Quotes of the day

posted at 10:01 pm on March 13, 2013 by Allahpundit

Bergoglio, 76, reportedly got the second-most votes after Joseph Ratzinger in the 2005 papal election, and he has long specialized in the kind of pastoral work that some say is an essential skill for the next pope. In a lifetime of teaching and leading priests in Latin America, which has the largest share of the world’s Catholics, Bergoglio has shown a keen political sensibility as well as the kind of self-effacing humility that fellow cardinals value highly, says his official biographer, Sergio Rubin.

Bergoglio would likely encourage the church’s 400,000 priests to hit the streets to capture more souls, Rubin said in an Associated Press interview. He is also most comfortable taking a low profile, and his personal style is the antithesis of Vatican splendor. “It’s a very curious thing: When bishops meet, he always wants to sit in the back rows. This sense of humility is very well seen in Rome,” Rubin said…

“Jesus teaches us another way: Go out. Go out and share your testimony, go out and interact with your brothers, go out and share, go out and ask. Become the Word in body as well as spirit,” Bergoglio said.

***

The new pontiff is considered a straight shooter who calls things as he sees them, and a follower of the church’s most conservative wing…

Bergogolio’s selection of the name of Pope Francis is “the most stunning” choice and “precedent shattering,” Allen said. “The new pope is sending a signal that this will not be business as usual.”

The name symbolizes “poverty, humility, simplicity and rebuilding the Catholic Church,” Allen said.

***

Tears and cheers erupted across Latin American on Wednesday as an Argentine cardinal became the first pope from the hemisphere, and many expressed hope that he help bring the church closer to the poverty-wracked region that is home to more Catholics than any other…

“It’s a huge gift for all of Latin America. We waited 20 centuries. It was worth the wait,” said Jose Antonio Cruz, a Franciscan friar at the church of St. Francis of Assisi in the colonial Old San Juan district in Puerto Rico…

Latin America has some of the world’s sharpest divides between rich and poor and Marvin Cruz, a Catholic at the Parish of the Miraculous in the Honduran capital of Tegucigalpa, said the pope’s “main challenge will be the fight against economic inequality.”

“His training as a Jesuit will allow him to take it head on,” Cruz said.

***

Pope Francis is unique not just for being the first Latin American pope. He’s also the first Jesuit pope, possibly signaling a renewed emphasis on traditional Catholic theology by the church…

“I think you’ll find a man who is conservative theologically but very strong on matters of social justice,” Sheeran said…

The Society of Jesus is the largest religious order of men in the Catholic Church, according to church statistics, and the largest single order of Catholic priests. But there has never before been a Jesuit pope, reflecting both the order’s own reluctance to get deeply involved in church politics and its history as a polarizing force within Catholicism.

“I’m amazed (Francis) was selected,” Sheeran said, because “the Jesuits steer clear of getting high-ranking jobs like this.”

***

Benedict was selected in 2005 as a caretaker after the momentous papacy of John Paul II, but the shy theologian appeared to show little inclination toward management. His papacy suffered from crises of communications — with Muslims, Jews and Anglicans — that, along with a sex abuse crisis that raged back to life in Europe in 2010, evolved into a crisis of governance…

Francis will have to help make the Vatican bureaucracy — often seen as a hornet’s nest of infighting Italians — work more efficiently for the good of the church. After years in which Benedict and John Paul helped consolidate more power at the top, many liberal Catholics also hope that the new pope will give local bishops’ conferences more decision-making power to help respond to the needs of the faithful.

The reform of the Roman Curia, which runs the Vatican, “is not conceptually hard,” said Alberto Melloni, the author of numerous books on the Vatican and the Second Vatican Council. “it’s hard on a political front, but it will take five minutes for someone who has the strength. You get rid of the spoil system, and that’s it.”

***

Yet the new pontiff is in other ways a cautious choice — first, because at 76, he’s only two years younger than Benedict was when he was chosen in 2005, and while not exactly a ‘caretaker pope,’ is certainly a less risky choice than someone younger, who would have been expected to have a longer pontificate…

Cardinal Borgoglio may also have been a less radical choice than some other options — Milan’s Cardinal Angelo Scola, for instance — in terms of institutional reform.

