Meet the man who shot Bin Laden

posted at 4:41 pm on February 11, 2013 by Allahpundit

I want to call this the feelgood story of the day but it’s the opposite. There are feelgood moments — Bin Laden ends up with a few extra postmortem bullet holes, and don’t miss the conversation the SEALs have on their way to the first briefing about the mission — but ultimately it’s the tale of a hero abandoned. No pension(!), no health care(!!), family troubles, little help transitioning to the private sector, and eternal worry about reprisals from jihadis. Everyone wishes they could have been the one to pull the trigger on Osama; see how you feel about that after the Esquire piece.

If you read only one eyewitness account today of the leader of Al Qaeda taking three bullets in the face, let it be this one.

The SEALs had nightscopes, but it was coal-black for bin Laden and the other residents. He can hear but he can’t see.

He looked confused. And way taller than I was expecting. He had a cap on and didn’t appear to be hit. I can’t tell you 100 percent, but he was standing and moving. He was holding her in front of him. Maybe as a shield, I don’t know.

For me, it was a snapshot of a target ID, definitely him. Even in our kill houses where we train, there are targets with his face on them. This was repetition and muscle memory. That’s him, boom, done.

I thought in that first instant how skinny he was, how tall and how short his beard was, all at once. He was wearing one of those white hats, but he had, like, an almost shaved head. Like a crew cut. I remember all that registering. I was amazed how tall he was, taller than all of us, and it didn’t seem like he would be, because all those guys were always smaller than you think.

I’m just looking at him from right here [he moves his hand out from his face about ten inches]. He’s got a gun on a shelf right there, the short AK he’s famous for. And he’s moving forward. I don’t know if she’s got a vest and she’s being pushed to martyr them both. He’s got a gun within reach. He’s a threat. I need to get a head shot so he won’t have a chance to clack himself off [blow himself up].

In that second, I shot him, two times in the forehead. Bap! Bap! The second time as he’s going down. He crumpled onto the floor in front of his bed and I hit him again, Bap! same place. That time I used my EOTech red-dot holo sight. He was dead. Not moving. His tongue was out. I watched him take his last breaths, just a reflex breath.

And I remember as I watched him breathe out the last part of air, I thought: Is this the best thing I’ve ever done, or the worst thing I’ve ever done?

The thought of Bin Laden standing there in the dark, disoriented, hearing the gunshots and melting with dread at what might be coming, is a small but satisfying bit of poetic justice for what people trapped in the Towers endured. Then, the shots. Quote: “His forehead was gruesome. It was split open in the shape of a V. I could see his brains spilling out over his face. The American public doesn’t want to know what that looks like.” I’m … not so sure that’s true, but okay. He ends up back at the base in Afghanistan, eating a breakfast sandwich while standing next to Bin Laden’s body and watching Obama announce the killing on TV. He gives the CIA agent who helped find Bin Laden, a woman you already know, the magazine that was in his gun when he shot him. Later, he retires from the service after 16 years (four short of pension eligibility), returns to civilian life, and has to cope with near-zero support from the government. Which, I assume, is why he’s talking about this now: It’s too dangerous to identify himself, as lucrative as that would be, but by publicizing his situation maybe he can shame the feds into doing better by their elite veterans.

Exit question: How can the guy who shot Bin Laden not be eligible for military health insurance?


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2 3

blockquote>You may be right, but … damn … I’d be careful throwing around accusations like that. If you’re right. Fine. If you’re not … you’re an a$$hole of epic proportions.

besser tot als rot on February 11, 2013 at 5:41 PM

Did either of you read the article in its entirety?

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 5:41 PM

I just went and skimmed it.
Written by someone at Esquire who used to work for the San Francisco Chronicle. That doesn’t raise raise any suspicions?
Also – since a book has already been published, and a movie put out detailing the raid, it wouldn’t be that hard for a skilled pathological liar to make up a good story that sounds real.
I work with a retired Army Special Ops guy, I’ve worked with others in the past, and I’ve dealt with a couple “stolen valor” types of pathological liars, and this story just has a bad smell to it.

dentarthurdent on February 11, 2013 at 5:57 PM

If I am wrong, I’m more than man enough to admit it here on Hot Air, and wherever else I might post. I am a Life Member of the DAV. I’ve seen the real folks, and the posers, and this guy’s story doesn’t pass the smell test.

TKindred on February 11, 2013 at 5:49 PM

What I found most fishy is that he talked about all of these stories to someone in the press. I have friends and family who are SEALS and other special forces and tell me less. But, I feel that it is not my place to even question that far. Then again, I don’t want someone getting underserved recognition (but, does he get anything out of this if what he says isn’t true – especially if he remains anonymous?).

besser tot als rot on February 11, 2013 at 5:57 PM

Exit question: How can the guy who shot Bin Laden not be eligible for military health insurance?

Because those are the rules, AP.

Everybody and their brother (even most civilians who had even a passive interest in serving at one time or another in their lives) knows that since we went AVF (All Volunteer Force) in the late 70s it’s been 20 years (minmum) to get pension and health bennies. Bear in mind you STILL have to pay your TriCare premiums if you’re eligible.

Now here’s the thing-whether this article is legit or not-it does painfully demonstrate the need to FIX the crappy military retirement system.

The fact that you have to serve for 20 years is nuts-generally speaking either you are a very old officer by then (O-6 and above and have no need of a pension) or a very old enlisted man (and nearly broke all the time as well as probably physically crapped) not to mention all the political BS you have to survive through for your last 4-6 years (or more).

Medical exemptions to the 20 year rule exist-but trying to get one involves fighting the VA as well as your service’s medical & personell boards who make every effort to insist your problems were pre-existing or didn’t happen from your service.

Military retirement should be restructured to be more like a civilian 401(k) or IRA plan where a fixed amount of your pay goes into a set of mutual funds, bonds, etc and is matched by your service (say 5-10% every monthly dispersion). This money accumulates from your first pay dispersion in Basic and cannot be touched BY ANYONE until you seperate from the service (whenever that is) it can only be increased or decreased by the recipeint to a specified cap.(Say no higher than 20% but no lower than 2%)

Additionally TriCare should be able to be bought into by all honorably seperated servicemembers albeit at a higher premium rate than a 20 year vet. And finally the 20 year rule should be dropped to 15/16 years.

TriCare scale could work in this manner

16 (or more) year vet: 80% off set premium (which is what I believe it currently is but only for 20+ years of service)
12>xxx<8 year vet: 40%
4 year (or mimum contracted period whichever is shorter): 25% discount on premium

TriCare Insurance Program works in the same manner as all other insurers + you can go a base hospital if one is nearby.

Thoughts?

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 5:57 PM

This is hearsay, but I understand Obama said, Hell no. My guys are not surrendering. What do we need to rain hell on the Pakistani military? That was the one time in my life I was thinking, I am “censored” voting for this guy. I had a picture of him lying in bed at night, thinking, You’re not “censored” with my guys. Like, he’s thinking about us.

Sorry, I can’t buy this. The man thinks he’s going on a suicide mission and he’s lying in bed with a photo of Obama and not his kids or wife?

