Video: Pope Francis’ Angelus blessing, plus shots of the crowd

posted at 2:01 pm on March 17, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

(VATICAN CITY) Earlier today, Pope Francis offered the traditional Sunday Angelus prayer, as well as blessings on the citizens of Rome.  At least 150,000 crowded into St. Peter’s Square and the Via Conciliazione to hear the new pontiff offer some spontaneous thoughts before and after the Angelus prayer, speaking only in Italian — a bit of a break from recent tradition.  “In just five days,” writes CBS News (via The Week), Francis’ straightforward, spontaneous style has become immediate hallmark of his papacy”:

Earlier Sunday, he made an impromptu appearance before the public from a side gate of the Vatican, startling passers-by and prompting cheers, before delivering a six minute homily — brief by church standards — at the Vatican’s tiny parish church.

I had actually heard about the plan for Francis’ homily late yesterday. In fact, I went to Mass there on Saturday morning before lining up for the papal audience, and we went once during our last trip to Rome.  The church is beautiful, with plenty of astonishing artwork, but very small.  I doubt it could seat 100 people, and even getting in early would have been an impossibility.  As it turned out, the combination of the planned Angelus and the city’s annual marathon forced the suspension of bus service in the center of the city, so I walked a mile to get to another church nearby the Vatican so I could cover the papal address. I had to walk back, too, and the planned sightseeing bus tour will have to wait for another day.

Instead of offering the entire event, which lasted around 13 minutes, the video below is of Pope Francis’ post-Angelus remarks, with still shots of the crowd during and immediately after the speech interspersed.  There are plenty of banners and flags, and be sure to see if you can spot Pakistan’s flag in the crowd, apparently representing the small Christian community there:

I shot this from the top of the left colonnade, part of the beautiful architecture that embraces the piazza from the basilica, and that’s a story in itself.  The top of the colonnade is around three or four stories up, and the only way up is a construction-style lift that normally panics me.  A kind photographer from National Catholic Reporter kept me calm, and it was well worth the journey.  I was able to get much clearer photos of detail on the basilica, and two of the images you will see in the video.  I’d guess that there were 200-300 media people up there with me, and I was probably in the first 50 to go back down at the end.

(Side note: I’ll have to go back up again, I believe, for the installation Mass on Tuesday, but I won’t shoot video; I’ll stick with still shots.)

To wrap this up, let’s check in with David Gregory on Meet the Press, talking with Cardinal Francis George about Pope Francis.  George tries to emphasize the pastoral focus of the new pontiff, but Gregory’s more interested in talking about American politics — which earns a rebuke from Cardinal George, as The Corner’s Patrick Brennan reports:

When asked about the tension between the Church’s teachings and contemporary attitudes, George emphasized that the pope “simply has to preach the Gospel,” even in a context so secularized that it seems “there is no god and Freud is his prophet.” He lamented that “for the sake of sexual liberation, we’re willing to let a lot of other liberties go.” The cardinal said he was “not sure we realize what’s going on,” but that Pope Francis “will help us to realize it better.” Gregory pushed him about the Church’s role in American politics, but the cardinal rejected that Catholic teachings are easily mapped onto American politics: “The categories you use are conservative and liberal, you’ll be using them today, our categories are what is true and what is false.”

Sounds like the media isn’t moving on from its initial focus in this papal transition.  Too bad.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

They are part of the proble. Lying is a sin gregory and you so called journalists do it every day, just like your glorious leader. Deceipt is not a virtue or moral behavior.

crosshugger on March 17, 2013 at 2:12 PM

Gregory the Goon!

KOOLAID2 on March 17, 2013 at 2:12 PM

Video cuts off at end in middle of the money quote. ” “The categories you use are conservative and liberal, you’ll be using them today, our categories are what is true and what is false.”

aquaviva on March 17, 2013 at 2:18 PM

The panel afterwards was even more cringeworthy.

Illinidiva on March 17, 2013 at 2:18 PM

Christianity does not bow to culture. The liberals just can’t handle that truth.

Rose on March 17, 2013 at 2:19 PM

Sounds like the media isn’t moving on from its initial focus in this papal transition. Too bad.

We have no reason to believe the media is going to be any less vehemently anti-truth and anti-religious as it has always been. In fact, my bet is they will get even more nasty and demonic given, at least from initial impressions, that Pope Francis’ example is going to be very effective at combating the evil rot that our mass media aids, comforts, and promotes.

BKennedy on March 17, 2013 at 2:21 PM

David Gregory is a despicable agenda “journalist”, and his agenda is liberalism. The Cardinal did a good job of diplomatically smacking down the weasel. The panel afterwards was almost unwatchable, particularly since it included Chris Matthews.

simkeith on March 17, 2013 at 2:26 PM

True and False………Words to make the head spin of any Progressive Government worshiping Leftie.