After years of embarrassing sexual abuse and financial scandals, anyone stepping into the role of pope knows sweeping administrative reform is needed — even those inside the Curia who will fight hardest for the status quo publicly say they support it — and the new pope has also spoken of the need to clean house, saying, “We have to avoid the spiritual sickness of a self-referential church.”

But since Cardinal Borgoglio never worked inside the Vatican, he’s seen as less likely than some other candidates were to overhaul the way its government functions, and doesn’t, the thinking being that to truly reform the Curia, it helps to know how it works.

***

My only provisional thoughts are these. First, whatever correlations of factions and forces within the conclave produced this result, Bergoglio won relatively swiftly, which — joined to his runner-up status last time, in a conclave that had a very different slate of cardinal electors — suggests a man with deep reservoirs of support and goodwill among his fellow prelates. Even if he was a compromise choice of some sort, his fellow electors were clearly quite happy to make it. If the new pope makes bold moves, and especially moves that ruffle feathers in the Roman court, it will reflect his confidence in that support. On the other hand, if he does prove more of a caretaker figure, it will be a sign that a supermajority of his fellow cardinals had much less interest in institutional change than the pre-conclave press accounts suggested.

Second, the choice of a Latin American makes a great deal of sense on paper, since Latin America is in many ways the place where the different experiences of global Catholicism converge. The region shares a New World experience with North America, a long record of church-state entanglements with Western Europe, a history of colonial exploitation and stark extremes of wealth and poverty with sub-Saharan Africa. The Latin church faces the same challenges from secularism and sexual liberation as the church in the developed world, and the same explosive growth of Pentecostalist and prosperity-oriented Christian alternatives as the church elsewhere in the global South. A pontiff from the region is thus a natural choice, in ways that an African or Asian pope might not have been, to move the church’s focus away from Europe and North America (and especially Europe) in some ways without cutting the Vatican off from the trends, issues and crises facing the church in a secularizing West.

***

But the other way to look at the dawn of this papacy is that it is one more in the pile of recent Catholic novelties and mediocrities. He is the first Latin American pope, the first Jesuit to be pope, and the first to take the name Francis. And so he falls in line with the larger era of the church in the past 50 years which has been defined by ill-considered experimentation: a “pastoral” ecumenical council at Vatican II, a new synthetic vernacular liturgy, the hasty revision of the rules for almost all religious orders within the church, the dramatic gestures and “saint factory” of Pope John Paul II’s papacy, along with the surprise resignation of Benedict XVI. In this vision, Benedict’s papacy, which focused on “continuity,” seems like the exception to an epoch of stunning and unsettling change, which—as we know—usually heralds collapse.

There are reasons to believe that Pope Francis is a transitional figure, unlikely to affect major reform at the top of the church. He is not known as a champion of any theological vision, traditional or modern. He is just two years younger than Pope Benedict was upon his election eight years ago. He has deep connections to Italy, but little experience with the workings of the Vatican offices. A contentious reading of Pope Francis’ rise is that Benedict’s enemies have triumphed completely. It is unusual for a one-time rival in a previous election to triumph in a future one. And there is almost no path to Bergoglio’s election without support from curial Italians, combined with a Latin American bloc. Low-level conspiracy theories already flourish in Italy that Benedict’s resignation was the result of a curia determined to undermine his reforms. This election will only intensify that speculation. An older pope who does not know which curial offices and officers need the ax, will be even easier to ignore than Benedict…

Of course, the papacy has offered surprises in the past. Catholic tradition holds that the papacy was built on a mediocre man, St. Peter, who was once described as “a shuffler, a snob, a coward—in a word, a man.” Pope Francis is now the man at the head of a Church impaired by immoral clergy, negligent bishops, and a moribund intellectual and spiritual life. God help him.

***


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Sleep well Ken.

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:19 AM

You’re wrong, but ignorance is always bliss, blessedly.

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:17 AM

yup as wrong as I was when I predicted here Obama would win pretty comfortably.

the polls were skewed remember lmao!

DBear on March 14, 2013 at 12:20 AM

Ave Maria – Schubert

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:20 AM

DBear on March 14, 2013 at 12:20 AM

Obama will destroy you all, one by one. I’m just watching, without funding you.

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:21 AM

I’m all poped out.

