Video: Media meets Pope Francis in first public papal audience; Update: Video fixed

posted at 9:31 am on March 17, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

(VATICAN CITY) Pope Francis gave his first public audience yesterday morning, speaking for twelve minutes to some of the gathered media and a few of their guests.  As you will see in the very beginning of the video, the line to get into the hall for the audience stretched forward from roughly my place in it for a couple of hundred feet, and behind me for a few hundred yards by the time we started filing slowly into the media center.  (So much for irrelevance.) Not everyone made it in, unfortunately, but I ended up in the front half of the hall, with plenty of opportunity to take photos with a longer-range lens.

The video has Pope Francis’ remarks in full with some my photographs merged into it.  His speech was in Italian, but the official Vatican transcript follows (update: video fixed):

Dear Friends,

At the beginning of my ministry in the See of Peter, I am pleased to meet all of you who have worked here in Rome throughout this intense period which began with the unexpected announcement made by my venerable Predecessor Benedict XVI on 11 February last. To each of you I offer a cordial greeting.

The role of the mass media has expanded immensely in these years, so much so that they are an essential means of informing the world about the events of contemporary history. I would like, then, to thank you in a special way for the professional coverage which you provided during these days – you really worked, didn’t you? – when the eyes of the whole world, and not just those of Catholics, were turned to the Eternal City and particularly to this place which has as its heart the tomb of Saint Peter. Over the past few weeks, you have had to provide information about the Holy See and about the Church, her rituals and traditions, her faith and above all the role of the Pope and his ministry.

I am particularly grateful to those who viewed and presented these events of the Church’s history in a way which was sensitive to the right context in which they need to be read, namely that of faith. Historical events almost always demand a nuanced interpretation which at times can also take into account the dimension of faith. Ecclesial events are certainly no more intricate than political or economic events! But they do have one particular underlying feature: they follow a pattern which does not readily correspond to the “worldly” categories which we are accustomed to use, and so it is not easy to interpret and communicate them to a wider and more varied public. The Church is certainly a human and historical institution with all that that entails, yet her nature is not essentially political but spiritual: the Church is the People of God, the Holy People of God making its way to encounter Jesus Christ. Only from this perspective can a satisfactory account be given of the Church’s life and activity.

Christ is the Church’s Pastor, but his presence in history passes through the freedom of human beings; from their midst one is chosen to serve as his Vicar, the Successor of the Apostle Peter. Yet Christ remains the centre, not the Successor of Peter: Christ, Christ is the centre. Christ is the fundamental point of reference, the heart of the Church. Without him, Peter and the Church would not exist or have reason to exist. As Benedict XVI frequently reminded us, Christ is present in Church and guides her. In everything that has occurred, the principal agent has been, in the final analysis, the Holy Spirit. He prompted the decision of Benedict XVI for the good of the Church; he guided the Cardinals in prayer and in the election.

It is important, dear friends, to take into due account this way of looking at things, this hermeneutic, in order to bring into proper focus what really happened in these days.

All of this leads me to thank you once more for your work in these particularly demanding days, but also to ask you to try to understand more fully the true nature of the Church, as well as her journey in this world, with her virtues and her sins, and to know the spiritual concerns which guide her and are the most genuine way to understand her. Be assured that the Church, for her part, highly esteems your important work. At your disposal you have the means to hear and to give voice to people’s expectations and demands, and to provide for an analysis and interpretation of current events. Your work calls for careful preparation, sensitivity and experience, like so many other professions, but it also demands a particular concern for what is true, good and beautiful. This is something which we have in common, since the Church exists to communicate precisely this: Truth, Goodness and Beauty “in person”. It should be apparent that all of us are called not to communicate ourselves, but this existential triad made up of truth, beauty and goodness.