Yeah… I’m calling bullshit at this point.

ButterflyDragon on February 11, 2013 at 6:00 PM

Last part of my comment should read

16 (or more) year vet: 80% off set premium (which is what I believe it currently is but only for 20+ years of service)
12>xxx<8 year vet: 40%
4 year (or mimum contracted period whichever is shorter): 25% discount on premium

TriCare Insurance Program works in the same manner as all other insurers + you can go to a base hospital if one is nearby.

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 6:00 PM

This is twice now jeez

16 (or more) year vet: 80% off set premium (which is what I believe it currently is but only for 20+ years of service)
more than 12 but less than 16 year vet: 60% off
more than 8 but less than 12 year vet: 50% off
more than 4 but less than 8 year vet: 35% off
4 year (or mimum contracted period whichever is shorter): 25% discount on premium

TriCare Insurance Program works in the same manner as all other insurers + you can go a base hospital if one is nearby.

Thoughts?

Please remove my other wierd comment.

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 6:00 PM

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 6:04 PM

In the meanwhile this took place today.

Schadenfreude on February 11, 2013 at 5:32 PM

Schadenfreude:

I watched it,from Cindy Munfords link,
and it was hard to watch,it was tear
welled up moments!:)

canopfor on February 11, 2013 at 5:55 PM

I also watched with thanks to Cindy’s link. Glad I had a box of tissues next to me. RIP and prayers to his family and friends.

CoffeeLover on February 11, 2013 at 6:04 PM

dentarthurdent on February 11, 2013 at 5:57 PM

The two I am presenting the question to are both leftists trolls.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 6:05 PM

Sorry, I can’t buy this. The man thinks he’s going on a suicide mission and he’s lying in bed with a photo of Obama and not his kids or wife?

Yeah… I’m calling bullshit at this point.

ButterflyDragon on February 11, 2013 at 6:00 PM

Mental image man.

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 6:06 PM

What I found most fishy is that he talked about all of these stories to someone in the press. I have friends and family who are SEALS and other special forces and tell me less. But, I feel that it is not my place to even question that far. Then again, I don’t want someone getting underserved recognition (but, does he get anything out of this if what he says isn’t true – especially if he remains anonymous?).

besser tot als rot on February 11, 2013 at 5:57 PM

Exactly – which is why I don’t trust this story.
My father-in-law did at least one tour in Vietnam, and for most of his life has told his family he was just an admin clerk. However, he was an expert marksman with a case full of shooting competition trophies. When my youngest son was talking about enlisting in the Army to be a sniper, my father-in-law started talking to him about what snipers do – with more insight than an admin clerk should have – which my wife thought was very interesting. My wife still has never gotten a straight answer directly from her Dad about what he really did in Vietnam. A former co-worker suggested that I look up Operation Dufflebag – and it was quite illuminating.

Bottom line – most of the people who really did these things don’t typically talk a lot about it – and especially don’t go to a left-wing reporter to sob about how horrible their life is.
So I’m with TKindred and a few others on this one – just doesn’t smell right.

dentarthurdent on February 11, 2013 at 6:09 PM

Bottom line – most of the people who really did these things don’t typically talk a lot about it – and especially don’t go to a left-wing reporter to sob about how horrible their life is.
So I’m with TKindred and a few others on this one – just doesn’t smell right.

dentarthurdent on February 11, 2013 at 6:09 PM

When USS Michael Murphy (DDG-112) was christened 2 years ago, a large number of present and former SEALS came up for the ceremony. That evening, they took over most of the local Irish pub. Those guys were handsome, and some of the local girls were hitting on them. I recognized some of them from the ceremony, and so did the retired Master Chief who owns the place.

When asked what they did, not one of them, not ONE of them claimed he was a SEAL. they all just referred to their Navy rates. Like, “I’m a Gunner’s Mate” or “I’m a Hospital Corpsman” or “I’m a Machinist’s Mate” etc. That’s what the real guys do.

V/R

TKindred on February 11, 2013 at 6:18 PM

Not sure if I think the story is real or not…

Do know that I’ve run into a couple of blowhards who wanted to tell all about their military exploits & embellish them. This has that feel. But, maybe there’s truth here. If so, I wish him the best.

However, for those saying “why did he get out just a few years short of retirement?” he answered that:

Back in April, he and some of his SEAL Team 6 colleagues had formed the skeleton of a company to help them transition out of the service. In my yard, he showed everyone his business-card mock-ups. There was only a subtle inside joke reference to their team in the company name.

Maybe he was hurt, knew he’d never do anything “bigger” than this, and a group came up with a scheme to capitalize on their experience/skills.

Unfortunately, reality doesn’t follow a script.

(there are also details about how healthcare, disability etc. is continuing to be processed. Takes time, from what I hear, and the process shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone who’s finished a single tour).

cs89 on February 11, 2013 at 6:18 PM

Mental image man.

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 6:06 PM

Oh, okay. I read it completely different. LOL

ButterflyDragon on February 11, 2013 at 6:18 PM

The two I am presenting the question to are both leftists trolls.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 6:05 PM

I know sega is; I don’t know Politricks.
However, I don’t disagree with what they’re saying in this thread.
Everyone in the military, especially someone at the 16 year mark, knows you have to get to 20 years to get the pension and lifetime tri-care. In fact, if you make it to 16 or 17 years, the military will often let people more or less slide through a few more years just to get them to retirement.

But for me, the problem with this story is just that I think the writer got scammed by a skilled liar – stolen valor type. I just don’t believe the story is real.

dentarthurdent on February 11, 2013 at 6:19 PM

I just don’t believe the story is real.

dentarthurdent on February 11, 2013 at 6:19 PM

I have read all your comments pertaining to that. The trolls seem to be working in tandem yet off of two separate talking points. I simply would like to probe them a bit more.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 6:24 PM

Alas, it would appear that they have left. I was late getting in. Next time perhaps.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 6:26 PM

cs89 on February 11, 2013 at 6:18 PM

I don’t buy it. Starting a new company is risky and having that pension gives you something to fall back on if it doesn’t pan out – especially in this economy. And any (real) SEAL would be smart enough to know that and have solid plans and backup plans, and they would all know they would be in a better position to start a company once they’ve done their 20 and got the pension.

BTW – he would also be eligible for post 9/11 GI Bill – which will pay for college of any kind along with living expenses for at aleast a few years.

dentarthurdent on February 11, 2013 at 6:28 PM

So,it appears Obama doesn“t have his back,
or any other US Servicemen!!!

canopfor on February 11, 2013 at 5:50 PM

What about all those uber cool celebrities holding up that cheezy little “6″ pin and saying lustily: “We’ve got your back”????

It seems some of them could donate some of their petty cash to help this SEAL pay his bills.

Nutstuyu on February 11, 2013 at 6:42 PM

Bmore,

What’s your beef with any point that I have made?

And do you even know what a troll is? I mean, people use it to describe anyone they disagree with now. It’s lazy.

segasagez on February 11, 2013 at 6:45 PM

Later, he retires from the service after 16 years (four short of pension eligibility), returns to civilian life

Why would he do that exactly?