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 12:22 AM

Good evening..:)

Dire Straits on March 14, 2013 at 12:22 AM

Dire Straits on March 14, 2013 at 12:22 AM

Good evening, Dire. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:23 AM

I’m going to DIG up my old IBM selectric type writer with built in corrector ribbon and fire off a report to MG. I’ll need several hundred yards of corrector tape to make sure its impeccable and if anyone has a few gallons of white out I’d appreciate it.

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 12:24 AM

I’m all poped out.

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 12:22 AM

LOLZ! Good one…

OmahaConservative on March 14, 2013 at 12:24 AM

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 12:22 AM

I’d imagine he’s pretty tired, too, about now. All the excitement, and accepting such a monumental task.

Good evening, Rusty. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:24 AM

Hi, again, Jackie

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:27 AM

I’m all poped out.

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 12:22 AM

.
I believe that speaks for a lot of us, here … : )

listens2glenn on March 14, 2013 at 12:27 AM

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 12:24 AM

lol! Spark, just so long as it’s legible and fairly neat, it will suffice. I don’t want you spending too much time filing paper work. Besides your regular duties, you still have that hectic schedule frolicking with the nymphs and flirting with the ‘hotties’ in the Glade. Don’t spread yourself too thin. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:27 AM

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:27 AM

Good evening, Schadenfreude. It’s great to see you, as always. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:28 AM

Father Z has an interesting writeup on Pope Francis, whom he met in 2009…

excerpt:

“Then one day as I was leaving the palazzo, he was getting out of a car and coming in, wearing under a greca the house cassock, fascia, and zucchetto of a Cardinal of Holy Roman Church.

It turns out that it was Jorge Card. Bergoglio I had been lunching with.

Since he had impressed me simply as a person, I started paying more attention to him and what he had done. I asked around and learned a little about this S. American prelate…

Effectively, Card. Bergoglio thinks that baptism should be given more freely even to the children of those who are not practicing their faith. Some time ago, Pope Benedict also said something along these lines, explaining that when he was younger, he had a more restrictive view. The Church in S. America is facing a horrible challenge from secularism and relativism on the one hand, fundamentalist sects on the other.

“Cardinal Bergoglio has explained the meaning of all this in an interview with the international magazine “30 Days”:

The child has no responsibility for the condition of his parents’ marriage. The baptism of children can, on the contrary, become a new beginning for the parents. A while ago, I baptized the seven children of one woman, a poor widow who works as a maid and had her children by two different men. I met her on the feast of Saint Cajetan. She said to me, ‘Father, I am in mortal sin, I have seven children and have never had them baptized, I don’t have the money for the godparents and for the party… I saw her again and after a little catechesis I baptized them in the chapel of the archepiscopal residence. The woman said to me, ‘Father, I can’t believe it, you make me feel important’. I said to her, ‘But madam, what do I have to do with it? It’s Jesus who makes you important.[Do I hear a big "Amen!"?]

Bergoglio is anxious not to extinguish a tradition typical of the most remote areas of Argentina, in those towns and villages where the priest comes only a few times a year:

“There, popular piety feels that children must be baptized as soon as possible, so there are men or women known by all as ‘bautizadores’ who baptize the children when they are born, in anticipation of the arrival of the priest. And when he arrives, they bring the children to him so that he can anoint them with holy oil, completing the rite. When I think about it, I am reminded of the story of those Christian communities in Japan that were without priests for more than two hundred years. When the missionaries returned, they found all of them baptized and all of them sacramentally married.”

http://wdtprs.com/blog/2009/12/whos-the-important-one/

workingclass artist on March 14, 2013 at 12:29 AM

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:28 AM

I linked something for you, related to the NHS/health’care’, in col. 2.

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:29 AM

wolly4321 on March 13, 2013 at 11:34 PM

It is not wrong to hate evil. It is what you do after deciding to resist evil that can be the problem. As to scorn read Psalms 1. It is not something you want to get into.

chemman on March 14, 2013 at 12:30 AM

I don’t know. I’m not Catholic. But we need allies in freedom. Argentina.. communism is not charity. At some point there’s a big fight coming. Just like all of us they’ll have to decide when enough is enough.

Hope they choose well.

