The end of a free press in Taiwan?

posted at 1:01 pm on February 16, 2013 by Jazz Shaw

With everything happening back here at home these days, it’s easy to lose track of some of the stories taking place half a world away. This weekend, I wanted to take a moment to touch on one story of eroding freedom in a long time ally of the United States, Taiwan. Erika posted a story earlier about how China’s new leadership is leaning hard on old fashioned communist suppression moving into the future, and I have to wonder if they aren’t looking at similar tactics in Taiwan. On the island nation, Chinese interests are gobbling up the press market, a move which may soon put independent journalism on the endangered species list.

The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) joins its affiliate the Association of Taiwan Journalists (ATJ) in expressing concern about the details of the sale of Next Media’s Taiwan Holdings and the potential threat posed to media diversity and press freedom in Taiwan.

It was first reported in mid-October by local media that media mogul Jimmy Lai planned to sell his Taiwan-based print and television assets to a consortium including Jeffrey Koo, the chairman of Chinatrust Charity Foundation, William Wong, chairman of the Formosa Plastics Group (FPG), and a Singapore-based private equity fund.

Concerns over the impact on media diversity as a result of the sale have heightened following confirmation of the dominance of Want Want China Times Group (WWCT)– whose Chairman tycoon Tsai Eng-meng, is largely seen as pro-Beijing–in the US$601.2 million deal has been confirmed.

The deal includes the sale of Taiwan’s Chinese-language newspapers, Apple Daily, Sharp Daily, as well as Next Magazine and Next TV.

I realize this may seem like something of an obscure story at the moment, but it really should be of concern to the United States. We’re not only seeing more aggressive moves by the Chinese at home, but it comes at a time when the US is shifting its foreign policy focus to the western Pacific. The long running, barely contained hostilities between mainland China and Taiwan are no secret, and the position of the United States as a backer of Taiwan put us in an increasingly delicate position in the coming century.

The lack of media freedom and diversity in Taiwan is already being widely noted. Reporters Without Borders has already downgraded Taiwan in their rankings of press freedom in Asia, where they had previously ranked first. The Wall Street Journal has taken note of the Taiwanese youth fighting for their freedom all over again and protesting the pending media deal. Allowing the Chinese to slowly seal up the public flow of information in Taiwan would set a dangerous precedent and pave the way for potentially worse things to come. I’m not sure what, if anything, the US can do about this beyond speaking out and using their influence in the region, but it definitely seems worth the effort.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Tyranny is utopia. Learn to love it.

tom daschle concerned on February 16, 2013 at 1:07 PM

The end of a free press in Taiwan?

…how about the US of A?

KOOLAID2 on February 16, 2013 at 1:07 PM

Good, now we don’t have to defend their a$$es.

abobo on February 16, 2013 at 1:08 PM

…WTF do you think is happening slowly…slowly…slowly here?

KOOLAID2 on February 16, 2013 at 1:09 PM

Thomas Friedman is no doubt very pleased.

Gator Country on February 16, 2013 at 1:14 PM

The long running, barely contained hostilities between mainland China and Taiwan are no secret, and the position of the United States as a backer of Taiwan put us in an increasingly delicate position in the coming century.

Barely contained hostilities? I wonder how many Taiwanese flew home today after spending the Spring Festival holiday on the mainland?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:15 PM

Uh, the US backed Taiwan (ROC) when there was far less freedom. And Taiwan is hardly a unique case.

aryeung on February 16, 2013 at 1:16 PM

When China senses that the time is right for taking Taiwan, they will take it.

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 1:16 PM

When China senses that the time is right for taking Taiwan, they will take it.

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 1:16 PM

I assume you mean the People’s Republic of China since the Republic of China already has Taiwan.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:19 PM

The long running, barely contained hostilities between mainland China and Taiwan are no secret

Jazz, could you give a recent example of such barely contained hostilities.

aryeung on February 16, 2013 at 1:19 PM

OT …

FACEBOOK GETS MULTIBILLION-DOLLAR TAX BREAK

per Drudge……SURPRISE…SURPRISE…SURPRISE…!!!

