Video: Nemo slams Northeast

posted at 11:31 am on February 9, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

Four dead, transportation at a standstill, and power out to more than 650,000 homes. That qualifies as a big deal, especially coming just a few months after Hurricane Sandy battered an adjacent region. Boston imposed its first traffic curfew in 35 years yesterday afternoon, threatening anyone who went out on the road with a year in jail and/or a $500 fine. CBS News reports on what they say will become known as “The Great Blizzard of 2013,” and it’s not over yet:

A behemoth storm packing hurricane-force wind gusts and blizzard conditions swept through the Northeast on Saturday, dumping more than 2 feet of snow on New England and knocking out power to 650,000 homes and businesses.

More than 28 inches of snow had fallen on central Connecticut by early Saturday, and areas of southeastern Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Hampshire notched 2 feet or more of snow — with more falling. Airlines scratched more than 5,300 flights through Saturday, and New York City’s three major airports and Boston’s Logan Airport closed. …

The National Weather Service says up to 3 feet of snow is expected in Boston, threatening the city’s 2003 record of 27.6 inches. A wind gust of 76 mph was recorded at Logan Airport.

The impact of the storm will go far beyond its geographic boundaries:

On “CBS This Morning: Saturday,” Ben Mutzabaugh, a travel writer for USA Today, estimated that close to 6,000 flights would be cancelled by the end of Saturday.

That means traffic snarls across the country.  Flights in and out of other airports rely on planes flying from those airports, and a massive shutdown of air traffic in the region will cut into the availability for other routes.  If you’re flying from the middle of the country in the next few days, you’d better check to make sure your flight is still scheduled.

How serious is the issue in Boston?  The Catholic archdiocese reminded parishioners that their obligation to attend Sunday Mass is secondary to personal safety:

In heavily Catholic Boston, the archdiocese urged parishioners to be prudent about attending Sunday Mass and reminded them that, under church law, the obligation “does not apply when there is grave difficulty in fulfilling this obligation.”

More seriously, any attempt to use transportation is probably too dangerous to consider.  Three of the four deaths are traffic-related, and police in New York are now being diverted to help stranded motorists:

Early snowfall was blamed for a 19-car pileup in Cumberland, Maine, that caused minor injuries. In New York, hundreds of cars began getting stuck on the Long Island Expressway on Friday afternoon at the beginning of the snowstorm and dozens of motorists remained disabled early Saturday as police worked to free them. …

At least four deaths were being blamed on the storm, three in Canada and one in New York. In southern Ontario, an 80-year-old woman collapsed while shoveling her driveway and two men were killed in car crashes. In New York, a 74-year-old man died after being struck by a car in Poughkeepsie; the driver said she lost control in the snowy conditions, police said.

It’s a good weekend to stay indoors and watch a movie, read a book, or catch up on Hot Air posts.  Be safe.

Meanwhile, CBS asks a question that’s probably on a lot of minds in that region today:

The winter smackdown the Northeast is getting today raises a perennial question for companies facing major weather events: Should employees be allowed to work from home or leave early, or should they tough it out and report to work as usual?

It depends on the job, and the region.  In my former career, shutting down the center was not an option, as we needed to monitor burglary and fire alarms 24/7.  However, Minnesota also has a lot of infrastructure to keep roads open and power running — we have to, in this part of the country, in order to survive.  In almost ten years, I was only tempted to get hotel rooms near the office for key personnel on two or three occasions.  It turned out to be unnecessary all three times, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t plan for it.


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Cue the Climate Change soundbites.

gatsbysgirlontheside on February 9, 2013 at 11:35 AM

Global warming climate change thought to be the culprit.

Seriously, if you’re in that area be safe.

VibrioCocci on February 9, 2013 at 11:37 AM

When did we start naming winter storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:40 AM

I spent several wonderful hours clearing my driveway. There must be close to 2 1/2 feet, excluding drifting.

Now I’m waiting for the plows to come by and fill in my driveway. >:(

evilned on February 9, 2013 at 11:41 AM

I don’t see climate change as much as just plain old hype change. This storm was hyped up far too much. I get the importance of preparation, but… give me a break.

Red Cloud on February 9, 2013 at 11:42 AM

OMG, another named winter storm! There are 100% more of them than just 5 years ago and these wingnuts are still denying climate change!

