North Korea bars South Korean workers from joint industrial facility

posted at 8:01 am on April 3, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

Analysts have had understandable trouble taking the inflamed rhetoric from Pyongyang seriously for the last few weeks. It has a cyclical quality to it, and the recent election of Park Geun-hye in South Korea gave the Kim regime in the DPRK a perfect excuse to vent its spleen. Even the missile tests and the threats to the US come out of the Kim playbook of the past several years, they have pointed out. The real indication of a serious breach, they predicted, would be a sudden stop to cooperation at the one joint venture both countries share, an industrial center in the North Korean city of Kaesong. Closing access to the facility would be a huge red flag, an indication that Pyongyang wants to burn its bridges.

Today, the red flag is out:

North Korea on Wednesday barred South Korean workers from entering a jointly run factory park just over the heavily armed border in the North in the latest sign that Pyongyang’s warlike stance toward South Korea and the United States is moving from words to action. …

The Kaesong industrial park started producing goods in 2004 and has been an unusual point of cooperation in an otherwise hostile relationship between the Koreas, whose three-year war ended in 1953 with an armistice. Its continued operation even through past episodes of high tension has reassured foreign multinationals that another Korean War is unlikely and their investments in prosperous dynamic South Korea are safe.

“The Kaesong factory park has been the last stronghold of detente between the Koreas,” said Hong Soon-jik, a North Korea researcher at the Seoul-based Hyundai Research Institute.

He said tension between the Koreas could escalate further over Kaesong because Seoul may react with its own punitive response and Pyongyang will then hit back with another move.

This is also not unprecedented. Kim Jong-un’s father suspended cooperation at Kaesong for three days in 2009 after the annual joint military exercises between South Korea and the US. That also was accompanied by a test of their long-range missile capability and a nuclear test, both of which failed. In this case, though, the DPRK is allowing South Korean workers trapped in the North to return home, unlike in 2009.

This follows a more serious threat to reopen the Yongbyon nuclear reactor, which had been a key for producing the material for North Korea’s nuclear weapons. CBS reports that one nuclear non-proliferation analyst says not to expect an immediate restart, but the next few weeks will be critical in understanding Pyongyang’s real intentions:

North Korea said Tuesday that it will quickly begin “readjusting and restarting” the facilities at its main Yongbyon nuclear complex, including the plutonium reactor and a uranium enrichment plant. Both could produce fuel for nuclear weapons. Analysts saw the statement as Pyongyang’s latest attempt to extract U.S. concessions by raising fears of war.

Nuclear non-proliferation expert Mark Fitzpatrick, of the IISS, told CBSNews.com that Tuesday’s warning from Pyongyang was merely “an announcement of an intention.”

“It would take them at least 6 months to get it going again,” said Fitzpatrick. “The coming weeks will probably provide some evidence as to whether they’re following through on it.”

“There’s a long way to go between a stated intention and actually being able to pull it off,” said State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland.

True — but that’s what the US initially said about North Korea’s attempts to build a nuclear-weapons program in the first place. It’s not going to be that difficult for them to rebuild it, if they haven’t already done so more clandestinely.

CNN has a report from the ground at Paju, just outside the checkpoint for the Kaesong facility for the South. While workers are being allowed to leave, over 800 South Koreans are still in the facility. They also point out that the facility makes a lot of hard cash for Pyongyang, which means this is akin to cutting off their noses to spite their faces. But the Kim regime “only has a few cards in the deck” to play, the reporter explains, “and this is one of them.” Left unsaid: the Kim regime is a few cards short of a full deck, but perhaps CNN just assumes everyone knows that.


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Not to worry, John Kerry is on his way to the peninsula. What could possibly go wrong?

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:02 AM

But the Kim regime “only has a few cards in the deck” to play, the reporter explains, “and this is one of them.” Left unsaid: the Kim regime is a few cards short of a full deck, but perhaps CNN just assumes everyone knows that.

