Video: Who will be the next Pope?

posted at 6:21 pm on February 12, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

I’d say the question misses the point, but I’m highlighting this interview for a couple of reasons. First, Matt Lauer has done what many in the media won’t do, which is to get someone who knows what he’s talking about to discuss the papal succession — and he’s done it two days in a row. Yesterday, Lauer invited Cardinal Timothy Dolan to discuss the implications of Benedict XVI’s resignation as Pope, the first in nearly 600 years.  Today he interviews the highly-respected Fr. Robert Barron to discuss what the cardinals want in the next Pope, and Barron emphasizes continuity in doctrine while suggesting organizational reform:

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Barron authored the Catholicism series, which is taught in parishes throughout the US and provides much-needed catechesis to rank-and-file Catholics.  Our parish has just started the series, and it’s excellent, especially for evangelization within the Church itself.

If you’re interested in the leading names in the mix that have popped up in the media over the last 24 hours, Barron explains the gifts of each, and the potential.  A number of readers hope that Cardinal Dolan gets the nod, and he’s one of the potential candidates discussed.  The most valuable part of the conversation takes place in the first minute, though, as Barron rightly points out that the focus in the conclave will be on evangelization of the constant faith, not innovation in doctrine, which is simply not possible for any Pope.  There may be reform in organization and in some practices, but those who expect the Pope to somehow become less Catholic will be in for an unpleasant surprise.

Kudos to Lauer for hosting two informed discussions on the topic.  Perhaps more will follow his lead.  The Washington Post invited Fr. Dwight Longenecker to share his thoughts on other issues surrounding the papal succession in today’s edition, especially on the potential incongruities that may occur with having both an active Pope and a retired Pope simultaneously.  He offers an intriguing historical analogy:

With Benedict’s retirement, what may develop, is a papacy with two parts. A pope emeritus who is a theologian and man of prayer–a man with over forty years experience of the papacy, the Vatican and all its workings, and therefore a man who remembers and can advise and guide the younger man.

Remember the role of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. After her husband died she became a senior member of the English royal family, a trusted adviser to the queen, a friend of the young royals and a fixed point of continuity and tradition. The senior pope–papa emeritus–becomes just that: a senior adviser, a friend and counselor and an advocate and supporter of his successor.

A man more driven by ambition and ego than Joseph Ratzinger may find such a role impossible. He will not. A man of his intellect and creativity will be able to function in exactly this role as an elder statesman–a wise retired abbot and a theological and ecclesial consultant.

It’s an interesting comparison, and the most likely outcome for as long as the then-Cardinal Ratzinger can participate in that relationship.  But at Patheos, Fr. Dwight really lets it all hang out in his argument for an African Pope:

Africans have more important things to think about than women’s ordination or gay marriage. Their issues are things like getting a job, saving some money, improving their lives for their children, building a school or a hospital or a parish church. They’re concerned with the invasion of their countries by colonialist powers. They’re interested in peace and justice not in some academic Marxist textbook sort of way–but in real things like their own hungry children, their old people living in slums and their sons and daughters selling themselves on the streets.

The right African pope will shift our wealthy, decadent minds away from the petty problems of our dying culture of death and make us pay attention to a continent that is teeming with life.

Most of all, the right African pope will shift our attention back to the vital core of our faith. In Africa the Catholic faith is vibrant and strong, and most of all it is supernatural in its understanding. God is real. Angels and demons are real. The barren results that a dull academia which sells reason without faith are seen in our eviscerated Western Catholicism. This kind of cynical, tired agnosticism is unknown in Africa. In the West we have too many greying clergy and nuns who sit in their big empty convents planning New Age retreats or managing retirement incomes. The idea that the Catholic Church was founded by the incarnate Son of God and that it is God’s instrument on earth for the salvation of souls, the victory over death and final eternal glory is considered to be unworkable, impossible and even worse: bad taste.

In contrast, the Church in Africa is thumpingly vibrant and strong. There’s no nonsense about the faith. The ancient primitive religions with their bloodthirsty practices are still too close for comfort. Africans understand the battle against the devil. They see it every day. They understand the forces of darkness and realize that the core of the Catholic faith is the monumental struggle between the powers of darkness and the force of Christ’s radiant light. The right African pope will bring a fresh awareness of the heart of the faith to the whole church.

That would be quite a testimony indeed.  I’m sure the Holy Spirit will lead the conclave to the best possible choice for what lies ahead, of course, but that’s a great argument.