Seriously, please don’t use the stupid storm names.

forest on February 9, 2013 at 11:45 AM

I was shoveling last night at the height of the storm, it was brutal and we ended up between a foot and a half and 2 feet.

rob verdi on February 9, 2013 at 11:46 AM

Here in Danbury/Ridgefield Ct, we have seen worse.

Have about a foot of ‘global warming’ to contend with, but the power is still on…mostly because most of the trees that were going to fall and disrupt power were already down from Sandy and prior storms.

Whenever we don’t have to fire up the generator, we figure we dodged a bullet.

marybel on February 9, 2013 at 11:47 AM

When did we start naming winter storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:40 AM

It makes it easier for Al Gore to reference it…

Electrongod on February 9, 2013 at 11:48 AM

Oh Good Christ…..

We’re naming blizzards now????

Kiss my a$$….

BigWyo on February 9, 2013 at 11:48 AM

According to what I found, it’s the Weather Channel that started naming them. It isn’t official.
Oh, and Forest, the reason there are “100% more of them than 5 years ago” isn’t climate change. It’s because nobody was naming them five years ago.

Who named the Storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:51 AM

When did we start naming winter storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:40 AM

When the leftists figured out that it made them sound more hurricaney and dangerous. I would rate the new naming of blizzards a 2 out of 10, as we’re already into the “N”s and I didn’t even know we had any others. And whoever came up with “Nemo” …

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 9, 2013 at 11:51 AM

Wow – WINTER! (it happens every year, ya know.)

Pork-Chop on February 9, 2013 at 11:53 AM

Sorry to hear y’all are having troubles up there.

Bmore on February 9, 2013 at 11:53 AM

damn global warming, and no one would listen to that world renown scientist Derek Jeter

gsherin on February 9, 2013 at 11:54 AM

Wow – WINTER! (it happens every year, ya know.)

Pork-Chop on February 9, 2013 at 11:53 AM

Racist!!!

BigWyo on February 9, 2013 at 11:55 AM

Now I feel bad for whining about the gray damp rainy weather in Virginia a couple of weeks ago. Although I must say it is lovely here in northern Florida.

Cindy Munford on February 9, 2013 at 11:58 AM

21 inches and counting here in central NH.

Apparently the jackpot was down in SE MA, RI and SE CT.

Manchester, CT (near Hartford) 32″

Hartford CT 27″

Framingham, MA 30″

Spencer, MA (near Worcester) 30″

Somerville, MA 28″

Southwick, MA (western MA) 28″

New Boston, NH (SW part of the state) 30″

Del Dolemonte on February 9, 2013 at 12:03 PM

Don’s storm dictionary:

Vindication: is getting “help us” calls from friends who laughed when I bought a plow blade and put in a fixed generator.
Patience is not saying,”I told you so.”

Don L on February 9, 2013 at 12:03 PM

2 feet of snow…
When I lived in Montana..

It filled in the pot holes..
It was like driving on a new road…

Electrongod on February 9, 2013 at 12:03 PM

Who named the Storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:51 AM

Just a little note – according to my security blocks, that link accesses a website that “wants to store data on your computer”.
If you give a website a cookie —

AesopFan on February 9, 2013 at 12:04 PM

Can’t Nanny Bloomberg simply ban high capacity winter storms?

rbj on February 9, 2013 at 12:04 PM

Although I must say it is lovely here in northern Florida.

Cindy Munford on February 9, 2013 at 11:58 AM

Party’s at Cindy’s house –
Rocky Mountains had snow all week, and it’s moving across the Colorado plains later today.
If we named every winter snow-job, we would have to use one of those “Baby Name Books” and go through a chapter or two each season.

AesopFan on February 9, 2013 at 12:08 PM

I am sure a Nemo Spending Bill will be on the floor in Congress next week..
With pork to Hollywood and Disney…
And of course..
NASA

Electrongod on February 9, 2013 at 12:09 PM

AesopFan on February 9, 2013 at 12:08 PM

I’m waiting for Orangjello and Lemonjello.

Cindy Munford on February 9, 2013 at 12:09 PM

When did we start naming winter storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:40 AM

After AlGore released his HurriChakra.