What I’m having a hard time seeing is just how you give lil Kim a face-saving way to back down from his brinksmanship.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:06 AM

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:02 AM

He might forget his lucky hat ?

gh on April 3, 2013 at 8:06 AM

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:06 AM

$$$

gh on April 3, 2013 at 8:07 AM

Happy 50th Ed

Enjoy the day :)

cmsinaz on April 3, 2013 at 8:08 AM

Seriously – why do we care about the NoKors ?

They’re just trash talking because they know Omarxist won’t do crap about them.

The only thing the U.S. can do is to legitimize an otherwise third world sh!thole, where the gangster leaders need to cry for attention and relevance- while their people starve.

Let the countries in THEIR region deal with them. Tired of hearing about them.

FlaMurph on April 3, 2013 at 8:11 AM

$$$

gh on April 3, 2013 at 8:07 AM

I think that might have been lil Kim’s original intent but when you shut down a joint venture that makes billions for both Koreas, it isn’t all about the money. To a certain extent I think this is Kim Jong Un’s way of convincing crusty old North Korean generals that their 27-year-old leader isn’t a cream puff. Despots can’t have their military leaders deciding that the army can do a better job of running things.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:12 AM

Let the countries in THEIR region deal with them. Tired of hearing about them.

FlaMurph on April 3, 2013 at 8:11 AM

Well, those US troops on the border are definitely a concern of ours – unless, of course, you believe (as the Administration does) that dead US personnel aren’t really our business.

Whether or not they should be there isn’t the point anymore. They are there, and should Li’l Kim push the button, they’ll be the first line of defense.

Do we hang them out to dry and salute the coffins as they come home, or do we defend and protect them with the full might of the US government/military depending on how the North plays it?

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:16 AM

“Send them an Ipod of my greatest speeches translated into North Korean”, said Bark.

Bishop on April 3, 2013 at 8:21 AM

Is the “Reset Button” too late or did Shillary take that with her?

Electrongod on April 3, 2013 at 8:23 AM

Not to worry, John Kerry is on his way to the peninsula. What could possibly go wrong?

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:02 AM

What could go wrong? He’s bringing Joe Biden with him. :o

TKindred on April 3, 2013 at 8:25 AM

Do we hang them out to dry and salute the coffins as they come home, or do we defend and protect them with the full might of the US government/military depending on how the North plays it?

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:16 AM

Let’s not forget either that South Korea is part of the G-20. Chuck Hagel or John Kerry could go before Congress after we hang those troops out to dry and ask “at this point what difference does it make” but the fact of the matter is that disruption of the South Korean economy would make a difference. There is also the fact that the United States has made a commitment to South Korean defense.

But as I posted above, I’m seeing less and less ways that lil Kim can back down without losing face. But hey, what 27-year-old acts rashly?

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:25 AM

What could go wrong? He’s bringing Joe Biden with him. :o

TKindred on April 3, 2013 at 8:25 AM

Hey, if Joe can go to the Vatican and manage to get through the installation of a new Pope without getting all American Catholics excommunicated, then maybe he can be of use in this conflict.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:27 AM

Seriously – why do we care about the NoKors ?

They’re just trash talking because they know Omarxist won’t do crap about them.

The only thing the U.S. can do is to legitimize an otherwise third world sh!thole, where the gangster leaders need to cry for attention and relevance- while their people starve.

Let the countries in THEIR region deal with them. Tired of hearing about them.

FlaMurph on April 3, 2013 at 8:11 AM

Because of the 8th US Army, USAF personnel at Osan AFB, and US Navy personnel stationed at Chin hae… That, and that whole UN Armistice thingy…

/signed/ retired Navy guy who trained a lot in the ROK (South Korea)

Khun Joe on April 3, 2013 at 8:32 AM

There is also the fact that the United States has made a commitment to South Korean defense.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:25 AM

We’ve also made commitments to Israel’s defense, but I’m not so sure we’d back them up either.

I don’t know if we’d rush to engage the North, but I do know I’d hate to be a soldier in the South right now, wondering/hoping we will if it comes to it.

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:34 AM

… and the Marines… I should have mentioned the Marines…

My apologies, and Semper Fi!

Khun Joe on April 3, 2013 at 8:35 AM

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:12 AM

Things are much more complicated than that. I listened to the entire hour here on Monday:

http://csis.org/event/what-should-obama-do-north-korea

The moderator, Victor Cha, really knows NK and has a new book out.

