A blessed Easter to all our readers

posted at 12:01 am on March 31, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus’ body. Very early on the first day of the week, just after sunrise, they were on their way to the tomb and they asked each other, “Who will roll the stone away from the entrance of the tomb?”

But when they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had been rolled away.  As they entered the tomb, they saw a young man dressed in a white robe sitting on the right side, and they were alarmed.

“Don’t be alarmed,” he said. “You are looking for Jesus the Nazarene, who was crucified. He has risen! He is not here. See the place where they laid him. But go, tell his disciples and Peter, ‘He is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him, just as he told you.’” — Mark 16 1-7

For this year’s Easter post, I’d like to go back to the homily at last year’s papal Mass.  In his 2012 Urbi et Orbi address, now-Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI proclaimed Surrexit Christus, spes mea (Christ, my hope, has risen), and then explained how each of us in the Christian faith relives the experience of Mary Magdalene on this day:

Every Christian relives the experience of Mary Magdalene. It involves an encounter which changes our lives: the encounter with a unique Man who lets us experience all God’s goodness and truth, who frees us from evil not in a superficial and fleeting way, but sets us free radically, heals us completely and restores our dignity. This is why Mary Magdalene calls Jesus “my hope”: he was the one who allowed her to be reborn, who gave her a new future, a life of goodness and freedom from evil. “Christ my hope” means that all my yearnings for goodness find in him a real possibility of fulfilment: with him I can hope for a life that is good, full and eternal, for God himself has drawn near to us, even sharing our humanity.

But Mary Magdalene, like the other disciples, was to see Jesus rejected by the leaders of the people, arrested, scourged, condemned to death and crucified. It must have been unbearable to see Goodness in person subjected to human malice, truth derided by falsehood, mercy abused by vengeance. With Jesus’ death, the hope of all those who had put their trust in him seemed doomed. But that faith never completely failed: especially in the heart of the Virgin Mary, Jesus’ Mother, its flame burned even in the dark of night. In this world, hope can not avoid confronting the harshness of evil. It is not thwarted by the wall of death alone, but even more by the barbs of envy and pride, falsehood and violence. Jesus passed through this mortal mesh in order to open a path to the kingdom of life. For a moment Jesus seemed vanquished: darkness had invaded the land, the silence of God was complete, hope a seemingly empty word.

And lo, on the dawn of the day after the Sabbath, the tomb is found empty. Jesus then shows himself to Mary Magdalene, to the other women, to his disciples. Faith is born anew, more alive and strong than ever, now invincible since it is based on a decisive experience: “Death with life contended: combat strangely ended! Life’s own champion, slain, now lives to reign”. The signs of the resurrection testify to the victory of life over death, love over hatred, mercy over vengeance: “The tomb the living did enclose, I saw Christ’s glory as he rose! The angels there attesting, shroud with grave-clothes resting”.

Dear brothers and sisters! If Jesus is risen, then – and only then – has something truly new happened, something that changes the state of humanity and the world. Then he, Jesus, is someone in whom we can put absolute trust; we can put our trust not only in his message but in Jesus himself, for the Risen One does not belong to the past, but is present today, alive. Christ is hope and comfort in a particular way for those Christian communities suffering most for their faith on account of discrimination and persecution. And he is present as a force of hope through his Church, which is close to all human situations of suffering and injustice.

May you have a blessed Easter rejoicing in the presence of Jesus Christ in your lives.  I’m including one of my favorite hymns, which our church will sing today and throughout this season until Pentecost.  Unfortunately, I do not have a recording of our parish’s choir singing Tom Conry’s “Roll Away the Stone,” but this version is not bad at all:

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Wishing people have a nice day is not stupid, having a holiday that celebrates the death of another individual is what is stupid.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 12:01 PM

And this is why we consider the current crop of God-hating trolls to be a breed of a lower sort than what we are used to.

Easter doesn’t celebrate the DEATH of Jesus. Good Friday celebrates his sacrifice on the cross, but Easter celebrates that Jesus is ALIVE!

You have the holiday completely 180 degrees backwards, and yet you consider us “stupid”. I prefer the sacrifice and redemption of amazing grace to the “wisdom” of worldly fools…

(Psalm 14)

dominigan on March 31, 2013 at 4:38 PM

much thanks, Ed. A Happy Easter to the Morrissey family as well and all my friends here at HotAir.

He is risen, indeed!

ted c on March 31, 2013 at 4:47 PM

I don’t attack only Christianity steebo. I speak out against ALL religion.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 11:44 AM

You should find a nice Mosque to protest in front of.

JellyToast on March 31, 2013 at 4:49 PM

SauerKraut ain’t too bright.

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 5:03 PM

Wishing people have a nice day is not stupid, having a holiday that celebrates the death of another individual is what is stupid.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 12:01 PM

.
Easter doesn’t celebrate the DEATH of Jesus. Good Friday celebrates his sacrifice on the cross, but Easter celebrates that Jesus is ALIVE!

dominigan on March 31, 2013 at 4:38 PM

.
Thanks dominigan, I missed this one from earlier.

The celebration is about an empty tomb, and the re-enabling of a direct personal relationship with the living God.
Adam and Eve were created in a direct personal relationship with God, but Adam threw it away. This decision on the part of Adam, affected ALL of his subsequent posterity.
The “last Adam” (Jesus) made a way back to God , again.
If this ‘Way’ is not willfully chosen, then you will (by default) spend forever with Satan and his host of fallen angels in the place specifically prepared for them.

listens2glenn on March 31, 2013 at 5:42 PM

One might think that it can’t get any worse than the intense, relentless pain illuminated so forcefully in The Passion of The Christ, but I believe the worst part of Jesus’ suffering was the rejection:

–by the civil government
–by the religious elite
–by his family (Jesus had half-brothers & -sisters, none of whom believed in him until after his resurrection)
–by the crowds that once followed him
–by his disciples (Judas betrayed him, Peter denied him, others ran away)
and, in my opinion, the worst thing anyone has ever suffered, Jesus’ own beloved Father turned his back on his beloved Son.

The Father had to forsake the Son when the sins of the world were dumped on him.

If you’ve seen Slumdog Millionaire, you’ll remember the scene in which the young protagonist falls into the cesspool and emerges covered in feces. I think that might begin to illustrate the revulsion that the perfectly holy Lord Jesus must have felt when our sins were put upon him.

Thank you for leaving the glory of Heaven to suffer for us, Lord.

Have a happy yet pensive Resurrection Day.

itsnotaboutme on March 31, 2013 at 6:03 PM

Have you renounced your worship of O’bama and renounced your membership in the Church of the Democrat Party? No.

Del Dolemonte on March 31, 2013 at 3:57 PM

No I haven’t, because I never worshiped him and I’ve never voted (D). I voted for Romney/Ryan and donated $750 to his campaign. Now go find all the $750 donations to his campaign (it’s on the record) and one of those is me. Before that I voted McCain, Bush, Bush again, Dole, Bush Sr, and then Reagan before that… I was too young any earlier than that.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 6:11 PM

How Do We Know That Jesus Rose From The Dead?