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The black guy.
Just because.

Mimzey on February 12, 2013 at 6:23 PM

He figures he`s already telling them what to do, so Obama will step in and take the job.

ThePrez on February 12, 2013 at 6:24 PM

Wright.

Bishop on February 12, 2013 at 6:25 PM

The majority of the world’s Catholics reside in Latin America, and it’s about time.

Marcus on February 12, 2013 at 6:32 PM

A number of readers hope that Cardinal Dolan gets the nod, and he’s one of the potential candidates discussed.

Cardinal Burke (St. Louis) would also lift the spirits of traditionalist Catholics. Sadly, I think he’s too green to be considered seriously.

KingGold on February 12, 2013 at 6:40 PM

Let’s see what Sacha Baron Cohen can do with the role…

trigon on February 12, 2013 at 6:41 PM

Never mind, he’s Jewish.

trigon on February 12, 2013 at 6:43 PM

As a Catholic I say bring em’ on. Either Cardinal Francis Arinze of Nigeria Cardinal Peter Kodwo Appiah Turkson of Ghana. Cardinal Arinze is 80 and Cardinal Turkson is 64. It would depend on whether they would make the same decision as with John Paul II, a young (relatively) vigerous Pope.

itsspideyman on February 12, 2013 at 6:44 PM

It’s time for a female Pope – Stretch Pelosi.

TarheelBen on February 12, 2013 at 6:44 PM

Seriously, time for somebody from Latin America, I think.

trigon on February 12, 2013 at 6:44 PM

Ed: We watched the ‘Catholicism’ series for women’s bible study. Barron is slightly left,but all-in-all it was a very interesting study.
*Of course, as former Chicagoan, a ‘guy’ outta Mundelein was bound to keep my attention. LoL *

annoyinglittletwerp on February 12, 2013 at 6:49 PM

trigon on February 12, 2013 at 6:43 PM

So was Peter. It’s doable. *grin*

annoyinglittletwerp on February 12, 2013 at 6:50 PM

First Google “Prophecy of the Popes” and then consider what this article is saying. Cardinal Peter Turkson from Ghana (Africa) sure looks like he could be a top contender to me.

sirmatthew on February 12, 2013 at 6:51 PM

Some of you seem to forget that in many parts of Latin America the Catholic church is in retreat before a wave of conversion to Protestant Evangelical churches – and the motor is not outreach from the USA but from native born pastors. Read this surprisingly honest piece from a Cathpolic website

callingallcomets on February 12, 2013 at 6:54 PM

Some of you seem to forget that in many parts of Latin America the Catholic church is in retreat before a wave of conversion to Protestant Evangelical churches – and the motor is not outreach from the USA but from native born pastors. Read this surprisingly honest piece from a Cathpolic website

http://ncronline.org/blogs/all-things-catholic/dramatic-growth-evangelicals-latin-america

callingallcomets on February 12, 2013 at 6:57 PM

So was Peter. It’s doable. *grin*

annoyinglittletwerp on February 12, 2013 at 6:50 PM

That occurred to me, but I was worried that the Sascha Baron Cohen thing might have been a little sketchy as it was. :-)

trigon on February 12, 2013 at 6:58 PM

You think Christians in Africa will riot, kill muslims and burn mosques if the next pope is Latin American?

TX-eye on February 12, 2013 at 6:59 PM

Let’s see if Father Malachy ends up being another Mayan.

Decoski on February 12, 2013 at 7:02 PM

Definitely not Dolan.

There’s a very good argument to make for an African Pope and I hope someone comes forward to make it. I’m not impressed with Fr Dwight’s unbridled argument for one.

In any event, I hope it’s made based on what is best for the faith, not what’s best politically speaking and that our Lord is first served.

Dusty on February 12, 2013 at 7:04 PM

[sirmatthew on February 12, 2013 at 6:51 PM]

Do you have a problem providing the link itself, or do you work for Google?

Dusty on February 12, 2013 at 7:06 PM

I was going to school down in LA getting my Graduate Gemologist diploma when Pope Paul passed away. I mentioned to one of my (Jewish) friends and classmates that I was disappointed that I was going to miss seeing all the activities that surrounded the election of a new pope. I didn’t own a TV, not wanting any distractions from studying. He wanted to know why I cared since I was a protestant. I told him that it was one of the last great spectacles left in the modern world next to the coronation of a British monarch. He thought this was kind of amusing.