Moral relativism for all!!!

I’m surprised that when Gregory was told that his eyes didn’t turn fire red and the vomit started being spewed.

PappyD61 on March 17, 2013 at 2:34 PM

And it’s good to see that the 76 year old with one lung might be more like John Paul I and his ability to connect.

Though his papacy will not likely be a long one.

PappyD61 on March 17, 2013 at 2:35 PM

Gregory total putz

cmsinaz on March 17, 2013 at 2:39 PM

Madleine Muray O’Hare–the demon-filled person that brought down prayer in schools–was a rabid Satan worshipper, but one of her sons escaped eventually and became a minister who wrote a book about how deeply the satanic worshipping was imbedded in both Nazism and communism. It opens your eyes a lot and makes you shake your head when those in the GOP refuse to recognize that our freedom is vulnerable to these left meddling simply because ofour not dealing with the breakdown of social issues.
Dr. Carson has the same take–different words.

The simple truth is that the economy is but a by-product of moral corruption. But, as the cardinal just said, “for the sake of sexual liberation, we’re willing to let a lot of other liberties go.” And thqat applies to far too many on the right at well.

Don L on March 17, 2013 at 2:42 PM

“The categories you use are conservative and liberal, you’ll be using them today, our categories are what is true and what is false.”

If this were true, there would have been no reformation.

Kjeil on March 17, 2013 at 2:45 PM

The media blind like Gregory have the same template and view The Church as if it is some kinds of social club with a lot of arbitrary rules made up to oppress liberals.

Here are the rules. Nature. Truth. The sacred. The mysteries of the holy spirit. Love. Modesty. Charity. Thankfulness. The questions Gregory is asking are false questions, like a lot of the fantasy liberals seem to chase. They don’t see a natural law, they want Man to be bigger and better than God.

The church is not a political system. The church is the spiritual body of Christ, the rest is just window dressing. They can take it down and build it up differently, and Christ remains. I hope the new Pope will take charge and get rid of whatever leeches are attracted to good things.

The NYT has an even stranger op ed this weekend. I just remembered that I am not supposed to read the NYT, and the WPost and the B.Globe on Sunday. Darn, wasted my time.

Fleuries on March 17, 2013 at 2:46 PM

Sounds like the media isn’t moving on from its initial focus in this papal transition.

To paraphrase LTG Honore, stuck on stupid.

CC Senor on March 17, 2013 at 2:46 PM

As a Buddhist I sometimes wonder if Hindus ever get reborn as Catholics.

DarkCurrent on March 17, 2013 at 3:02 PM

Down with Gregory and down with the NcR.

Spade on March 17, 2013 at 3:19 PM

From what I’ve seen of him so far, Pope Francis’s communication style isn’t too dissimilar from Don Novello’s act as Fr. Guido Sarducci.

I love it.

But I probably need to learn Italian to fully appreciate it.

JimLennon on March 17, 2013 at 3:19 PM

Plus, Cardinal George to David Gregory: “The categories you use are conservative and liberal … our categories are what is true and what is false.”

To Gregory and his tribe it’s equivalent. To them liberal = true and conservative = false. Also, liberal = good and conservative = evil.

farsighted on March 17, 2013 at 3:19 PM

Gregory’s more interested in talking about American politics

Clearly Gregory wants a much more “Progression” Catholic Church.

The long range goal of “Progressives”, and this would take two Catholic Churches, is to split the Catholic Church in two and have a Pope for each. The Pope of the one would be a thrice married lesbian atheist who would reside in San Francisco and the Pope of the other would be a Muslim Imam with four 6 year old wives, already in burkas, who would reside in Meca.

VorDaj on March 17, 2013 at 3:58 PM

David Gregory lost me in the first minute. He began the interview respectfully addressing Cardinal George as “Your Eminence” then immediately had to bring up the shameful scandals that have infected our church as if there were anyone on the planet unaware of those scandals.

fourdeucer on March 17, 2013 at 4:05 PM

Hey, it’s gun law violator David Gregory! He’s not in jail? Whuh?

Trying to explain right and wrong to Gregory is like trying to explain algebra to a chimp. But at least the chimp wants to learn.

Sugar Land on March 17, 2013 at 4:18 PM

“The categories you use are conservative and liberal, you’ll be using them today, our categories are what is true and what is false.”

No more needs to be said. And so much of what Gregory and his kind believes IS false.

Alabama Infidel on March 17, 2013 at 4:30 PM

He lamented that “for the sake of sexual liberation, we’re willing to let a lot of other liberties go.”

!

Count to 10 on March 17, 2013 at 4:33 PM

I shot this from the top of the left colonnade, part of the beautiful architecture that embraces the piazza from the basilica, and that’s a story in itself.

Terrific job, Ed. I’m not Catholic, but I’m really enjoying your reportage.