CorporatePiggy on February 9, 2013 at 12:12 PM

Seriously, stop calling the storm Nemo. Only The Weather Channel does it, and it’s gimmicky.

wargamer6 on February 9, 2013 at 12:12 PM

winter storm Nemo

“just keep snowing… just keep snowing”

We got 28 inches here in Central Mass — just a dusting.

pastselldate on February 9, 2013 at 12:13 PM

I can sympathize with since I have gone through two larger storms than these in my lifetime. 36 inches overnight at Misawa AFB, Japan in the early 70′s and 40 inches overnight at Scott AFB, IL in early 82. Scott was interesting since the century storm plans called for 18 inches and that is all the equipment they had on hand. It took us from Monday morning to Thursday afternoon to get the Runways open for Medivac flights.

I don’t see what the bru-ha-ha is though on the East coast. They get these types of storms periodically and should be prepared.

chemman on February 9, 2013 at 12:13 PM

I knew that the media would have to turn this into Armageddon.

Such pathetic cry babies.


I mean really people it’s freaking called WINNNNNNNNNTER.

When it happens in the Devils Triangle (from NYC to DC and out to the Hamptons) it’s the end of the world. When it happens in the rest of the country it’s just an unnamed “snowstorm”. When it happens to the Media Cabal it must have a name it’s sssssssooooo important.

Nemo slams Northeast”

Winter……when it get colds and snows……derp!!

PappyD61 on February 9, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Nemo: Brought to you by The People’s Department of Agitation and Propaganda

petefrt on February 9, 2013 at 12:16 PM

And I’m not talking about the people shoveling snow or dealing with the side effects, or dying during the blizzard.

I’m talking about the shrill media jihadis that freak out over……WINNNNNNNNTER.

PappyD61 on February 9, 2013 at 12:16 PM

We can thank the Weather Channel for the stupid names for Winter storm. Nemo (as well as all the others) was a dumb choice as people thought of the cute little clown fish rather than evil Captain Nemo.

Beaglemom on February 9, 2013 at 12:17 PM

I am sure a Nemo Spending Bill will be on the floor in Congress next week..
With pork to Hollywood and Disney…
And of course..
NASA

Electrongod on February 9, 2013 at 12:09 PM

****opening bids?……..do I hear $10 billion?

PappyD61 on February 9, 2013 at 12:17 PM

So the snow falls and it just sits there, huh. RUN!!!!!!!!!

Ronnie on February 9, 2013 at 12:19 PM

When the leftists figured out that it made them sound more hurricaney and dangerous.
ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 9, 2013 at 11:51 AM

Now this makes sense…really wondering when they’re going to get around to naming that orange ball that rapes Gaia from the east every morning.

BigWyo on February 9, 2013 at 12:19 PM

I’m talking about the shrill media jihadis that freak out over……WINNNNNNNNTER.

PappyD61 on February 9, 2013 at 12:16 PM

95% of the media live in the NE.

Nowhere else matters.

CorporatePiggy on February 9, 2013 at 12:22 PM

Massachusetts Gov. Patrick banned ALL travel on Friday at 4pm (except plows, emergency vehicles, hospital workers). As of Sat at 12:20, the ban has not been lifted.

I will say though….. it will make it a HECK of a lot quicker for cleanup. Especially in the city of Boston. Plus they won’t have any yahoo’s firing up their RV and going out joyriding.

pastselldate on February 9, 2013 at 12:24 PM

Twenty years ago we had a storm blow through the Carolinas dumping 30 inches of snow during the NCAA Final Four week. Hundreds of thousands without power for days in temperatures near zero, including us.
Found out later that we got barely a mention on the national news. After all, it missed New York.

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 12:25 PM

So the snow falls and it just sits there, huh. RUN!!!!!!!!!

Ronnie on February 9, 2013 at 12:19 PM

“It’s a SKY TSUNAMI!!!” — The Whether Channel

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 9, 2013 at 12:25 PM

Naming winter storms isn’t uncommon. What’s uncommon is giving them people’s names. The Blizzard of ’68 is a name. So is the Christmas Blizzard of 2009 and the Knickerbocker Blizzard.

There are usually only a few big ones that deserve names and they are useful if only to cover and recall something extraordinary. I like to see them named after the fact based on what might point out what is extraordinary about them. Attaching to stupid, irrelevant made up names like Nemo to winter storms only shows how juvenile some people can be about marketing hysteria and garnering attention in order to profit from it.

Dusty on February 9, 2013 at 12:26 PM

When the leftists figured out that it made them sound more hurricaney and dangerous.
ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 9, 2013 at 11:51 AM

Now this makes sense…really wondering when they’re going to get around to naming that orange ball that rapes Gaia from the east every morning.

