leader, who the bad guys in the world consider weak. This is probably the first of many such tests the bad guys have planned for our Dear Leader in his second term. It will get harder when they start coordinating their tests.

farsighted on April 3, 2013 at 9:43 PM

Don’t waste your time arguing with him. His original statement cosisted of “conventional warfare”. He threw in the “nuke” argument after my comment. He knows little of naval capabilities and projected power. We also have considerable airpower in place in S.Korea, Japan, Okinawa, Guam and even Alaska.

dddave on April 3, 2013 at 9:28 PM

Exactly, and China doesn’t have comparable forward bases from which to project conventional forces against American targets.

Not that it matters because they’re in no rush to fight us.

(Reposting because it got stuck at the bottom of the last page and it’s one of the most interesting articles about world affairs you’re likely to read all year)

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/nov/29/wikileaks-cables-china-reunified-korea

alchemist19 on April 3, 2013 at 9:44 PM

(Reposting because it got stuck at the bottom of the last page and it’s one of the most interesting articles about world affairs you’re likely to read all year)

alchemist19 on April 3, 2013 at 9:44 PM

Not as interesting as these two from this morning:

Why the Norks chose those targets.

What will happen when NoKo collapses.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:49 PM

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:39 PM

how much flight deck do you have to destroy to make it useless?

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 9:55 PM

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 9:55 PM

Not very much at all.

Still waiting for a point.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:58 PM

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:58 PM

The point is you’re being intentionally obtuse. We are not nearly as invulnerable as you think we are.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:01 PM

exit question:

what if NK brought a bomb over the southern border? I don’t think Kim mentions Austin for no reason.

I mean you have people climbing over the fence infront of Senators would it be too hard for NK or any country that hates us to ship an bomb up from the South? Nope. What if all the moving of the missles is nothing more then an effort to keep our eyes on the big bad guys whiloe the little moles come up fromt he South.

Not saying its a big possibility but since our gov has abducated its duty to secure our borders in the sotuh is a possibility and a route I would use if I were going to attack the USA.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:02 PM

Not very much at all.

Still waiting for a point.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:58 PM

keep waiting.
you just answered it.
they’re obsolete, despite O’bozo’s sarc.

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 10:04 PM

Well “Battleship” is on.

I’m gonna go watch Might MO do in a group that mastered interstellar travel

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 10:05 PM

I mean you have people climbing over the fence infront of Senators would it be too hard for NK or any country that hates us to ship an bomb up from the South? Nope. What if all the moving of the missles is nothing more then an effort to keep our eyes on the big bad guys whiloe the little moles come up fromt he South.

Not saying its a big possibility but since our gov has abducated its duty to secure our borders in the sotuh is a possibility and a route I would use if I were going to attack the USA.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:02 PM

Hell, I wasn’t even going to mention saboteurs or the collapse of our EMT and FEMA readiness operations on the basis of a small nuke. If Katrina is any indication, the cities would be hell on earth. Plus I left out bacteriological warfare. All a NK agent would have to do a drop a canister into a major city water supply or release it in a Naval port city like San Diego and the panic would be…well…all consuming.

Bulletchaser on April 3, 2013 at 10:09 PM

soldiers who were subsequently turned around and sent back to North Korea,

sounds like China is a very big ALLY of North Korea. those waiting for China to settle North Korea better check the military border buildup. It looks like China is forward basing thier military for a jump off. once china is in position the North attacks the SOuth. And china comes in with reinforcements. Acouple nukes in key cites within the USa and the USa will be hamstrung to react unless they go nuclear and who are they going to blast? if its not a missle how do you determine which country sent the nuke in the suitcase?

within a month the china/NK allaince will have sway over the entrie far east and at that point thanks to outsource and jus tin time inventory there isn’t a damn thing the USa can do about it. If at the same time Iran moves in the middle east and Russia moves back into eastern eurpoe and central asia then what?

our enemies are circling and our leade ris playing golf.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:10 PM

The point is you’re being intentionally obtuse. We are not nearly as invulnerable as you think we are.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:01 PM

And you are a Nork Henny Penny.

they’re obsolete, despite O’bozo’s sarc.