It’s quite logical to believe in the resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth:

1) Nineteen pagan Roman historians referred to him as a contemporary teacher, as did three non-Christian Jewish historians.

2) None of them refuted the fact that he was executed for his teaching.

3) His disciples taught that they saw him risen from the dead.

4) Most of those witnesses were put to death for this teaching.
Why would someone die for what they know is a lie?

5) If the Romans or the Jewish leaders had the body of a dead Jesus, they would have displayed it and stopped this “cult” from spreading “lies”.

itsnotaboutme on March 31, 2013 at 6:17 PM

It’s quite logical to believe in the resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth

itsnotaboutme on March 31, 2013 at 6:17 PM

No it’s not. It’s on par with the claims of Muslims who tell us Mohammed rode on a winged horse to Jerusalem.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 6:20 PM

Happy Easter from Dear Leader!

Examiner.com

Obama pastor attacks conservatives in Easter message with race card

While many Christians were celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ on Sunday, Barack Obama, his family, and everyone else attending St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. received a message that included an attack on conservatives, the Weekly Standard reported.

“It drives me crazy when the captains of the religious right are always calling us back … for blacks to be back in the back of the bus … for women to be back in the kitchen … for immigrants to be back on their side of the border,” said Dr. Luis Leon.

According to a tweet sent by Reuters’ Jeff Mason, the pastor also included a reference to gays in the closet.

Sounds like the good pastor had his own Reverend Wright Moment…

Del Dolemonte on March 31, 2013 at 6:23 PM

Sounds like the good pastor had his own Reverend Wright Moment…

Del Dolemonte on March 31, 2013 at 6:23 PM

That’s probably not a church, but a liberal club in religious clothing.

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 6:34 PM

Obama pastor attacks conservatives in Easter message with race card

While many Christians were celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ on Sunday, Barack Obama, his family, and everyone else attending St. John’s Episcopal Church in Washington, D.C. received a message that included an attack on conservatives, the Weekly Standard reported.

“It drives me crazy when the captains of the religious right are always calling us back … for blacks to be back in the back of the bus … for women to be back in the kitchen … for immigrants to be back on their side of the border,” said Dr. Luis Leon.

According to a tweet sent by Reuters’ Jeff Mason, the pastor also included a reference to gays in the closet.

Sounds like the good pastor had his own Reverend Wright Moment…

Del Dolemonte on March 31, 2013 at 6:23 PM

I’m sure Barry didn’t hear a word of that and its just a coincidence that he happens to gravitate towards preachers with that slant on things.

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 6:47 PM

I’ve never voted (D). I voted for Romney/Ryan and donated $750 to his campaign. Now go find all the $750 donations to his campaign (it’s on the record) and one of those is me. Before that I voted McCain, Bush, Bush again, Dole, Bush Sr, and then Reagan before that… I was too young any earlier than that.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 6:11 PM

Sure.
What did you like about those candidates that you voted for. What about their world view did you find that resonated with yours?
just curious.

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 6:50 PM

, I converted by listening to atheists talking to other theists and being an impartial judge of what was said…

Interesting.
What was it they said that “converted” you, that you did not know before? Did it transfer over to your political views as well? I ask because you claimed to be all for voting and supporting, with your cash, Republicans.
It seem odd that your history of voting repub runs from the present all the way back to pre voting age, but somewhere along the line you went atheist. Did that happen at a young age?

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 6:58 PM

I reserve the right to scoff at “good” deeds done for me that involve the killing of other people… ;-)

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 12:00 PM

So I assume you also don’t celebrate July 4th, right?

I mean, I never consented to the colonists killing all those Redcoats. Why should I celebrate all this death and destruction?

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 6:58 PM

No it’s not. It’s on par with the claims of Muslims who tell us Mohammed rode on a winged horse to Jerusalem.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 6:20 PM

Who says he didn’t?

SK, you’re not an atheist, you’re an anti-theist. I don’t know what happened to you, and I won’t pry, but it’s obvious you’re a bitter, angry person who hates God and those who believe in God.

I’m an ex-Jewish agnostic. I have no animus against religion, though.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 7:00 PM

***********Happy Easter *******************

And,Most Bless’d Day To All..

..To H/A Staff,Friends,Posters,and Visitors——————-:)

canopfor on March 31, 2013 at 7:00 PM

What did you like about those candidates that you voted for. What about their world view did you find that resonated with yours?
just curious.

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 6:50 PM

I liked the fact that they seemed to be for limited government and fiscal responsibility, that they were defenders of, and for, freedom and liberty. That they were on the right side of the debate on social and fiscal matters.

I of course have been disappointed with several of their decisions along the way, on certain matters, but as Lincoln said, (paraphrased of course) you can’t please all of the people all of the time.

At the time I voted for them all I was with their belief in Christianity, of course that’s now changed, but I’d still vote for them if given the choice again and the rest of what they stood for I was with, thus why I voted for them.

I could see from an early age that the utopia that liberals envisioned wasn’t, and wouldn’t be a good way to live/operate as a society. They’ve only gotten worse since then, but then the GOP hasn’t got much better either.

As the Democrats moved more to the left, I saw the religious right taking over the GOP just the same.

It used to be that our politicians were all middle of the road, D and R, but the political landscape has gotten much worse and now all we do is play gotcha games with each other and swing the thermostat up and down like me and my wife play with the AC/heat in the house.

Our country was so much better when our politics was more about compromise and getting along. Today’s political landscape is completely out of whack with the far left and far right both burning down the house.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:03 PM

canopfor on March 31, 2013 at 7:00 PM

Thanks, and back at ya. Happy Easter!

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 7:06 PM

I’m an ex-Jewish agnostic. I have no animus against religion, though.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 7:00 PM

You should, because beliefs have consequences.

It is NOT an exaggeration to say that if the city of New York were suddenly replaced by a ball of fire, some significant percentage of the American population would see a silver-lining in the subsequent mushroom cloud, as it would suggest to them that the best thing that is ever going to happen was about to happen: the return of Christ.

It should be blindingly obvious that beliefs of this sort will do little to help us create a durable future for ourselves – socially, economically, environmentally, or geopolitically.

The fact that nearly half of the American population apparently believes this, purely on the basis of religious dogma, SHOULD be considered a moral and intellectual emergency.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:06 PM

“It drives me crazy when the captains of the religious right are always calling us back … for blacks to be back in the back of the bus … for women to be back in the kitchen … for immigrants to be back on their side of the border,” said Dr. Luis Leon.

Strange. I’m for none of these things, and yet I am a member of the religious right.

One thing that Dr. Leon does not mention is the fact that Christianity is rooted in personal acts and personal faith — not in voting to have the Government steal the possessions of others for your own benefit. In that matter, the religious right — of any faith — is far closer to Jesus than he is.