About a month later, I was studying and the phone rang. It was my Jewish friend. “Hey, guess what? The new pope just died. They’re going to elect another one and you’re going to miss this one, too!”

trigon on February 12, 2013 at 7:08 PM

The though of “What if Dolan” sent chills down my spine. Fr. Barron is right though, it is who ever the Holy Spirit chooses. I think Fr. Barron is also right about his inclination of an evangelizer the Gospel, the “good news,” applies to everything legitimate truth, even the ones we don’t like. Correct me if I’m wrong but we are in a twilight zone, are we not?

Gatekeeper on February 12, 2013 at 7:08 PM

There may be reform in organization and in some practices, but those who expect the Pope to somehow become less Catholic will be in for an unpleasant surprise.

In 1968, that was the exact reaction of some dissidents in the Catholic Church — Charles Curran, among others — to Pope Paul VI’s encyclical “Humanae Vitae.” The pope was merely reaffirming the traditional view of marriage, marital relations and the continued condemnation of artificial birth control. It was only controversial to those dissidents who thought and perhaps expected he’d moderate his views and thus were not only angry about it, but openly advocated defiance to the encyclical among the faithful. That attitude began the opening of the floodgates of tremendous damage and confusion to the moral and spiritual life of the average Catholic in the pew to where we are now, almost 50 years later — trying to build back up what was lost seemingly overnight.

I’m sure the new pontiff is well aware of this bit of history and will take care not to see it be repeated.

PatriotGal2257 on February 12, 2013 at 7:08 PM

“… and the motor is not outreach from the USA but from native born pastors.”

[callingallcomets on February 12, 2013 at 6:54 PM]

Probably disillusioned Jesuits. Those cloak and dagger boys are always causing problems.

Dusty on February 12, 2013 at 7:09 PM

[trigon on February 12, 2013 at 7:08 PM]

LOL.

Dusty on February 12, 2013 at 7:11 PM

I’m sure the new pontiff is will be well aware of this bit of history and will take care not to see it be repeated.

PatriotGal2257 on February 12, 2013 at 7:08 PM

PatriotGal2257 on February 12, 2013 at 7:11 PM

I wonder if Jerry Sandusky is Catholic. I hear he’s looking for a job.

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 7:16 PM

I’m sure the Holy Spirit will lead the conclave to the best possible choice for what lies ahead…

I appreciate your faith regarding this. I’m somewhat skeptical as to the Holy Spirit selecting individuals like the Borgias, Julius II, or Stephen VI or underwriting popes that came to office as a result of bribery, murder, or rigged elections. I find it hard to believe that the individuals described above were the best possible choice in a given age. But that’s just me.

EA_MAN on February 12, 2013 at 7:18 PM

Matt Damon.

Oh, I thought you said “poop”. I hear that he is going to hold his until the world has clean water to drink.

southsideironworks on February 12, 2013 at 7:29 PM

An American.

After Hell freezes over.

TimBuk3 on February 12, 2013 at 7:37 PM

You think Christians in Africa will riot, kill muslims and burn mosques if the next pope is Latin American?

TX-eye on February 12, 2013 at 6:59 PM

I wish…

Archivarix on February 12, 2013 at 7:49 PM

Fr. Guido Sarducci is available and hasn’t been doing much lately :)

I remember he campaigned for the job after JP2 passed away.

simkeith on February 12, 2013 at 7:53 PM

I wonder if Jerry Sandusky is Catholic. I hear he’s looking for a job.

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 7:16 PM

Dude, that is so played out you shouldn’t have wasted yours or anybody else’s time. Go tell a cop or a teacher, or a protestant minister that they are child molesters, because there are higher incidences of abuse among them than among Catholic clergy.

But you don’t have a philosophical bone top pick with any of them, so you aren’t quite so forthcoming with specious arguments. The Catholic Church, however, is a powerful moral force for good, and you can’t handle it.

Good bye.

Greek Fire on February 12, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Wow! It doesn’t take much to get you going. Lighten up, Alice. Did it ever occur to you that I was thinking of the Vatican football team?

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 8:49 PM

A higher incidence rate of child abuse by Protestant ministers? Where did you pick up that jewel? Is your name “Vatican Bob”?

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 8:57 PM

Good heavens…talk about out of character. Barron is righteous.