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 10:04 PM

Yeah, ever since the airdales said so, over sixty years ago.

Why won’t they go away?

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:10 PM

Well “Battleship” is on.

I’m gonna go watch Might MO do in a group that mastered interstellar travel

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 10:05 PM

pretty good movie for what it is.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:11 PM

Plus I left out bacteriological warfare. All a NK agent would have to do a drop a canister into a major city water supply or release it in a Naval port city like San Diego and the panic would be…well…all consuming.

Bulletchaser on April 3, 2013 at 10:09 PM

yeap and NK has plenty of bio and chem weapons. Our country has been secured because of our nukes. Obama has begun to disarm all of those. Once they go. We are helpless.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:13 PM

We are helpless.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:13 PM

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . ,.-‘”. . . . . . . . . .“~.,
. . . . . . . .. . . . . .,.-”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .“-.,
. . . . .. . . . . . ..,/. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”:,
. . . . . . . .. .,?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .\,
. . . . . . . . . /. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,}
. . . . . . . . ./. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,:`^`.}
. . . . . . . ./. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,:”. . . ./
. . . . . . .?. . . __. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :`. . . ./
. . . . . . . /__.(. . .“~-,_. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,:`. . . .. ./
. . . . . . /(_. . ”~,_. . . ..“~,_. . . . . . . . . .,:`. . . . _/
. . . .. .{.._$;_. . .”=,_. . . .“-,_. . . ,.-~-,}, .~”; /. .. .}
. . .. . .((. . .*~_. . . .”=-._. . .“;,,./`. . /” . . . ./. .. ../
. . . .. . .\`~,. . ..“~.,. . . . . . . . . ..`. . .}. . . . . . ../
. . . . . .(. ..`=-,,. . . .`. . . . . . . . . . . ..(. . . ;_,,-”
. . . . . ../.`~,. . ..`-.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..\. . /\
. . . . . . \`~.*-,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..|,./…..\,__
,,_. . . . . }.>-._\. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .|. . . . . . ..`=~-,
. .. `=~-,_\_. . . `\,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .\
. . . . . . . . . .`=~-,,.\,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .\
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . `:,, . . . . . . . . . . . . . `\. . . . . . ..__
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .`=-,. . . . . . . . . .,%`>–

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:15 PM

alchemist19 on April 3, 2013 at 9:44 PM

that’s dated form 2010. Its three years later and China hasn’t abandoned NK yet. thus the cable was a hoax.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:16 PM

And you are a Nork Henny Penny.

You’re the inspiration for “Dum-Dum” pops.

It’s going to take a military version of 9/11 before you wannabe Captain Americas are told to sit down and shut up like the fools you are.

Well “Battleship” is on.

I’m gonna go watch Might MO do in a group that mastered interstellar travel

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 10:05 PM

I have to wonder if all the “durr hurr its such a stewpid moovie” lines from the “press” and blog reviewers weren’t largely due to the fact that it portrays the US military in such a positive light.

A lot of the ‘reviewers’ seem to be complaining about a lack of deep meaningful content…as if they were capable of appreciating such content in the first place. Let alone recognizing deep content without being so obvious it reached Narm levels.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:17 PM

I’m gonna go watch Might MO do in a group that mastered interstellar travel

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 10:05 PM

FYI, the novelization explains that aspect a bit better. Without spoiling too much, we got a BIG lucky break with a combination of officer-level incompetence by ET, the John Paul Jones in the right place at just the right time, and the Mighty Mo being barely capable of one last outing.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:19 PM

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:15 PM

Once they go. We are helpless.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:13 PM

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:23 PM

FYI, the novelization explains that aspect a bit better. Without spoiling too much, we got a BIG lucky break with a combination of officer-level incompetence by ET, the John Paul Jones in the right place at just the right time, and the Mighty Mo being barely capable of one last outing.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:19 PM

and the Capt playing the game battleship when he was young.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:24 PM

Not as interesting as these two from this morning:

Why the Norks chose those targets.