Unless, due to the nature of his job, he didn’t think he could MAKE IT another four years? As in, it was getting too dangerous for him and maybe his wife wanted him the eff out?

Let me explain this guy a bit …

I wasn’t a SEAL – but was a Master Chief. Everywhere I went, every room I walked into – people looked at me and knew I owned it. My will was law (if I wanted it that way). This “shooter” here – rubbed elbows with highest echelons of the military brass and CIA doing a damned important job …

But then, when you’re out … all that comes to a screeching halt. People don’t go out of their way to please me anymore … I have to talk to people and convince them to do things vice issue orders. In short – you have to find another “path”. I found mine.

But this guy – well, he may feel all alone and suddenly very unimportant. And you know what – somewhere in the back of his mind he may want to “out” himself as the shooter. He’s a national hero – there could be a lifetime livelihood in that … speeches, appearances, books, TV appearances …

It would be awesome for him – but there is always the threat of the IslamoFascists out there …

I think in the end he’ll be taken care of – because the Navy can’t afford the message that not taking care of him would send to other SEALS who are asked to participate in high-profile specwar hits.

HondaV65 on February 11, 2013 at 6:46 PM

I sorry, but I don’t get the “abandoned” part.

Plenty of men courageously fought in WWII and then came home and lived normal peaceful lives, which included getting a civilian job and paying for their own health care, etc.

A retired SEAL is too elite to be selling sunglasses? (That sounded like a cool business idea too). Why is that? My grandfather came home from the war and sold chocolates. He then started his own business selling sporting goods. Later he took the real estate licensing test and sold real estate. All of these things took place while supporting a family.

My other grandfather came back from the war and put himself through medical school to become a doctor. He did so by taking advantage of the GI bill which required serving in the reserves for a number of years.

I feel like everyone seems to be falling prey to the idea that these men in elite military units are somehow fundamentally different from civilians. They are not.

There is nothing special about most human beings. Those in elite military units are just as capable of civilian life as your regular Joe Smith. And regular Joe Smith? Given the same training, several average citizens could perform the same role as a Navy SEAL.

This is not to belittle the courage or valor of the Navy SEALS. It’s simply important to remember that we are not that different. Why should these men be afraid of civilian life? More so then fear of death in combat? That’s not rational, and suggests that we are all buying into a false differentiation between military and civilians. We are all human beings, and that commonality is more important then the differences.

Being a courageous warrior does not mean that the rest of society has to pay for you for the rest of your life. Get a job. Any job. Work your way up.

The leadership and determination that serves a man so well in the military will serve you well in any civilian role. Employers will hire you because of it, and will promote you quickly as well. (I should know, I’m a hiring manager). You don’t need “I killed Osama Bin Laden” on your resume to get that. Just “16 years in the Navy with honorable discharge” is enough to give you a leg up.

Sackett on February 11, 2013 at 6:49 PM

The thought of Bin Laden standing there in the dark, disoriented, hearing the gunshots and melting with dread at what might be coming, is a small but satisfying bit of poetic justice for what people trapped in the Towers endured.

And there it is. The adolescent boy revenge fantasy that lurks at the heart of all “true conservatives” Who knows if he was “melting with dread”? Maybe he was thinking ‘bring it on’? That panel isn’t in your comic book, I realize.

lostmotherland on February 11, 2013 at 6:51 PM

<blockquote>Back in April, he and some of his SEAL Team 6 colleagues .

It’s puzzling.

There is no Team 6 but people like Barky and reporters talk about it all the time…

I’ll be more gentle.

This story is horseshit.

CorporatePiggy on February 11, 2013 at 6:55 PM

Sackett on February 11, 2013 at 6:49 PM

The SEAL teams have been in a constant state of war for TWELVE years now. It’s the longest military engagement in US history. Safe to say there might be a bit of institutionalization in terms of constant war fighting.

blatantblue on February 11, 2013 at 6:57 PM

Later, he retires from the service after 16 years (four short of pension eligibility), returns to civilian life, and has to cope with near-zero support from the government.

I admire the guy, but this may be a little sour grapes. If you get out at 16, or even 18 years….that’s not retiring—it’s ETSing, or end term of service.

Stan McChrystal recounts in his book about something that GEN John Vines had told him about the last act that the military would be for him—it would be rejection. The story is played over and over again–for both war heroes and non-war heroes. It’s not to say that its unfair, it just is what it is.

His status as the guy who shot Bin Laden is now no greater than the guy who fueled the helicopter that flew him there, nor the cook that made him the sammich that he ate once he got back to the hangar. That’s a hard pill to swallow, but, he isn’t the first to face that and I’m sure there are a lot of other chiefs and senior petty officers in the “let me out at 16yrs” line that are learning the same lesson.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:03 PM

Military retirement should be restructured to be more like a civilian 401(k) or IRA plan where a fixed amount of your pay goes into a set of mutual funds, bonds, etc and is matched by your service (say 5-10% every monthly dispersion). …..

Additionally TriCare should be able to be bought into by all honorably seperated servicemembers albeit at a higher premium rate than a 20 year vet. And finally the 20 year rule should be dropped to 15/16 years.

TriCare scale could work in this manner

16 (or more) year vet: 80% off set premium (which is what I believe it currently is but only for 20+ years of service)
12>xxx<8 year vet: 40%
4 year (or mimum contracted period whichever is shorter): 25% discount on premium

TriCare Insurance Program works in the same manner as all other insurers + you can go a base hospital if one is nearby.

Thoughts?

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 5:57 PM

Many.

First off, lots of luck getting people to sign up to go into harm’s way with the promise of a 401K sometime in the future. You really think that scheme is going to appeal to an 18-year-old considering enlisting? Plus, I don’t think it is fair to spend 20 plus years serving this nation and away from one’s family only to be told “see ya when you’re old.”

Secondly, you’ve got TriCare all wrong. It is virtually impossible to get into a Medical Treatment Facility (base hospital) if you aren’t on active duty. And everybody is contracted for eight years so the litmus test would have to be years of active service not contracted rate.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:03 PM

If he’s been in for 16 years, he should have known that getting out before his 20 would have left him without benefits. Frankly, when I was in the Corps (I didn’t retire) most Marines generally acknowledged that at 12 years, you really need to make your decision: are you staying in for 20, or are you going to bail now and go for a civilian career? I don’t know his reasons for leaving with only 4 years til retirement, but I can tell you that, had I stayed in, 2 years ago I would have been eligible for lifetime benefits, and now I kick myself every day. For him with only 4 years left, he’s probably going to be kicking himself that much harder. If he was sick of the Teams, I’m sure that the guy who shot UBL could have found another billet to fill for the remainder of his 20….

quikstrike98 on February 11, 2013 at 7:04 PM

He should’ve stayed in and sold war bonds for 4 years…

/

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:07 PM

HondaV65 on February 11, 2013 at 6:46 PM

Hi Obama voter! Why are you complaining or taking issue? You voted for a man who has shown disdain for the military and only uses them as photo ops.

This is what you voted for. You knew this when you cast your vote.