One also wonders what Dr. Leon thinks about this “gay marriage” thing — he seems also to have missed that one in his diatribe against the religious right. Perhaps this is appropriate:

Luis León, pastor of Saint John’s Church, a historic Episcopal church just steps from the White House, was invited to take the role after the pastor originally selected withdrew.

Atlanta megachurch pastor Louie Giglio removed his name from the program after his years-old sermons against gay marriage came to light.

unclesmrgol on March 31, 2013 at 7:09 PM

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:03 PM

Thanks for the answer. I appreciate it.
I’m not quite sure how you see the the repubs as having been taken over by the religious right. It seems the opposite to me. It may be the effect of relative perception. If the candidates going back to Reagan did not seem to you, to be advocating ideas of this being a religious based country…but now they do, to the extent of being off-putting, what is that view based on? Back in the 80′s, this was a country of much more religious and traditional values, and the expression of these things were not shied away from or shunned.
Can you give me some examples of the “religious right” taking over the republican party?..I just don’t see a lot of religious expression coming from the politicians these days, let alone a lot more than in days of yore.

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 7:18 PM

You should, because beliefs have consequences.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:06 PM

Yes, they do; thousands of Catholic/other religious hospitals, charities and other various and sundry doers of good deeds. How many secular humanist hospitals are there, SK?

Beliefs *do* have consequences. Anti-theism has given us collectivism, the welfare state and the hedonism that characterizes our country’s current decline. So spare me your stories of the religious boogeyman. I’d gladly take a nation of Pat Robertsons over a nation of Lena Dunhams and Kermit Gosnells.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 7:19 PM

The fact that nearly half of the American population apparently believes this, purely on the basis of religious dogma, SHOULD be considered a moral and intellectual emergency.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:06 PM

Believes that New York will be incinerated in a ball of fire? You betcha I do.

unclesmrgol on March 31, 2013 at 7:25 PM

It is NOT an exaggeration to say that if the city of New York were suddenly replaced by a ball of fire, some significant percentage of the American population would see a silver-lining in the subsequent mushroom cloud, as it would suggest to them that the best thing that is ever going to happen was about to happen: the return of Christ.

It should be blindingly obvious that beliefs of this sort will do little to help us create a durable future for ourselves – socially, economically, environmentally, or geopolitically.

The fact that nearly half of the American population apparently believes this, purely on the basis of religious dogma, SHOULD be considered a moral and intellectual emergency.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:06 PM

But it is an exaggeration. And one that you just made up.
As you said…beliefs have consequences.
Your belief the so many people would like to see NY hit with a bomb, is the result of your belief system.
Do you actually believe such nonsense? If so, what is the basis of this belief?

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 7:25 PM

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 7:19 PM

+1000

unclesmrgol on March 31, 2013 at 7:26 PM

Ed.

Not sure if you’ve seen “The Life of Pi” or not, but its a must see.

ted c on March 31, 2013 at 7:28 PM

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 7:19 PM

Spot on.

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 7:28 PM

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 7:18 PM

Back in the 80′s this country was more religious yes, but it was kept separate from government and politics outside of an opening prayer or things like that at events like inaugurations, etc…. Today it is an overt and in your face, “I’m going to place these ten commandments in the courthouse and you’re going to “like” it because we’re a Christian nation, etc… And if you don’t like it, well you can just get out!”

We SHOULD be removing religious references from the public lands. I know that in some places these monuments to Christianity have been around for a long time, but they never should have been there in the first place. It is the fault of our grandparents, and grandparents grandparents, who placed these religious symbols and statues in the government buildings.

Our nation was founded on the idea of separation of church and state. The people who populated this country early on were about freedom of religion, and freedom FROM religions they didn’t agree with. We lived with the idea that we could agree to disagree and we wouldn’t go to blows over our differing interpretations of the bible, etc… One of the things we had to agree on was that the Federal government would not be in the business of regulating religions or choosing one over another.

Placing religious symbols in government buildings clearly gives people like the Muslims that our government was favoring Christianity over Islam, thus why they see this as a religious war.

I get that this country is dominated by Christians but it goes against the Constitution to erect religious symbols in govt buildings or on Federal land that give the impression of favoritism… The corollary is that you must then allow Muslims and other religions to do the same. You wouldn’t want that now would you? That’it’d get under your craw…

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Your belief the so many people would like to see NY hit with a bomb, is the result of your belief system.
Do you actually believe such nonsense? If so, what is the basis of this belief?

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 7:25 PM

I didn’t say they’d LIKE to see NYC hit with a bomb, but that they’d interpret the events to mean that their “savior” was coming to rapture them up into heaven to save them from the coming “storm”. That’s the silver lining, you understand the idiom right?

That they’d see that silver lining is what is abhorrent about religious belief.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:37 PM

Back in the 80′s this country was more religious yes, but it was kept separate from government and politics outside of an opening prayer or things like that at events like inaugurations, etc…

Today it is an overt and in your face, “I’m going to place these ten commandments in the courthouse and you’re going to “like” it because we’re a Christian nation, etc… And if you don’t like it, well you can just get out!”

That doesn’t seem like an accurate claim at all. The 10 Commandment were in the Supreme Court room long ago. Christmas trees were on the courtyards of all levels of government. As with Easter celebrations, etc.

We SHOULD be removing religious references from the public lands. I know that in some places these monuments to Christianity have been around for a long time, but they never should have been there in the first place. It is the fault of our grandparents, and grandparents grandparents, who placed these religious symbols and statues in the government buildings.

Fault?? Whats your problem with them?
Here’s the odd thing. Atheists claim to not care about religion…but it always seems to be on their minds. And it’s something that they always have their tit in a wringer over. Why is that? If you didn’t care…why do you all seem to care so much? Why do you think about it so much?
I personally don’t believe in space aliens or alien abductions, and becouse of this, thought beliefs never enter my mind. I don’t care if others do believe in them…and I would never think of weasting my time and money to go pis* on the celebrations of those who do. I wouldn’t make it a point to go to Roswell on their festival day and “Make a point”. Why? ..because I don’t believe in that.

Our nation was founded on the idea of separation of church and state. The people who populated this country early on were about freedom of religion, and freedom FROM religions they didn’t agree with.

The only thing in the establishment Clause about religion, is the the government can not establish an official religion, to the exclusion of other religions. “Congress shall make no law”.. Can you site the law that Congress passed concerning the establishment of a religion”?

Placing religious symbols in government buildings clearly gives people like the Muslims that our government was favoring Christianity over Islam, thus why they see this as a religious war.

This really makes no sense.
Are you claiming that if we stopped celebrating Christmas or removed symbols from government property, the Islamists would stop being Islamists? I never heard that one before.