What will happen when NoKo collapses.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 9:49 PM

The targeting of Austin is interesting but I think the Wikileaks story passes the smell test a lot better than the idea China would try to annex North Korea. What does China want with North Korea in the first place? If the situation there is so bad that people will try to escape into China to get out of it then it doesn’t sound like anything the Chinese want any part of. Better to let the South Koreans clean up the mess. It’s possible that if North Korea falls apart on its own that China may cross the border, not start shooting but at least get a foothold in Korean territory so it can negotiate from a position of strength. Work something like allowing South Korea to reunify the country but the US military has to decamp from the peninsula.

alchemist19 on April 3, 2013 at 10:26 PM

A lot of the ‘reviewers’ seem to be complaining about a lack of deep meaningful content…as if they were capable of appreciating such content in the first place. Let alone recognizing deep content without being so obvious it reached Narm levels.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:17 PM

just finished watching the remake of Red Dawn and thought the same thing. It was a decnet movie for what it was. Just like battleship. Acting was good not great, plots were a little thin, action and special effects were good on both. but listening to the reviews you would think they were 1 star movies.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:27 PM

that’s dated form 2010. Its three years later and China hasn’t abandoned NK yet. thus the cable was a hoax.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:16 PM

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . ,.-‘”. . . . . . . . . .“~.,
. . . . . . . .. . . . . .,.-”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .“-.,
. . . . .. . . . . . ..,/. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ”:,
. . . . . . . .. .,?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .\,
. . . . . . . . . /. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,}
. . . . . . . . ./. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,:`^`.}
. . . . . . . ./. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,:”. . . ./
. . . . . . .?. . . __. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :`. . . ./
. . . . . . . /__.(. . .“~-,_. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,:`. . . .. ./
. . . . . . /(_. . ”~,_. . . ..“~,_. . . . . . . . . .,:`. . . . _/
. . . .. .{.._$;_. . .”=,_. . . .“-,_. . . ,.-~-,}, .~”; /. .. .}
. . .. . .((. . .*~_. . . .”=-._. . .“;,,./`. . /” . . . ./. .. ../
. . . .. . .\`~,. . ..“~.,. . . . . . . . . ..`. . .}. . . . . . ../
. . . . . .(. ..`=-,,. . . .`. . . . . . . . . . . ..(. . . ;_,,-”
. . . . . ../.`~,. . ..`-.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..\. . /\
. . . . . . \`~.*-,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..|,./…..\,__
,,_. . . . . }.>-._\. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .|. . . . . . ..`=~-,
. .. `=~-,_\_. . . `\,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .\
. . . . . . . . . .`=~-,,.\,. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .\
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . `:,, . . . . . . . . . . . . . `\. . . . . . ..__
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .`=-,. . . . . . . . . .,%`>–

alchemist19 on April 3, 2013 at 10:27 PM

The targeting of Austin is interesting but I think the Wikileaks story passes the smell test a lot better than the idea China would try to annex North Korea. What does China want with North Korea in the first place?

Buffer zone to democratic SK and a perpetual thorn in our side. We can’t invade first because they’ve got 20+ million young men with no bride…and that’s just for starters. We’d get Zerg-rushed off the God-blessed peninsula barring a massive ChiCom screwup.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:28 PM

alchemist19 on April 3, 2013 at 10:26 PM

China doesn’t want to annex North Korea.

But they want North Korea taken over by the south even less.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:28 PM

just finished watching the remake of Red Dawn and thought the same thing. It was a decnet movie for what it was. Just like battleship. Acting was good not great, plots were a little thin, action and special effects were good on both. but listening to the reviews you would think they were 1 star movies.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:27 PM

Yeah, you get exactly what I mean. Ridiculously over-the-top objections by bloggers and ‘professional’ reviewers who, when you look at their history, have the IQ of a grapefruit and the cultural appreciation of a teenager raised on South Park.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:32 PM

Why do we assume they intend to use missiles? Perhaps they will backpack a couple of small nuclear weapons across the Mexican border and bring them into Houston and Dallas?

We know far less about their bioweapons stocks.

slickwillie2001 on April 3, 2013 at 6:08 PM

Given the level of sophistication required for a functional backpack nuke is almost certainly far greater than the North Koreans’ capability, I’d expect a seaborne strike at a port…assuming the North Koreans want to detonate a functional nuke on American soil.