You should be happy!

kim roy on February 11, 2013 at 7:09 PM

Like “Shooter” said in the article. He was tired of war, and wanted to be around for the lives of his children. Can’t blame the guy for leaving early.

blatantblue on February 11, 2013 at 7:09 PM

That’s a hard pill to swallow, but, he isn’t the first to face that and I’m sure there are a lot of other chiefs and senior petty officers in the “let me out at 16yrs” line that are learning the same lesson.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:03 PM

I initially had the same reaction you did. The guy got out 3.5 years shy of being qualified for a “retirement.” But then I got to thinking about it a bit more and I’m less certain of my opinion. The guy was a SEAL who spent the majority of those years post 9/11/01 doing stuff a lot more demanding than making a “ham sammich.” Perhaps there should be a tiered retirement system where those doing the tough jobs like SEAL get a little better deal than the guy who spent 20 years in the Navy Band or making “sammiches” for people who did the real fighting.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:10 PM

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:10 PM

Continual and constant utilization for 12 years

blatantblue on February 11, 2013 at 7:13 PM

I wasn’t a SEAL – but was a Master Chief. Everywhere I went, every room I walked into – people looked at me and knew I owned it. My will was law (if I wanted it that way). This “shooter” here – rubbed elbows with highest echelons of the military brass and CIA doing a damned important job …

HondaV65 on February 11, 2013 at 6:46 PM

Wow, somebody like you was a Master Chief? What a hard fall you must have had after retirement when you discovered that you really weren’t as smart and powerful as you thought you were. It’s easy to bully and cow a room full of First Class Petty Officers. Another thing entirely when you have to work as part of a team.

Besides, as kim roy said. You voted for Obama despite the way he has treated the military from the very first day. You must have been one crappy Master Chief. The kind that looked out for himself and not the well being of the troops. Most Master Chiefs these days are of your ilk so it isn’t like you are the exception to the rule. Just the demise of the whole institution called “Navy Chief.” At one time Chiefs were more or less technically proficient leaders and mentors. Now they simply strut around and pretend they are mini-division officers.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:17 PM

Happy Nomad–there is this thing called “early retirement” that the Navy does offer. Maybe he took it, maybe not, but apparently there is a lag time between the end of service and the onset of benefits. I know of two guys who just recently retired who struggled to make ends meet for a few months while they tried to find a job. One guys little girl just got diagnosed w/ diabetes as well. Same rank most likely as this fella.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:18 PM

Last time I noticed..we don’t have the draft

It’s a choice and you know exactly what you’re getting into

Redford on February 11, 2013 at 7:22 PM

SEALs and other SOF personnel have benefitted from pretty generous reenlistment bonuses over the last 12 + years. They also get up front a lot of specialty pays–sea pay, HALO pay, dive, hazardous duty pay, sub pay if pertinent–so they are compensated for the danger that they face, when they are facing it. Once they are no longer facing it, then they are right back in the same Navy that they started from. That is difficult to face because they are so well cared for and supported for so long. I do feel sorry for the guy and his predicament, but please understand the full story of SEAL compensation both during and after service.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:23 PM

Navy is Increasing Money for Some Sailors With Critical Skills

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Navy has increased Special Duty Assignment Pay for about 2,400 sailors with critical skills, said Senior Chief Scott Rossiter.

Sailors who are seeing an increase in the special duty pay are in high-demand, undermanned ratings that are important to the global war on terrorism, he said.

Rossiter is coordinator for the Special Duty Assignment Pay program, which gives sailors in high-demand skills extra money per month.

About 22,000 enlisted sailors receive the extra pay, which is meant to attract sailors to certain assignments, according to the Navy. The last time the Navy made changes to the program was in January 2006.

The Navy offers six levels of special duty pay per month: SD-1-$75; SD-2-$150; SD-3-$225; SD-4-$300; SD-5-$375; SD-6-$450.

He said the following sailors will see increases in special duty pay:

Navy SEALs will get $450 per month, up from $375 per month.
Basic explosive ordnance disposal technicians will get $300 per month, up from $150 per month.
Senior EOD technicians will get $450 per month, up from $300 per month.
Master EOD technicians will get $450 per month, up from $375 per month.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:26 PM

Bonus Pay

Newly enlisted SEALs receive a bonus of $20,000 and the Navy authorizes re-enlistment bonuses up to $90,000. Enlisted SEALs sign contracts between four and eight years long, which obligates their service to the Navy. Officers, including SEALs, do not sign contracts like enlisted personnel.

Special Duty Pay

SEALs receive many types of special duty pay and imminent danger pay. While in combat zones, Navy SEALs receive $225 a month and may receive tax relief on all of their income earned while in the combat zone. Additionally SEALs receive extra compensation, including dive pay up to $340, parachute pay and demolition pay.

Read more: How Much Do Navy SEALs Get Paid a Year? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_8022569_much-navy-seals-paid-year.html#ixzz2KdkSAS8l

Many of the special pays that SEALs get are given to them on a monthly basis. As long as they remain in a billet that requires them to dive, face imminent danger, HALO etc, they get the pay. Once they aren’t in the billet, the pay stops. Thus, they are compensated during the time of service well above the normal base pay of the rank which they hold.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:30 PM

More socialism for our veterans! Wait, no. More socialism for some of our veterans!

The guy knew what he was signing up for, and he knew it took at least 20 years for retirement. If he needs the security, give it to him.

And don’t most people try to not quit their jobs (and keep their insurance) when they have medical problems?

And aren’t there programs that help with the transition? They must be working so well.

Free Constitution on February 11, 2013 at 7:31 PM

What’s your beef with any point that I have made?

And do you even know what a troll is? I mean, people use it to describe anyone they disagree with now. It’s lazy.

segasagez on February 11, 2013 at 6:45 PM

Where to start? Well lets try this. There is an interesting technique available to all/most folks who have exchanges here at HA. Everything is permanently archived in a non editable condition. For example. In the google search window of your browser, type in the following. Hotair segasagez. Remarkable isn’t it? Another unique and interesting trick for you beginners, google search window in your browser once again, this time type in the word, troll. Remarkable, yes I know. Alrighty then, with that small piece of book keeping out of the way, lets proceed, shall we? My question to you pertaining to this thread. Remember what it was? No matter allow me to repeat.

What about the guy who has PTSD because he shot a kid in some un-named battle? What about the thousands of others who have seen horrors as well?

Politricks on February 11, 2013 at 5:12 PM

I tend to fall on this side of the debate. I mean, can we officially say that this guy “deserves more” his pension that the guy search for un-exploded mines in Iraq?

segasagez on February 11, 2013 at 5:15 PM

Did either of you read the article in its entirety?

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 5:41 PM

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:32 PM

REALLY?… the most intel rich target on the face of the Earth… unarmed…..and 3 Head shots.

wow

donabernathy on February 11, 2013 at 7:32 PM

How nice, in my absence another leftist troll has weighed in.

Go find a ditch to die in.
lostmotherland on December 21, 2012 at 6:49 PM

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:34 PM

A $90,000 4-year reenlistment bonus for a SEAL places him on par with the specialty compensation over the same period of time as an ER physician.