Nighty night. See ya tomorrow.

wolly4321 on March 14, 2013 at 12:32 AM

Etude Opus 10, no. 3 – Chopin (Pollini)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:32 AM

workingclass artist on March 14, 2013 at 12:29 AM

What a wonderful anecdote. Thanks for sharing…

OmahaConservative on March 14, 2013 at 12:32 AM

Oh, and ya’ll forget to read my latest crazy rant… The Path Forward.

SWalker on March 14, 2013 at 12:33 AM

uh, why? just like the GOP the catholic church is a relic and as popular with young people as cold sores….

DBear on March 14, 2013 at 12:12 AM

Actually, young Catholics are more conservative than older Catholics. Francis will likely be very popular with them.

Resist We Much on March 14, 2013 at 12:33 AM

the catholic church is a relic and as popular with young people as cold sores….

DBear on March 14, 2013 at 12:12 AM

Quick…. Somebody tell the hundreds of teenagers who go to Friday Mass every week just a couple blocks from my house, they apparently do not have any idea that they hate the Catholic Church.

SWalker on March 14, 2013 at 12:35 AM

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:05 AM

Yes. It’s absolutely contemptible to put people in a situation where being able to communicate effectively and efficiently, both with staff and patients, is critical to life and well being, who cannot speak and read English fluently. It is malicious, and when people suffer needlessly and die as a result, they will, just as they are now claiming in Britain, say it was ‘an oversight’, or, as they so often do here, claim it as ‘an unexpected consequence of the legislation’.

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:38 AM

DBear on March 14, 2013 at 12:12 AM

Which shows just how much you understand about Christianity (Catholic or Protestant versions). It doesn’t exist to be popular with anyone. It does call you to deny yourself and take up your cross and follow Him.

chemman on March 14, 2013 at 12:39 AM

Love Will Find A Way – Yes

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:45 AM

Just for DBear

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:45 AM

Roundabout – Yes

Peter Banks, guitarist and co-founder of “Yes”, died of heart failure in his home March 7. He co-wrote and performed on the first two seminal albums for the band. He was 65.

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:48 AM

uh, why? just like the GOP the catholic church is a relic and as popular with young people as cold sores….

DBear on March 14, 2013 at 12:12 AM

Actually, young Catholics are more conservative than older Catholics. Francis will likely be very popular with them.

Resist We Much on March 14, 2013 at 12:33 AM

Agreed.

I think he could have great impact on missionaries.

Article excerpt:

“It recounts his response to the legalization of same sex marriage as an “absolutely illegal” act by the government.

In a mass for victims of trafficking, he condemned human trafficking in a manner both concrete and demanding:

“in our city there are people committing human sacrifice, killing the dignity of these men and these women, these girls and boys that are submitted to this treatment, to slavery. We cannot remain calm.” …. The cardinal urged his fellow citizens to report “breeding grounds for submission, for slavery,” “altars where human sacrifices are offered and which break the will of the people,” asking that “everyone do what they can, but without washing their hands of it, because otherwise we are complicit in this slavery.”

He offered a broad account of the sins of a “discarding culture”

This culture consists of applying the “death penalty” through abortion, and in “hidden euthanasia” of the elderly through neglect and maltreatment.…“there is hidden euthanasia, the social infrastructure pays up to a certain limit, but discards the elderly when, in fact, they are the seat of the wisdom of the people.” Children “are maltreated; they are neither educated nor nourished. Many are forced to prostitute and exploit themselves.”

He went on to challenge a “puritan” focus on sexual morality in preaching.

In a forceful speech last Fall, he condemned the refusal to baptize a child born out of wedlock as “hypocritical clericalism” and “pharisaical Gnosticism” and “sacramental blackmail.”

in this “hijacking” of the sacrament that marks the beginning of Christian life, the Jesuit cardinal sees the expression of a rigorous and hypocritical neo-clericalism which also uses the sacraments as tools to affirm its own supremacy. For example by rubbing the fragility and wounds of faithful in their faces or by dampening the hopes and expectations of those who supposedly do not fulfill the “requirements” in terms of doctrinal preparation or moral status. Not only are such pastoral models misleading, but according to Bergoglio, this modus operandi distorts and rejects the dynamics of Christ’s incarnation, which is reduced to a mere doctrinal slogan to serve the interests of religious power. “Jesus did not preach his own politics: he accompanied others. The conversions he inspired took place precisely because of his willingness to accompany, which makes us all brothers and children and not members of an NGO or proselytes of some multinational company.”