If, however, they want to do a dirty radiological (or bioweapon) bomb, backpacking in the components is far easier.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 10:33 PM

We are not nearly as invulnerable as you think we are.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:01 PM

the majority of our conventional military strength rests on GPS. China has teasted KSM….sucessfully.

Our manufacturing base is gone. Our companies use just in time inventory any disruption in the supply chain will cause massive ramifications in our economy.

Our country is broke and simply printing money if the dollar can’t buy supplies from the world we will need months to years to be able to make the needed parts. ammo is on an 8m motnh backorde rthanks to the gungrabbers and Obama. If the army needs ammo will it be able to get it? Not sure what suppliers the military uses for ammo. We have several months supply I’m sure but after that? who knows.

Our military is spread around the world from Europe, the middle east, africa, Asia. Taking out the communications will make the big amry several small ones fighting their own little wars.

Our internet has been shown to be very weak to hackers and our finacial system rests on the internet as well as our communications….

We are weak in many key areas and only the threat of massive nukes flying if we are attacked have protected us to this point.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:35 PM

Beijing tests ‘killer’ missile

From:The Australian
March 25, 201312:00AM

CHINA has successfully tested a “carrier killer” missile designed to change the military balance of power in Asia by deterring US aircraft carrier operations up to 2000km from Chinese shores.

The feat will have pleased the leaders of China and Russia, who have been discussing military co-operation at their first summit since a change of power in Beijing.

hmmmm.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:36 PM

who, when you look at their history, have the IQ of a grapefruit and the cultural appreciation of a teenager raised on South Park.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 10:32 PM

and if we dug a little deeper I would say they have a strong dislike for a strong USa and/or the military

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:39 PM

updated 1/4/2013 8:05:08 PM ET

China may be gearing up to perform a controversial anti-satellite test this month, perhaps in the next week or two, some experts say.

For several months, rumors have been circulating within the United States defense and intelligence communities that a Chinese anti-satellite test is imminent, says Gregory Kulacki of the Union of Concerned Scientists. It could even be conducted on Jan. 11, the date on which China performed ASAT operations in both 2007 and 2010.

“Given these high-level administration concerns, and past Chinese practice, there seems to be a strong possibility China will conduct an ASAT test within the next few weeks,” Kulacki wrote in a blog post Jan. 4. “What kind of test and what the target might be is unclear.”
.
In the 2007 test, China destroyed one of its own defunct weather satellites at an altitude of 530 miles, spawning about 3,000 new pieces of space junk. The 2010 operation used similar technology to take out an object that was not in orbit.

The upcoming ASAT test — if China is indeed planning one — may not necessarily be so destructive, Kulacki says. [ Top 10 Space Weapons ]

“There are different types of technologies that can be used as ASAT weapons, and a satellite may not be destroyed at all,” he wrote. “The planned test could be of the same technology as the 2007 and 2010 tests but in a missile defense or flyby mode, or a test of technology that doesn’t destroy a satellite.”

Some U.S. officials suspect China may want to go higher than it did in either 2007 or 2010, targeting an object 12,000 miles or so above Earth’s surface. This ability to reach medium-Earth orbit (MEO) could theoretically put the constellation of U.S. Global Positioning System navigational satellites at risk.

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/50368590/ns/technology_and_science-space/t/china-gearing-anti-satellite-test-experts-say/

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:41 PM

China doesn’t want to annex North Korea.

But they want North Korea taken over by the south even less.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:28 PM

That calculus might be changing. If/once reunification happens, the South Koreans will be quite busy rebuilding the North for decades, and the US will likely depart the Korean peninsula long before the North is integrated into a unified Korea.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 10:44 PM

That calculus might be changing. If/once reunification happens, the South Koreans will be quite busy rebuilding the North for decades, and the US will likely depart the Korean peninsula long before the North is integrated into a unified Korea.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 10:44 PM

I highly doubt Japan will sit back and do nothing if that happens.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:51 PM

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 10:44 PM

Could be, but then China would have a capitalist Asian neighbor.