While there is a difference in the base pay, the specialty pay of a SEAL can be pretty good.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:36 PM

Like “Shooter” said in the article. He was tired of war, and wanted to be around for the lives of his children. Can’t blame the guy for leaving early.

blatantblue on February 11, 2013 at 7:09 PM

I don’t blame or begrudge the guy anything he decides to do with his life, he’s served well and he deserves the best, I wish him well. But to leave at 16 and then bitch that he’s not getting bennies….well, that’s the contract you signed, and as my First Sergeant used to like to say, “Nobody put a gun to your head when you signed the papers.”

quikstrike98 on February 11, 2013 at 7:38 PM

REALLY?… the most intel rich target on the face of the Earth… unarmed…..and 3 Head shots.

wow

donabernathy on February 11, 2013 at 7:32 PM

Fits the mind-set of the Obama administration. They are amazingly incurious about what their “targets” know and are willing to blow them up without even an attempt at capture.

Then again, if the Obama admin was actually to get anything useful from OBL or any of the drone targets that would require them to do something or be held accountable.

Can’t have that.

kim roy on February 11, 2013 at 7:38 PM

How nice, in my absence another leftist troll has weighed in.

Go find a ditch to die in.
lostmotherland on December 21, 2012 at 6:49 PM

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:34 PM

Tell him the ObamaCare thread is down the hall, second door on the left.

kim roy on February 11, 2013 at 7:39 PM

Happy Nomad–there is this thing called “early retirement” that the Navy does offer.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:18 PM

Other than those that get “medically retired” there is no such thing as an early retirement. The only other exception I can think of involves when a Reservist is retirement eligible based on years of active service but a Reservist’s retirement doesn’t kick in until age 60. So, no, the Navy doesn’t really offer early retirement.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:41 PM

A $90,000 4-year reenlistment bonus for a SEAL places him on par with the specialty compensation over the same period of time as an ER physician. While there is a difference in the base pay, the specialty pay of a SEAL can be pretty good. ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:36 PM

IF you disregard the training the SEAL had to go through (and spare me the Doc vs SEAL training comparison…one is mental…one is mental AND physical)… and is the Doc deployed constantly to garden spots where the natives try to kill him her? Ok, other than Dim controlled cities like Chicago, Detroit, DC, et al.

Dingbat63 on February 11, 2013 at 7:42 PM

kim roy on February 11, 2013 at 7:39 PM

Yes, like so many of the leftist trolls here at HA they only pick the threads where they think they can further expand the narrative they seek. Many of the good threads as of late have been entirely troll free. This as you know becomes a quandary. The threads read much better without the leftist nonsense, however I am beginning to think them cowards.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:42 PM

Beginning may not have been the correct word selection in this instance. My apologies.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:44 PM

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Oct. 16, 2012) — Soldiers with at least 15 but less than 20 years of service may be eligible for early retirement.

According to Army Directive 281/2012, titled “Temporary Early Retirement Authority,” or TERA, officers and warrant officers who have twice failed selection for promotion to the next grade and noncommissioned officers denied continued service as a result of an approved qualitative service program centralized selection board are eligible for the program.

“Soldiers who elect to retire under TERA and are approved, will receive full retirement benefits at a slightly reduced annuity,” said Gerald Purcell, the enlisted personnel policy integrator with Army G-1. He emphasized that TERA is not an entitlement.

The TERA is one of the tools the Army is using to reduce the force in the coming years, said Purcell. He said the reduction affects active-status Soldiers serving in the active and reserve components.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:44 PM

Bmore,

You’re a troll and you don’t even know it.

What exactly are you contending? Do you believe the guy should get his pension? Take a stand on the issue. Put forth an opinion. Do something, anything, other than troll around here.

segasagez on February 11, 2013 at 7:46 PM

The Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert announced plans Jan. 19 to offer voluntary early retirement to certain Sailors separating due to the Enlisted Retention Board (ERB), during an all hands call at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

The National Defense Authorization Act, signed into law Dec. 31, 2011, reinstated the authority for the Department of Defense to implement Temporary Early Retirement Authority (TERA) for Sailors who have completed at least 15 years of service. TERA is a temporary, voluntary program that offers voluntary early retirement at a reduced monthly annuity to eligible members with 15 to 20 years of active service.

Eligible Sailors who desire early retirement under TERA must submit an application. TERA is not an entitlement, so all applications may not necessarily be approved. Once program application procedures are established, Sailors may still be able to separate prior to 1 September 2012 if their application is approved and they have accumulated 15 years of active service.

Sailors whose TERA application is approved will be retired voluntarily no later than Sept. 1, 2012, and will not be entitled to involuntary separation pay (ISP). However, Sailors will remain qualified for enhanced ERB transition benefits until their retirement date.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:46 PM

Pardon me while I have supper. I will check back.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:46 PM

That is difficult to face because they are so well cared for and supported for so long. I do feel sorry for the guy and his predicament, but please understand the full story of SEAL compensation both during and after service.

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:23 PM

Tell you what, why don’t you enlist, pass the physical tests, go through BUDS, excel to the point you get assigned to SEAL Team 6, and spend 12 years in demanding operational billets before you sit back on the couch in your mom’s basement whining that SEALs are overpaid.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:47 PM

segasagez on February 11, 2013 at 7:46 PM

Hold that thought. I’ll return in just a bit.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:47 PM

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:41 PM

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 7:46 PM

I stand corrected. However, it looks like this was a one-time thing that ended in September and not an ongoing policy. And even then was designed to cull the ranks in certain rates and paygrades. The ERB essentially is designed to earmark performers from others. Something tells me that a request for TERA from a SEAL would not be approved.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:52 PM

Yeah, the story is melodramatic. I do not know if that is the “shooter’s” doing or the writer, but it is campy. Also creepy Obama references to boot.

A few people think something seems fishy, and they are pounced on by some rabid dolts who add nothing to the conversation.

B-less.

I think something is a bit amiss about the whole situation. All he had to do was wait 4 years, and there are tons of affirmative action programs for veterans AT LIKE EVERY FREAKIN’ EMPLOYER. Some national banks have hired tens of thousands of vets this year.

antisense on February 11, 2013 at 7:53 PM

There is something very wrong with this government that this man isn’t taken care of for life.

WisCon on February 11, 2013 at 8:00 PM

Sorry, I can’t buy this. The man thinks he’s going on a suicide mission and he’s lying in bed with a photo of Obama and not his kids or wife?

Yeah… I’m calling bullshit at this point.

ButterflyDragon on February 11, 2013 at 6:00 PM

No. I think it means that he had a picture (mental image?) of obama lying in bed, etc. Not that he had a picture of lil barry in the bed with him.

[At least, I hope that SEALs aren't the kind of guys who'd sleep with a picture of barry.]