KOOLAID2 on February 16, 2013 at 1:20 PM

You think maybe someone could start a new newspaper? It would take a bit of money, but Taiwan’s government isn’t the one clamping down — the sellers, in essence, are — as is their right.

If there’s a market for a conservative viewpoint, then the paper will fly. If not….

unclesmrgol on February 16, 2013 at 1:21 PM

When China senses that the time is right for taking Taiwan, they will take it.

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 1:16 PM

I assume you mean the People’s Republic of China since the Republic of China already has Taiwan.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:19 PM

I think he meant exactly what he said. Your dancing for the neo-fascist regime in mainland China doesn’t change any of the facts regarding the nature of who they are.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:22 PM

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:19 PM

You are correct, sir. It’s only a matter of time.

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 1:24 PM

The lack of media freedom and diversity in Taiwan is already being widely noted.

The lack of media diversity closer to home has also been noted. What would someone new to the US who watched only broadcast news on CBS, NBC, and ABC in the think?

As to the lack of media freedom in the US, the Left is working on that. Efforts are under way to silence conservative talk radio and FOXnews, and the WH is an enthusiastic supporter.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:25 PM

Personally – I think it’s time to hand Taiwan over to the Chinese. Tell the Chinese … “You keep the frack away from Japan – no more conflict with them – and you let US deal with North Korea (or you can go in and take the country yourself).”

The Taiwanese government have given up their “return” policy. They no longer advocate retaking the mainland. You cannot be the legitimate government of China unless you have the mainland, or at least intend to retake it. They have neither.

Give ‘em to the Chinese.

HondaV65 on February 16, 2013 at 1:26 PM

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:22 PM

Thanks. I didn’t understand his quibble.

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 1:26 PM

End of free Taiwan is coming. I hope we ship nuclear weaponry to them…make the Commies pay dearly if they try it.

MelonCollie on February 16, 2013 at 1:26 PM

For bonus points, let’s compare “media freedom and diversity” in Taiwan with that in mainland Communist China.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:27 PM

I think he meant exactly what he said. Your dancing for the neo-fascist regime in mainland China doesn’t change any of the facts regarding the nature of who they are.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:22 PM

Don’t get your panties in a twist.

Fact is both the PRC and ROC consider themselves ‘China’. In fact it’s what the common ‘C’ stands for, as you probably know.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:29 PM

Thanks. I didn’t understand his quibble.

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 1:26 PM

He always trots out some nonsense as to why China is justified in everything they do. It’s tiresome.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:29 PM

Fact is both the PRC and ROC consider themselves ‘China’. In fact it’s what the common ‘C’ stands for, as you probably know.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:29 PM

I do and I also know what Taiwan means and China as well when used side by side.

When someone tells me about North Korea I don’t jump in asking whether they mean the northern part of South Korea. It’s just a deflection from the point being made.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:33 PM

Personally – I think it’s time to hand Taiwan over to the Chinese. Tell the Chinese … “You keep the frack away from Japan – no more conflict with them – and you let US deal with North Korea (or you can go in and take the country yourself).”

Give ‘em to the Chinese.

HondaV65 on February 16, 2013 at 1:26 PM

The US sort of did that when we established diplomatic relations with the PRC and stopped recognizing the ROC as the government of China.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:37 PM

It’s just a deflection from the point being made.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:33 PM

AKA, BS.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:38 PM

per Drudge……SURPRISE…SURPRISE…SURPRISE…!!!

KOOLAID2 on February 16, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Not a surprise if you read Karl Denninger.

gh on February 16, 2013 at 1:38 PM

I do and I also know what Taiwan means and China as well when used side by side.

When someone tells me about North Korea I don’t jump in asking whether they mean the northern part of South Korea. It’s just a deflection from the point being made.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:33 PM

So if someone just said ‘Korea’ which part would they mean?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:39 PM

AKA, BS.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Exactly.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:41 PM

AKA, BS.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:38 PM

Oops, I meant CS

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:41 PM

So if someone just said ‘Korea’ which part would they mean?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:39 PM

“We need to withdraw our troops from Korea”.