And her population is more aware of the world than it ever has been.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:54 PM

I highly doubt Japan will sit back and do nothing if that happens.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 10:51 PM

The Japanese air force could do some damage, but if memory serves, they don’t exactly have a lot of amphibious hardware.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:00 PM

The Japanese air force could do some damage, but if memory serves, they don’t exactly have a lot of amphibious hardware.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:00 PM

No they don’t, and it wouldn’t do them a whole lot of good if they did IIRC.

MelonCollie on April 3, 2013 at 11:01 PM

Could be, but then China would have a capitalist Asian neighbor.

And her population is more aware of the world than it ever has been.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:54 PM

While true, the follow-up question is whether Korea would be more likely to take vengeance against China or Japan.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:03 PM

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:00 PM

Time for an update. Their Hyuga class is a carrier in all but name. They are pushing for the F-35b harder than the US Marine Corps.

The next class of “helicopter destroyer” will be even bigger.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 11:05 PM

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:03 PM

Flip a coin, it could go either way. In some ways, China has been trying harder than Japan to mend those fences.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 11:06 PM

Perhaps Big Sis can loan Zero one of her super secret drones to put one in KJU’s window.

Seriously, the thing that really worries me is if this is a red herring feint with follow up flanking actions from some of our other enemies – the dog pack strategy if you will. That would be really bad right now. One way or the other, I hope someone has this little prick in some crosshairs.

ghostwalker1 on April 3, 2013 at 11:07 PM

The Japanese air force could do some damage, but if memory serves, they don’t exactly have a lot of amphibious hardware.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:00 PM

one of the reasons the USA is in Korea is so Japan doesn’t have a reason to rearm. Japan has a small military because the USA protects it and its interests in the area. the sea between Japan and Korea is a a major interest to the nation of japan. It was one of the reason they invaded in 1910. Japan will not sit back and allow a enemy like China to control that real estate. We don’t really want a rearmed japan in the area.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Could be, but then China would have a capitalist Asian neighbor.

And her population is more aware of the world than it ever has been.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:54 PM

One more thought related to an item from above – with elements of the North Korean military looking to get out into China, North Korea’s value as a buffer might be coming to an end.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:07 PM

North Korea’s value as a buffer might be coming to an end.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Change “North Korea” with “the Kim’s” and we will be on the same page.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 11:09 PM

Time for an update. Their Hyuga class is a carrier in all but name. They are pushing for the F-35b harder than the US Marine Corps.

The next class of “helicopter destroyer” will be even bigger.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 11:05 PM

Noted, though that would merely extend the air arm out some. There’s still the matter of getting troops onto the beach.

Now if they Hyuga or the follow-on class were more along the lines of the Wasp class than a light carrier, that would make things a bit more “interesting”.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:12 PM

Movie’s over.

Yeah, ever since the airdales said so, over sixty years ago.

Why won’t they go away?

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 10:10 PM

Because they come in handy beating up on 3rd world countries.

How many the Russians (the guys with all the MIRVs) got?

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 11:12 PM

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:12 PM

They call theirs the Osumi class.

WryTrvllr on April 3, 2013 at 11:12 PM

You still haven’t made a relevant point.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 11:18 PM

one of the reasons the USA is in Korea is so Japan doesn’t have a reason to rearm. Japan has a small military because the USA protects it and its interests in the area. the sea between Japan and Korea is a a major interest to the nation of japan. It was one of the reason they invaded in 1910. Japan will not sit back and allow a enemy like China to control that real estate. We don’t really want a rearmed japan in the area.

unseen on April 3, 2013 at 11:07 PM

Point of order – outside of aircraft carriers (see cozmo’s comment for the partial/potential resumption of that capability), amphibious ships and ballistic missiles, the Japanese are pretty much re-armed. The inability to get large numbers of troops to a foreign shore (which I don’t see being addressed) would tend to limit the ability of the Japanese to retake the Korean peninsula to the point of making it impossible even if they went up against Korea instead of the PLA, but they stand a fair shot of keeping the Sea of Japan open.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:20 PM

The inability to get large numbers of troops to a foreign shore (which I don’t see being addressed)

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:20 PM

Osumi class mentioned above.

Don’t let the LST designation fool you.

The Japanese are constitutionally prohibited from possessing aircraft carriers. Even with the creative descriptions, the Osumi’s got all kinds of panties in a wad back in the 90′s.