BigWyo on February 9, 2013 at 12:19 PM

I expect a “named” heatwave every time the temperature gets over 110 degrees here in Vegas.

VegasRick on February 9, 2013 at 12:26 PM

They should have named the storm “Squirrel” because it is being used to take people’s mind off unemployment and the failure of Congress to pass a …

Look! A squirrel!

Wino on February 9, 2013 at 12:28 PM

I don’t see what the bru-ha-ha is though on the East coast. They get these types of storms periodically and should be prepared.

chemman on February 9, 2013 at 12:13 PM

Well, for us folks in northern New England it’s business as usual, as we are used to it. I remember the February 1969 blow, when Mt. Washington got something like 60 inches in 3 days. Since they already had 8 feet of global warming on the ground when that storm began, they did not have any room to put the 5 additional feet that fell.

But Boston hasn’t seen a winter snowstorm this huge since the 1978 blizzard. They had a “major” one in 2007 but it was nothing like this.

Del Dolemonte on February 9, 2013 at 12:29 PM

Whenever we don’t have to fire up the generator, we figure we dodged a bullet.

marybel on February 9, 2013 at 11:47 AM

Exactly, but thank goodness for the generators when you need them.
We have had 3 different occurrences over the past 2 years where we were out of CL&P power for more than a week.

We are just north of you in Sherman and we only got about 15″. Blue skies now but still haven’t gone out to clear anything because the wind is still howling.
It’s sure pretty though!

CTSherman on February 9, 2013 at 12:31 PM

I think it should be The Great New England Double Blizzard, unless something more remarkable about it has occurred, like it having affected Canada as significantly, in which case it could be called the Great Border Blizzard of 2013.

Dusty on February 9, 2013 at 12:32 PM

Next release of the Unemployment numbers will be blamed on Nemo..

Electrongod on February 9, 2013 at 12:32 PM

They should have named the storm “Squirrel” because it is being used to take people’s mind off unemployment and the failure of Congress to pass a …

Look! A squirrel!

[Wino on February 9, 2013 at 12:28 PM]

How about the Great Distraction from Hurricane Sandy, or the Great Whiteout of Hurricane Sandy.

Dusty on February 9, 2013 at 12:35 PM

Great Whiteout

Racist!

Wino on February 9, 2013 at 12:37 PM

Who named the Storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:51 AM

A little known fact is; when I was in the navy (Korean War) they named all the storms after women because they kept changing their direction (minds) But that changed rapidly with PC.
I await the animal-rights crowd to stop naming storms after other equal species. Nemo? Fishophobes!

Don L on February 9, 2013 at 12:38 PM

The Great Kreskin predicts the snow will melt and the East Coast will still be there.

Limerick on February 9, 2013 at 12:38 PM

Good. Now the Democrats have another weather disaster to blame the next six months of economic statistics on.

Anybody else old enough to remember when communist countries seemed to suffer from nearly-endless droughts and crop failures that they blamed their problems on?

When I lived in Minnesota, two feet of snow meant you had to wait for the plows before you could drive to work. With luck, the schools would close.

tbrosz on February 9, 2013 at 12:39 PM

I currently live just North and West of NYC and dodged the bullet big time. Only got 7″ or 8″ of the fluffy stuff. Back in Fairfield County CT I heard 27″ or more. The wind is whipping around pretty good here, I shoveled the walkway and within a half hour it just filled back in with snow. :/

In heavily Catholic Boston, the archdiocese urged parishioners to be prudent about attending Sunday Mass and reminded them that, under church law, the obligation “does not apply when there is grave difficulty in fulfilling this obligation.”

As a teenager, I was often reminded that “sleeping in” didn’t meet the Catholic Church’s definition of “grave difficulty”.

JetBoy on February 9, 2013 at 12:39 PM

It snowed?

Cleombrotus on February 9, 2013 at 12:46 PM

Video: Nemo slams Northeast

Snow does not slam. It falls gently like a feather.

Ronnie on February 9, 2013 at 12:47 PM

Pop quiz: If people can work from home, why aren’t they already doing this most of the time instead of rarely?

HopeHeFails on February 9, 2013 at 12:51 PM

Nineteen car pileup in Cumberland, Maine? It’s only a 20-car town!

John the Libertarian on February 9, 2013 at 1:03 PM

Snow does not slam. It falls gently like a feather.

-Unless accompanied by a 40-60mph wind.