http://americamagazine.org/content/all-things/quotes-pope-francis

Interview with vatican insider dated 2/24/2012

http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/inquiries-and-interviews/detail/articolo/america-latina-latin-america-america-latina-12945/

workingclass artist on March 14, 2013 at 12:48 AM

A communis in charge of Labor

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:48 AM

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:23 AM

Good evening..:)

Dire Straits on March 14, 2013 at 12:51 AM

Communist, for Labor, mainly illegal labor.

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 12:51 AM

Dire Straits on March 14, 2013 at 12:51 AM

It’s great to see you, Dire. Any tunes for us? :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:53 AM

Hey Mark, how have you been?

OmahaConservative on March 14, 2013 at 12:55 AM

We Have Heaven – Yes

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:56 AM

http://youtu.be/-7eloXr2iak

natives

Fred

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:01 AM

Nothing Compares To You – O’Conner

With the perspective of time, and given her fall, this tune takes on a completely different meaning… today.

Time will tell.

Still, a good tune.

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:02 AM

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:01 AM

Good evening, Fred. How cool. A great tune. I haven’t heard it in a while. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:04 AM

We Have Heaven – Yes

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 12:56 AM

LOL… some guy at Macy’stoday had ..and You and I from Close tothe Edge as a cell ring tone today. That brought back memories. Jon Anderson is a lovely guy. He really is what he sings. He is a true believer.

lexhamfox on March 14, 2013 at 1:04 AM

Soon

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 1:05 AM

http://youtu.be/hmZv5ND2YuI

lobo

Fred

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:07 AM

Interview with Cardinal Bergoglio from Feb. last year…

“What do you make of the Pope’s decision to call for a year of faith and his insistence on the new evangelisation?

“Benedict XVI has insisted on the renewal of faith being a priority and presents faith as a gift that must be passed on, a gift to be offered to others and to be shared as a gratuitous act. It is not a possession, but a mission. This priority indicated by the Pope has a commemorative purpose: through the Year of Faith we remember the gift we have received. And there are three pillars to this: the memory of having been chosen, the memory of the promise that was made to us and the alliance that God has forged with us. We are called to renew this alliance, our belonging to the community of God’s faithful.”

What does evangelisation mean in a context such as that of Latin America?

“The context is that which emerged from the fifth conference of Latin American bishops, held in Aparecida, in 2007. It called us to undertake a continental mission, the entire continent is a missionary state. Plans were and continue to be made, but the paradigmatic aspect remains: all ordinary activities of the Church take place in view of the mission. This signifies very strong tensions between centre and periphery, between parish and district. We need to come out of ourselves and head for the periphery. We need to avoid the spiritual sickness of a Church that is wrapped up in its own world: when a Church becomes like this, it grows sick. It is true that going out onto the street implies the risk of accidents happening, as they would to any ordinary man or woman. But is the Church stays wrapped up in itself, it will age. And if I had to choose between a wounded Church that goes out onto the streets and a sick withdrawn Church, I would definitely choose the first one.”

What is your experience of this in Argentina and in Buenos Aires in particular?

“We seek to make contact with families that are not involved in the parish. Instead of just being a Church that welcomes and receives, we try to be a Church that comes out of itself and goes to the men and women who do not participate in parish life, do not know much about it and are indifferent towards it. We organise missions in public squares where many people usually gather: we pray, we celebrate mass, we offer baptism which we administer after a brief preparation. This is the style of the parishes and the diocese itself. Other than this, we also try to reach out to people who are far away, via digital means, the web and brief messaging…”

http://vaticaninsider.lastampa.it/en/inquiries-and-interviews/detail/articolo/america-latina-latin-america-america-latina-12945/

workingclass artist on March 14, 2013 at 1:09 AM

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 1:05 AM

Good one. I’d forgotten that one.:)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:10 AM

God and the reverse

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 1:10 AM

lexhamfox on March 14, 2013 at 1:04 AM

Good evening. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:10 AM

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:07 AM

lol! I hadn’t even thought of that in ages. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:11 AM

Dancing In The Moonlight – King Harvest

Just had to. :)

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:14 AM

http://youtu.be/x_iLZXjhI-g

cry

Fred

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:14 AM

OT – this is simple enough for Obama to get it.