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 11:32 PM

cozmo on April 3, 2013 at 11:32 PM

Which gives the Japanese a modest sealift capability, more suited for a counteroffensive against invasion than an offensive.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:57 PM

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:57 PM

Baby steps, though they have more sealift capability than any other Asian nation. Arguably the most powerful surface force in the Pacific after the US.

Another thing to remember is the financial backing by the government to Japanese flagged vessels. Lots of low draft ferries with bow doors and RO-RO ships.

The British would not have been able to take back the Falklands without requisitioning commercial ships they helped finance.

cozmo on April 4, 2013 at 12:03 AM

He’s young, quite possibly stupid, and also quite possibly drunk on the compulsory adulation he’s getting. All bets are off.

Are you talking about Kim or Obama?

DRayRaven on April 4, 2013 at 7:49 AM

cozmo on April 4, 2013 at 12:03 AM

There’s a big difference between a blue-water navy (which is what the Japanese built) and a ‘gator navy (mostly dominated by the US, though the South Koreans, the ChiComs and Singapore have larger amphibious navies than Japan).

Of course, if the Japanese government appropriates the private shipping flying the Japanese flag, then all that’s needed is a not-destroyed dock or two. In addition to the British example you pointed out, there’s the National Defense Reserve Fleet here.

Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 7:52 AM

Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 7:52 AM

All true. Though I think you meant littoral instead of gator/amphibious.

Those ships will make a difference, at the beginning. You are also assuming South Korea will be lost very early on. And that the whole thing will last long enough for the reserve force to even be mentioned.

cozmo on April 4, 2013 at 8:41 AM

If our media were doing its job then people would understand what we are seeing in pieces and starts is a rapid mobilization of troops, equipment and supplies for a coming war. China is mobilizing on its border with NK, The NK is mobilizing its missles and troops, the USA, Japan and SK are mobilizing their troops. Not saying a war will happen but all the major powers are acting as if it will. You do not position forces in this way if war was unlikely. China would not be massing on the border of North Korea for no reason. The USA would not be sending heavy assets into theater if the leaders did not think they were needed.

As russia put it:

Unilateral actions are being taken around North Korea which manifest themselves in an escalation of military activity,” Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said. …

“….Thanks to their rhetoric, the North Koreans in fact play into the hands of Americans, giving them a great excuse to ramp up missile defense capabilities in the Asia-Pacific region,” the military source said.

http://www.naharnet.com/stories/77527-russia-fears-out-of-control-n-korea-situation/print

Washington is this week deploying a dozen F/A-18 fighters to the Philippines, the first time it has sent so many of the aircraft there, to take part in annual military drills with a close security ally amid rising tension in the Asia-Pacific region.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/04/04/us-philippines-usa-military-idUSBRE9330BC20130404

So you have china pushing outward for control of the area using North Korea among other things to talk tough, the Americans are building up troops and assets in the region, pushing china to back their ally more and reinforce the border region with NK, all of which is being played in the backdrop of a push by China to exert control over the area via the Philippines, Japan and Tawain.

In sum china is making the move the West has or should have been fearing since entry into WTO. China is set to show the world they are a super power and what better way then to embarass the USA and gain defacto control over the entire region. this Washington can’t allow. So you have two major powers ona collision course and both sides know it. the question is what will Obama do about it.

unseen on April 4, 2013 at 11:01 AM

Russia Military Exercises 2013: Large-Scale, Surprise Drills In Black Sea Region Announced

Reuters | Posted: 03/28/2013 7:45 am EDT | Updated: 03/28/2013 10:01 am EDT

hmmmm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/28/russia-military-exercises-2013_n_2970184.html

unseen on April 4, 2013 at 11:19 AM

Those ships will make a difference, at the beginning. You are also assuming South Korea will be lost very early on. And that the whole thing will last long enough for the reserve force to even be mentioned.

cozmo on April 4, 2013 at 8:41 AM

I actually don’t anticipate a second Korean War lasting too long, at least as long as the PLA/PLAAF doesn’t get involved. The North Koreans in 1950 had superior armor, and the ChiComs at the end of 1950 had far superior numbers; the North Koreans today have neither. They might make it to southern Seoul (or a similar distance along the eastern coast) before they get stopped by both the lack of logistics and total air dominance by the South Koreans, and then it will be a race back through what’s left of Seoul on the way to the Yalu River.