I get that this country is dominated by Christians but it goes against the Constitution to erect religious symbols in govt buildings or on Federal land that give the impression of favoritism… The corollary is that you must then allow Muslims and other religions to do the same. You wouldn’t want that now would you? That’it’d get under your craw…

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Really? What part of the Constitution does it go against?
Muslims can erect whatever they please. It doesn’t get under my craw at all. The same as other religions. They have Mosques all over this country.

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 7:54 PM

What a glorious day today has been!!

Halleujah…Praise God!

Thank you Jesus for your sacrifice for my life and soul.

Praise God, He is Risen!!

Happy Easter to the HA crew, to friends members and trolls!

How blessed is this day, when earth and heaven are joined and humankind is reconciled to God!

May the light of Jesus shine continually to drive away all darkness. May Christ, the Morning Star who knows no setting, find his light ever burning in our hearts, he who gives his light to all creation, and who lives and reigns for ever and ever. Amen.

Scrumpy on March 31, 2013 at 7:54 PM

I just to be Wally’s little Jewish Easter Bunny. I was wearing bunny ears @ work-and made many a little one smile. I also hopped on request. Seeing all those young-uns smile. made my very busy work day all worth it.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 7:58 PM

I got…
Long day.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 7:58 PM

I didn’t say they’d LIKE to see NYC hit with a bomb, but that they’d interpret the events to mean that their “savior” was coming to rapture them up into heaven to save them from the coming “storm”. That’s the silver lining, you understand the idiom right?

That they’d see that silver lining is what is abhorrent about religious belief.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:37 PM

What are you basing that on? Who are They?

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 8:00 PM

That they’d see that silver lining is what is abhorrent about religious belief.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:37 PM

As oppose to irreligious belief, where there’s no silver lining and life is meaningless?

Our nation was founded on the idea of separation of church and state. The people who populated this country early on were about freedom of religion, and freedom FROM religions they didn’t agree with. We lived with the idea that we could agree to disagree and we wouldn’t go to blows over our differing interpretations of the bible, etc… One of the things we had to agree on was that the Federal government would not be in the business of regulating religions or choosing one over another.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Except it wasn’t. We’ve gone over this before: Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists isn’t an official government document. The country was founded on freedom of religion, yes, but not a complete separation of religion and government. Massachusetts, home of many of the founders, had a state church until 1833.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:01 PM

The corollary is that you must then allow Muslims and other religions to do the same. You wouldn’t want that now would you? That’it’d get under your craw…

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

You’ve offered this strawman multiple times, and nobody is biting. If Muslims want to carve the Koran into the walls of the Dearborn court, I don’t give a ****.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:02 PM

What are you basing that on? Who are They?

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 8:00 PM

I’ve met people like this in person, I know people who believe it. People who have said they look forward to the end times. I’ve even read people comment here saying they look forward to the rapture. It’s been a while and I don’t recall who it was but that’s not the point. Even if YOU’VE never met a person who said they looked forward to the end times, (because then they’d get to finally meet Jesus (counter to what they’ve claimed where they say they have a personal relationship with him, etc)), they do exist, and they are numerous.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:13 PM

What the crap is a rapture?

Rusty Allen on March 31, 2013 at 8:17 PM

Pope Francis’ Easter Urbi et Orbi Message – Full Text
by POPE FRANCIS
Sunday, March 31, 2013 6:03 AM
******************************

Dear brothers and sisters in Rome and throughout the world, Happy Easter!

What a joy it is for me to announce this message: Christ is risen! I would like it to go out to every house and every family, especially where the suffering is greatest, in hospitals, in prisons…

Most of all, I would like it to enter every heart, for it is there that God wants to sow this Good News: Jesus is risen, there is hope for you, you are no longer in the power of sin, of evil! Love has triumphed, mercy has been victorious!

We too, like the women who were Jesus’ disciples, who went to the tomb and found it empty, may wonder what this event means (cf. Lk 24:4). What does it mean that Jesus is risen? It means that the love of God is stronger than evil and death itself; it means that the love of God can transform our lives and let those desert places in our hearts bloom.

This same love for which the Son of God became man and followed the way of humility and self-giving to the very end, down to hell – to the abyss of separation from God – this same merciful love has flooded with light the dead body of Jesus and transfigured it, has made it pass into eternal life. Jesus did not return to his former life, to earthly life, but entered into the glorious life of God and he entered there with our humanity, opening us to a future of hope.

This is what Easter is: it is the exodus, the passage of human beings from slavery to sin and evil to the freedom of love and goodness. Because God is life, life alone, and his glory is the living man (cf. Irenaeus, Adversus Haereses, 4,20,5-7).

Dear brothers and sisters, Christ died and rose once for all, and for everyone, but the power of the Resurrection, this passover from slavery to evil to the freedom of goodness, must be accomplished in every age, in our concrete existence, in our everyday lives. How many deserts, even today, do human beings need to cross! Above all, the desert within, when we have no love for God or neighbour, when we fail to realize that we are guardians of all that the Creator has given us and continues to give us. God’s mercy can make even the driest land become a garden, can restore life to dry bones (cf. Ez 37:1-14).

So this is the invitation which I address to everyone: Let us accept the grace of Christ’s Resurrection! Let us be renewed by God’s mercy, let us be loved by Jesus, let us enable the power of his love to transform our lives too; and let us become agents of this mercy, channels through which God can water the earth, protect all creation and make justice and peace flourish.

And so we ask the risen Jesus, who turns death into life, to change hatred into love, vengeance into forgiveness, war into peace. Yes, Christ is our peace, and through him we implore peace for all the world.

Peace for the Middle East, and particularly between Israelis and Palestinians, who struggle to find the road of agreement, that they may willingly and courageously resume negotiations to end a conflict that has lasted all too long. Peace in Iraq, that every act of violence may end, and above all for dear Syria, for its people torn by conflict and for the many refugees who await help and comfort. How much blood has been shed! And how much suffering must there still be before a political solution to the crisis will be found?

Peace for Africa, still the scene of violent conflicts. In Mali, may unity and stability be restored; in Nigeria, where attacks sadly continue, gravely threatening the lives of many innocent people, and where great numbers of persons, including children, are held hostage by terrorist groups. Peace in the East of the Democratic Republic of Congo, and in the Central African Republic, where many have been forced to leave their homes and continue to live in fear.

Peace in Asia, above all on the Korean peninsula: may disagreements be overcome and a renewed spirit of reconciliation grow.

Peace in the whole world, still divided by greed looking for easy gain, wounded by the selfishness which threatens human life and the family, selfishness that continues in human trafficking, the most extensive form of slavery in this twenty-first century. Peace to the whole world, torn apart by violence linked to drug trafficking and by the iniquitous exploitation of natural resources! Peace to this our Earth! Made the risen Jesus bring comfort to the victims of natural disasters and make us responsible guardians of creation.

Dear brothers and sisters, to all of you who are listening to me, from Rome and from all over of the world, I address the invitation of the Psalm: “Give thanks to the Lord for he is good; for his steadfast love endures for ever. Let Israel say: ‘His steadfast love endures for ever’” (Ps 117:1-2).