Some people wanted to know why the Bishop of Rome wished to be called Francis. Some thought of Francis Xavier, Francis De Sales, and also Francis of Assisi. I will tell you the story. During the election, I was seated next to the Archbishop Emeritus of São Paolo and Prefect Emeritus of the Congregation for the Clergy, Cardinal Claudio Hummes: a good friend, a good friend! When things were looking dangerous, he encouraged me. And when the votes reached two thirds, there was the usual applause, because the Pope had been elected. And he gave me a hug and a kiss, and said: “Don’t forget the poor!” And those words came to me: the poor, the poor. Then, right away, thinking of the poor, I thought of Francis of Assisi. Then I thought of all the wars, as the votes were still being counted, till the end. Francis is also the man of peace. That is how the name came into my heart: Francis of Assisi. For me, he is the man of poverty, the man of peace, the man who loves and protects creation; these days we do not have a very good relationship with creation, do we? He is the man who gives us this spirit of peace, the poor man … How I would like a Church which is poor and for the poor! Afterwards, people were joking with me. “But you should call yourself Hadrian, because Hadrian VI was the reformer, we need a reform…” And someone else said to me: “No, no: your name should be Clement”. “But why?” “Clement XV: thus you pay back Clement XIV who suppressed the Society of Jesus!” These were jokes. I love all of you very much, I thank you for everything you have done. I pray that your work will always be serene and fruitful, and that you will come to know ever better the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the rich reality of the Church’s life. I commend you to the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Star of Evangelization, and with cordial good wishes for you and your families, each of your families. I cordially impart to all of you my blessing. Thank you.

I told you I was cordially imparting my blessing. Since many of you are not members of the Catholic Church, and others are not believers, I cordially give this blessing silently, to each of you, respecting the conscience of each, but in the knowledge that each of you is a child of God. May God bless you!

As you can hear, Pope Francis has a sense of humor, and at least some of this was clearly off-script.  Frs. Federico Lombardi and Thomas Rosica at the Vatican press office had told us earlier in the week that they would probably not provide embargoed copies of remarks before they were given, as Francis’ spontaneity makes it impossible. Those who didn’t understand Italian had to wait to read the speech to see what he said.

I understand enough Italian to have grasped the main thrusts of his speech.  It’s clear that this pontificate will focus on the poor, and that his personal example (at least, if not his management) will be to introduce humility and poverty into the Holy See’s approach to the world.  Francis himself emphasized in the speech that his choice of name was explicitly from Francis of Assisi and not the Jesuit founder Francis Xavier or Francis de Sales, although the story about how the cardinals joked with him before his decision escaped me during his speech. Francis of Assisi was, like this Francis, a man who eschewed pomp for personal connection to pastoral work. Even Pope Francis’ spontaneity speaks to that impulse.

If the speech was in Italian, why include the audio, which I recorded separately? The words on the page don’t give as clear a sense of Francis as his own voice and images do.  As you can see and hear — even without understanding Italian — Francis brings a sense of joy, as other Popes have, but also a sense of personal connection, a humility and a humanity that sometimes has been lost in the trappings of the office.  He’s not afraid to tell self-effacing jokes or personal anecdotes, even to a gathering of the media.  That has a purpose, which he emphasized in this passage:

Christ is the Church’s Pastor, but his presence in history passes through the freedom of human beings; from their midst one is chosen to serve as his Vicar, the Successor of the Apostle Peter. Yet Christ remains the centre, not the Successor of Peter: Christ, Christ is the centre. Christ is the fundamental point of reference, the heart of the Church. Without him, Peter and the Church would not exist or have reason to exist.

The media also widely reported this passage:

How I would like a Church which is poor and for the poor!

Don’t expect Francis to divest the Church of its art and other resources, however; in an exhortation to the media, he noted that the Church protects and communications “truth, beauty, and goodness.”  What he means is a poverty of approach, an end to the pomp and excess of the Church, and he means to set that example personally from the start.   In yesterday’s briefing, the press office noted that he told the nuncio in Argentina that the people there should not come to the installation Mass on Tuesday, as it’s too expensive to travel to Rome, and that the money would be better off being spent on the poor.  (Fr. Rosica noted at the time with a hearty laugh, “This is not a prohibition, of course!”)