Of course, if the PLA/PLAAF does provide cover and forces, that changes everything.

Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 11:22 AM

Japan starts buildup of its military

By Martin Fackler / New York Times News Service
Published: April 03. 2013 4:00AM PST

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service file phot

A Japanese soldier walks away from an Osprey aircraft during a U.S. Marines and Japanese military force training exercise last month called Iron Fist, at Camp Pendleton, Calif. The mock invasion, part of a joint training held annually, broke new ground as leaders of their Japanese elite unit for the first time helped plan the war game, taking on a role closer to equals than to junior partners.

SAN CLEMENTE ISLAND, Calif. — The Japanese soldiers in camouflage face paint and full combat gear were dropped by U.S. helicopters onto this treeless, hilly island, and moved quickly to recapture it from an imaginary invader. To secure their victory, they called on a nearby U.S. warship to pound the “enemy” with gunfire that exploded in deafening thunderclaps.

Perhaps the most notable feature of the war games in February, called Iron Fist, was the baldness of their unspoken warning. There is only one country that Japan fears would stage an assault on one of its islands: China.

Iron Fist is one of the latest signs that Japan’s anxiety about China’s insistent claims over disputed islands as well as North Korea’s escalating nuclear threats are pushing Japanese leaders to shift further away from the nation’s postwar pacifism

http://www.bendbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130403/NEWS0107/304030348/0/FRONTPAGE&template=print

unseen on April 4, 2013 at 11:28 AM

Of course, if the PLA/PLAAF does provide cover and forces, that changes everything.

Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 11:22 AM

not sure if a treat means anything to the chicoms but they are under treaty to help North Korea. And if they don’t russia is there with open arms to provide supplies and assisntance. Korea is a stratgic piece of land in the region Russia would love another port in the pacific.

unseen on April 4, 2013 at 11:30 AM

This is a very serious rethink of Japan’s security,” said Satoshi Morimoto, defense minister in the last administration who was an architect of changes in Japan’s defense policy.

Until recently, a simulated battle with Chinese forces would have been unthinkably provocative for Japan, which renounced the right to wage war — or even to possess a military — after its march across Asia in World War II resulted in crushing defeat. The purely defensive forces created in 1954 are still constrained from acting in too offensive a manner: Last year, a smaller mock assault by Japanese and U.S. forces on an island near Okinawa was canceled because of local opposition.

The recalculation could have broad implications for the power balance in the region, angering China and likely giving the United States a more involved partner in its pivot to Asia to offset China’s extended reach.

unseen on April 4, 2013 at 11:31 AM

I actually don’t anticipate a second Korean War lasting too long, at least as long as the PLA/PLAAF doesn’t get involved.
Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 11:22 AM

Exactly, which makes most of the previous discussing about amphibs moot. There certainly won’t be another Inchon.

And, as with the 1950 war, much will depend on the Yalu.

cozmo on April 4, 2013 at 11:44 AM

I actually don’t anticipate a second Korean War lasting too long, at least as long as the PLA/PLAAF doesn’t get involved.
Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 11:22 AM

Exactly, which makes most of the previous discussing about amphibs moot. There certainly won’t be another Inchon.

And, as with the 1950 war, much will depend on the Yalu.

cozmo on April 4, 2013 at 11:44 AM

Let’s just hope that after the REB’s purges, there are enough good admirals and generals left to lead.

slickwillie2001 on April 4, 2013 at 11:49 AM

not sure if a treat means anything to the chicoms but they are under treaty to help North Korea. And if they don’t russia is there with open arms to provide supplies and assisntance. Korea is a stratgic piece of land in the region Russia would love another port in the pacific.

unseen on April 4, 2013 at 11:30 AM

The potential ChiCom intervention is the proverbial $64,000 question. I know I said it on another thread, but I’ll repeat it here – if the South Koreans do a pre-emptive strike, or if the ChiComs signed off on a North Korean invasion much like the Soviets (and to a lesser extent, Red China) did in 1950, they’re all in. If, however, Krazy Kim the Third goes off half-cocked, I honestly don’t see much of an upside for China to intervene. A unified Korea would be busy for the next few decades rebuilding the North and Seoul, and with Korea unified, the UN (and thus US) presence on the peninsula would come to an end.