Solaratov on February 11, 2013 at 8:18 PM

There is something very wrong with this government that this man isn’t taken care of for life. WisCon on February 11, 2013 at 8:00 PM

You might have checked in without, understandably, reading earlier posts. The BS flag is being waved on the article by knowledgeable folks (I’m not totally qualified, but smell something too). The other discussion is, assuming that the article is accurate (cough, BS), should one operator be given special consideration vs his fellow bubbas…since he (not Obama) killed Osama? What about the bubbas and bubbets in the entire operator and logistics tail that made it possible for him (cough, BS) made this happen? Shouldn’t they also be “taken care of for life”?

Dingbat63 on February 11, 2013 at 8:19 PM

In Internet slang, a troll (pron.: /ˈtroʊl/, /ˈtrɒl/) is someone who posts inflammatory,[1]extraneous, or off-topic messages in an online community, such as a forum, chat room, or blog, with the primary intent of provoking readers into anemotional response[2] or of otherwise disrupting normal on-topic discussion.[3] The noun troll may also refer to the provocative message itself.

I stated my opinion based on the facts presented in the article. How does giving your opinion on the topic in question make one a “troll”?

Im curious to know the answer to that.

Also, Im not a veteran but it seems like the veterans over at “this is hell” also find this story highly unlikely. I guess they’re trolls as well.

:/

Back on topic. I stick with my original statement. I appreciate his service but see no reason why him not getting a pension for not finishing his service should be a suprise.

Politricks on February 11, 2013 at 8:23 PM

I was entranced by the article as to the actual operation, but it is a strange article. There is no doubt that a Navy Seal has lots of skills. One of the themes is that we don’t appreciate these guys enough? That story is probably as old as soldiers and war.

This soldier was making $60,000 a year, killing high value targets with hundreds of millions of dollars of training and hardware behind him. He served at the tip of the spear. I’m pretty sure that when you take that job, you’re doing it for the intangibles, not the money. Anyway, it didn’t seem like he was pounding the pavement looking for a job. He doesn’t want to work in security, fair enough. I chuckled at the references to how these soldiers could build businesses, not because I don’t believe it, but because I tried to imagine a Navy Seal working as a manager of a Staples. Maybe that was the point. If it takes a few years to settle into a career after you retire from a career where you killed your country’s #1 enemy, that’s probably natural. If he’s as good as the author portrays him, he will be fine. If he got lucky enough to be the guy because of hard work generated from US intel, and now he wants the equivalent of his own personal powerball lottery, then that’s unfortunate. He either meant it when he said they’ll all got bin Laden or he didn’t. There’s no in between. He deserves our thanks for putting his life on the line for every operation he went on. All the Navy Seals deserve our thanks for killing bin Laden.

An Objectivist on February 11, 2013 at 8:28 PM

lostmotherland on February 11, 2013 at 6:51 PM

You’re an idiot…
lostmotherhumper

Solaratov on February 11, 2013 at 8:29 PM

Bmore,

You’re a troll and you don’t even know it.

What exactly are you contending? Do you believe the guy should get his pension? Take a stand on the issue. Put forth an opinion. Do something, anything, other than troll around here.

segasagez on February 11, 2013 at 7:46 PM

Sorry for the slow response, supper was being served. Now where were we? Yes, so as to my initial question. Did you read the entire article?

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 8:38 PM

I got some satisfaction in his account.

To answer your question how can we let our veterans, elite and otherwise just get tossed out at the corner like an unwanted dog?

Because we have Congress and the executive branch pissing away money, our money and this veteran’s money, like drunk rock stars on tour with their drug dealer.

There is no reason why Obama in this economy should be firing up AF1 unless he is going to visit a disaster area like, oh Chicago….

But here you have everyone flying around in G5s like they are taking the damn subway to Foggy Bottom.

It is a damn disgrace is what it is! With no budget in sight and another year of dicking around, yammering on about anything but something important…. Our children do not deserve this!

Washington looks like idiots because they are all basically Ken Lay/Enron on steroids and we the stock holders look incompetent because we just let them keep the ship on course.

We are on the Titanic and it does not matter what class you are residing in there are not enough life boats….

Tilly on February 11, 2013 at 8:40 PM

Many.

First off, lots of luck getting people to sign up to go into harm’s way with the promise of a 401K sometime in the future. You really think that scheme is going to appeal to an 18-year-old considering enlisting? Plus, I don’t think it is fair to spend 20 plus years serving this nation and away from one’s family only to be told “see ya when you’re old.”

Secondly, you’ve got TriCare all wrong. It is virtually impossible to get into a Medical Treatment Facility (base hospital) if you aren’t on active duty. And everybody is contracted for eight years so the litmus test would have to be years of active service not contracted rate.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:03 PM

Okay the intent of a 401(k) or IRA-type plan would be the investment advantages of a 401(k)/IRA but WITHOUT having to wait until you hit 60/63/65 (whatever the hell the number is now) to pull on it TAX FREE. You can pull on it TAX FREE (a new service benefit) from the day after you officially ETS.

I.E. you serve 4,8,12,20+ years active, Guard, and/or Reserve (not counting IRR for obvious reasons) and you ETS you have a pile of money account that you can then draw from (obviously not HUGE if you were only in 4 years and only made E-4).

At the same time it keeps us taxpayers from having to pay someone who “retired” (call it what it is left the service) at 38-42 years old for the next 40 years while they have a 2nd or 3rd career.

Obviously they would ALL get whatever re-up, stop-loss, and GI Bill and VA bennies they would already have earned but also have some cushion they could draw on while they find a job, transition and whatnot.

This really really saves taxpayers money on careerist officers who get paid at least $4,544.70 per month (minimum 20 year rank of O-6 anything less than that you are usually pushed out the door before 20 years) after separating from the service at age 42 (computed based on current pay scale of $9089.40 monthly for an O-6 w/ 18 or more years in service and figuring 20 year retirement at 50% base pay of last rank held for last 3 years after average commissioning age of 21 years).

A similar enlisted member (if they even MAKE it to 20 years) gets $1,825.35(E-6)-2,678.70(E-9) per month (same pay scale calculations average enlistment age of 19 years).

Pay Scale:
http://www.militaryfactory.com/military_pay_scale.asp

SgtSVJones on February 11, 2013 at 8:48 PM

Did not have time to read all the comments. When my husband and I heard this on Fox News the first thing we said to each other was…there is something off about this. I don’t dispute he shot bin laden, what does not sound right is his leaving the navy at 16 years. Why? If he stayed for 20 he would have gotten half pay, medical for him and his family. What does the navy owe him for doing his job and leaving under 20 years?

I’m having a little problem with all these navy seals talking so much. I thought the honor was serving not personal glory.

formerwm on February 11, 2013 at 8:49 PM

I’m I’m thinking half term serving state senators who eat dog and can read a promptr should be given executive authority and draw a pension regardless of performance. And if they, like piles of scat, can be covered in flies….well then they deserve secret service protection forever.

tom daschle concerned on February 11, 2013 at 8:58 PM

HondaV65 on February 11, 2013 at 6:46 PM

Wow, somebody like you was a Master Chief? What a hard fall you must have had after retirement when you discovered that you really weren’t as smart and powerful as you thought you were. It’s easy to bully and cow a room full of First Class Petty Officers. Another thing entirely when you have to work as part of a team.