My personal sense of Pope Francis is that of a humble man perhaps thrown into a high-profile role, but with a very clear sense of himself and of a mission of reform.  Most of all, in my very first audience with any pontiff, I get the sense of a man who wants to focus on being the Pastor of the World more than on refining theology.  He wants to put into personal action — with prayer at the center — the efforts he sees as needed to evangelize the faith in the same way Francis of Assisi once advised: “Proclaim the Gospel … use words if necessary.”

This should be a very interesting — and different — pontificate. In a very real sense, it has already started to capture the world’s attention, and Francis’ personal touch will confound the skeptical and delight the rest.

Addendum: The Anchoress, with whom I had lunch yesterday along with Christiane Ried of the German wire service EPD, also attended the audience and has more thoughts.


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…just keep Uncle Joe away from the poor man!

KOOLAID2 on March 17, 2013 at 9:41 AM

“For you always have the poor with you, and whenever you wish you can do good to them; but you do not always have Me. ” mark 14:7

Logus on March 17, 2013 at 9:44 AM

This should be a very interesting — and different — pontificate. In a very real sense, it has already started to capture the world’s attention, and Francis’ personal touch will confound the skeptical and delight the rest.

Although I don’t agree with all of our new pope’s past statements, I have really high hopes about him, and his guidance in the coming years…a “people’s pope” if you will. His passage reminding the world that it is indeed Christ who is the center of the Church, not the pope. It’s amazing how many non-Catholics don’t understand that.

Awesome reporting as always, Ed. Happy St. Patrick’s day!

JetBoy on March 17, 2013 at 9:58 AM

Ed, the video is marked as private. We mere mortals can not access it.

simkeith on March 17, 2013 at 10:04 AM

not the Jesuit founder Francis Xavier

Co-founder

Gatekeeper on March 17, 2013 at 10:07 AM

You the new pope, Ed?

abobo on March 17, 2013 at 10:15 AM

” This is something which we have in common, since the Church exists to communicate precisely this: Truth, Goodness and Beauty “in person”. It should be apparent that all of us are called not to communicate ourselves, but this existential triad made up of truth, beauty and goodness…” – Pope Francis

Inspiring…Truly.

Thanks for the post Ed.

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 10:16 AM

Ed, the video is marked as private. We mere mortals can not access it.

simkeith on March 17, 2013 at 10:04 AM

Sorry about that. The video editor in which I’m working wants to do that as a default when it uploads. I’ve fixed it now.

Ed Morrissey on March 17, 2013 at 10:29 AM

How I would like a Church which is poor and for the poor!

While Our Lord calls on us to divest ourselves of our possessions, what He is leading us to is being “poor in spirit”… the first of the eight Beatitudes. Being to such an extraordinary degree awash in material wealth tempts us to take our eyes off the goal of the Faith… which is salvation through Jesus Christ.

Greek Fire on March 17, 2013 at 10:44 AM

Thanks, Ed, for all your reports from the Vatican these past days. It was good to have someone we trusted, and who has a vast knowledge of the Church as well, bringing us the story each day. Peace be with you.

TXUS on March 17, 2013 at 10:46 AM

Saint Francis of Assisi one of the most influential Catholic Saints according to Charles River Editors, providers of original content for third party publishers and republishes some of the greatest literary works via ebooks. St. Francis became the first person recorded in history to bear the stigmata.

fourdeucer on March 17, 2013 at 10:47 AM

Greek Fire on March 17, 2013 at 10:44 AM

And then there’s James 2:5…

Yeah, yeah, I know, epistle of straw ad all that..

sloopy on March 17, 2013 at 10:52 AM

I like this guy, I’m not religious but a first blush with the new Pope was positive for me based on what happened when he first spoke to the Cardinals, saying: “May God forgive you for what you’ve done.”

