Reminder: That incandescent light bulb ban was not a good idea

posted at 6:41 pm on March 22, 2013 by Erika Johnsen

Why? Not merely because government directives might forcibly funnel consumer demand, investment, and R&D toward a product that really isn’t ready for mass consumption, but also because, no matter how great their intentions might be, the free market is always better than politicians at picking efficient solutions. The free market’s only bias is in appealing to people’s rational self-interest; i.e., if people figure out that Product A is more expensive or of lower quality than comparable substitute Product B, people will buy Product B.

In this case, the compact fluorescent bulbs politically favored by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 encountered a lot of resistance because CFLs are impractical, more expensive, and it turns out they might actually be a cancer risk, no big deal or anything. But if the goal is to get people to buy bulbs that use electricity more efficiently, government mandates aren’t nearly as effective as a product that can actually make those electricity savings more pragmatic, more affordable, and more worthwhile, and the market is happy to provide. Via the NYT:

You’ve probably seen LED flashlights, the LED “flash” on phone cameras and LED indicator lights on electronics. But LED bulbs, for use in the lamps and light sockets of your home, have been slow to arrive, mainly because of their high price…

That’s a pity, because LED bulbs are a gigantic improvement over incandescent bulbs and even the compact fluorescents, or CFLs, that the world spent several years telling us to buy.

LEDs last about 25 times as long as incandescents and three times as long as CFLs; we’re talking maybe 25,000 hours of light. Install one today, and you may not own your house, or even live, long enough to see it burn out. …

You know how hot incandescent bulbs become. That’s because they convert only 5 to 10 percent of your electricity into light; they waste the rest as heat. LED bulbs are far more efficient. They convert 60 percent of their electricity into light, so they consume far less electricity. …

As the NYT review goes on to point out, there are now LED bulbs out there that cost as little as $10 — pretty darn affordable for a bulb that both turns on instantly and keeps on keepin’ on like the Energizer Bunny. If these bulbs really are everything they’re cracked up to be, they’ll catch on — no government mandates necessary.


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And I own NO stock. Not with DJIA at 14500

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 12:38 AM

.
Now THAT I agree with you on.

I hope everyone here gets rid of any stock they may own, very shortly.

listens2glenn on March 23, 2013 at 12:49 AM

Hooray.

I won page 2 Bishop.

Now, on with our show . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

listens2glenn on March 23, 2013 at 12:51 AM

Right on.

Buy the frickin craters.

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 1:00 AM

Your LED won’t survive an EMP

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 12:41 AM

Yeah, if we get hit with an EMP the first thing I’m going to worry about is my light bulbs.

The Rogue Tomato on March 23, 2013 at 1:02 AM

Yeah, if we get hit with an EMP the first thing I’m going to worry about is my light bulbs.

The Rogue Tomato on March 23, 2013 at 1:02 AM

or your flashlight…..

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 1:05 AM

The electrical load LED bulbs put on the line is not as simple as “inductive load”, and if it were it would not be a big deal unless the lighting were a substantial fraction of your power load. Study the Fourier transform if you want the essential tool to understand it, but expect to spend about 80 hours with algebra and calculus before you get good at it.

There are LED bulbs that work with dimmers. Their brightness curve won’t match incandescents OR other brands.

The usual dimmer control is a very bad design compromise. Because it is in one leg of the AC supply wiith no reference connection to the other leg, it can only work with the voltage/current that comes through the lamps. The problems are too numerous to detail here, but even incandescents cause most dimmers to “jump” as they are turned on.

njcommuter on March 23, 2013 at 1:06 AM

Interesting how much of the comments are detailed arguments on one technology over another.

The whole point is we should all be making the decisions for ourselves, not having debates that assume the winner will get to be the technology that’s forced on everyone.

TB on March 23, 2013 at 1:38 AM

Interesting how much of the comments are detailed arguments on one technology over another.

The whole point is we should all be making the decisions for ourselves, not having debates that assume the winner will get to be the technology that’s forced on everyone.