“We can’t allow Korea to develop a nuclear tipped ICBM”

“I was on vacation in Korea and it was great fun”

Doesn’t exactly take a genius to figure it out.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Maybe if we called them something simple like ‘West China’ and ‘East China’ it’d be easier to ignore the real complexities of the situation.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Maybe if we called them something simple like ‘West China’ and ‘East China’ it’d be easier to ignore the real complexities of the situation.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:45 PM

Maybe we could call one of them after the island of Taiwan? That might work! /s

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:49 PM

Maybe we could call one of them after the island of Taiwan? That might work! /s

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:49 PM

I think we should leave that up to them, don’t you?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:51 PM

Since it’s really none of our business anyway.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:51 PM

Mainland commie China: area 3,747,879 sq mi, population about 1,350,000,000.

Taiwan: area 13,974 sq mi, population about 23,000,000.

Easy to see how someone could be confused about which you are talking about when someone says “China”. /

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:54 PM

I’m not sure what, if anything, the US can do about this beyond speaking out and using their influence in the region, but it definitely seems worth the effort.

We could do some things, but the Obama/Biden team cheering on the ChiComs.
Biden openly stated he didn’t see anything wrong with China’s murderous one-child policy. He probably couldn’t think of anything to object to with the press monopoly, either.

itsnotaboutme on February 16, 2013 at 1:55 PM

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 1:51 PM

I am going to go out on a limb here and guess that the situation is ‘so complicated‘ that if China were to act militarily to seize Taiwan, there just wouldn’t be any way we could respond militarily and unravel the complexities until after the invasion was successful?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:57 PM

I’m for nuking every yellow bastard if my Ali mountain tea supply dries up.

tom daschle concerned on February 16, 2013 at 1:52 PM

I will be writing to HotAir’s tip line about your stupid, calloused, senseless, racist remark.

itsnotaboutme on February 16, 2013 at 1:58 PM

The lack of media diversity closer to home has also been noted. What would someone new to the US who watched only broadcast news on CBS, NBC, and ABC in the think?

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 1:25 PM

If a neutral observer were to do as you postulated, the only conclusion they could draw is that the media reaching the bulk of US citizens is controlled solely by, and for the benefit of, the Democrat party and more specifically the far left wing element of the democrat party. If that neutral observer were to then be provided an employment history of the members of that media and democrat politicians, that conclusion would be further reinforced — the MSM and democrat offices are a revolving door.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 1:58 PM

One calls itself the “People’s Republic of China”, claims ownership of the territory currently occupied by the “People’s Republic of China” + that occupied by the “Republic of China” and some mostly inconsequential islets.

The other calls itself the “Republic of China”, claims ownership of the territory currently occupied by the (who could have guessed) “Republic of China” + that occupied by the “People’s Republic of China” + Mongolia and some mostly inconsequential islets. Basically all ever formerly Qing territory, without exception.

It’s all China, except maybe Mongolia and the Senkaku Islands.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:00 PM

I am going to go out on a limb here and guess that the situation is ‘so complicated‘ that if China were to act militarily to seize Taiwan, there just wouldn’t be any way we could respond militarily and unravel the complexities until after the invasion was successful?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:57 PM

Taiwan is already occupied by the Chinese. You’ve been to Taiwan I think…

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:04 PM

I will be writing to HotAir’s tip line about your stupid, calloused, senseless, racist remark.

itsnotaboutme on February 16, 2013 at 1:58 PM

Well, keep it civil.

/

Solaratov on February 16, 2013 at 2:06 PM

I’m for nuking every yellow bastard if my Ali mountain tea supply dries up.

tom daschle concerned on February 16, 2013 at 1:52 PM

That goes very well with your

“let’s repeal the amendment that gave blacks their freedom. No seriously” comment.