[Unscripted remarks] Dear brothers and sisters who have come from all over the world to this Square, the heart of Christianity and to all of you joining us via the media, I repeat my wishes for a happy Easter! Bring to your families and your nations the message of joy, of hope, and of peace that every year, on this day, is powerfully renewed. May the Risen Lord, who defeated sin and death, sustain us all especially the weakest and those most in need. Thank you for your presence and the witness of your faith. A thought and special thanks for the gift of these beautiful flowers that come from the Netherlands. I affectionately repeat to all of you: May the Risen Christ guide all of you and all of humanity on the paths of justice, love, and peace!

[Pope Francis then imparted the “Urbi et Orbi” blessing.]

http://www.ncregister.com/blog/edward-pentin/pope-francis-urbi-et-orbi-address-full-text

canopfor on March 31, 2013 at 8:21 PM

I’ve met people like this in person, I know people who believe it. People who have said they look forward to the end times. I’ve even read people comment here saying they look forward to the rapture. It’s been a while and I don’t recall who it was but that’s not the point. Even if YOU’VE never met a person who said they looked forward to the end times, (because then they’d get to finally meet Jesus (counter to what they’ve claimed where they say they have a personal relationship with him, etc)), they do exist, and they are numerous.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:13 PM

Gee, so we’re supposed to just believe that these people exist without seeing/meeting them?

So you want us to take it on faith?

Lulz.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:21 PM

As oppose to irreligious belief, where there’s no silver lining and life is meaningless?

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:01 PM

You’ve tried this line before B-Plus… What makes you think that a life without theistic gods necessarily means that one can’t see life as meangingful?

Massachusetts, home of many of the founders, had a state church until 1833.

The Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, founded by religious dissenters forced to flee the Massachusetts Bay colony, is widely regarded as the first polity to grant religious freedom to all its citizens.

From 1780 Massachusetts had a system which required every man to belong to a church, and permitted each church to tax its members, but forbade any law requiring that it be of any particular denomination. This was objected to, as in practice establishing the Congregational Church, the majority denomination, and was abolished in 1833.

At the time of the passage of the Bill of Rights, many states acted in ways that would now be held unconstitutional. All of the early official state churches were disestablished by 1833 (Massachusetts), including the Congregationalist establishment in Connecticut. It is commonly accepted that, under the doctrine of Incorporation—which uses the Due Process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to hold the Bill of Rights applicable to the states—these state churches could not be reestablished today.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:22 PM

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:21 PM

Seriously? You’ve NEVER met or heard someone say they looked forward to the end times? Rest assured, they exist.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:27 PM

At the time of the passage of the Bill of Rights, many states acted in ways that would now be held unconstitutional. All of the early official state churches were disestablished by 1833 (Massachusetts), including the Congregationalist establishment in Connecticut. It is commonly accepted that, under the doctrine of Incorporation—which uses the Due Process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to hold the Bill of Rights applicable to the states—these state churches could not be reestablished today.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:22 PM

So then where do you get off saying “this country was founded on separation of church and state”?

It’s clearly not true.

You’ve yet to cogently tell me how we’re going to somehow become a theocracy even though people are much less religious than they’ve ever been.

We had a country for almost 200 years without Lemon v. Kurtzman. We didn’t devolve into theocracy. But it’s suddenly going to happen in a more secular country because a few courthouses have the 10 Commandments?

That’s why your breathless phobia of religious dominance is so hilarious.

You’ve tried this line before B-Plus… What makes you think that a life without theistic gods necessarily means that one can’t see life as meangingful?

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:22 PM

You can see life as whatever the hell you want to see it, SK. How about you stop forcing your beliefs down people’s throats, eh? :D

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:29 PM

Seriously? You’ve NEVER met or heard someone say they looked forward to the end times? Rest assured, they exist.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:27 PM

Seriously? You’ve NEVER met or heard of a leprechaun riding a unicorn?

Rest assured, they exist.

And no, in my many years of conversing with religious people (including studying Theology for many years in college), I’ve never met someone who was actively looking forward to the Apocalypse.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:31 PM

This image,teared me up!

Image:(1 of 27)

The Associated Press ‏@AP 3h

PHOTOS: Pope Francis kisses a physically disabled boy passed to him from the crowd: http://apne.ws/XRbmDg -CC
==========================================

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/ap-photos-easter-celebrations-around-world

canopfor on March 31, 2013 at 8:32 PM

Seriously? You’ve NEVER met or heard of a leprechaun riding a unicorn?

Rest assured, they exist.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:31 PM

LOL! Big difference in your comparison… We know humans exist. We know humans believe a lot of crazy things so it’s not nearly the “stretch” you make it out to be.

If you felt smug in your belief, thinking that you had chosen the right religion and god to follow, then living in the end times wouldn’t “bother” you much. You would know that you’re “saved” and so it wouldn’t be that big of a deal to you. You might even look forward to it as in you’d be “blessed” with being able to meet Jesus on his final curtain call defeat of Satan. ;-)

Trust me, I’ve known people who’ve intimated as much to me. Guess you need to quit hanging around the HA forums and get out into the real world? ;-)~

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:35 PM

I just to be Wally’s little Jewish Easter Bunny. I was wearing bunny ears @ work-and made many a little one smile. I also hopped on request. Seeing all those young-uns smile. made my very busy work day all worth it.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 7:58 PM

Nice. happy Easter :)

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 8:37 PM

I got…
Long day.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 7:58 PM

annoyinglittletwerp:….Happy Easter ALT:)

canopfor on March 31, 2013 at 8:39 PM

Nice. happy Easter :)

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 8:37 PM

You as well, friend.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 8:40 PM

canopfor on March 31, 2013 at 8:39 PM

Back at ya.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 8:40 PM

So then where do you get off saying “this country was founded on separation of church and state”?

It’s clearly not true.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:29 PM

You’re clearly playing semantic games here… Why else would the Federal government do away with these state churches VERY EARLY ON IN OUR COUNTRIES HISTORY if the idea WASN’T to have a separation of church and state?

If the goal was to be more religious and let government and religion comingle, why was the state church of Mass done away with?

You’re logic doesn’t stand up to the evidence B-Plus.

You can see life as whatever the hell you want to see it, SK. How about you stop forcing your beliefs down people’s throats, eh? :D

I DO see it how I see it, but I don’t see how me simply making my thoughts known is “forcing” my beliefs down people’s throats. I’m not breaking into their homes and tying them up until they believe what I believe.

Freedom of speech doesn’t mean you’re free to not be offended.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:43 PM

Thank you, Hotair writers and tech staff, for the kind Easter wish. I wish you all the best on this lovely day.

princetrumpet on March 31, 2013 at 8:47 PM

Even if YOU’VE never met a person who said they looked forward to the end times, (because then they’d get to finally meet Jesus (counter to what they’ve claimed where they say they have a personal relationship with him, etc)), they do exist, and they are numerous.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:13 PM

I forgot..what is this in the context of??