Little Boomer on February 9, 2013 at 1:04 PM

Nineteen car pileup in Cumberland, Maine? It’s only a 20-car town!

John the Libertarian on February 9, 2013 at 1:03 PM

AYUH!

pastselldate on February 9, 2013 at 1:05 PM

All the best to the residents in the Northeast.

On one of the liberal blogs I often look at, I am 100% certain there will be a post on Monday blaming AGW (they don’t usually post on weekends).

22044 on February 9, 2013 at 1:09 PM

Nineteen car pileup in Cumberland, Maine? It’s only a 20-car town!

John the Libertarian on February 9, 2013 at 1:03 PM

Yeah, but they’re all Liberals. So there’s that.

Cleombrotus on February 9, 2013 at 1:09 PM

Pop quiz: If people can work from home, why aren’t they already doing this most of the time instead of rarely?

HopeHeFails on February 9, 2013 at 12:51 PM

Contracts.

I’m authorized to work from home twice per week, and only on certain days of the week. That’s the contract. I can, theoretically, perform “unscheduled telework” on additional days, in the case of poor weather conditions, but given the sensitive nature of my work (we handle lots of PII), unless I’ve loaded up my laptop to the brim with cases, there’s no way I could telework on certain days because I’d literally have no work to, well, work ON.

Vyce on February 9, 2013 at 1:12 PM

In 2010 when a great blizzard hit the DC area, I remember going out a day before everybody else did to shovel (and it was still snowing). I thought it would be the same amount of work if I went out the next day, when the snow was forecasted to stop, so I figured, why not spread out the work?

I was out there for about 2 hours, enough to make a good-sized dent. It made the rest of the shoveling a lot easier the following day.

22044 on February 9, 2013 at 1:13 PM

I expect a “named” heatwave every time the temperature gets over 110 degrees here in Vegas.

VegasRick on February 9, 2013 at 12:26 PM

They made the move on the heat side years ago when they started using the “heat index” instead of the air temperature that had been used since … forever. All of a sudden they started reporting “temperatures” of 100+ all the time when they were really speaking about the heat index that took the humidity into account.

Along the same despicable, lying scumbag lines, have you noticed how they changed the “price of oil” since Barky got into office? The “price of oil” used to be North Sea Brent but as soon as Barky slimed into the White House they changed to using West Texas Intermediate as the “price of oil”. They shaved over $20 off the price in one, fell swoop. They did it so quietly that few people even know that the “standard” price as quoted in the news has changed to give the appearance of a lower price. North Sea Brent has been over $110/bbl for a very long time but they report West Texas Intermediate at under $90 and act as if that compares to the North Sea prices from the Bush era.

They are all scum.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on February 9, 2013 at 1:19 PM

You would think there would be some kind of device you could lay out on your sidewalk, plug it in, and have it melt the falling snow, now that forecasting is so accurate.

When we were kids in Chicago, we loved a good blizzard. No school! And skiing behind somebody’s VW bug.

PattyJ on February 9, 2013 at 1:19 PM

-Unless accompanied by a 40-60mph wind.

Little Boomer on February 9, 2013 at 1:04 PM

No. Snow does not slam anything, even in a40-60mph wind. No one has EVER been killed by a speeding snowflake.

Ronnie on February 9, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Ban snowstorms!

WhatSlushfund on February 9, 2013 at 1:24 PM

I’ve been havin fun here.

Bout a foot of the white stuff. Huge mess of stranded cars, lol. Back near my hometown on LI, there’s a stretch of stranded vehicles about a mile long (over a hundred or so). Silly people.

Home got two feet about. I enjoy this weather.

blatantblue on February 9, 2013 at 1:31 PM

I am sure a Nemo Spending Bill will be on the floor in Congress next week..

Electrongod on February 9, 2013 at 12:09 PM

Since Sandy consumed the latest tax increase, it must be time to ask the wealthy to pay a little bit more.™

Barnestormer on February 9, 2013 at 1:33 PM

Here in the Philly area… my tenant in the front apt came to my door yesterday ~ noon… ‘Can I park in that little spot in the drive way instead of on the street? I’m afraid the “60 mph blizzard” is going to KILL my car’ <(slight embellishment but this is what she meant).
-
Uh… that stuff will be in Boston, not here… but sure park there tonight.
-
A couple of my crew left work early last night because "it's snowing"… @ less than an inch on the ground. When I left 3 hours later there was ~ 1" and the roads were clear…
-
This is how Obama got elected… People don't think beyond what some hyperventilating person on The Tube tells them, and this is especially true when they want to believe…
-

RalphyBoy on February 9, 2013 at 1:37 PM

When did we start naming winter storms?