Jaibones on February 12, 2013 at 10:21 PM

A higher incidence rate of child abuse by Protestant ministers? Where did you pick up that jewel? Is your name “Vatican Bob”?

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 8:57 PM

From the Christian Science Monitor in 2002:

Despite headlines focusing on the priest pedophile problem in the Roman Catholic Church, most American churches being hit with child sexual-abuse allegations are Protestant, and most of the alleged abusers are not clergy or staff, but church volunteers. (emphasis mine – JL)

These are findings from national surveys by Christian Ministry Resources (CMR), a tax and legal-advice publisher serving more than 75,000 congregations and 1,000 denominational agencies nationwide.

From the Denver Post in 2010:

National Center for Missing and Exploited Children President Ernie Allen said his organization has received more than 825,000 reports of child abuse and does not see any statistical indication the Catholic Church has a greater prevalence of cases than any other setting — after accounting for the size of the church, the largest Christian denomination in the U.S. and the world.

Wisconsin-based Church Mutual Insurance Co. has 100,000 client churches and has seen a steady filing of about five sexual molestation cases a week for more than a decade, even though its client base has grown.

“It would be incorrect to call it a Catholic problem,” said Church Mutual’s risk control manager, Rick Schaber. “We do not see one denomination above another. It’s equal. It’s also equal among large metropolitan churches and small rural churches.”

Iowa-based Guide One Center for Risk Management, which insures more than 40,000 congregations, also said Catholic churches are not considered a greater risk or charged higher premiums.

“Our claims experience shows this happens evenly across denominations,” said spokeswoman Melanie Stonewall.

From a blog linking to Ethics Daily:

By Bob Allen

The Associated Press reported recently that three insurance companies receive upward of 260 reports each year of young people under 18 being sexually abused by Protestant clergy, challenging the assumption that clergy sexual abuse is an exclusively Catholic problem that does not take place in other churches.

That is a higher number than the annual average of 228 “credible accusations” brought against Catholic clerics in records reported by the Catholic Church in response to media scrutiny, a priest observed in a Fox News commentary questioning why the story isn’t garnering more attention.

Google “child abuse protestant church”.

JimLennon on February 12, 2013 at 10:32 PM

Google “child abuse protestant church”.

The interesting part of this ‘defense’ by Catholics is this; Catholics treat Protestants denominations individually when they want to highlight Catholic ‘unity’ (33,000 denominations, etc..). But when it comes to the clergy abuse scandal they want to treat Protestantism as a singular entity.

If Protestants denominations are so individualistic, then it is reasonable to assume that with regards to clergy sexual abuse, some are better than others. So please, enlighten us; which are the better Protestant churches and which are the worse?

EA_MAN on February 12, 2013 at 10:47 PM

By Bob Allen

The Associated Press reported recently that three insurance companies receive upward of 260 reports each year of young people under 18 being sexually abused by Protestant clergy, challenging the assumption that clergy sexual abuse is an exclusively Catholic problem that does not take place in other churches.

That is a higher number than the annual average of 228 “credible accusations” brought against Catholic clerics in records reported by the Catholic Church in response to media scrutiny, a priest observed in a Fox News commentary questioning why the story isn’t garnering more attention.

Why not use the same source for both the Catholic Church data and the Protestant church data? Did the insurance companies decide which incidents were “credible” accusations like the source of the Catholic Church data did? Oh, wait. The source for the Catholic Church data was… The Catholic Church.

Sort of makes this comparative exercise silly, don’t you think?

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 11:03 PM

The interesting part of this ‘defense’ by Catholics is this; Catholics treat Protestants denominations individually when they want to highlight Catholic ‘unity’ (33,000 denominations, etc..). But when it comes to the clergy abuse scandal they want to treat Protestantism as a singular entity.

If Protestants denominations are so individualistic, then it is reasonable to assume that with regards to clergy sexual abuse, some are better than others. So please, enlighten us; which are the better Protestant churches and which are the worse?

EA_MAN on February 12, 2013 at 10:47 PM

I’ll let you find that out for yourself. Telling you to Google “child abuse protestant church” is just easier and faster than telling you to Google “child abuse episcopalian church”, followed by “child abuse lutheran church”, followed by “child abuse methodist church”, followed by “child abuse baptist church”, followed by “child abuse presbyterian church”, followed by “child abuse pentecostal church”, followed by “child abuse seventh day adventist church”, followed by “child abuse non denominational bible believing christian church”, and on and on and on.