This is another good source (no opinions, just reporting):
http://nkleadershipwatch.wordpress.com/kim-jong-un/

In a nutshell, Jang (KJ-Un’s uncle, married to KJ-Il’s sister) was ousted in 2003 by the generals and rehabilitated in 2007. In 2011, when Un was elevated things were quite unclear but since then Jang and Un have replaced the 4 top generals and are running the show.

Jang was the one who came up with NK’s “business model”, counterfeiting etc. I expect that both $$$ is and retaining the loyalty of the army are the only things that matter. That means being a tough guy but not letting things get out of hand. However, the Kims are in it for themselves so letting things get out of hand is not so important … won’t bother the US mainland much but Seoul might suffer some damage.

Much of this is on Wikipedia but the sources above may be more credible.

gh on April 3, 2013 at 8:35 AM

“Send them an Ipod of my greatest speeches translated into North Korean”, said Bark.

Bishop on April 3, 2013 at 8:21 AM

The problem here isn’t translating something into “North Korean” The problem is finding the electricty in North Korea to charge the Ipod!

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:37 AM

This will probably put me in the minority, but I think the US needs to stand nose to nose with NoKo.

I’m as war weary, and as Obama leary, as anyone, but NoKo and the Kim family need a stark reminder that the US has not only the ability, but willingness to end their regime.

Robert_Paulson on April 3, 2013 at 8:37 AM

I don’t know if we’d rush to engage the North, but I do know I’d hate to be a soldier in the South right now, wondering/hoping we will if it comes to it.

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:34 AM

Good point about or stated commitments. At the end of the day we still have an administration not particularly interested in living up to these promises.

One thing to point out about our troops in South Korea. It isn’t just the soldier. South Korea is an area where the troops are able to bring their families. So…. if something happens that soldier will have more to worry about than the mission.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:42 AM

I’m as war weary, and as Obama leary, as anyone, but NoKo and the Kim family need a stark reminder that the US has not only the ability, but willingness to end their regime.

Robert_Paulson on April 3, 2013 at 8:37 AM

I’d prefer not to go to war again, but if that’s what it takes to defend our people and our allies, then that’s what it takes.

A reminder may be just the think Li’l Kim needs.

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:43 AM

South Korea is an area where the troops are able to bring their families. So…. if something happens that soldier will have more to worry about than the mission.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:42 AM

Fact. I just hope Barky’s got someone near him with the balls to point that out. I’d accept shaming him into doing the right thing.

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:45 AM

This will probably put me in the minority, but I think the US needs to stand nose to nose with NoKo.

I’m as war weary, and as Obama leary, as anyone, but NoKo and the Kim family need a stark reminder that the US has not only the ability, but willingness to end their regime.

Robert_Paulson on April 3, 2013 at 8:37 AM

You need to explain what “nose to nose” means. Do we put troops on the border? Do we send troops over the border? Do we conduct a bombing campaign? Blockade?

Bottom line is that anything the United States does is provocative more than it is a reminder. But to the bigger point, I’m not sure this administration has the willingness for regime change. The rat-eared devil is a proven coward.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:45 AM

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:45 AM

Not to mention the chinese.

The most likely scenario is that Jong-Un will shell something much smaller than Seoul. Last two escalations stopped there due to threats and concessions. However, it’s not obvious this will happen this time.

Rat-ears may very well decide to raise the ante. He’s already done a B2 flyover, so it wouldn’t be a big deal to him to do it again. It’s just a big drone to him. It really depends how much he’s talking with the chinese.

gh on April 3, 2013 at 8:52 AM

Bottom line is that anything the United States does is provocative more than it is a reminder.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:45 AM

I actually disagree with this. Reminding Kim that we’ll defend ourselves and our interests isn’t provocation. Doing nothing, however, is. If Kim escalates and we retain our normal posture, the message sent is that we don’t care or aren’t interested.

Letting him know we’re paying attentin is honestly the best way to prevent a hot war from breaking out.