How serious do you take those kind of sentiments? They seem to be in the vein of people who offhandedly say things like..”Boy..do I wish I was single again..the freedom that would bring”, They don’t actually wish for that end to come.

Mimzey on March 31, 2013 at 8:57 PM

Ed.

Not sure if you’ve seen “The Life of Pi” or not, but its a must see.

ted c on March 31, 2013 at 7:28 PM

http://static.themetapicture.com/media/funny-Pi-number-quote.jpg

davidk on March 31, 2013 at 9:06 PM

If the goal was to be more religious and let government and religion comingle, why was the state church of Mass done away with?

You’re logic doesn’t stand up to the evidence B-Plus.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:43 PM

If separation of church and state was the goal of the founders, why wasn’t it codified in our founding documents? It’s only in Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists. We *know* freedom of speech was a founding principle. We *know* free of religion was a founding principle. They’re right there in the plain text of our most important foundational documents.

If anyone is playing semantic games, it is, was and always has been you. You glom onto a single line in one letter from one of the founders. Meanwhile, I’ve got the entire canon of *every other founder*.

Face it, you’re wrong. Separation of church and state to the extreme point of the Lemon Test was not in any way a founding principle.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 9:13 PM

I DO see it how I see it, but I don’t see how me simply making my thoughts known is “forcing” my beliefs down people’s throats. I’m not breaking into their homes and tying them up until they believe what I believe.

Freedom of speech doesn’t mean you’re free to not be offended.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:43 PM

Neither are religious people, yet you seem pretty annoyed when they “force their beliefs on people.”

You’d almost think you were a giant, bitter hypocrite or something. :D

LOL! Big difference in your comparison… We know humans exist. We know humans believe a lot of crazy things so it’s not nearly the “stretch” you make it out to be.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:35 PM

This is a really stupid argument. “We know humans exist. We know some people believe stupid things. Therefore, we know a church exists solely devoted to worshiping the TV show Knight Rider.”

And you scoff at people who have faith. They might be the only ones impressed by your faulty logic.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 9:15 PM

And you scoff at people who have faith. They might be the only ones impressed by your faulty logic.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 9:15 PM

Are you kidding? That cat’s reasoning ability is a joke!

tom daschle concerned on March 31, 2013 at 9:25 PM

Ed.
Not sure if you’ve seen “The Life of Pi” or not, but its a must see.
ted c on March 31, 2013 at 7:28 PM

Indeed, a must see twice.

Rusty Allen on March 31, 2013 at 9:27 PM

The nature of constitutional law is such that when I litigate or file briefs on religious liberty issues, I survey and cite to the Supreme Court’s decisions and religious liberty historical facts in this country going back to when the Constitution and Bill of Rights were first adopted. Doing so recently, it vividly struck me that in all of American history religious liberty has never been as gravely threatened as it is today, especially for Christians. [Emphasis added]

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2013/03/31/Christians-and-Religious-Liberty-in-America-on-Easter-Sunday-2013

davidk on March 31, 2013 at 9:30 PM

He is risen, indeed! Alleluia.
:)

GWB on March 31, 2013 at 9:38 PM

There’s something troubling SK. Maybe Jesus is trying to get his attention…that he would come on here and argue with and preach at His followers. May his eyes be opened, so he may see the light and find eternal life.

If the apostle Paul can trust in Christ for his salvation, then SK can as well. God’s grace & Word will not return void!

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 9:39 PM

With Jesus’ death, the hope of all those who had put their trust in him seemed doomed.

This comment glosses over an important point. Mary Magdalene went to that tomb not believing in the resurrection. Even with the evidence of the empty tomb she mistakes the risen Christ with the caretaker who moved the body. Only when she realized that she was not addressing the caretaker did she realize that there was more to Christ than this world.

That last step of belief that is so crucial in Christindom is the critical one. And it is the only one that matters. Because if you do not believe in the risen Christ none of the rest of it is of any consequence.

Happy Nomad on March 31, 2013 at 9:39 PM

Ed.
Not sure if you’ve seen “The Life of Pi” or not, but its a must see.

ted c on March 31, 2013 at 7:28 PM

Indeed, a must see twice.

Rusty Allen on March 31, 2013 at 9:27 PM

I’ll add to my redbox list. Thanks!

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 9:41 PM

Oldie but a goodie An X-Ray of the Cross.

tom daschle concerned on March 31, 2013 at 9:43 PM

There’s something troubling SK. Maybe Jesus is trying to get his attention…that he would come on here and argue with and preach at His followers. May his eyes be opened, so he may see the light and find eternal life.

If the apostle Paul can trust in Christ for his salvation, then SK can as well. God’s grace & Word will not return void!

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 9:39 PM

Amen. So be it.

davidk on March 31, 2013 at 9:46 PM

If separation of church and state was the goal of the founders, why wasn’t it codified in our founding documents?

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 9:13 PM

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution provides that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ….” and Article VI specifies that “no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.”

“Separation of church and state” is a phrase used by Thomas Jefferson and others expressing an understanding of the intent and function of the Establishment Clause and Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States. The phrase has since been repeatedly cited by the Supreme Court of the United States, but Jefferson, Madison and others were the guys who created the dang documents…

One would think that, being the writers and creators of our founding documents, they knew the intent of our founding documents.

Apparently, and self interestedly, you disagree.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 9:54 PM

davidk, Did you have on 88.1 tonight? The Chicken Shack Alley show switched programming from Soul/blues to old time gospel. It was really really good.

The replay should be available tomorrow.

tom daschle concerned on March 31, 2013 at 10:01 PM

22044, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gsnQTsMhB84

davidk on March 31, 2013 at 9:57 PM

Thanks davidk – gonna watch some television for a while but I’ll check this out!

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 10:02 PM

tom daschle concerned on March 31, 2013 at 10:01 PM

New to me. Bookmarked it. Thanks.

I’m just across the river, so if I had a radio I would tune it in.

davidk on March 31, 2013 at 10:05 PM

There’s something troubling SK. Maybe Jesus is trying to get his attention…that he would come on here and argue with and preach at His followers. May his eyes be opened, so he may see the light and find eternal life.

If the apostle Paul can trust in Christ for his salvation, then SK can as well. God’s grace & Word will not return void!

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 9:39 PM

Not gonna happen. ;-)

The best I’ll ever believe in is the god that could be. I’m damn sure the god of the bible ain’t it, neither the Islamic variety, or any other man made god(s).

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 10:16 PM

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 10:16 PM

Have it as you may, but your point of view is a few bricks short of a full load when you’ve been posting irrational arguments on an otherwise friendly forum all day.

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 10:45 PM

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution provides that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof ….” and Article VI specifies that “no religious Test shall ever be required as a Qualification to any Office or public Trust under the United States.”