I figure if the dude can be self-effacing like that right off the bat he should be ok.

Bishop on March 17, 2013 at 10:58 AM

” All they asked was that we should continue to remember the poor, the very thing I had been eager to do all along.” Paul the Apostle. Galatians 2:10.

But he also wrote: “For even when we were with you, we used to give you this order: if anyone is not willing to work, then he is not to eat, either. For we hear that some among you are leading an undisciplined life, doing no work at all, but acting like busybodies. Now such persons we command and exhort in the Lord Jesus Christ to work in quiet fashion and eat their own bread.” I Thessalonians 3:10-12.

davidk on March 17, 2013 at 10:59 AM

the poor“……

…..let’s hope that’s not code for “social justice”.

PappyD61 on March 17, 2013 at 11:07 AM

Yeah, yeah, I know, epistle of straw ad all that..

sloopy on March 17, 2013 at 10:52 AM

Paul was writing about one’s redeemed position before God which cannot be gained by any works. (Saving faith is not a work. Saving faith is something you have.)

James was writing about the existential outworking of that saving faith. James’ epistle is a wondrous work, not “a right strawy epistle.”

I’m surprised that Martin Luther, and many Churches both Catholic and protestant, did/do not see that. It would save a lot of infighting.

davidk on March 17, 2013 at 11:08 AM

fourdeucer: The very fact that St. Francis of Assisi is so well-known (or, at least, perhaps the least misinterpreted) might contribute to the Evangelism.

Pappy: Well, that begs the question of what ‘social justice’ is code for, really.

While I would not be surprised if Pope Francis believes that, say, the poor should receive medical care even if they cannot afford it, from his background, he was one of the most anti-communist/socialist cardinals in the Curia.

I doubt we’ll be any worse off with him than we were with Benedict or Blessed John Paul.

Scott H on March 17, 2013 at 11:13 AM

Being at that first audience would be a treat for anyone. Thanks for fixing the video, Ed. Now your real fun starts. You get to follow Joe Biden around with a video/audio recorder for the next few days. I’m waiting for all the gaffes you get you capture. My prediction is he asks the Pope how his wife and children are. :)

simkeith on March 17, 2013 at 11:25 AM

So happy for you Ed! That must have been the experience of a lifetime.

eski502 on March 17, 2013 at 11:32 AM

How I would like a Church which is poor and for the poor!

While Our Lord calls on us to divest ourselves of our possessions, what He is leading us to is being “poor in spirit”… the first of the eight Beatitudes. Being to such an extraordinary degree awash in material wealth tempts us to take our eyes off the goal of the Faith… which is salvation through Jesus Christ.

Greek Fire on March 17, 2013 at 10:44 AM

There is another way to look at it…(Of course I’m a Catholic artist so I’m a bit biased)

Each of us are called to contribute what we can towards the evangelization of the Faith…including Artists and Artisans.

The Vatican awash in material wealth as you describe is a Church where for centuries Artists and Artisans contributed the best of their talents to their faith for God and the People (Our Family in Faith) to share. Charity pleases God.

(Creating those works was hard labor, but done with enthusiasm beyond seeking fame…Each commission was humbling in it’s challenge)

The Vatican shares this beauty with the world and that beauty lifts up hearts toward God.

Currently the Vatican is digitizing it’s Archives (One of the largest libraries in the world) to share with the world as it has shared these with scholars over the centuries.

Vestments are created all over the world by people of faith…Sacred Objects used for devotion and The Mass are created by people of Faith. This is an ongoing tradition of expressing creatively the Love for God.

The next time you see a beautiful Basilica, Cathedral or a small chapel…Think on the love that went into each carving and the great story of God’s love for his children and his children’s love for God reflected in each illustrated Gospel or each saints story of devotion to God in each stained Glass, carved pillar or architectural detail.

For Catholics this expression of Love brings us closer in a visceral way to revering God by celebrating in beauty our gratitude toward God,the Tradition and History that binds us as a people.