I see I haven’t misjudged you.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:07 PM

Taiwan is already occupied by the Chinese. You’ve been to Taiwan I think…

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:04 PM

Would you support an American military response to an attack?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 2:08 PM

I am going to go out on a limb here and guess that the situation is ‘so complicated‘ that if China were to act militarily to seize Taiwan, there just wouldn’t be any way we could respond militarily and unravel the complexities until after the invasion was successful?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:57 PM

Taiwan is already occupied by the Chinese. You’ve been to Taiwan I think…

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:04 PM

Reading comprehension fail. And more chickesh!t.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 2:10 PM

Taiwan is already occupied by the Chinese. You’ve been to Taiwan I think…

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:04 PM

Yeah, I can see where the term “tiresome” comes in to play here.

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 2:13 PM

Would you support an American military response to an attack?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 2:08 PM

I suppose that would depend first on whether it was an attack on an entity the US had formal diplomatic relations with, and whether or not there were any specific treaty obligations.

Certainly treaty obligations must be upheld.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:20 PM

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:04 PM

I think it’s cute that HotAir has its own PRC propagandist. Apparently HotAir has sufficient viewership that the PRC thinks it worthwhile to have an apologist assigned to this site. … Or maybe they were able to find a useful idiot that volunteered to serve for free.

It never has anything negative to say about the PRC, that’s for sure.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 2:21 PM

Reading comprehension fail. And more chickesh!t.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 2:10 PM

When you go to Taiwan (as I guess you probably don’t), what language do you speak?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:21 PM

It never has anything negative to say about the PRC, that’s for sure.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 2:21 PM

I think I might if HA ever had an overly positive post about China.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:24 PM

I think I might if HA ever had an overly positive post about China.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:24 PM

What can we say positively about Communism?

(This should be fun)

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 2:26 PM

O/T but this great news on gun makers! Gotta love them for this and it might be nice to buy from these businesses when you need guns/ammo?

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/02/15/group-of-second-amendment-supporting-gun-makers-now-refusing-to-sell-arms-to-law-enforcement-in-new-york-and-other-gun-restricting-states/
L

letget on February 16, 2013 at 2:28 PM

I think I might if HA ever had an overly positive post about China.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:24 PM

So your opinion of an oppressive regime is determined by the fact that others post negative opinions about said regime so therefore you must post only positive comments. Kind of a counter-balancing viewpoint, eh? Doesn’t matter if the negative comments are correct or not, you just need to counteract with positive.

Yeah, propagandists do that.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 2:29 PM

If China took Taiwan, Obama would leave the room again….

Don L on February 16, 2013 at 2:36 PM

Don’t we still have a TREATY with Taiwan to protect them ?
Or did I miss something ?

Lucano on February 16, 2013 at 2:36 PM

letget on February 16, 2013 at 2:28 PM

Absolutely awesome. Would be more cool if some of the major manufacturers were todo the same thing.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 2:40 PM

When you go to Taiwan (as I guess you probably don’t), what language do you speak?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:21 PM

What language do most speak in Austria?

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 2:41 PM

Don’t we still have a TREATY with Taiwan to protect them ?
Or did I miss something ?

Lucano on February 16, 2013 at 2:36 PM

Nope. Carter annulled it in 1979.

That was his way of saying that he was fine with a Chinese attack on Taiwan.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 2:41 PM

So your opinion of an oppressive regime is determined by the fact that others post negative opinions about said regime so therefore you must post only positive comments. Kind of a counter-balancing viewpoint, eh? Doesn’t matter if the negative comments are correct or not, you just need to counteract with positive.

Yeah, propagandists do that.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 2:29 PM

I post what I see. I’m not pro-Communist, but if I see some BS I’ll call it BS.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:45 PM

What language do most speak in Austria?

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 2:41 PM

I’ve only been there once, decades ago. Might have been Belgian Dutch, maybe Flemish or Swiss. It sounded kind of like German but with a different accent and tonality. Maybe Swedish.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:52 PM

He always trots out some nonsense as to why China is justified in everything they do.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 1:29 PM

No, DarkCurrent makes remarks derived from his experience.