TB on March 23, 2013 at 1:38 AM

TB, the argument isn’t over one technology over another. It’s showing why market forces would have picked one over the other eventually. The best idea would always win, in the long analysis, if it had been allowed to compete.

There is no freedom in buying a light bulb. EVERYONE is restricted by economic concerns.

And, heck, even I am gullible enough to own several.

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 1:43 AM

Wow, isn’t that sad. I can actually think, off the top of my head, how many LED’s I own.

This country is so screwed.

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 1:54 AM

I have an incandescent light bulb under my desk as a heat lamp. I can keep the house 4-6 degrees cooler during the day when I’m home alone working.

But is sure looks weird to have a light shining on my crotch.

cptacek on March 23, 2013 at 2:11 AM

NYT, we the people did not “listen to what the world was telling us” to buy when it came to deciding which light bulbs to use. It was the leviathan you routinely embrace and hold in great esteem that forced on us a mandate that closed bulb manufacturers, increased costs and health concerns just to light our homes and businesses. And if you think this mandate was a loser of a mistake I cannot wait for your article in a few years arguing,”Golly gee, that Affordable Healthcare Act was a disaster, yes?” NYT, all the news that’s fit to print several years ago. Idiots

stop2think on March 23, 2013 at 8:35 AM

CFLs are impractical, more expensive, and it turns out they might actually be a cancer risk

That’s alright, we have Obamacare. Soon everything will lead us to Obamacare. If we drink too many sugary drinks, why Ocare can put us on a diet and provide guidance on living a healthy lifestyle. See, the govt is here to help.

Kissmygrits on March 23, 2013 at 8:38 AM

LEDs last about 25 times as long as incandescents and three times as long as CFLs; we’re talking maybe 25,000 hours of light.

This is a lie-

To hit the targeted light output there are a number of companies that are running LED’s at higher than rated voltages. This increases the output of the LED while shortening the lifespan.

Don’t take my word for it, look around. Around CT there is no shortage of stoplights that are LED equipped that have a number of burned out cells. I even have a few flashlights that cells are burned out from overvolting.

You think China Inc, cares? By the time the item burns out most people will have forgotten the “good for 10 year” hype or the company will be out of business.

gdonovan on March 23, 2013 at 8:55 AM

Do you use any of them outside during “temperature extremes?”

listens2glenn on March 22, 2013 at 10:32 PM

Yes, and so far, so good. (I’m on top of a mountain ridge in western PA, so it does get cold.)

petefrt on March 23, 2013 at 8:59 AM

Something I forgot to add- LED’s do have a bright future in lighting but the tech needs time to mature.

gdonovan on March 23, 2013 at 9:04 AM

When I redid a rental property I own, I put in all LED light bulbs. Why? Because they use less electricity, because I don’t have to run in there and change them all the time, and because their light is more “true” to the incandescent feel and color of a real light bulb. When they are on, it’s almost impossible to tell that the bulbs are energy savers. Not like the pale, greenish glow from the CFLs. I always feel like I’m walking around in DOOM 95 with the radiation suit on whenever I’m in a room with CFLs.

Well, the rental property is shut down now, thanks to government interference. But the LEDs burn brightly on. Sucks about the price tag, though.

JoseQuinones on March 23, 2013 at 9:04 AM

Hey, also, for other preppers out there.

Your LED won’t survive an EMP

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 12:41 AM

Neither will a CFL. The EMP will blow out the electronics in the base.

Dasher on March 23, 2013 at 9:06 AM

Can’t buy a 100 watt equivalent LED. It would weight 4 pounds for the heat sink.

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 12:37 AM

SWITCH just recently put their 100 watt equivalent LED on the market. They tout…

“INDUSTRY LEADING THERMAL MANAGEMENT: Liquid cooling that is up to 40% more efficient than standard air-cooled lamps”

Haven’t tried any of the SWITCH bulbs yet, but in the forums they get good user reviews. I notice that it’s 4000K, which is far too blue for me. Hopefully soon they’ll come out with a 2700K version.