We all have our missionary work and for Artists and Artisans this is one aspect of service to God for his people…like musicians who create and perform sacred music…Sacred Poetry…It is a form of prayer,teaching and charity and this beauty inspires the weary souls of many.

imho

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 12:24 PM

What he means is a poverty of approach, an end to the pomp and excess of the Church.

POSTED AT 9:31 AM ON MARCH 17, 2013 BY ED MORRISSEY

Why does the pope wear such fancy clothing? Did Christ’s original apostles dress this way?

Rusty Allen on March 17, 2013 at 12:51 PM

What he means is a poverty of approach, an end to the pomp and excess of the Church.

POSTED AT 9:31 AM ON MARCH 17, 2013 BY ED MORRISSEY
Why does the pope wear such fancy clothing? Did Christ’s original apostles dress this way?

Rusty Allen on March 17, 2013 at 12:51 PM

The Pope’s clothing is pretty simple, actually. It just costs more today to have clothing that isn’t mass produced – and is made by hand the way it was made in the days of Christ. Yes, the Pope’s clothes are much like St. Peter: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2d/Pope-peter_pprubens.jpg/220px-Pope-peter_pprubens.jpg

eski502 on March 17, 2013 at 1:41 PM

Great report, Ed!

dogsoldier on March 17, 2013 at 1:45 PM

What he means is a poverty of approach, an end to the pomp and excess of the Church.

POSTED AT 9:31 AM ON MARCH 17, 2013 BY ED MORRISSEY

Why does the pope wear such fancy clothing? Did Christ’s original apostles dress this way?

Rusty Allen on March 17, 2013 at 12:51 PM

Even Jesus’ garment was handmade and seemless. Remember, the Romans were impressed by it’s fine workmanship. Today it would probably cost thousands.

philoquin on March 17, 2013 at 1:52 PM

What he means is a poverty of approach, an end to the pomp and excess of the Church.

POSTED AT 9:31 AM ON MARCH 17, 2013 BY ED MORRISSEY

Why does the pope wear such fancy clothing? Did Christ’s original apostles dress this way?

Rusty Allen on March 17, 2013 at 12:51 PM

Every article of clothing is symbolic of the Office & Tradition.

In terms of everyday the Pope wears a type of Papal Uniform that signifies his singular office in a fundamental way.

Starts with the Cassock.

The basic garment is the hand-stitched white wool cassock with white cape and wide silk sleeves. The cassock is fastened by 33 silk buttons recalling the years of the life of Christ, and is worn with a silk brocade sash with gold fringe. Later, this sash will have the new pope’s papal seal embroidered on it.

Over the cassock he will wear the classic burgundy red mozzetta, a short elbow-length cape worn by high prelates for formal occasions, and a gold embroidered stole – either red or white. (Pope Francis did not wear the mozzetta on his first appearance) The Mozzetta signifies Papal Authority.

The pope wears a white ‘zucchetto’, the beanie-like hat that bishops wear in purple and cardinals have in red.

Red shoes make up part of the traditional papal garb. (Pope Francis has kept his black shoes)

The Papal Regalia has symbolic meaning in Tradition as well and is worn during particular events at both Religious and State Functions.

Regalia:
Triregnum
Episcopal Mitre
Ring of the Fisherman
Crosier…Now replaced in the modern era with a Papal Cross
(Bishops still bear a Crosier)

Vestments:
Papal Pectoral Cross
Papal Pallium
Chasuble
Fanon
Stole
Maniple
Mantum

The Pope dresses in a particular way because he is singular in person and office.

Each vestment signifies symbolically the Office and the History of the Church as well as symbolic colors and ornament corresponding to the liturgical calendar.
(Priests alternate their vestments to the calendar as well)

Each Pope is a little different.

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 2:07 PM

Of course I’m a Catholic artist so I’m a bit biased

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 12:24 PM

Always mean to ask you: what kind of art do you do? Do you do specifically Catholic artwork or are you a Catholic who happens to be an artist? I’m genuinely curious, because I am a graphic designer who is Catholic.