Others commenting about China repeat what they have learned about China from the propaganda departments that westerners like to think of as their un-biased “free press”. In other words they get their China information from the same media that spouts liberal and socialist propaganda, that fails to ask intelligent pertinent questions of politicians, that treats fashionable rumours with the same gravity as historical facts, that suffers from herd mentality and group-think, that seeks to profit by offering lewd and base titillation, and that contains more ignorant opinion and speculation than it does raw reportage. Most China “information” comes from the same free-press that is frequently and justifiably derided by HotAir commentators.

Given the source of the “knowledge” most westerners have regarding China it is not surprising that somebody actually living China should hold contrary views.

YiZhangZhe on February 16, 2013 at 2:53 PM

Don’t we still have a TREATY with Taiwan to protect them ?
Or did I miss something ?

Lucano on February 16, 2013 at 2:36 PM

Nope. Carter annulled it in 1979.

That was his way of saying that he was fine with a Chinese attack on Taiwan.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 2:41 PM

Thanks , I should have googled it first .
We still do have the Taiwan Relations
Act ” to provide Taiwan with arms of
defensive character ”
Wasn’t there some question of this during
the Bush administration ? Aircraft maybe ?

Lucano on February 16, 2013 at 2:58 PM

I’ve only been there once, decades ago. Might have been Belgian Dutch, maybe Flemish or Swiss. It sounded kind of like German but with a different accent and tonality. Maybe Swedish.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 2:52 PM

Nice dodge, or you aren’t as smart as you think you are.

They speak German in Austria and have for a millenia, at least. German is the official language of Austria.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 2:59 PM

YiZhangZhe on February 16, 2013 at 2:53 PM

Nice speculation and good imagination. Totally wrong, but nice try. As far as getting our information from the MSM and therefore that is leading to our negative opinions. Please cite any MSM story in the past several years that has been negative toward China. With the exception of stories on Foxpro, and that is really more aimed at denigrating US companies like Apple or Nike than China, China is portrayed in a very positive light.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 3:01 PM

Continuing with the German analogy… “Germany” was never a nation state in the modern sense until established in 1866. Prussia and Austria went to war to settle which would become the dominant player in a new German speaking nation state that would embrace all other predominantly German speaking regions. Prior to 1866 what became “Germany” was a loosely confederated group of large and small German speaking regions, city-states, duchies, principalities, etc.

After WW I the Versaille treaty handed many predominantly German speaking regions over to existing or new non-German speaking nation states.

In the late 1930′s Hitler attempted by diplomacy, intimidation, and finally force to incorporate all German speaking regions into a Greater Germany, because he believed all of these regions were part of “Germany, “The Reich”, etc.

What mainland commie China is trying to do with Taiwan is not unlike what Hitler tried to do with Austria, the Sudetenland, Danzig, etc.

In modern times everyone know what most people mean when they say “Germany”. They obviously do include Austria as part of Germany.

Similarly, in modern times everyone knows what most people mean when they say “China”. They obviously do include Taiwan as part of China.

To obscure this fact and lecture others, and to try to use one’s own definitions as opposed to common usage, is pedantic chickensh!t sophistry. And not unlike what liberals and lefties do when they use their own newly created definitions for words, like “racism”.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 3:07 PM

In other words they get their China information from the same media that spouts liberal and socialist propaganda, that fails to ask intelligent pertinent questions of politicians, that treats fashionable rumours with the same gravity as historical facts, that suffers from herd mentality and group-think, that seeks to profit by offering lewd and base titillation, and that contains more ignorant opinion and speculation than it does raw reportage. Most China “information” comes from the same free-press that is frequently and justifiably derided by HotAir commentators.

YiZhangZhe on February 16, 2013 at 2:53 PM

Sorry, but we can make up our own minds and obviously we have to have done so or we wouldn’t be conservatives would we?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 3:08 PM

This is a capitalistic takeover, NOT a crackdown. BIG difference, very little different from some media buys in the west. If there is a market for a ‘fox-style’ alternative, it WILL arise.

michaelo on February 16, 2013 at 3:35 PM

Continuing with the German analogy… “Germany” was never a nation state in the modern sense until established in 1866.