I hate the stinkin’ CFLs and have thrown them all away. (Half the time they blew after a few months anyway.) But I’ve had good luck with the LEDs, and the color at 2700K is almost like incandescent.

petefrt on March 23, 2013 at 9:21 AM

It is like a beautiful dawn every time I turn on my CFLs. Takes about 10 minutes for them to reach full brightness.

Thank you democrats!

tom daschle concerned on March 23, 2013 at 9:22 AM

In our home we’ve ended up with a mix of different lighting, which is what you would expect during a technological transition. We have about 40% CFLs. (They come in different color temperatures and with different startup times, by the way.) In the garage we have the old style large diameter fluorescents. And upstairs I just installed a set of LEDs in my man cave, that are supplemented by a halogen desk lamp. In the living room are two chandeliers with those little pointy incandescents. My ’87 Vanagon Westfalia Syncro now has all LED lights in the interior and our flashlights are all LED except for one 3D Maglight that seldom used, and the Glock Tactical Light on my 31C.

claudius on March 23, 2013 at 10:26 AM

The free market’s only bias is in appealing to people’s rational self-interest; i.e., if people figure out that Product A is more expensive or of lower quality than comparable substitute Product B, people will buy Product B.

I guess the free market didn’t really apply to Apple, then.

mintycrys on March 23, 2013 at 11:17 AM

I have an incandescent light bulb under my desk as a heat lamp. I can keep the house 4-6 degrees cooler during the day when I’m home alone working.

But is sure looks weird to have a light shining on my crotch.

cptacek on March 23, 2013 at 2:11 AM

Bing. I use 75 or 100 watt bulbs in my utility light in the garage. They don’t burn out … they break when I drop it in the engine compartment or it falls off the tractor frame where I have clamped it. It’s cold outside, so I don’t give a fig how much electricity is “wasted” creating heat.

I used to use them to keep an outside pump thawed in the midwest winter. They are cheap…410 LED lights will not be a viable alternative once a month.

Jaibones on March 23, 2013 at 11:18 AM

America is run by imbeciles … you all know the ending to that story.

Jaibones on March 23, 2013 at 11:19 AM

Any time you want information about lighting, go to Rennselaer Polytech. This presentation gives a good rundown on choosing a lamp (bulb). My flash player is not up to date so the video runs stop-and-start as it downloads. I downloaded the pdf summary and it is very helpful.

http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/resources/JSFlash/lampupgradewebisode1.html

Lots of other helpful info too, if you want to poke around. One of my favorite pages deals with full spectrum light. Read that and you’ll never again fall for GE’s expensive Reveal bulb.

http://www.lrc.rpi.edu/programs/nlpip/lightingAnswers/fullSpectrum/disadvantages.asp
(this is page 5. the whole paper is worth reading)

timmytee on March 23, 2013 at 11:23 AM

How to get rid of the bans?

SarahW on March 23, 2013 at 11:28 AM

So much is these regulations are nonsense. Why can’t I have a real mercury thermometer but I must buy a CFL?

And what is the benefit to us to use less electricity? The utilities have a right, by law in CA, to raise their rates when their profits go down. So why bother?

Never thought of the bulb as a heater. Will try that in my den!

PattyJ on March 23, 2013 at 11:38 AM

Your LED won’t survive an EMP

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 12:41 AM

Which is why, if that ever happens, I have oil lamps. Problem solved.

Gothguy on March 23, 2013 at 11:44 AM

Your LED won’t survive an EMP

WryTrvllr on March 23, 2013 at 12:41 AM

Four words:

Coleman Lantern

Henry Rifle

Bring it.

CurtZHP on March 23, 2013 at 11:47 AM

I guess the free market didn’t really apply to Apple, then.

mintycrys on March 23, 2013 at 11:17 AM

If you take the consumer’s time spent on dealing with viruses and other dysfunctional product stupidity into account, you will probably find that Apple is often (NOT ‘always’) an extremely rational, better choice…as the free market has said.

landlines on March 23, 2013 at 12:20 PM

timmytee on March 23, 2013 at 11:23 AM

Good link. Thanks.