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:58 AM

I keep on seeing these videos of Li’l Kim gesticulating wildly while surrounded by all those generals in the funny hats. And I’m thinking, “Won’t one of you pop a cap in this toad’s head and free your country from perpetual servitude?”

CaptFlood on April 3, 2013 at 9:05 AM

Reminding Kim that we’ll defend ourselves and our interests isn’t provocation. Doing nothing, however, is. If Kim escalates and we retain our normal posture, the message sent is that we don’t care or aren’t interested.

Letting him know we’re paying attentin is honestly the best way to prevent a hot war from breaking out.

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 8:58 AM

The post I was responding to talked about going nose-to-nose with North Korea. That IS provocative.

I agree that doing nothing in light of escalation isn’t a good option. But it should be a measured response. Were I in charge, I’d probably be considering deploying the George Washington battle group out of Japan into closer proximity of the Korean peninsula. I’d probably think about issuing some sort of travel advisory for Americans traveling or living in South Korea. But, of course, with this administration they are first going to try and solve the crisis “diplomatically” by sending John Kerry over to talk.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 9:12 AM

gh on April 3, 2013 at 8:52 AM

It would be a real shame if one of them were to .. er … crash-land in China – IYKWIM.

OldEnglish on April 3, 2013 at 9:17 AM

I keep on seeing these videos of Li’l Kim gesticulating wildly while surrounded by all those generals in the funny hats. And I’m thinking, “Won’t one of you pop a cap in this toad’s head and free your country from perpetual servitude?”

CaptFlood on April 3, 2013 at 9:05 AM

Hey, Hitler and Stalin were surrounded by generals in funny hats too and nobody “popped a cap” in their heads. Fact of the matter is that those generals and their families are living the good life and have much to lose if they cross their beloved leader.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 9:17 AM

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 9:17 AM

They tried to do Hitler twice.

The cult of personality in NK is much stronger. Apparently the Kims really are loved and the regime’s propaganda really is believed. Either that, or everyone is truly terrified. No-one seems to know what the truth is and that is probably true of the North Korean military as well. However, everyone would like to live, at least until tomorrow so no-one really wants to risk it. The military, also has a vested interest (as you pointed out) in the status quo.

gh on April 3, 2013 at 9:28 AM

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 9:12 AM

Agreed. Nothing says ‘don’t eff with us’ like parking a carrier off the coast.

Washington Nearsider on April 3, 2013 at 9:29 AM

You need to explain what “nose to nose” means. Do we put troops on the border? Do we send troops over the border? Do we conduct a bombing campaign? Blockade?

Bottom line is that anything the United States does is provocative more than it is a reminder. But to the bigger point, I’m not sure this administration has the willingness for regime change. The rat-eared devil is a proven coward.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 8:45 AM

Kim isn’t the only wild card here. When North Korea bombed a South Korean island a few years ago, there was a pretty loud outcry from the South Korean public for its leaders to stand-up to North Korea. A tougher US posture may be necessary to keep things from getting out-of-hand.

What could the US actually do that would send the requisite message, but wouldn’t destabilize things? Well, a blockade is the traditional tactic for that purpose, and it may work here. Perhaps, some sort of joint US-SK military maneuvers that send a transparent signal of war mobilization. I’m not a military expert so I can’t talk specific tactics, but I think that Kim Jong Un might be more able to back down once he’s shown he can provoke a serious US response.

Robert_Paulson on April 3, 2013 at 9:37 AM

Nice hats, Generals. Heh.

ncjetsfan on April 3, 2013 at 9:44 AM

I think that Kim Jong Un might be more able to back down once he’s shown he can provoke a serious US response.

Robert_Paulson on April 3, 2013 at 9:37 AM

Why? Because the US taking things seriously would give lil Kim some serious street cred with the North Korean military leaders?

IMO, a blockade might be a good choice. Apparently one of the big reasons why North Korea was so upset over the joint military exercise is that it interefered with the fishing grounds off South Korea that North Korea generally uses this time of year to feed its people. In other words, it isn’t just about the exercises it is also messing with North Korea’s food supply. Nothing helps a despot see reason more than a starving populace.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 9:47 AM

This will probably put me in the minority, but I think the US needs to stand nose to nose with NoKo.