I get so much out of your responses and I genuinely admire your detailed explanations of Catholic doctrine and teachings.

PatriotGal2257 on March 17, 2013 at 4:25 PM

Of course I’m a Catholic artist so I’m a bit biased

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 12:24 PM

Always mean to ask you: what kind of art do you do? Do you do specifically Catholic artwork or are you a Catholic who happens to be an artist? I’m genuinely curious, because I am a graphic designer who is Catholic.

I get so much out of your responses and I genuinely admire your detailed explanations of Catholic doctrine and teachings.

PatriotGal2257 on March 17, 2013 at 4:25 PM

Thanks for asking…I’m a classically trained oldschool painter.

Professionally I have a decorative arts business for Interior Designers and Architects. Finishes,Images,Gilding,Fresco etc.

I am also a printmaker and have done illustrations for some books not yet published (Probably never will be published, but I’m not the writer).

I make devotional works for friends on request or as gifts and may eventually retire to do that full time…There are architects who look for artists & artisans who specialize in Church re-modeling…There’s a lot of ugly modern churches out there that are being remodeled into traditional styles. Often they need made to order sacred objects and ornamentals.

Currently I’m working on designing a Stations of the Cross for a friend who converted from Anglican to Catholic a few years ago. Her brother was going to do it for her but died before he could finish it…I promised him I would complete the designs for him. A craftsman will carve the work from the brothers designs that I’m finishing.

Handmade Catholic Devotionals are great gifts…especially for newly ordained priests,monks,nuns and missionaries. Catholic families are looking for devotionals for their homes that reflect their faith and their culture. They make great sacramental gifts for Catholics.

As a graphic designer you could make some beautiful devotionals…It’s a great way to seek serenity and be of service in a particular way…imho

For Artists it is actively making prayers and visual evangelism. The Iconography traditions are fun to learn. Unless it’s eastern tradition most can be self taught from books and tradition under the tutelage of a learned spiritual advisor to avoid unintentional errors (like a mistake as to symbolic color,flower etc.)

In sacred Art everything has a meaning and is unified to the story the image/object is telling.

The New Liturgical Movement has inspired more interest in both Latin and Eastern Traditions…Benedict XVI has been great in encouraging and inspiring Catholic Artists.

http://fraangelicoinstitute.com/2013/03/16/the-meaning-of-lent-repentance-and-renewal/

http://thewayofbeauty.org/

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 5:35 PM

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 5:35 PM

Wow … I am very impressed! While I have a bachelor’s degree in English, I also have a two-year associate degree from a small art college, where I teach part-time now. I guess you could say I’ve been classically trained as well from my years at the art college, but more so on my own with my rather extensive library of art books. My full-time design job is at a company where I do mainly print graphics, although we’re trending toward multimedia (no surprise there), and that’s what I’m getting into pretty much on my own outside of work. As I’m sure you know, there is never enough time to practice. :)

There are architects who look for artists & artisans who specialize in Church re-modeling…There’s a lot of ugly modern churches out there that are being remodeled into traditional styles. Often they need made to order sacred objects and ornamentals.

Funny you should mention architecture! This was part of my response from another thread and it was true for me even as a young child.

A third thing which I’m sensitive to is church architecture. I despise almost all modern Catholic church architecture and if I were to move to another area and had the choice between a beautiful Gothic cathedral-style church and one that looked like a modified airplane hangar, I’d pick the Gothic cathedral every time. That’s an addition reason for me not to want to set foot in my childhood parish unless I absolutely had to: I can’t stand to look at it. There’s a reason why the Vatican has been so big on art and architecture throughout the ages: the beauty and grandeur of it is another way to help us become closer to God. Modified airplane hangars just don’t do it. :)

PatriotGal2257 on March 15, 2013 at 4:40 PM

As a graphic designer you could make some beautiful devotionals…It’s a great way to seek serenity and be of service in a particular way…imho. For Artists it is actively making prayers and visual evangelism. The Iconography traditions are fun to learn. Unless it’s eastern tradition most can be self taught from books and tradition under the tutelage of a learned spiritual advisor to avoid unintentional errors (like a mistake as to symbolic color,flower etc.) In sacred Art everything has a meaning and is unified to the story the image/object is telling. The New Liturgical Movement has inspired more interest in both Latin and Eastern Traditions … Benedict XVI has been great in encouraging and inspiring Catholic Artists.