As for the Russians getting another port by intervening on behalf of North Korea, first there would need to be another port to get, and they’re sorely lacking north of the 38th parallel.

Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 11:56 AM

unseen on April 4, 2013 at 11:28 AM

Very interesting. The one thing the Japanese LSDs have in abundance is deck space for those Ospreys, which would somewhat offet the limited non-helicopter aspect of their amphibious capabilities.

Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 12:07 PM

Exactly, which makes most of the previous discussing about amphibs moot. There certainly won’t be another Inchon.

And, as with the 1950 war, much will depend on the Yalu.

cozmo on April 4, 2013 at 11:44 AM

The amphib operation discussion was, if my eyes serve, more on what the Japanese might do in case of a second Korean War, and specificially if the Chinese get involved.

I wouldn’t be surprised if the South Koreans/US Marines do an amphib landing, though it would likely be north of Inchon. After all, attacking in the enemy’s rear is a sound military strategy.

Everything depends on the Yalu.

Steve Eggleston on April 4, 2013 at 12:17 PM

dddave on April 3, 2013 at 6:33 PM

Dude, they “forbade” themselves – no one else did. The only reason it would have to be secret is to keep it from their OWN citizenry.

PJ Emeritus on April 4, 2013 at 12:28 PM

Dude, they “forbade” themselves – no one else did. The only reason it would have to be secret is to keep it from their OWN citizenry.

PJ Emeritus on April 4, 2013 at 12:28 PM

Japan’s non-nuclear weapons policy is a policy popularly articulated as the Three Non-Nuclear Principles of non-possession, non-production, and non-introduction of nuclear weapons imposed by the United States after Japan’s defeat in World War II.

dddave on April 4, 2013 at 12:46 PM

dddave on April 3, 2013 at 7:02 PM

Um, nope.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/japan/nuke.htm

You’re spreading FUD.

PJ Emeritus on April 4, 2013 at 12:52 PM

And Bulletchaser, the US 7th Fleet is THE strongest naval force afloat – guess where it’s based?

PJ Emeritus on April 4, 2013 at 12:58 PM

Is there any sort of preemptive attack (short of a comprehensive nuclear one, which would never happen) that might take out North Korean artillery, at least, before it can do major damage to Seoul?

The short answer is: No… Not even close.

BadBrad on April 4, 2013 at 4:38 PM

Kim Un: “So, general, is this what I should sign?”
General: “Yes, sign this”
Kim Un: “OK”
General to the party apparatchik news org’s: “Good news we now have been authorized to bomb the USA”

jake49 on April 4, 2013 at 6:39 PM

Maybe Kim just wants to be a Voodoo Chile.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NfOHjeI-Bns

claudius on April 4, 2013 at 8:42 PM

The number of factual statements in this thread is somewhere south of 10. Some of you need to quit equating the video games you play with knowledge of military affairs. Google can be your friend but only if you are interested in facts.

HiJack on April 3, 2013 at 8:44 PM

You are an imbecile. Remind me of the guy who used to post at HA that said because his grandfather fought against the Japanese in WW2 and was almost killed gave him the moral authority to use slurs/terms he knew were offensive.

Bradky on April 7, 2013 at 9:32 AM

The number of factual statements in this thread is somewhere south of 10. Some of you need to quit equating the video games you play with knowledge of military affairs. Google can be your friend but only if you are interested in facts.

The number or factual statements you have ever made on this site is in the single digits, the same as your IQ. And you wouldn’t know a fact if it came up and shouted “I’m a fact!” in your ear; it would just echo amusingly in your empty head.

MelonCollie on April 7, 2013 at 1:05 PM

MelonCollie on April 7, 2013 at 1:05 PM

Someday you will come close to but not quite attain the level of intelligence I have. In the meantime you can continue with your insults lobbed across the internet – safe in your little cocoon…

Bradky on April 7, 2013 at 2:47 PM

Comment pages: 1 2