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:17 PM

lol. jeezus, you ran that guy over with your 56 Nomad. :)

arnold ziffel on February 11, 2013 at 9:09 PM

I watched these guys in Norfolk. It’s no easy gig. Can’t speak to this guys story, but maybe they should pension out in 12 years. I would be happy my tax money did that. I’ve seen them do stuff I didn’t think possible. (from a safe distance) I helped them launch in ribs in the middle of the night, all bleary eyed, and crawled back in my comfy rack. They could have died while I slept in air conditioning.

They earn their money. Rarely do NFL players pull 20, and they don’t get shot at and make millions.

wolly4321 on February 11, 2013 at 9:19 PM

Happy Nomad on February 11, 2013 at 7:17 PM

HA! Awesome.

alchemist19 on February 11, 2013 at 10:02 PM

There is something very wrong with this government that this man isn’t taken care of for life.

WisCon on February 11, 2013 at 8:00 PM

Errr…no there isn’t. He was 4 years away from a rather good retirement deal, and he stepped away from it. I can’t imagine he couldn’t have stayed in another 4 years, and I can’t imagine that he couldn’t have found another job to do in those 4 years besides stay with the Teams. Heck, I went to Sick Call once at a Reserve Unit back in the ’90s, and a Chief Hospitalman there who was shuffling paperwork, had a Budweiser on his uniform. I’m not going to criticize his decision to leave the USN, I don’t know all the details, but the contract is the contract. Unless he has service-related disabilities, if he leaves before 20 and doesn’t have an early retirement deal, he gets the same thing any other person who’s served his country gets: jack, and squat. He had to have made the leap with open eyes, everyone else who leaves with that much time in does….

quikstrike98 on February 11, 2013 at 10:02 PM

Actually, since Jason is a friend of mine….”

Hey, Jason!

Yeah, what?? Ed Morrissey over at Hot Air–

–Ed who??

Sherman1864 on February 11, 2013 at 10:19 PM

however I am beginning to think them cowards.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 7:42 PM

Beginning? You are a good man to give a couple of chances for people to redeem themselves. ;)

kim roy on February 11, 2013 at 10:29 PM

So the guy is struggling as he tries to adjust to civilian life after serving in the military, and VA hasnt been very helpful. Welcome to the club.

He’s wrong about not having health care.

“Veterans who served in a theater of combat operations after November 11, 1998 are eligible for an extended period of eligibility for health care for 5 years post discharge.”

http://www.va.gov/healthbenefits/apply/returning_servicemembers.asp

Logboy on February 11, 2013 at 10:30 PM

Well, guess I’ll move along. If you two ever feel like answering the simple question I originally posed to you instead of pulling that same old tired leftist obfuscation routine. Perhaps we could have that conversation you both seem intent on having. Until then the list remains unchanged.

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 10:31 PM

kim roy on February 11, 2013 at 10:29 PM

I’m sure its my fault, supper and all. ; )

Bmore on February 11, 2013 at 10:32 PM

As others have said here, something ain’t right with this guys story.

“Even if he had stayed in for the full twenty, his pension would have been half his base pay: $2,197 a month”

That’s E-7/8 pay.

“But the Shooter will discover soon enough that when he leaves after sixteen years in the Navy, his body filled with scar tissue, arthritis, tendonitis, eye damage, and blown disks, here is what he gets from his employer and a grateful nation:

Nothing. No pension, no health care, and no protection for himself or his family”

Bullshit.

BallisticBob on February 11, 2013 at 10:44 PM

They earn their money. Rarely do NFL players pull 20, and they don’t get shot at and make millions.

wolly4321 on February 11, 2013 at 9:19 PM


Possibly the best point made in this thread.

Some general observations:

I went to college back in the ’70′s with a lot of military including Special Forces guys. There was NO glory or praise given to the folks who had served in Vietnam. One of them, vouched for by my best friend who was an active Captain sent to get his degree by the Army, was a former Green Beret who had resigned his comission as a colonel in the Berets with 17 years of total service. I asked him,

‘Why? With three to go, why would you just walk away?’

I can still see him answering me, “Because I woke up one day and realized that I, and everyone I knew, was certifiably insane. We were all caught up in in the idea of ALWAYS pushing the envelope. I realized one day I would push too far and would die as a result.”

That was a vastly different time and set of circumstances. The transformation to valuing highly trained assets was not in the chain of command yet. Too much value was placed on temporary advantages achieved at too high a cost.

Fast forward 25 years – and a church deacon is talking to me about a SEAL he was counseling for PTSD. He was enraged that a boy he knew growing up was almost destroyed by serving his country in one of the most elite units in the military. The answer was we had a CiC who never wanted to do anything publicly with the miliary more than “nation building” … but was eager to use our best assets to do the dirty things which never get acknowledged. And if it broke those assets in the process, there were too many REMF’s willing to sweep them under the rug.

So … is this article based in fact or fiction?

The leaving at 16 years rung a bell for me … if you are burnt out, the wisest choice is to get away from the situation.

Why?

Personal story – my niece married a great guy 30+ years ago who had the right skills at the right time. He moved up and and served in Desert Storm in a posting that got him recognized internal to his service and filed away in the heads of some of the rising stars. I only found out a little over a year ago where he disappeared to right after 9/11/01 and I cannot/will not discuss it with anyone – but he got some more attention. More time spent in more tours in more places. Finally there comes the time a few years ago when he is being processed out, end of service date set and my niece is thinking, “We’re done. He’s safe.”

Except something came up … and someone very highly placed calls him up, tells him there is a final assignment they need him on, and asks him to put off getting out as a personal favor.

This story has a happy ending. He came back in one piece and is now officially out. But the toll it tooks on his family was severe, one of his teenagers would not talk to him until after he had been back a while. The other was supportive and worried sick. My niece, she did what she had done every other time, she supported him and kept things together so he wouldn’t have to think about distractions.

They ALL paid a price for that final assignment despite the happy ending.

And there is always going to be someone our best people respect who will ask them to do one more job – and too many of those folks end up with unhappy endings and some of them should have just walked away.
.
.
I am not damning anyone here other than a CiC I have expressed contempt for before on this site.

Was this reporter rolled? Maybe, there are quotes that don’t ring true and there are good people who try very hard to watch over those who have served who would not even need to know his name to have reached out through their neworks before this article was published to help him find a path in his new life.

The counterpoint to all of those “angels” is Chris Kyle’s untimely death trying to help someone overwhelmed by PTSD.

Let Chris Kyle paying the “ultimate price” underscore the fact that while we have progressed far beyond where we were in the ’70′s, we still have a ways to go in helping those who serve.

PolAgnostic on February 11, 2013 at 10:51 PM

Anyone here truly believing this story? I got some PRIME beachfront property in Nebraska you’re going to love! (right at the hide tide line)

Katfish on February 11, 2013 at 10:52 PM

The counterpoint to all of those “angels” is Chris Kyle’s untimely death trying to help someone overwhelmed by PTSD.