Thanks so much for the links! They’re both bookmarked and I will look into them, and perhaps begin to study the art and craft of making devotionals. I love the idea of visual evangelism, seeking serenity and using the gift of art to become closer to God. I’m just overwhelmed thinking about it. Wow … Thank you.

This link does not pertain to sacred art as such, but when I stumbled onto this site many years ago, I do believe they were one of only a few places that are working actively to renew classical art traditions. You may have heard of it: The Art Renewal Center.

PatriotGal2257 on March 17, 2013 at 9:13 PM

A third thing which I’m sensitive to is church architecture. I despise almost all modern Catholic church architecture and if I were to move to another area and had the choice between a beautiful Gothic cathedral-style church and one that looked like a modified airplane hangar, I’d pick the Gothic cathedral every time. That’s an addition reason for me not to want to set foot in my childhood parish unless I absolutely had to: I can’t stand to look at it. There’s a reason why the Vatican has been so big on art and architecture throughout the ages: the beauty and grandeur of it is another way to help us become closer to God. Modified airplane hangars just don’t do it. :)

PatriotGal2257 on March 15, 2013 at 4:40 PM

Great link…thanks

Check this out…You’ll feel better (Catholics are correcting the…errors)

:)

This firm restores/remodels churches and builds new ones using classic Catholic Architecture from different periods (Oldschool with modern methods).

http://www.stroik.com/

This site has more on the movement to restore Catholic Traditions of Sacred Art & Architecture…
http://www.sacredarchitecture.org/articles/church_restoration_renovation_the_third_millennium/

I’ve always liked this little chapel…It was a gift from Henri Matisse to the nuns who cared for him when he was very ill…It is contemporary but intimate in scale and radiates Love for the Creator celebrated by the Nuns. He carefully thought of every detail and is an act of love and gratitude from him to these nuns. It was his last major work before he died…and I think his best.

http://www.musee-matisse-nice.org/expositions/chapelle_2001.html

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 10:52 PM

workingclass artist on March 17, 2013 at 10:52 PM

Thanks for your links, too. I found Duncan Stroik’s photostream on Flickr.com and I’m totally impressed. I’m really glad to see there seems to be a resurgence in traditional and sacred Catholic art and architecture.

And this leaped out at me from the article you linked:

Yet, in reality, the church renovators of those years merely acted on their own subjective desires rather than on the authority of the Council fathers. In fact, the Council had precious little to say about the architectural reform of our churches. Rather, Vatican II was dishonestly used as the catalyst for the reformation of Catholic church architecture.

Reading this makes me angrier still over the hijacking by Leftist elements inside the Catholic Church — among other things they hijacked, of course — and I’m glad to see that finally parishioners are starting to wake up to it and do something about it. Back in 2000, we very nearly had something like this happen in our parish (a classically-designed Gothic church) with one particular pastor who wanted to make a number of radical renovations as detailed in the article. But there was enough pushback from us average people in the pews that he discarded the idea. He did introduce some weirdly modern “art” in the couple years he was there, but thankfully none of it was permanently installed, so it was easily removed.

And I am very impressed with Matisse’s small chapel. What a labor of love! As I mentioned, I’m not a big fan of contemporary architecture of any kind, particularly churches, but this chapel is an exception.

Thanks again for the links. If I find others pertaining to either sacred or classical art, I will be happy to pass them along.

PatriotGal2257 on March 18, 2013 at 9:31 AM