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 9:54 PM

Yes, and for our entire existence both of those concepts have been followed meticulously. There’s nothing that says we can’t have a QB lead his team in prayer, or the 10 Commandments on a courthouse wall.

None of that came until Lemon, so how on Earth can you claim it was the intent of the founders based on a single line from a single letter from a single founder?

Oh, right, because you’re an anti-theist with a giant axe to grind.

One would think that, being the writers and creators of our founding documents, they knew the intent of our founding documents.

Apparently, and self interestedly, you disagree.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 9:54 PM

One would think that, if they expressly wanted a complete separation of government and religion, they’d have codified it in one of the founding documents. They didn’t.

See, here’s the thing: I don’t have any self-interest here. I’m an agnostic. You’re the one who selfishly wants to eradicate public references to the Bible because you want to do away with organized religion. Me? I don’t really give a ****.

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 10:53 PM

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 10:45 PM

By your leave

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 11:02 PM

Wishing people have a nice day is not stupid, having a holiday that celebrates the death of another individual is what is stupid.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 12:01 PM

There are approximately 38,000 Christian denominations in the world. This statistic takes into consideration cultural distinctions of denominations in different countries.

Today, in the United States of America, about 78% (244, 140,000) of adults identify themselves as Christian. In comparison, the next largest religions in America are Islam and Judaism. Combined they represent only about one to two percent of the United States population.

There are more than 1500 different Christian faith groups in America.

We celebrate His Resurrection

For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten son, that whosoever believe in Him, should not perish, but have everlasting life.

I’m a “whosover”.

I am sorry you are so bitter.

kingsjester on March 31, 2013 at 11:04 PM

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 11:02 PM

Are you going to beat on Christians every Easter? Or even every day?
If you’re into politics, most of us are conservatives and advocates for liberty. At least we have that in common.
Try to enjoy your life. At least other agnostics & atheists do. But nobody who is a true follower of Christ loses heart in this life and certainly have no concern with the angry ramblings of an antireligionist malcontent stranger.

22044 on March 31, 2013 at 11:12 PM

I just to be Wally’s little Jewish Easter Bunny. I was wearing bunny ears @ work-and made many a little one smile. I also hopped on request. Seeing all those young-uns smile. made my very busy work day all worth it.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 7:58 PM

I got…
Long day.

annoyinglittletwerp on March 31, 2013 at 7:58 PM

.
Where’s . . . . . . the . . . . . . P I C T U R E S ! ! !

listens2glenn on March 31, 2013 at 11:32 PM

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 9:54 PM

Even in that separation, the Constitution mandates that Government not interfere with the free exercise of religion.

In essence, the concept of religion can be distilled in this secular document to “freedom of conscience” and “freedom of association”.

Government officials are not restrained in their exercise of religion, even in some official contexts. Consider, for example, President Obama’s attendance at the National Prayer Breakfast, or the Senate’s appointment of a Chaplain, or even President Abraham Lincoln’s mention of “God” in his Gettysburg Address at the dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery.

Several courts have ruled against Obamacare already in the context of religious rights — only one court so far — in the case of Hobby Lobby — has denied a plaintiff excuse from the provisions of Obamacare.

You have a similar right not to support any religious belief which is counter to yours — and that is fine. You may remain silent during certain portions of the Pledge of Allegiance, you are not obligated to pay any tax to support a church’s activities…

But here you are, as a guest in a forum, disparaging the religious observances of the host. Now, the host may let you, being an accommodating person, do the equivalent of urinating on his lawn, but don’t expect the other guests not to call you on it.

unclesmrgol on March 31, 2013 at 11:47 PM

Happy Easter to everyone at Hot Air..:)

PS..May God Bless you all..:):)

Dire Straits on March 31, 2013 at 11:49 PM

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:29 PM

.
You’re clearly playing semantic games here… Why else would the Federal government do away with these state churches VERY EARLY ON IN OUR COUNTRIES HISTORY if the idea WASN’T to have a separation of church and state?

If the goal was to be more religious and let government and religion comingle, why was the state church of Mass done away with?

You’re logic doesn’t stand up to the evidence B-Plus.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:43 PM

.
The Founders were only trying to remove the government from having any influence over the practice of Christianity.

They fully intended for the practice of Christianity to have influence (which is NOT the same as “command”) over the whole United States; government and all.

Sessions of Congress were always begun with some kind of Christian prayer. The Christian Bible has always been used as the “swearing in” tool in all branches. I’m sure that State and local governing bodies did the same.
.

You can see life as whatever the hell you want to see it, SK. How about you stop forcing your beliefs down people’s throats, eh? :D

Good Solid B-Plus on March 31, 2013 at 8:29 PM

.
I DO see it how I see it, but I don’t see how me simply making my thoughts known is “forcing” my beliefs down people’s throats. I’m not breaking into their homes and tying them up until they believe what I believe.

Freedom of speech doesn’t mean you’re free to not be offended.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 8:43 PM

.
Okay, I agree with that.

listens2glenn on March 31, 2013 at 11:52 PM

Happy Easter to everyone at Hot Air..:)

PS..May God Bless you all..:):)

Dire Straits on March 31, 2013 at 11:49 PM

Dire Straits:)

And,to you and your family as well,Dire my friend:)

canopfor on April 1, 2013 at 12:00 AM

Our nation was founded on the idea of separation of church and state.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

.
Nope.
.

The people who populated this country early on were about freedom of religion, . . . . . . . . .

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

.
Yup.
.

. . . . . . . and freedom FROM religions they didn’t agree with.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

.
Nope
.

We lived with the idea that we could agree to disagree and we wouldn’t go to blows over our differing interpretations of the bible, etc… One of the things we had to agree on was that the Federal government would not be in the business of regulating religions …..

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

.
Yup.
.

….. or choosing one over another.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

.
But they DID choose one as a “standard bearer”, as pertains to standards of morality, and right and wrong.

They DID choose the Bible for “swearing in”.

listens2glenn on April 1, 2013 at 12:10 AM

Folks, we should all pray for the Sauer one.

I knew he would be on this Easter thread. He NEVER posts to the political threads…on a political site. Only to the Christian threads.

The atheist is OBSESSED with Christianity. Even more, if it’s possible, than this Jesus-lovin’ Christian is.

Pray for him. This hatred is taking over his life.

Grace_is_sufficient on April 1, 2013 at 5:48 AM

The atheist is OBSESSED with Christianity. Even more, if it’s possible, than this Jesus-lovin’ Christian is.

Pray for him. This hatred is taking over his life.

Grace_is_sufficient on April 1, 2013 at 5:48 AM

What atheist isn’t obsessed with Christ and Christianity? They are so sure of their un-belief that they will not be happy until those of us who have faith think exactly as they do. It is as if they need affirmation of faithlessness by forcing others to renounce their faith.

Atheism is about the most selfish and intolerant kind of faith there is.