Curmudgeon

I think only the weather channel does that and only for storms that might hit Boston…..

E9RET on February 9, 2013 at 2:01 PM

I think only the weather channel does that and only for storms that might hit Boston…..

E9RET on February 9, 2013 at 2:01 PM

It’s the new thing now unfortunately

blatantblue on February 9, 2013 at 2:12 PM

I spent several wonderful hours clearing my driveway. There must be close to 2 1/2 feet, excluding drifting.

Now I’m waiting for the plows to come by and fill in my driveway. >:(

evilned on February 9, 2013 at 11:41 AM

Del Dolemonte on February 9, 2013 at 12:03 PM

Over in the SE part of NH we got over two feet with some pretty big drifts.

dogsoldier on February 9, 2013 at 2:15 PM

The word blizzard itself is a newspaper invention. A New York editor was looking for a superlative that would describe the recent storm. He asked an employee of German descent what his thoughts were. The man (who experienced the storm)replied “blizzard” which meant in his German vernacular “wild uncontrolled fist fight”. It is a useful term to denote a severe storm. You don’t need to name them though.

BL@KBIRD on February 9, 2013 at 2:19 PM

They should have named the storm “Squirrel” because it is being used to take people’s mind off unemployment and the failure of Congress to pass a …

Look! A squirrel!

Wino on February 9, 2013 at 12:28 PM

…Y e p !

KOOLAID2 on February 9, 2013 at 2:25 PM

Cue the Climate Change soundbites.

gatsbysgirlontheside on February 9, 2013 at 11:35 AM

Gotcha covered…

As Trenberth explained, the ideal temperature for a blizzard is just below freezing — just cold enough to crystalize water into snow. Below that, the atmosphere’s ability to hold moisture to create those snowflakes drops by 4 percent for every one degree Fahrenheit fall in temperature.

“In the past, temperatures at this time of year would have been a lot below freezing,” Trenberth said. In other words, it’s been too cold to snow heavily. But that may become less of an obstacle for snow in the Northeast.

Kevin Trenberth, of the Climate Analysis Section at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado

Science. It works, bitches.

chumpThreads on February 9, 2013 at 2:28 PM

And the best reaction to the blizzard is:

Have a storm plan. Which family members will be eaten first? Lead an honest, loving discussion based on merit and caloric value.
— @pourmecoffee via TweetDeck

chumpThreads on February 9, 2013 at 2:33 PM

Ban snowstorms!

WhatSlushfund on February 9, 2013 at 1:24 PM

Assault Blizzard!

Del Dolemonte on February 9, 2013 at 2:34 PM

KOOLAID2 on February 9, 2013 at 2:25 PM

Agreed, and also the fact that people who are living in tents after Sandy are now snowed in as well. How many of those folks still have not been helped?

Del Dolemonte on February 9, 2013 at 2:34 PM

Now that’s funny!

dogsoldier on February 9, 2013 at 2:50 PM

The Weather Channel’s justification for naming winter storms has to be some of the weakest reasoning I’ve seen lately. The whole thing is purely a marketing ploy and has nothing to do with public safety concerns. I guess most of the weather forecasting industry is up in arms over TWC’s move.

That being said, the list of names is hilarious. Almost as hilarious as TWC’s explanations for their choices in names. From a Slate article (Winter Storm “Nemo” Is Not Named After a Fish, Because That Would Be Illegal):

Nemo, for instance, is defined thusly in the cable network’s official announcement:

* Nemo: A Greek boy’s name meaning “from the valley,” means “nobody” in Latin.

That’s not the only head-scratcher among the network’s storm-name explanations:

* Gandolf: A character in a 1896 fantasy novel in a pseudo-medieval countryside.
* Khan: Mongolian conqueror and emperor of the Mongol empire.
* Orko: The thunder god in Basque mythology.
* Q: The Broadway Express subway line in New York City.
* Rocky: A single mountain in the Rockies.
* Yogi: People who do yoga.

Got it? Not Gandalf from Lord of the Rings, or Khan from Star Trek, or Q from Star Trek or the James Bond films, or… you get the idea. No, the channel is careful to give all of its winter-storm names origin stories that spring from either ordinary nouns or proper names that are in the public domain.