We’re just getting tired of being lectured to by non-Catholic Christians who take gleeful joy in our church’s problems while ignoring the exact same problem in their own church.

Something about not throwing stones in a glass house.

JimLennon on February 12, 2013 at 11:16 PM

Oh, fer cryin’ out loud. Fine. I’ll do it. But I warn you: we’re goin’ back to fish on Fridays. And no more folk music masses. Those things drive me nuts.

princetrumpet on February 12, 2013 at 11:24 PM

Sort of makes this comparative exercise silly, don’t you think?

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 11:03 PM

I’ll concede this: the incidence of child abuse appears to be statistically similar across all denominations of Christianity. That’s what the insurance companies cited in the articles are saying. I can’t confirm Greek Fire’s claim of a statistically significant larger incidence rate.

With regards to Sandusky needing a job… Obama has a lot of openings that Sandusky could fill.

JimLennon on February 12, 2013 at 11:31 PM

“Something about not throwing stones in a glass house.”

I expected you to cite Luke 6:42 or Mt 7:3. But either way; how do you know that I’m living in a glass house? Quite simply, you don’t.

But since we’re on the subject; have you got any statistics on orchestrated cover-ups, evidence tampering, or witness intimidation by ecclesiastical officials by denomination? Maybe the folks over at bishopaccountability.org could provide some assistance to you.

EA_MAN on February 12, 2013 at 11:31 PM

princetrumpet on February 12, 2013 at 11:24 PM

Habemus papem!

JimLennon on February 12, 2013 at 11:32 PM

But since we’re on the subject; have you got any statistics on orchestrated cover-ups, evidence tampering, or witness intimidation by ecclesiastical officials by denomination? Maybe the folks over at bishopaccountability.org could provide some assistance to you.

EA_MAN on February 12, 2013 at 11:31 PM

By denomination, no. Most of the studies I’ve seen divide Christianity into Catholic vs. non-Catholic. I’ve yet to see anything formal comparing individual mainline Protestant denominations against each other.

But news reports on individual cases involving orchestrated cover-ups, evidence tampering, or witness intimidation? Yes, they’re out there.

LA Times, June 23, 2011:

Three men alleging that a Lutheran pastor in Bell Gardens sexually abused them when they were children filed lawsuits Wednesday seeking compensation from the church.

The complaints filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court for unspecified damages contend that church officials were aware of the pastor’s pedophile behavior during his 18 years as head of the Lutheran Church of San Pedro y Pablo but sought to cover it up and silence the victims.

In my area, the head of a very large local Baptist congregation is facing 10 years in prison for sexual misconduct with a minor.

Chicago Magazine, January 2013:

According to dozens of current and former church members, religion experts, and historians interviewed by Chicago—plus a review of thousands of pages of court documents—he is part of what some call a deeply embedded culture of misogyny and sexual and physical abuse at one of the nation’s largest churches. Multiple websites tracking the First Baptist Church of Hammond have identified more than a dozen men with ties to the church—many of whom graduated from its college, Hyles-Anderson, or its annual Pastors’ Schools—who fanned out around the country, preaching at their own churches and racking up a string of arrests and civil lawsuits, including physical abuse of minors, sexual molestation, and rape.

It is a culture, past and present members say, enabled by cover-ups and cultlike control. For example, after Schaap’s conviction, many church members blamed his victim as a temptress. “We were taught to not question and to take the ‘man of God’s’ [Schaap’s] word over everything,” says Julie Silvestrone Busby, a former First Baptist member who now hosts a Christian radio show in Iowa. She left the church after alleging that Schaap behaved inappropriately during marriage counseling sessions in 2004 through 2009.

JimLennon on February 13, 2013 at 12:05 AM

I’m not “defending” the child molestation scandal in any way, shape, or form. I want these idiots and monsters brought to justice and thrown out of the priesthood. I’m sure you feel the same way about clergy in your denomination (if any), right?

JimLennon on February 13, 2013 at 12:15 AM

Anyway, back to the original topic of the thread…

I wonder if the Italian cardinals are thinking, “Oh-akay, youza Poles and-a Germans have-a had you-a fun. Time-a to put an Italian back-a in charge.”