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 1:14 AM

Mona – Quicksilver Messenger Service

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:18 AM

The world’s most annoying ad is harassing me. Stop it Google. Stop bugging me. Almost as annoying as Michelle Obama.

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 1:20 AM

Schadenfreude on March 14, 2013 at 1:14 AM

He understands it. He’s just a very poor president. He’d rather lie and obfuscate than do the right thing for the nation and rein in that runaway spending and draft a budget that will lower the deficit and balance the budget… ever.

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:21 AM

If you flex your glutes every so often it can burn calories and firm up you gluteus.

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 1:22 AM

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 1:20 AM

That is bad.

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:23 AM

If you are a couch potato flexing your glutes can provide all the exercise you need to sit on the couch for hours.

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 1:25 AM

Fade To Black – Dire Straits

Ahh… it’s grown late again. Time flies. So much to do.

I bid you all a fond goodnight. It’s been a pleasure, as always. See you soon.

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:29 AM

thatsafactjack on March 14, 2013 at 1:18 AM

back in them days i was known to wear bell bottoms too.

Fred

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:31 AM

Good night all, have a Blessed evening…

OmahaConservative on March 14, 2013 at 1:32 AM

One more reflection from a conservative catholic blogger…

“If a person can be excited, happy, fearful, nervous, and almost ashamed at one time, then that was me.

As someone who describes my spirituality as “Dominican” and my theology as “Thomistic” a Pope named Francis, a Jesuit, was the furthest thing from my heart and mind. I will let you in on some insight — I was so wrapped up in all of this, that I had in my convoluted mind that this selection was specifically directed at me. When the full gravity of the situation, as it pertained to me, finally hit I could do nothing but laugh.

A Jesuit named Francis.

As one sarcastic meme said today, “Well played Holy Spirit, well played.”

I wanted someone who carried a sword, who lashed out with his tongue – I wanted a Pope that would “flip over the tables” in the temple. I wanted Leo XIV, Pius XIII, or Pope Rambo. I wanted ferocity, I wanted a Dominican-style preacher that would convince the world of Christ through logic and analysis. I wanted to be lead in the way I needed – or so I thought I needed…

How quick to judge I was, how short-sighted.

Then he came out onto the balcony. “Good evening” he said to the world. He asked for prayers, bowed his head, and that is when I

francis-1

realized — I must be humbled. As I like to throw around on my blog, “He must increase, I must decrease.” This isn’t about me. This is about the Church. This is about the body of Christ.

We have a Pope. He is a humble servant, a man of the people and for them. If Benedict spent almost a decade mending and healing the Church on the “inside”… it appears that Francis will spend his time healing on the “outside.” If Benedict worked to make the Liturgy something where people could come to experience, sense, and worship God. It seems that Pope Francis will go out now and gather the people in. If Benedict taught us the importance “Spirit of the Liturgy” then Pope Francis will work to teach us the “Body of the Liturgy.”

So, if you want to know what you should do with Pope Francis I suggest the following prayer, as cliche as it may seem:

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace,
Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
Where there is injury, pardon;
Where there is doubt, faith;
Where there is despair, hope;
Where there is darkness, light;
Where there is sadness, joy.

O Divine Master,
grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled, as to console;
to be understood, as to understand;
to be loved, as to love.
For it is in giving that we receive.
It is in pardoning that we are pardoned,
and it is in dying that we are born to Eternal Life.

Amen. ”

http://www.ignitumtoday.com/2013/03/13/what-is-a-dominican-thomist-to-do-with-pope-francis/

workingclass artist on March 14, 2013 at 1:34 AM

http://youtu.be/wBnmOtWsp9M

what were you expecting?

Fred

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:35 AM

So…

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 1:37 AM

Peaceful transition of power in China and the Vatican on the same day. Ahhhhhhhh

lexhamfox on March 14, 2013 at 1:39 AM

http://youtu.be/g8MYsii4DZY

just for the hell of it.