After seeing GE’s ads for their Reveal bulbs, I tried one. The light quality is HORRIBLE.

Neodymium glass bulbs like the GE “Reveal” or “Enrich, the Philips “Natural Daylight”, the Sylvania “Daylight”, the “Chromalux” and “Pure Lite” brands are not color corrected”, at all. They actually have a pretty low CRI (color rendition index) of about 70. Plain old clear glass incandescent bulbs, like sunlight, have a CRI of about 100. You cannot judge color anywhere near as accurately under a neodymium glass bulb as under a clear glass bulb. GE promotes them as more “natural” because they have a higher color temperature than clear glass bulbs, despite the lower CRI.

Unscrupulous bulb mongers push these horrible bulbs at many different groups. They got you (like the get painters and seamstresses) with a false promise of being able to judge colors more accurately. Some promote them as “full spectrum” or a “healthy” light. Others promote them as more efficient. Some market them to promote the health of pet lizards and birds. All these claims are, simply, false.

More: http://forums.dpreview.com/forums/post/22418166

petefrt on March 23, 2013 at 12:33 PM

I replaced all my can lights and lamp lights with LED lights and my power bill dropped big time. I figure it’ll take a year to recoup and the next 4 years are pure gravy since they carry a 5 year guarantee.

SansJeux on March 23, 2013 at 12:35 PM

The CFL fiasco will go down in history as one of the worst examples of a government interference to force a negative-value product which is wildly uneconomical, unreliable, dysfunctional (light is in the wrong spectrum), and poses huge risks to consumers.

This ill-conceived product would never have been brought to market without hugely intrusive government interference.

As for myself, I bought a 10-year supply of incandescent bulbs in all the shapes and sizes required. No matter what happens, I will be money ahead. There will never be a CFL in our home. LED, halogen, and other technologies are (and will be) used here when and where they make sense in a given application: NOT BEFORE.

It should be noted that forcing LED’s into sockets originally designed for incandescent bulbs often creates a fire hazard: does it make sense to risk burning down your house in order to possibly save a few pennies over a 10 year time frame?? Other new lighting technologies will similarly present new problems, and the market must be given time to find solutions and adapt. Government mandates also ignore other practical problems, like the need to prematurely scrap perfectly serviceable lighting fixtures, including most chandeliers.

If government spent a tenth of this effort truly promoting economical generation facilities (instead of blocking them), the entire nation would benefit financially, would be safer and more secure, and would develop the best technologies much faster.

The amount of electricity the bureaucrats are fretting about is completely insignificant to the average consumer, and the alleged “cost savings” will never truly materialize because government has spent every penny of potential consumer savings on foolishness such as advertising CFL’s, forcing domestic light bulb plants out of business, subsidizing ridiculous alternative lighting, and taking steps to force higher prices and less reliable sources for electricity.

In addition, you will note that many analyses tout “cost savings” FOR THE GOVERNMENT which NEVER GET TO THE CONSUMER!!! The object should be to SERVE the people…not hold them captive to bad ideas which only benefit cronies of politicians. There is no way that a move to change the price of a 100 watt bulb from 50 cents to $8.00 will EVER pay off for the consumer: this is just pure, unproductive waste!!

landlines on March 23, 2013 at 12:51 PM

I replaced all my can lights and lamp lights with LED lights and my power bill dropped big time. I figure it’ll take a year to recoup and the next 4 years are pure gravy since they carry a 5 year guarantee.

SansJeux on March 23, 2013 at 12:35 PM

Unless you have replaced the can fixtures along with the bulbs, I sincerely hope your fire insurance is up to date: this is one of the most dangerous places to install LED lighting. Incandescent bulbs dissipate heat out the front of the bulb, while LED’s must be cooled through the fixture: a comparable LED source will make the can MUCH HOTTER.