….
…….

……….
….

…..

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 3:07 PM

See, that’s where your analogy is flawed. At the outset.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 3:37 PM

“Barely contained hostilities? I wonder how many Taiwanese flew home today after spending the Spring Festival holiday on the mainland?”

Way to conflate the people with their POS dictators. BTW, not a lot of people traveling the opposite direction for the holiday, you know how it is for Chinese trying to get visas out of their socialist paradise

bernverdnardo1 on February 16, 2013 at 3:49 PM

Would you support an American military response to an attack?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 2:08 PM

LOL – no … would you? Why?

When Reagan was running for office – he was a bit supporter of Taiwan – so was I.

BACK then … Chang Kai Shek was the President of Taiwan and he and his Quomintang party had PLEDGED to retake the mainland someday.

Chang is dead … and Quomintang have disavowed their previous intentions to retake the mainland.

So why is the disposition of Taiwan an issue? They aren’t a particularly valuable ally. They have problems with running their democracy even.

I say … give the Chinese Taiwan in return for backing down off Japan … AND allowing us to “solve” the North Korean problem. Personally, if the Chicomms don’t want us going into NORK then I’m perfectly fine with them going in and restoring some kind of sanity to the place.

Taiwan is a liability – one we can ill afford anymore.

HondaV65 on February 16, 2013 at 3:59 PM

Oh dear the sinophile has rendered judgement…

How many more cycles must I suffer through?

I mean, I just want to sit down for a feast with the princely guy who took out his earrings.

tom daschle concerned on February 16, 2013 at 4:00 PM

See, that’s where your analogy is flawed. At the outset.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 3:37 PM

Tiresome pedantic, chickenshi!t, sophistry.

Obviously no analogy is ever perfect. All analogies are flawed.

The underlying point remains.

And you are the one who started this with your poorly thought through question about what language they speak in Taiwan.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 4:02 PM

… BTW, not a lot of people traveling the opposite direction for the holiday, you know how it is for Chinese trying to get visas out of their socialist paradise

bernverdnardo1 on February 16, 2013 at 3:49 PM

Most of the restrictions aren’t on the Chinese side though, are they?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:07 PM

Tiresome pedantic, chickenshi!t, sophistry.

Obviously no analogy is ever perfect. All analogies are flawed.

The underlying point remains.

And you are the one who started this with your poorly thought through question about what language they speak in Taiwan.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 4:02 PM

Back to the point, what language is it that’s most commonly spoken on Taiwan?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:10 PM

I say … give the Chinese Taiwan in return for backing down off Japan … AND allowing us to “solve” the North Korean problem. Personally, if the Chicomms don’t want us going into NORK then I’m perfectly fine with them going in and restoring some kind of sanity to the place.

Taiwan is a liability – one we can ill afford anymore.

HondaV65 on February 16, 2013 at 3:59 PM

I say … give the Germans the Sudetenland in return for backing down off Czechoslovakia … AND allowing us to “solve” the threat to international peace. Personally, if the Nazi’s don’t want us going into Poland then I’m perfectly fine with them going in and restoring some kind of sanity to the place.

The Sudetenland is a liability – one we can ill afford anymore.

I think that sort of thinking doesn’t work in the long run. You are buying a temporary peace and creating expectations in the mind of the enemy that cannot be met.

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 4:10 PM

Back to the point, what language is it that’s most commonly spoken on Taiwan?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:10 PM

Mandarin.

Why?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 4:16 PM

Back to the point, what language is it that’s most commonly spoken on Taiwan?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:10 PM

LOL. Now that you’ve had some time to think of a reply after being told that is irrelevant you want to waste more of my time?

Fat chance.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 4:17 PM

“Most of the restrictions aren’t on the Chinese side though, are they?”