Adios: vaya con dios

jrsrigmvr on March 14, 2013 at 1:46 AM

Sorry I am late checking back in..:)

Dire Straits on March 14, 2013 at 2:26 AM

I am asleep right now. My doctor is trying to cure me of sleep Blogging. The pills he gave me don’t work.

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 2:35 AM

Happy Pi day.
its 3/14

SparkPlug on March 14, 2013 at 2:44 AM

Happy pi day!
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Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 3:20 AM

Good morning Detroit!

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 3:24 AM

Sleep well, HotAirians

tommy71 on March 14, 2013 at 3:35 AM

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 3:20 AM

Rusty, you forgot to lead off with the 3.

That’s important if you don’t want to get stuck with some big rational number on your hands that’s not useful for anything but counting!

;)

INC on March 14, 2013 at 3:35 AM

I think our domestic useless idiots have a point: The Catholic Church is quite reliable on social issues (with the exception of the death penalty) and especially the Pro-Life movement owes much to the Catholic Church, but when it comes to economic questions Catholicism usually is bad news.

Valkyriepundit on March 14, 2013 at 3:35 AM

Gotta get some more sleep. Tarantula

tommy71 on March 14, 2013 at 3:38 AM

INC on March 14, 2013 at 3:35 AM

I know, I tries to paste it and that’s how it came out.

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 4:07 AM

Rusty Allen on March 14, 2013 at 4:07 AM

I knew you knew. Just kidding. I guess HA doesn’t do higher math! ;)

INC on March 14, 2013 at 4:46 AM

Good morning HA :)

cmsinaz on March 14, 2013 at 6:00 AM

Pi day?

and I’m on a diet :(

tom daschle concerned on March 14, 2013 at 6:41 AM

Bergoglio would likely encourage the church’s 400,000 priests to hit the streets to capture more souls, Rubin said in an Associated Press interview.

They’ll need a fitness program for that. Exercising shoe leather has not been something I have seen from the RCC as far back as I can remember. Locally they will have to try and outcompete the JW which, while swell people, aren’t exactly what I would call on the most sound of footings. They need some competition to sharpen their game and if the RCC starts to send not just priests but Jesuits out… hmmmm… Black Robed Regiment and supporting the faith to uplift your local communities…

Shoe leather priests! You want ‘community organizing’? Any organization structured on the Roman Legion ought to be pretty good at that. Let the new crop of priests know that they gotta log those miles on foot, to carry the good word out. I suggest at least sending them in pairs so you know that someone has always got your back… or whatever it is the old manuals from the Legion suggests, they always had a way of getting the word out…

Yes, although this is the Pope of The End, it cannot be forgotten that endings are also beginnings as well.

ajacksonian on March 14, 2013 at 7:07 AM

Good morning HA :)

cmsinaz on March 14, 2013 at 6:00 AM

Good morning yourself. How are Joe and Mika dealing with a new Pope this morning? For sure they aren’t going to bring up the utterly partisan political way that the rat-eared wonder hailed the choice or the fact that they are sending Biden to head up the delegation despite the fact that the new Pope doesn’t think that Biden should be allowed communion based on his hatred of unborn life.

Happy Nomad on March 14, 2013 at 7:14 AM

…morning!

KOOLAID2 on March 14, 2013 at 7:21 AM

Mornin’, y’all!

O/T: If the right to privacy means anything, it is the right of the individual, married or single, to be free from unwarranted governmental intrusion. – William J. Brennan

Anout that “Right to Privacy”…My take.

kingsjester on March 14, 2013 at 7:24 AM

O/T: If the right to privacy means anything, it is the right of the individual, married or single, to be free from unwarranted governmental intrusion. – William J. Brennan

kingsjester on March 14, 2013 at 7:24 AM

Unwarranted governmental intrusion. What a quaint idea. But of course, here in the real world, we have the FDA requiring calorie counts on bottled water, a mayor demanding we get rid of high capacity soda cups, legislators wanting to get rid of the Second Amendment, the federal government spying on us because they can, and Obamacare.

Happy Nomad on March 14, 2013 at 7:30 AM

I’m sure the Left is very disappointed in the choice of Francis I as Pope. I bet even non-believers were all but praying for a ‘modern’ Pontiff who would sanctify SSM and abortion. Instead, the Church has a traditionalist leading it. I’m not Catholic, but I’ll be interested to see the Church’s direction and the Left’s reactions to it.