I’m as war weary, and as Obama leary, as anyone, but NoKo and the Kim family need a stark reminder that the US has not only the ability, but willingness to end their regime.

Robert_Paulson on April 3, 2013 at 8:37 AM

You are not a minority on this at all. I have no problem with the U.S. having a strong military and defending our national interests. Korea is in our national interest because it is going to be player in a possible future conflict with China, if China goes “National Socialist” on us, which is where they seem to be headed at times.

South Korea is a modern, civilized (key word), and industrialized nation. They have a large and sophisticated military. In other words they are a smart people and their country counts. They by themselves could beat the NK, but we should help them to do it, but the number one reason our troops are in SK is as a warning to China. We must never forget NK exist today because of China. NK is their creation and I get a sense that the Chinese military (not the Chinese people) want to keep NK around no matter what crazy thing they do. Plus NK has made all sort of threats to the U.S. and other U.S. allies and we must never forget that.

What I am against, and I think a lot of conservatives/libertarians etc. are is the endless and pointless adventurers in the Islamic world. They are not civilized, not industrialized, and in general are basket cases. There is never going to be a stable and peaceful Islamic World, because of Islam. That is not the case with SK and Japan. The most important strategic asset in this world is intelligent people.

Lets take Japan as an example. It has made lots of stupid mistakes, like getting into a war with the U.S., but there is no denying that they transformed their world from a feudal society to an industrial one in less than 50 years after the arrival of the Americans in the 1850s. The also rebuilt their country into an economic power after WWII, yes with some American help, after they were bombed to rubble. So twice in a 160 year period they remade themselves into a power. Afghanistan on the other hand has been a backward hell hole for 800 to 900 years….heck maybe more. I am convinced if the entire Islamic joined together they would not have the technological ability and people needed to equal a SK or Japan.

The Neo-cons don’t seem to understand that SK / Germany / Japan are not Afghanistan / Iraq / Syria. It is much easier to establish a democratic form of government and to rebuild a nation if they are already educated, industrial, and are not saddled with an ancient theocracy that controls every aspect of life that is against the modern world.

You can be a hawk without being a Neo-Con. You just have to pick and choose your battles. Neo-Cons want to fight and rebuild the entire world, I don’t, I just want to help those places that matter strategically and who are also reasonably good and functional allies.

William Eaton on April 3, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Why? Because the US taking things seriously would give lil Kim some serious street cred with the North Korean military leaders?

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 9:47 AM

Yeah, that’s basically it. That’s assuming that what we’re dealing with here is a function of Kim’s courtier politics and not something else sub-rational. The generals understand the implications of actual shooting war with the US as much as anyone.

Robert_Paulson on April 3, 2013 at 10:11 AM

The question is how many North Korean shells will land on Seoul before the South Korean counterbattery fire and subsequent invasion shuts that down?

Off-topic, happy birthday Ed. Do try to get all the candles blown out before the house burns down :-)

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:29 AM

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:29 AM

If it happens. Too many.

No-one wants that. Without the rat-eared wonder, it would be the end of the NK regime … even he would have to do something but it might take a few weeks for Valerie to decide what.

gh on April 3, 2013 at 11:44 AM

What could go wrong? He’s bringing Joe Biden with him. :o

TKindred on April 3, 2013 at 8:25 AM

I bet he has his medals also. He’ll toss them across the DMZ in protest.

chemman on April 3, 2013 at 11:50 AM

gh on April 3, 2013 at 11:44 AM

I’d submit that even with Team SCOAMF not exactly helping, a major North Korean cross-border attack would be the end of the North Korean regime. Ill-equipped land-based armies with absolutely no air cover, like the North Korean army, don’t last long on the modern battlefield, and the South Koreans have a rather-well-trained combined-arms army complete with air cover.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:54 AM

Hey, Hitler and Stalin were surrounded by generals in funny hats too and nobody “popped a cap” in their heads. Fact of the matter is that those generals and their families are living the good life and have much to lose if they cross their beloved leader.