The J name was originally going to “Jor-El” (as in Superman’s father), but was changed to “Jove” for the “antiquity kind of theme.” Antiquity, kinda like the Q train, right?

steebo77 on February 9, 2013 at 2:50 PM

And there’s supposed to be a Superbowl at the Meadowlands next year at just about this time?

Yeppers, some forward looking people in charge in the NFL….

nukemhill on February 9, 2013 at 3:02 PM

No one has EVER been killed by a speeding snowflake.

Ronnie on February 9, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Ever hear of an avalanche? Those are pretty much a bunch of snowflakes going really fast together.

JetBoy on February 9, 2013 at 3:23 PM

When did we start naming winter storms?

Curmudgeon on February 9, 2013 at 11:40 AM

.
That just started this past Fall season (2012),
Curmudgeon.
My opinion of it, is (rest of line deleted).

Someone’s just adding a little more “drama” to weather reporting, and records keeping. Nothing more.
.

. . . . . Although I must say it is lovely here in northern Florida.

Cindy Munford on February 9, 2013 at 11:58 AM

.
Yeah, yeah … “Rub it in”, Cindy’ … : )

listens2glenn on February 9, 2013 at 3:25 PM

The J name was originally going to “Jor-El” (as in Superman’s father), but was changed to “Jove” for the “antiquity kind of theme.” Antiquity, kinda like the Q train, right?

steebo77 on February 9, 2013 at 2:50 PM

They really should have named one in honor of Frank “Don’t Eat the Yellow Snow” Zappa…

Don’t be a naughty Eskimo…

Del Dolemonte on February 9, 2013 at 3:29 PM

Nobody up here is calling this storm “nemo”…it is and will be “the blizzard of 2013!”

NHElle on February 9, 2013 at 3:39 PM

Nobody up here is calling this storm “nemo”…it is and will be “the blizzard of 2013!”

NHElle on February 9, 2013 at 3:39 PM

I only heard this morning the name Nemo…but yeah, I’m in NY and no one calls it by that name.

JetBoy on February 9, 2013 at 3:42 PM

No one has EVER been killed by a speeding snowflake.

Ronnie on February 9, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Ever hear of an avalanche? Those are pretty much a bunch of snowflakes going really fast together.

JetBoy on February 9, 2013 at 3:23 PM

A+

And the collective impact of those snowflakes can kill you.

They can also suffocate you, even if you’ve only been buried to the depth of a couple of inches.

About 15 years ago some friends and I were on “a 3 hour tour” one March day on Mt. Washington here in NH and we got dragooned into service for a litter detail to bring a hiker caught in an avalanche down the mountain. Not an easy task.

And one of the Wounded Warriors and some of his buddies got caught in an avalanche up there a couple of weeks ago, and were lucky to escape with their lives.

Del Dolemonte on February 9, 2013 at 3:52 PM

I only heard this morning the name Nemo…but yeah, I’m in NY and no one calls it by that name.

JetBoy on February 9, 2013 at 3:42 PM

With one notable exception:

Mike Bloomberg Verified account ‏@MikeBloomberg

We’re ready for #Nemo: We have 250,000+ tons of salt on hand, 350 salt spreaders & plows ready to be put on 1,800 Sanitation trucks

steebo77 on February 9, 2013 at 3:56 PM

Nobody up here is calling this storm “nemo”…it is and will be “the blizzard of 2013!”

NHElle on February 9, 2013

In Connecticut it’s called storm “Charlotte” by the local media.

chumpThreads on February 9, 2013 at 4:02 PM

Time for bark and a 100 or so of his friends to take a taxpayer funded vacation to some warm weather destination.

acyl72 on February 9, 2013 at 4:08 PM

Pop quiz: If people can work from home, why aren’t they already doing this most of the time instead of rarely?

HopeHeFails on February 9, 2013 at 12:51 PM

I worked from home yesterday rather than brave the storm. Here in the Toronto area the snow was pretty bad as well.

2 main reasons why I don’t more often:
1) Management discourages it, they’ve made it clear that working from home should be a rare occurrence.
2) I prefer going to the office. I like the social interaction, I love working downtown, I like being able to separate my work life completely from my home life. However I am single and childless, so I could definitely see the advantages for someone with a family.