Liam on March 14, 2013 at 7:33 AM

I’m sure the Left is very disappointed in the choice of Francis I as Pope. I bet even non-believers were all but praying for a ‘modern’ Pontiff who would sanctify SSM and abortion. Instead, the Church has a traditionalist leading it. I’m not Catholic, but I’ll be interested to see the Church’s direction and the Left’s reactions to it.

Liam on March 14, 2013 at 7:33 AM

I’m not catholic either and I can tell you that I couldn’t care less what the stupid left thinks about the pope.

re: kingsjesters blog, Another agency that the reprobates in DC can use to punish their enemies with. Of course the left will be silent about this.

I now live in the world that as a technophobe I feared most.

just wait till people start experiencing persecution at health care centers for non medical info.

tom daschle concerned on March 14, 2013 at 7:41 AM

Liam on March 14, 2013 at 7:33 AM

For an example of how upset Libs are over the selection of Pope Francis, please review yesterday’s thread. Our Trols are positively apoplectic.

Especially sese or “sissy hooligan” as I call him/her/it.

kingsjester on March 14, 2013 at 7:41 AM

kingsjester on March 14, 2013 at 7:41 AM

Just read about a page on that thread. Not a happy day in Libland. I got a kick out of the troll who said he’s not a bigot. *LOL*

Liam on March 14, 2013 at 7:53 AM

— and the new pope has also spoken of the need to clean house, saying, “We have to avoid the spiritual sickness of a self-referential church.”

Haven’t been to a church lately – either Catholic or otherwise – where that doesn’t apply.

Cleombrotus on March 14, 2013 at 8:41 AM

At little Pope Francis humour.

At the end of last night’s dinner with Cardinals, Pope Francis spoke and ended with

“May God forgive you for what you have done.”

can_con on March 14, 2013 at 8:55 AM

At little Pope Francis humour.

At the end of last night’s dinner with Cardinals, Pope Francis spoke and ended with

“May God forgive you for what you have done.”

can_con on March 14, 2013 at 8:55 AM

I saw that…A Pope with a sense of humor.

Catholics worldwide are curious about this fellow (That liberals are angry is a good sign…and although he has demonstrated compassion for Gays, he’s not shy about voicing opposition to Gay Marriage or Gay adoptions)

Saw this at Father Z’s blog from the first press event…Pope Francis will go see Benedict XVI this weekend.

“We were told that the General of the Jesuits issued a statement about the election of Francis, a Jesuit. He referred to the special bond of Jesuits with the Pope and their vow of obedience. ( I look forward to seeing that in some certain Jesuits I have in mind.)

The Pope knows Spanish, Italian, German, English, and French and probably some Portuguese.

A question was raised about security given that this Pope is rather spontaneous and informal. The security team will have to do its best given the Pope’s style.”

http://wdtprs.com/blog/2013/03/updates-on-pope-francis-first-day-as-pope/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+wdtprs%2FDhFa+%28Fr.+Z%27s+Blog+-+What+Does+The+Prayer+Really+Say%3F%29&utm_content=Google+Reader

workingclass artist on March 14, 2013 at 9:14 AM

This is interesting…Perhaps He will encourage the Bishops to take action that is wholly within their authority.

As Cardinal Bergoglio was outspoken on denying the Eucharist to unrepentant facilitators of abortion including politicians.

“Such an instance is not the only way in which the Holy Father has been clear on his pro-life stance as a Cardinal. In an article about Francis I, LifeSiteNews mentions that in 2007, on behalf of the bishops of Latin America, Cardinal Bergoglio clearly stated that being disallowed holy communion was a consequence for those who facilitated in an abortion, politicians included…

…Pope Francis I looks to be a very promising pro-life leader for the Church. It is even more encouraging that he has taken such a clear and adamant stance against such Catholics receiving holy communion. Hopefully other leaders within the Church will follow the call of the Holy Father then…”

http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2013/03/pope-francis-clear-on-denying-communion-to-politicians-who-facilitate-abortion/

workingclass artist on March 14, 2013 at 9:23 AM

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