And I’d like to see backup for your assertion that you can recoup the cost of conversion in a year: NO WAY!!!

landlines on March 23, 2013 at 12:57 PM

The CFL fiasco will go down in history as one of the worst examples of a government interference to force a negative-value product…
landlines on March 23, 2013 at 12:51 PM

Kinda like windmills and electric cars, huh.

petefrt on March 23, 2013 at 12:59 PM

My wife is epileptic and has lupus. The flickering of CFLs messes with her epilepsy and the cracks in them exposes her to ultra-violet light which is bad for her Lupus. I will use candles before I put something in my house which will negatively impact my wife.

It is for situations like this, if nothing else, that the classic light bulbs should be legal even if they were the more expensive bulbs.

I damn the government’s interference in this matter every time I think about it.

Theophile on March 23, 2013 at 1:23 PM

Why should I hook up electricity to my house.? That stuffs dangerous! Why do you think they use it to execute people? Anyway those electric bulbs give me a headache. And why should I depend on the electric company? The power can go out, and then I’ll be stumbling around in the dark! Anyway I’ve got enough kerosine for 6 months out in the shed…/s

claudius on March 23, 2013 at 1:55 PM

Unscrupulous bulb mongers,,,

I don’t care who you are, that’s funny, right there!

claudius on March 23, 2013 at 2:03 PM

I guess that means the vacuum tube to solid state revolution if finally complete.

Count to 10 on March 23, 2013 at 2:26 PM

On the other hand, people are now starting to develop nano-scale transistors that work on the same principle as vacuum tubes, so…

Count to 10 on March 23, 2013 at 2:27 PM

Erika,

I am disappointed that you linked CFLs to cancer. In theory, if you were sitting or staring directly under a CFL for hours on end every day for years, maybe you would get cancer. This is not normal behavior.

Maybe you just didn’t research it, but the UV damage can easily be mitigated. If you are more than a foot away or have a lamp shade attached, this blocks almost all radiation.

In general, the probability that artificial lighting for visibility purposes induces any acute pathological conditions is low, since the levels of maximum exposure are normally much lower than those where such effects occur in healthy people and certainly much lower than in typical summer daylight. In a common exposure situation, such as most household lighting, would involve an illumination level so low that exposure to potentially hazardous radiation is considered negligible.

In closing, light bulb ban is stupid, let the free market decide.

nazo311 on March 23, 2013 at 4:05 PM

You can get all the incandescents you want at 1000bulbs.com.

SukieTawdry on March 23, 2013 at 5:15 PM

I have enough good ‘ole 100 Watters stashed around the home to supply my lifetime, my son’s lifetime, and his (future) son’s lifetime.

Oh ya, and that goes for the 75′s too!

Need I detail how I altered those idiotic CARB EPA gas cans so they are, once again, joyfully reunited with an unobstructed nozzle and working vent? Let’s just call it Yankee Ingenuity!!! It is now a household JOKE around here that when I use my “new & improved” gas cans, I loudly proclaim: “screw you Lisa Jackson”!!! Laughs all around. Actually isn’t that what it’s become? Laughing at Liberals instead of just being thoroughly disgusted.

And Libtards, I don’t really care if “W” signed any of these measures into law or not; they were tacked on to a defense spending bill, if I recall correctly. Sigh.

GreatCommunicator on March 23, 2013 at 6:26 PM

Erika,
I am disappointed that you linked CFLs to cancer. In theory, if you were sitting or staring directly under a CFL for hours on end every day for years, maybe you would get cancer. This is not normal behavior.
nazo311 on March 23, 2013 at 4:05 PM

I’d forget the cancer risk and worry more about turning one’s house into a blazing inferno. When a CFL burns out, it really does burn out and spews mercury fumes all over the joint as a side benefit.

whatcat on March 23, 2013 at 6:29 PM

Unless you have replaced the can fixtures along with the bulbs, I sincerely hope your fire insurance is up to date: this is one of the most dangerous places to install LED lighting. Incandescent bulbs dissipate heat out the front of the bulb, while LED’s must be cooled through the fixture: a comparable LED source will make the can MUCH HOTTER.