Let Chris Kyle paying the “ultimate price” underscore the fact that while we have progressed far beyond where we were in the ’70′s, we still have a ways to go in helping those who serve.

PolAgnostic on February 11, 2013 at 10:51 PM

Except that no one knows if that murdering thug who killed Kyle had PTS or not. He was a REMF, a unit armorer who would never have gone outside the wire. Some people have claimed that he suffered from PTS, but again, there is no proof outside of those close to him who claim that. What they ALL say, however, is that he drank to much and used drugs. The shooter’s own sister claims that he told her after the event that he’d shot two guys and stolen their truck.

Thing is, that it is extremely rare for someone with PTS to harm anyone but themselves. They might act out a bit, talk a little to loudly, maybe push that adrenaline envelope, but mostly what happens is they find a way to cope with it. The records show that it is indeed rare for someone with PTS to harm someone else, let alone murder someone

So where does the truth lie? The problem is that a lot of folks who WANT to view veterans as “damaged goods” or as “victims” because it helps their agenda are the first to throw out the PTS claim. There are guys who also use it falsely as a cover for their own failings, to excuse their behavior and to shield themselves from the personal responsibility for their actions. I’ve known several like that.

I said earlier in this thread that I believe that this story is bogus. Either the alleged SEAL conned the author, or the author himself made it all up.

It’s gonna be interesting to see how it all shakes out, but I’m betting the Esquire will be damaged goods right shortly here.

TKindred on February 11, 2013 at 11:20 PM

Your questions have been answered by many on here and I’m quite surprised you had to even ask them. For years and years, no one gave a crap about the military or the men and women who served. Even now, only the high profile cases get the attention from the press/media. Not to take anything away from these guys!! They served honorably and deserve their medals and glories.

But were they more honorable than the 20 year cook on numerous ships, or the 16 year mechanic who repaired hundreds of vehicles, or the 12 year jet engine mechanic who keeps the planes flying?
Do SEALS deserve a 10 year or 15 year retirement while others have to serve 20? Maybe they do. I’m not really sure but what I am sure of is that every single day there are grunts in the field, airmen on the tarmac, marines humping packs, and sailors fixing rustbuckets who are every bit as honorable, nobel, and patriotic as the few we hear about in the media.

I salute you all!!!

Tim Smith
US Navy 1985-1995

wirebitersmith on February 11, 2013 at 11:32 PM

I’m not getting why someone would separate from the military at the 16+ year mark, instead of gutting out the last 3 or so years and retiring with pension and benefits intact. And without having a job lined up to boot.

Hayabusa on February 11, 2013 at 5:00 PM

It’s not at all unusual, particularly with special forces types. They’re not doing it for the pension.

Wendya on February 11, 2013 at 11:40 PM

The slime in Congress get their benefits after 5 years.

bitsy on February 11, 2013 at 11:40 PM

does the post get updated?

ted c on February 11, 2013 at 11:41 PM

Except that no one knows if that murdering thug who killed Kyle had PTS or not.

*snip*

TKindred on February 11, 2013 at 11:20 PM


Did Chris Kyle believe that fellow had PTSD?

If Chris Kyle did, who are you to second guess his judgement and his sacrifice?

And REMF’s are the a$$hats who serve sitting at a desk, never having faced combat and blithely sacrificing those who do in order to advance their career.

Sitting inside the wire in either Iraq or Afghanistan is not a warm and cozy place by the fire – for that judgement I take the word of my niece’s husband who spent years outside the wire.

PolAgnostic on February 11, 2013 at 11:52 PM

Not the point. We have a story put out, and several sub stories. What all of us need to do is wait until the facts are known. That’s what I’m on about.

And I’ve also seen the pointy end of the spear. I’ve also lost friends. I’ve also been diagnosed with PTS. I know a little about what I’m saying.

V/R

TKindred on February 11, 2013 at 11:55 PM

Meet the man who shot Bin Laden

Him?

I thought he had a comm tie in like the NFL coaches.

arnold ziffel on February 11, 2013 at 11:55 PM

Hanging out with the boys.

Bmore on February 12, 2013 at 12:07 AM

Bmore if you’re talking to me. No I didnt read the entire article which is why I only personally commented on the portion I did read which was the loss of his pension for not meeting the terms of a contract. What does that have to do with politics?

Politricks on February 12, 2013 at 2:57 AM

Osama is still dead.

Trolls be damned.

TimBuk3 on February 12, 2013 at 9:03 AM

when he lies about what the author of no easy day wrote I immediately question the veracity of this story.
when he lies about what benefits are actually available to any oef/oif soldier by BS meter pegs out.
be very cautious of this one.

dmacleo on February 12, 2013 at 9:38 AM

I wasn’t a SEAL – but was a Master Chief. Everywhere I went, every room I walked into – people looked at me and knew I owned it. My will was law (if I wanted it that way). This “shooter” here – rubbed elbows with highest echelons of the military brass and CIA doing a damned important job …

HondaV65 on February 11, 2013 at 6:46 PM

gee, who knew obama had yet another composite identity.

dmacleo on February 12, 2013 at 9:49 AM

Veterans who served in a theater of combat operations after November 11, 1998 are eligible for an extended period of eligibility for health care for 5 years post discharge.”

http://www.va.gov/healthbenefits/apply/returning_servicemembers.asp

Logboy on February 11, 2013 at 10:30 PM

I hope everyone got the “Headlines” update to this thread. Seems like the author of this story is full of it.

Vince on February 12, 2013 at 9:57 AM

Look here for the update.

Vince on February 12, 2013 at 10:02 AM

I hope everyone got the “Headlines” update to this thread. Seems like the author of this story is full of it.

Vince on February 12, 2013 at 9:57 AM

He would also be eligible for the post 9/11 GI Bill – which pays tuition, fess, books, and housing allowance for up to 3 years.
http://www.gibill.va.gov/benefits/post_911_gibill/index.html

As I said yesterday (see first page) something doesn’t smell right with this story.
If he was injured or had PTSD or something else, why didn’t he go for a medical review board and get an early medical retirement?
Why didn’t he just put in for a transfer to an easy job to coast to retirment (like many others do).
If he has any injuries from his service, he’s eligible for VA disability – granted the VA is slow and has a big backlog, but he would eventually get everything due to him. Shoot – I’ve got a 20% disability from a broken wrist in the Air Force (that the AF doctors didn’t set right), and that’s worth $255 a month right now (I’m not retired).
IF this guy is real, which I doubt, the story just doesn’t add up.

dentarthurdent on February 12, 2013 at 10:42 AM

I and others formerly associated with Naval Intelligence have asked why he left early, before retirement, tgo.

Not even touching the issue raises questions about all of what is written and quoted. Remember Dick Marcinko was very open about his jail time.

Denver Bob on February 12, 2013 at 10:47 AM

I hope everyone got the “Headlines” update to this thread. Seems like the author of this story is full of it.

Vince on February 12, 2013 at 9:57 AM

I suspected the “report” by this “journalist” was at least in part left wing BS when it was first posted in HA’s “Headlines” section.

farsighted on February 12, 2013 at 11:03 AM

Comment pages: 1 2 3