John the Libertarian on March 17, 2013 at 4:36 PM

Like all socialists, Gregory favors ‘the state’ as his god above all else.

It was amusing to see Gregory DEMAND that the church change the bible to fit the needs of the polls he quoted.

The devil has many faces.

Freddy on March 17, 2013 at 4:44 PM

“The categories you use are conservative and liberal, you’ll be using them today, our categories are what is true and what is false.”

I’m sure you won’t mind if I steal, err, borrow, that one, Cardinal?

Cleombrotus on March 17, 2013 at 4:45 PM

“…but Gregory’s more interested in talking about American politics —”

His ideology is his religion…

Seven Percent Solution on March 17, 2013 at 5:39 PM

As a Buddhist I sometimes wonder if Hindus ever get reborn as Catholics.

DarkCurrent on March 17, 2013 at 3:02 PM

When I studied Hinduism in college, I saw many strange parallels between the two faiths. Mostly in the whole hierarchy of holy ancestors and divine beings that do the “leg work” of intercession between the sacred and the mundane. Even their Avalokiteshvara struck me as a vague Christ-like analog. I often thought that Hindus might be easier converts to Catholicism than westerners might think.

I say this as a life-long Protestant, with no intended insult towards Catholics or Hindus.

stefanite on March 17, 2013 at 5:43 PM

As a Buddhist I sometimes wonder if Hindus ever get reborn as Catholics.

DarkCurrent on March 17, 2013 at 3:02 PM

Catholicism is nirvana in one try.

unclesmrgol on March 17, 2013 at 7:49 PM

When I studied Hinduism in college, I saw many strange parallels between the two faiths. Mostly in the whole hierarchy of holy ancestors and divine beings that do the “leg work” of intercession between the sacred and the mundane. Even their Avalokiteshvara struck me as a vague Christ-like analog. I often thought that Hindus might be easier converts to Catholicism than westerners might think.

I say this as a life-long Protestant, with no intended insult towards Catholics or Hindus.

stefanite on March 17, 2013 at 5:43 PM

Some questions:
a) Do you ever ask someone to pray for you, or to pray for someone you love who is going through a troubled time?
b) If you do, then why? After all, if everyone has a direct line to God, then why have someone else pray for you?
c) If you die, are you still Christian?
d) If so, will you still pray for others?

Just askin’.

unclesmrgol on March 17, 2013 at 7:52 PM

As a Buddhist I sometimes wonder if Hindus ever get reborn as Catholics.

DarkCurrent on March 17, 2013 at 3:02 PM

When I studied Hinduism in college, I saw many strange parallels between the two faiths. Mostly in the whole hierarchy of holy ancestors and divine beings that do the “leg work” of intercession between the sacred and the mundane. Even their Avalokiteshvara struck me as a vague Christ-like analog. I often thought that Hindus might be easier converts to Catholicism than westerners might think.

I say this as a life-long Protestant, with no intended insult towards Catholics or Hindus.

stefanite on March 17, 2013 at 5:43 PM

Went to Mass this evening and sat next to a lovely young Indian family, the mother wore traditional sari dress.

The Priest was from India as well…and this is in Texas.

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 9:04 PM

As a Buddhist I sometimes wonder if Hindus ever get reborn as Catholics.

DarkCurrent on March 17, 2013 at 3:02 PM

Catholicism is nirvana in one try.

unclesmrgol on March 17, 2013 at 7:49 PM

Well Done unclesmrgol…

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 9:05 PM

“The categories you use are conservative and liberal, you’ll be using them today, our categories are what is true and what is false.”

If this were true, there would have been no reformation.

Kjeil on March 17, 2013 at 2:45 PM

Technically there was no reformation…There was another great schism.

Luther didn’t reform the Church or her Liturgy…He protested and was excommunicated.

The resulting schism formed Protestant denominations that have continued in schism with each other which resulted in 41,000 Christian denominations to date.

The Eastern Churches are in full communion with Rome and there will be Patriarchs attending the Papal Inauguration Mass.

The last pope to be crowned was Paul VI. Though he decided to cease wearing a papal tiara within weeks of his coronation, and laid his own on the altar of St. Peter’s Basilica in a gesture of humility, his 1975 Apostolic Constitution, Romano Pontifici Eligendo, still prescribed that “the new pontiff is to be crowned by the senior cardinal deacon.”

Pope John Paul I,John Paul II & Benedict XVI chose not to have Coronation Masses.

A handcrafted Papal Tiara was made for Benedict XVI…but he never wore it, just received it graciously as a State Gift from a group of German Catholics. It is in the Vatican Museum.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiara_of_Pope_Benedict_XVI

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 9:30 PM

Video cuts off at best part promoted in post.

Sherman1864 on March 18, 2013 at 5:58 PM