And I’d like to see backup for your assertion that you can recoup the cost of conversion in a year: NO WAY!!!

landlines on March 23, 2013 at 12:57 PM

I did. Home Depot has a sweet replacement that works quite well.

SansJeux on March 24, 2013 at 12:56 AM

Rather than banning perfectly useful technologies like incandescents, we ought to use a more balanced and logical approach:

- the curlies have their uses, but make most sense when they are: located in places where they will be on more or less continuously, and where you don’t want any additional heat. Not good if the light will be on and off often.
- the “old-style” bulbs are most useful when you DO want the extra heat: traffic lights in snowy/icy regions, in the winter (also colder regions). Also good when the potential breakage hazard for the curlies is not worth it – like a baby’s room, the kitchen, or in parts of the house with flooring that can’t easily be cleaned up.
- LEDs are great – fabulous for night lights, flashlights, reading lights, and we have a string we sometimes use in the evenings when we want to have a subdued atmosphere (much as others use candles). Also we use them in the garden pathways, so we can get to our car without tripping.

I’m against banning. As I age, I find that I need VERY bright lights for close work. The curlies don’t give off enough light for me – I need the incandescants, or LEDs.

I’m also against government subsidizing companies. If they are better for the environment, let the greenies’ organizations pay out the subsidies.

lfox on March 24, 2013 at 12:00 PM

As I age, I find that I need VERY bright lights for close work. The curlies don’t give off enough light for me – I need the incandescants, or LEDs.

lfox on March 24, 2013 at 12:00 PM

If you need very bright light then I propose that CFLs are presently the optimum choice, but you might need to search on-line to get what you need. For close work a 30W CFL in a desk lamp will give you twice the light intensity of a 60W incandescent but with half the heat.

Online, it is fairly easy to buy CFLs with actual power use between 20W and 125W — these having approximately the intensity of 80W to 500W incandescents. The 125W bulbs are huge so not practical in many situations. I use lots of 30W size curlies.

The CFLs are also available in different color temperatures — 2700K is a yellow similar to an incandescent, while 6400K is almost indistinguishable from daylight. You might find you have better vision when using the higher color temperatures because they give you much more color contrast.

YiZhangZhe on March 24, 2013 at 12:59 PM

Government mandates can never keep up with technology. In fact, it is ofter incompatible with itself. For example, ethanol is required to, ostensibly, use less gas, but ethanol lowers mileage. My quick calculation on my jeep says it is a net even. The mileage dropped from 20 to 18.

RickCaird on March 24, 2013 at 1:58 PM

Wouldn’t it be awesome if we could judge lightbulbs on the basis of–silly thought here–how well they provide light? I don’t want to spend $25 on something that “comes close” to what costs a tiny fraction of that. And as has been previously stated, the big savings associated with CFLs and LEDs only show up for homeowners who stay in the same house for years–otherwise, you either have to pack your lightbulbs (and who wants to risk breaking all those mercury death bulbs and contaminating everything you own?)when you move or buy all new lights at considerable expense. And then there is the fact that incandescents do perform a helpful service, during the winter months for sure, in also providing heat and offsetting heating bills. And you don’t need to wear sunscreen when you need to use the light really close to detailed projects you’re working on.

In conclusion…I heart incandescents. Incandescents forever. Long live incandescents.

butterflies and puppies on March 24, 2013 at 2:32 PM

The People must not be allowed a free choice!

George W. Bush, the GOP and the Dems.

profitsbeard on March 24, 2013 at 5:03 PM

I think a better way to describe the incandescent vs CFL vs LED bulb situation is that politicians make laws which are categorical in nature — incandescent bad, CFL good, LED whazzat? — for the consumer where the market makes available choices where the consumer has the opportunity to decide what mix of tradeoffs suits their particular circumstances and uses. If not for the LED bulbs that are coming around, this would be almost a case of “one size fits all” for ordinary consumers.