Are you kidding? Chinese citizens can’t even visit Hong Kong without permission from Beijing. Yeah, in communist China you need permission to leave, and its not easy to get. Surely you know this…

“Most restrictions” lol, you know damn well almost any place in the world freely gives tourist visas if they can get the hell out of China.

bernverdnardo1 on February 16, 2013 at 4:23 PM

I say … give the Chinese Taiwan in return for backing down off Japan … AND allowing us to “solve” the North Korean problem. Personally, if the Chicomms don’t want us going into NORK then I’m perfectly fine with them going in and restoring some kind of sanity to the place.

Taiwan is a liability – one we can ill afford anymore.

HondaV65 on February 16, 2013 at 3:59 PM

Because that approach was so successful for Chamberlain when ceding the Sudetenland to Germany. Yes, we should emulate those actions that have been historically demonstrated to be resounding successes.

AZfederalist on February 16, 2013 at 4:27 PM

LOL. Now that you’ve had some time to think of a reply after being told that is irrelevant you want to waste more of my time?

Fat chance.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 4:17 PM

Heh, seems you just did.

Tip: Know what you speak of before you speak.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:31 PM

Mandarin.

Why?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 4:16 PM

Mandarin as in Mandarin Chinese?

Read up the thread for context

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:35 PM

LOL. Now that you’ve had some time to think of a reply after being told that is irrelevant you want to waste more of my time?

Fat chance.

farsighted on February 16, 2013 at 4:17 PM

Obviously…

ladyingray on February 16, 2013 at 4:38 PM

This is disturbing. Look at what one-party control of the media has produced here in the US–Creeping government control of the economy, class warfare, impending eviseration of the defense department and the curtailment of freedom of speech at our great universities.

KW64 on February 16, 2013 at 4:40 PM

Jazz, you or Erika (preferably Erika) really should come to China.

Ed should pay for it.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Back to the point, what language is it that’s most commonly spoken on Taiwan?

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:10 PM

Mandarin.

Why?

sharrukin on February 16, 2013 at 4:16 PM

Hey, I learned something today,
All this time, I thought it was Cantonese.

Count to 10 on February 16, 2013 at 4:49 PM

The Wheel

tom daschle concerned on February 16, 2013 at 5:50 PM

HondaV65 on February 16, 2013 at 3:59 PM

And you would trust the commies to keep their word!?

Get on yer bike!

OldEnglish on February 16, 2013 at 6:02 PM

Jazz, you or Erika (preferably Erika) really should come to China.

Ed should pay for it.

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:42 PM

Which impresses you more, DK? The Chinese people, their culture, or their political/economic system?

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 6:03 PM

DarkCurrent on February 16, 2013 at 4:35 PM

It really doesn’t matter, does it? After all, Americans speak English – sort of.

OldEnglish on February 16, 2013 at 6:07 PM

Is that Noam Chomsky in the screencap for this post? Man, I don’t like that guy. (MIT is on the placard he is holding, so it seems a very likely assumption that that is Noam Chomsky.)

BigWillieStyles on February 16, 2013 at 6:45 PM

itsnotaboutme on February 16, 2013 at 1:58 PM

did you have a good cry? I did.

tom daschle concerned on February 17, 2013 at 4:51 AM

It really doesn’t matter, does it? After all, Americans speak English – sort of.

OldEnglish on February 16, 2013 at 6:07 PM

Americans declared their independence from Britain, so we speak “American” now ;)

In contrast, the ROC has not declared itself independent from China, which is why it still has a “C” for “China” in the name.

DarkCurrent on February 17, 2013 at 5:39 AM

Which impresses you more, DK? The Chinese people, their culture, or their political/economic system?

Cleombrotus on February 16, 2013 at 6:03 PM

Mostly it’s the xiaolongbao. Certainly not the political system.

DarkCurrent on February 17, 2013 at 5:40 AM

Overblown concerns.

Short of any laws banning media, this is a big nothing. Taiwanese can still just say no to buying dumbed down garbage, just as Americans can do.

Just as the internet has risen in America, options can arise in Taiwan…if no government interference, and I don’t see that. And that isn’t the only newspaper. Just the biggest tabloid, I think. Other newspapers aren’t going away.

MNHawk on February 18, 2013 at 8:51 AM