Happy Nomad on April 1, 2013 at 6:55 AM

Pray for him. This hatred is taking over his life.

Grace_is_sufficient on April 1, 2013 at 5:48 AM

You’d have to drive that legion out of him.

Atheism is about the most selfish and intolerant kind of faith there is.

Happy Nomad on April 1, 2013 at 6:55 AM

Well said.

hawkdriver on April 1, 2013 at 7:44 AM

You guys are hilarious, and your assessments of my psychological disposition crack me up, especially you grace. This is typical of the religious who don’t like their delusions being shoved in their faces, characterize your “opponent” as loony and pray for the best. ;-)

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 8:29 AM

. . . . . . . and freedom FROM religions they didn’t agree with.

SauerKraut537 on March 31, 2013 at 7:32 PM

.
Nope

listens2glenn on April 1, 2013 at 12:10 AM

Hey Glenn (you said hi earlier),

You disagree with this part of my assessment of how our country was founded but the idea of freedom of religion contains within it the idea of freedom FROM religion as well. Why else do you think people came over here in the first place? Weren’t pilgrims and others fleeing religious institutions that were hindering their ability to express their religious faiths? Wasn’t that the point of the majority of people who came over here? To profess their faith in a manner they wished to?

These people came from states that ruled hand in hand with the religious authorities in the old world. If you were a Catholic in Protestant lands, or vice versa, you sought to get out from under the infighting that was taking place between these two competing camps of religious thought.

Freedom of religion implies freedom FROM religion as well Glenn. I’m free to not believe as you do, and vice versa. I’m free to not be punished by you and your brethren if you disagree with my religious faith, or lack of faith as the case now is.

Think about it…

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 8:37 AM

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 8:37 AM

Congratulations!

Today’s your day!

Happy National Atheists’ Day!

Psalm 14:1

kingsjester on April 1, 2013 at 8:49 AM

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 8:37 AM

The baffled king composes Hallelujah.

hawkdriver on April 1, 2013 at 8:50 AM

What atheist isn’t obsessed with Christ and Christianity? They are so sure of their un-belief that they will not be happy until those of us who have faith think exactly as they do. It is as if they need affirmation of faithlessness by forcing others to renounce their faith.

Atheism is about the most selfish and intolerant kind of faith there is.

Happy Nomad on April 1, 2013 at 6:55 AM

I’m not really arguing with you (or hawk, or anyone else) broadly or even trying to nose into the discussion, just wedging in that I know atheists who are more tolerant of my Christianity than many other Christians are. I’ve also been in more than one rhetorical firefight where I was rescued by an atheist, and that includes discussions about the nature of Christianity and the goodness of Christianity’s God.

Your hijacker is an anti-theist who “speak[s] out against ALL religion.” They’re peculiar. They seem to believe that by embracing Atheism, they have affirmed their inherent intellectual superiority, and they argue with a haughtiness and disrespect that makes you wonder if they believe they are arguing with cave people.

Atheists and anti-theists aren’t the same thing, though they necessarily overlap. Since all anti-theists are also atheists by definition, it’s easy for us to use one word for the other. I think we need to try to be more exact.

Anyway, on behalf of those atheists that would no sooner sneer at me for being Christian than drown a bag of kittens, who would laugh at the idea of calling me a hapless pawn of the Bible publishing industry, who have never hinted that maybe I should keep all my superstition in my basement or see a shrink and get my weak mind happy with oblivion — and especially on behalf of those that wished me a happy Easter yesterday and respected me enough to allow me some quality Jesus time — this. :)

/back-to-handling-troll

O! PS:

They are so un-sure of their un-belief that they will not be happy until those of us who have faith think exactly as they do.

It describes antitheists really well, but fify. :)

Axe on April 1, 2013 at 8:58 AM

Axe on April 1, 2013 at 8:58 AM

I wouldn’t argue with anything you’ve said. It’s just that I’ve had so many exchanges, (long ones) with sk. His position turns on a dime to try to make a point. He has no actual idea what he’s saying and he has no idea of the reaction his banter creates. He’s of the impression he’s so good at what he does, that he’s constantly driving people from their faith.

If this were the Wind and the Sun fable, he’d be the wind.

hawkdriver on April 1, 2013 at 9:07 AM

If this were the Wind and the Sun fable, he’d be the wind.

hawkdriver on April 1, 2013 at 9:07 AM

I know man. :) I really do. I hope Nomad takes me in the spirit I intended, too.

. . . trying to ignore the details of your (plural) discussion with SauerKraut as much as I can . . . no time at the moment to get in there.

Axe on April 1, 2013 at 9:15 AM

hawkdriver on April 1, 2013 at 9:07 AM

You say my position changes on a dime, that I have no idea what I’m saying and that I have no idea of the reaction my banter creates.

My position hasn’t changed at all over the course of our “long” discussions, I know very well what I’m saying when I say it and my position is logically consistent.

I’m well aware that my ruminations cause angst among those who still believe. I imagine there is a bit of anger over having their beliefs dismantled, thus why I’m characterized as a loon and out of touch, etc, etc, etc… It’s all part of the territory of discussing these things. I used to do the same when I was still on your “side” of the argument and defending my faith.

Anything to avoid the pink elephant in the room…

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 10:08 AM

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 10:08 AM

You protest too much – and your insistence on arguing on this forum, on this page, instead of somewhere else, trumps any possible validity in your arguments, if they had any substance.

22044 on April 1, 2013 at 10:17 AM

I’m well aware that my ruminations cause angst among those who still believe. I imagine there is a bit of anger over having their beliefs dismantled, thus why I’m characterized as a loon and out of touch, etc, etc, etc… It’s all part of the territory of discussing these things. I used to do the same when I was still on your “side” of the argument and defending my faith.

Anything to avoid the pink elephant in the room…

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 10:08 AM

You’re funny. In a delusional kind of way.

HumpBot Salvation on April 1, 2013 at 10:20 AM

You protest too much – and your insistence on arguing on this forum, on this page, instead of somewhere else, trumps any possible validity in your arguments, if they had any substance.

22044 on April 1, 2013 at 10:17 AM

I’m here, discussing it here, and you guys are answering me with more and more faulty logic that requires a response. If I was discussing it somewhere else I’d be discussing it somewhere else. It’s not that I’m insisting I argue it on this forum but I made an innocuous comment to start this all off. Someone was complaining about Google’s lack of showing reverence to Easter, which I asked a simple question of, and the discussion has evolved as it has until here we are today.

Since I’ve been discussing this with several people over the course of the day, I’ve had many things thrown my way that required a response. Because I’m responding to these comments, I’m arguing/protesting too much?

LOL! You’re funny with your logic… Because I’m not arguing this topic somewhere else, THAT very fact trumps any possible validity in my arguments? WTH?! Where did you go to school because you apparently need more of it.

SauerKraut537 on April 1, 2013 at 10:48 AM

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