CFLs do pretty well (generally last several years of ordinary use) if left on for a goodly period once turned on. They tend to go bad much sooner (say a year) if they are constantly turned on and off, say like a bathroom light.

LED lights do fine by me serving as partially a night light when I am active at night so I don’t trip over things and to provide light at specific locations like the keyboard area of my computer. Not as bright but adequate for my purposes. I might just swap out the CFL in my bathroom when it goes bad which is where I find it lasts about a year and see how the LED bulb fares.

Russ808 on March 24, 2013 at 5:19 PM

If there is an EMP, there will probably be no power to run anything… but just in case, I have a stash of filament bulbs :)

rgranger on March 24, 2013 at 5:20 PM

sablegsd on March 24, 2013 at 9:07 PM

If there is an EMP, everything inside a 20 or 40 foot shipping container will be protected as long as it is insulated mildly from the shell of the container. 1/4 inch plywood works well enough.

I bought my first LEDs, 75 watt 5000k replacements. Still awaiting their arrival. I did this after having bought all new lights for the house only to have over half burn out in a little more than a month.

After running electricity rates through an excel data sheet, I will save the cost of the bulbs in little more than a year of usage.

When the 100 watt replacements come out at a reasonable price, I will be updating to those likely.

astonerii on March 25, 2013 at 10:06 AM

I installed CFC bulbs in my home years before being told to by Big Brother, but not everywhere. I have a number of areas where I prefer to use a dimmer switch, which cannot be used with CFC bulbs.

These CFC bulbs are just so wonderful, that the list on what to do if one gets broken is about 15 steps long and I belive incudes overflights by NASA satellites to monitor any escaped alien gases.

For those nasty incadescent bulbs, it’s like wear shoes, sweep up broken pieces, throw away. Awful, just awful. Thank you, Big Brother for protecting me from my ignorant self. Dam, that sounds like it belongs in Pyongyang.

NeoCon_1 on March 25, 2013 at 10:36 AM

I use CFLs only for the front door and the outside garage lights because no one would steal them and I got those free from the power company.

SansJeux on March 25, 2013 at 2:11 PM

If I can’t buy incandescent, I will by LED. CFLs are banned from my house.

Mutnodjmet on March 22, 2013 at 6:53 PM

I use the CFL’s on the outside of my house. That way nobody will steal them.

flstc on March 25, 2013 at 2:48 PM

But we should be reminded of a similar case when the government mandated low flow per flush toilets. There was the toilet black market and most of us flushing multiple times to get the job done. Eventually the toilets were engineered better. This is probably the example that government ilk use as a success.

flstc on March 25, 2013 at 2:52 PM

I use the CFL’s on the outside of my house. That way nobody will steal them.

flstc on March 25, 2013 at 2:48 PM

Might want to do some research, I hear that they are a fire hazard outdoors.

astonerii on March 25, 2013 at 9:24 PM

Not to mention the number of American manufacturing jobs that were shipped overseas to China for production of the “better” light bulbs…and the manufacturers’ profits that are now going into Chinese bank accounts.

in_awe on March 26, 2013 at 4:26 PM

For the last two years, I have been experimenting with Cree LED bulbs in a portion of my new home. The quality of the light is much better than CFLs and is essentially equivalent to incandescent bulbs. However, bulb life is a problem. The LED itself is not the problem. It is the starter circuit that converts 120v AC into the DC voltage needed by the Cree LED. The base of the PAR 30 LED bulbs that I have used in the kitchen can be opened up to allow me to install/solder a new starter for about 1-2 dollars, but it is a pain to replace them and they only seem to last about one year before they fail. Besides that, smaller bulbs simply are not designed to allow replacement of the starter circuit. Because of this problem, I am now using Feit Electric decade incandescent bulbs that are designed for long life. They still use more watts, but they last longer than the LED bulbs. I hope that they can fix this design weakness of the LED bulbs, because they have great potential. In the meantime, it’s good old reliable, cheap incandescent bulbs for me.

NuclearPhysicist on March 27, 2013 at 10:01 AM

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