JimLennon on February 13, 2013 at 12:31 AM

Greek Fire on February 12, 2013 at 8:08 PM

Boom. Thank you for the take down. You too, JimLennon.

cptacek on February 13, 2013 at 1:05 AM

I know next to nothing of the Catholic faith, so my opinion doesn’t count.

/don’t really have one anyway.

Ugly on February 13, 2013 at 1:36 AM

As someone who is Latin rite Catholic but also has ties to other rites (most notably the Melkite), I would love to see an Eastern Patriarch gain the papacy. Someone I’ve heard mentioned is the Maronite Patriarch of Antioch, who is indeed a Cardinal.

Scott H on February 13, 2013 at 2:25 AM

Boom. Thank you for the take down. You too, JimLennon.

cptacek on February 13, 2013 at 1:05 AM

Yes, it’s much better to express anger at criticism of the church’s internal disgrace than to openly reveal it. We all know that pedophiles will stop their disgusting abusiveness if just left alone. Boom.

Syd B. on February 13, 2013 at 5:55 AM

Who cares? Religion is for the stupid, weak minded and the closet cases.

Your Mamma loves me on February 13, 2013 at 6:46 AM

I’m sure you feel the same way about clergy in your denomination (if any), right?

Yes

Time-a to put an Italian back-a in charge.

And Yes – I think that the Cardinals will go for an adminstrative type this time around (i.e. someone from within the Vatican), having gone with philosophical and theological type picks the last two times. But if we can handicap the way Cardinals can vote, how is that letting the Holy Spirit choose?

Since Catholics appeal to Acts 1:21-26 to substantiate Apostolic Succession, why don’t they use the same method the Apostles used to fill a vacant position (i.e. the casting of lots)? It would seem to me that this method would be less open to poliicing, favoritism, etc…

EA_MAN on February 13, 2013 at 6:47 AM

Who cares? Religion Liberalism is for the stupid, weak minded and the closet cases.

Your Mamma loves me on February 13, 2013 at 6:46 AM

Preach it, brother. ;-)

JimLennon on February 13, 2013 at 7:56 AM

Yes, it’s much better to express anger at criticism of the church’s internal disgrace than to openly reveal it. We all know that pedophiles will stop their disgusting abusiveness if just left alone. Boom.

Syd B. on February 13, 2013 at 5:55 AM

I’m sorry. I guess I misunderstood. This mini-thread started with your Jerry Sandusky joke…

I wonder if Jerry Sandusky is Catholic. I hear he’s looking for a job.

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 7:16 PM

…which, given your following response to Greek Fire’s objection…

Wow! It doesn’t take much to get you going. Lighten up, Alice. Did it ever occur to you that I was thinking of the Vatican football team?

Syd B. on February 12, 2013 at 8:49 PM

…I interpreted to be a joke in very bad taste. I did not think the joke was intended to be serious, substantive criticism. My bad.

JimLennon on February 13, 2013 at 8:03 AM

EA_MAN on February 13, 2013 at 6:47 AM

I’ve always wondered the same !

pambi on February 13, 2013 at 8:04 AM

EA_MAN on February 13, 2013 at 6:47 AM

I’ve always wondered the same !

pambi on February 13, 2013 at 8:04 AM

Well, given they don’t allow cameras in the conclave, who’s to say they’re not doing exactly that? ;-)

“Angelo, pass-a me the dice. If I roll a seven, Ima gonna vote for you!”

JimLennon on February 13, 2013 at 9:16 AM

My contact inside the WH says the President will deem the College of Cardinals to be in recess, and appoint Rev. Wright.

BobMbx on February 13, 2013 at 9:58 AM

Well, given they don’t allow cameras in the conclave, who’s to say they’re not doing exactly that? ;-)

During his Pontificate, JP II issued an Apostolic Constitution describing how the selection of his successor would work: http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/apost_constitutions/documents/hf_jp-ii_apc_22021996_universi-dominici-gregis_en.html

Unless Benedict XVI issues other instructions modifying this in the next two weeks, they won’t be throwing dice in the Sistine Chapel to decide who the next pope will be.

I don’t know if any official explanation exists as to why the RCC does not follow the practice outlined in Acts 1. I just find it curious that they don’t since it depicts the only case of filling an apostolic vacancy in Scripture.

In any event, may your Lenten experience be filled with grace.

EA_MAN on February 13, 2013 at 10:54 AM

Don’t care.
Sorry. (where applicable)

S. D. on February 13, 2013 at 7:32 PM