Happy Nomad on April 3, 2013 at 9:17 AM

Beyond what gh said, flag officers in Stalin’s Soviet Union weren’t around Moscow long enough to conduct a revolution thanks to non-stop purges and then World War II coming home to Mudder Russia.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 12:03 PM

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 11:54 AM

The NK regime is a creation of China and the latest (see Victor Cha above) is that they still want them there. This is not Iraq. Even Dubya would not be going in guns blazing. This is where rat-ears foreign policy blundering will really hurt. War with NK is a no-brainer but war with China is a big F’n deal (h/t to J Biden).

gh on April 3, 2013 at 12:08 PM

gh on April 3, 2013 at 12:08 PM

Ward, really, useful only as a buffer against a “militarized” South Korea. It is a given that if South Korea pre-emptively strikes at North Korea, or if the ChiComs give a go-ahead to Krazy Kim to start shelling Seoul, the ChiComs will intervene on North Korea’s behalf.

However, if a South Korean strike (even up to and including an invasion) is a response to an “unauthorized” shelling of Seoul, I’m not entirely convinced that the ChiComs will lift a finger to save North Korea. In that case, Beijing may well calculate that after reunification, whatever military goals a united Korea might have would be aimed more toward the east and Japan than toward China. After all, the last occupying force in Korea (for roughly 45 years) was Japan.

Steve Eggleston on April 3, 2013 at 1:40 PM

What is worrying is the template of commentary coming out of the administration. It matches every other screw up.

1) pretend that there is no problem at all.
2) make excuses for, and try to explain away, any hostile moves by the opponent.
3) the pooch ends up walking bow-legged.
4) the administration asks, “in the end, what does it matter?”.

Given Chinese and Nork pressure on Japan also, if I had my druthers, in addition to the Aegis/SM-III-capable [that is the operational seaborne ballistic missile defense system on 2 dozen or so US cruisers and destroyers that has been tested against missiles AND has shot down a test satellite] destroyer John McCain off of South Korea; I would send one or more Aegis/SM-III-capable vessels to Japan. I would have them take part in public joint exercises with one or more of their 4 Japanese equivalent ships; JS Kongo, JS Chokai, JS Myoko, and JS Kirishima emphasizing that we would defend Japan from Nork missile attacks. An expressed willingness to defend an ally we are committed to, away from the theater of the conflict, is not aggressive or provocative.

The movements of the George Washington CVBG, of course, could be part of any political response.

In the event that a more kinetic option, short of a direct attack on the Nork infrastructure or military, is decided upon; there is one staring us in the face.

North Korea still holds the USS Pueblo [AGER-2] which was attacked and seized on the high seas by the North Koreans in 1968 and left unsupported and abandoned by then-President Lyndon Johnson [Democrat presidents are at least consistent with American military lives]. While we eventually grovelled and got the crew back, the Norks still hold the ship as a monument to their forcing the Americans to back down. It is a museum now permanently moored in the Botong River [recently moved from an anchorage in the Taedong River] in Pyongyang. http://tinyurl.com/br4dp52

She is also still a commissioned warship of the US Navy. She belongs to us. We have her location mapped out to the inch, with a lot better than commercial satellite images.

We have precision, standoff, munitions not dreamed of in 1968. If the Pueblo just happened to blow up at zero-dark 30 some night; it would be an unmistakeable message. And she is our own ship, which we can do as we please with.

Subotai Bahadur on April 3, 2013 at 1:45 PM

So, North Korea starts something, China backs them militarily and we… unilaterally cancel all US debt held by China. That possibility has to give the Chinese pause.

PersonFromPorlock on April 3, 2013 at 2:23 PM

So, North Korea starts something, China backs them militarily and we… unilaterally cancel all US debt held by China. That possibility has to give the Chinese pause.

PersonFromPorlock on April 3, 2013 at 2:23 PM

Right. Keep dreaming.

DarkCurrent on April 3, 2013 at 3:38 PM

Not that Jong-Un would be rational, but I think we just start sending him nice postcards and pamphlets with pictures like Saddam Hussein, Osama Bin Laden, Manuel Noriega, Muammar Gaddafi, and Hosni Mubarak. Then we print 4 little words on these, “It’s what we do.”

InWyoVeritas on April 3, 2013 at 10:21 PM