CityFish on February 9, 2013 at 4:24 PM

Only got 7 inches of snow in NJ. The storm after Christmas 2 years ago was much worse.

njrob on February 9, 2013 at 4:29 PM

forest on February 9, 2013 at 11:45 AM

Exactly. “Nemo”?!? Really? (You’d think they would at least try Wikipedia or Google and come up with something appropriate……..)

Someone’s just adding a little more “drama” to weather reporting, and records keeping. Nothing more.

listens2glenn on February 9, 2013 at 3:25 PM

It’s of a piece with the OMG!!!! All crisis, all the time!™ weather reporting that has been going on for almost a decade now. We’re all gonna die, you know – it’s just a question of whether the weatherman will get us sufficiently excited about it before we do……

And, though I know a foot or two of snow is pretty heavy, it really isn’t “storm of the century” level. I was forced to land in the middle of a lake effect storm at Griffis AFB once, where the next morning, the snow level was high enough to bury the 707′s engines. The piled snow on the streets was high enough to make walking down a sidewalk like walking in a hallway. Now, that’s a storm!

GWB on February 9, 2013 at 4:51 PM

I’m so tired of hearing about this storm. Suck it up, if you weren’t ready it’s your fault…they’ve been talking about it for a week.

We have 150 inches so far this year and 34 on the ground here in upper Michigan and somehow we have survived.

WelfareWonderland on February 9, 2013 at 5:37 PM

Hey folks, what you are having is normal winter weather in the snow belt. Stop trying to blame it on global climate change.

SC.Charlie on February 9, 2013 at 6:01 PM

And you can always submit your photos here.

Who says there isn’t a museum for everything? :)

Seriously, stay safe, those of you in New York, New England and Canada.

I had a major scare many years ago during the March blizzard of 1993 that was the big finale of winter weather that began the previous October, as I almost wiped out at 30 mph on the Pennsylvania Turnpike on my way home from the overnight shift at work. I got home safely, but before the Governor declared a state of emergency. I wasn’t about to attempt driving anywhere once I got home.

PatriotGal2257 on February 9, 2013 at 6:20 PM

due to drifting (some 6 feet in many spots) hard to get a good read of accurate snowfall here (etna, maine) but I have some areas usually not affected by drifts and they were running 24-26″ measured.
still snowing a bit too. and got more (3 or so) coming monday then another storm next weekend.
power went out at 515 am, was 7-8 deg out, gen was hooked up and running at 530. power came back on around noon or a bit after.
the damn winds hurting us here.
26″ snow is just snow. no big deal.
my yard looks like a roiling sea os snow waves, pretty cool actually.
driveway had snow up to windows on crown vic and onto hood of the taurus.
going to take days to clear it, wind blows it back in as fast as I can blow it out.

dmacleo on February 9, 2013 at 6:49 PM

and if it helps, I found Nemo.
he covered my yard and never floundered…

dmacleo on February 9, 2013 at 6:51 PM

Forty years ago this month South Carolina experienced the snowstorm of the century. Yes, I said South Carolina.

“1973 – February 8-11, Snow Storm: The snow storm that crossed the Southeastern states from February 8 to February 11, 1973, brought a record breaking snowfall to South Carolina. Snow fell for approximately 24 hours beginning in late afternoon on the 9th. The belt of largest amounts lay parallel to the coast about 75 miles inland. The heaviest snowfall was 24 inches measured in Rimini. About 30,000 tourists were stranded on the State’s highways. Many had to be rescued by helicopter. Eight fatalities resulted from exposure. The snow was accompanied by strong winds and followed by severe cold. Drifts to 8 feet were found in some locations. At least 200 buildings collapsed, as did thousands of awnings and carports. The property damage and road damage plus cost of snow removal and rescue operations were estimated at close to $30 million.”

SC.Charlie on February 9, 2013 at 7:10 PM

OK, I don’t get it. Why do these storms always paralyze the East Coast? 2-3 ft of snow, that’s all?

The Denver area usually gets that kind of snow several times each winter (the current drought excepted) and 4-5 ft isn’t uncommon. We have never had the streets shut down with threats of arrest and fines, nor are our highways turned into parking lots. There may be a few minor power outages of a few thousand, but never massive outages that take out the whole city.

Normally, you go out for a few hours to shovel, then go about your business. Unless there’s over 2 ft of snow, side streets don’t even get plowed.

Common Sense on February 9, 2013 at 8:36 PM

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