Video: And the Super Bowl winner was …

posted at 8:01 am on February 4, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

Oh, not the football game, which went down as one of the strangest Super Bowls ever, and which the Baltimore Ravens barely hung on to win, 34-31.  No, we’re talking about the advertising game, as companies competed for the hearts and minds of consumers everywhere.  By acclamation — at least on my twitter feed — the winning ad came from Dodge and the late Paul Harvey, whose long-ago sermon heralding farmers as God’s steward of the land and of values touched the hearts of nearly everyone:

This ad got more than 329,000 views overnight — not bad for a car ad.  The worst ad, in my opinion, came from (no surprise) GoDaddy, which turned a funny concept into a rather disgusting presentation.  Having Bar Rafaeli make out with a geek to argue that the Internet service is both hot and solid was a pretty funny concept.  Its execution, complete with close-up and enhanced audio, produced more gag response than gag.  Note to admakers: There’s a reason why filmmakers add music to these scenes in movies.

If Dodge was the good and GoDaddy the bad, then the power outage in the Superdome was the ugly.  Half of the lights when out shortly after the second half started, which had the effect of cooling off the Ravens and allowing the 49ers to regain their poise.  Whether that was a good or bad thing depended on which team one was rooting for, but all sides could take some pleasure in the fact that the power outage cut Phil Simms’ mike in the middle of another Captain Obvious explanation.

A few viewers attempted to post video of the outage on YouTube, but the NFL rushed to claim copyright infringement.  CNN used photos to report on it:

No one is still quite sure what happened:

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu promised answers.

“In the coming days, I expect a full after action report from all parties involved.”
The power company said it wasn’t to blame, and stadium officials apologized but said little else until well after the game.

And then, in a statement hours later, Superdome officials said a piece of equipment designed to monitor the electrical load “sensed an abnormality in the system.”

“Once the issue was detected, the sensing equipment operated as designed and opened a breaker, causing power to be partially cut to the Superdome in order to isolate the issue,” the statement said.

It still isn’t clear what the “abnormality” was — but more than a few people had their own suspicions.

The only thing that’s sure is that we nearly saw the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history, but it fell five yards short.


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fight like a girl on February 4, 2013 at 9:52 AM

Don’t know how old you are but it might be an age thing. Paul Harvey has a voice that for me, exemplifies Americana, similar to Norman Rockwell paintings.

I wasn’t paying a great deal of attention to the game, but when I heard his voice, I had to rewind the commercial so I could watch it from the begining. I thought it was great. Then again, I’ll be 47 in a few weeks and maybe I’m just getting old…

CTSherman on February 4, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Paul Harvey….the last of the real Americans.

BobMbx on February 4, 2013 at 10:02 AM

Hard for them to top their Darth Vader-kid ad though.

rockmom on February 4, 2013 at 9:58 AM

I don’t know…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ad4fagTyaM4

Cleombrotus on February 4, 2013 at 10:05 AM

which had the effect of cooling off the Ravens

So power outages, by design, affect the ability of the team with the lead to win while at the same time energizing (no pun intended) the losing team? Does this indicate a need to play only day games, outside in the sun to ensure fair play?

What theory explains that sentiment? I hope this theory includes the effect of a halftime period, which doesn’t seem to have any effect worth mentioning.

BobMbx on February 4, 2013 at 10:07 AM

Half of the lights whenwent out

-Language Martinet

The Monster on February 4, 2013 at 10:22 AM

Best commercial: Oreos. The woman breaking the chair over the dude and the cop whispering into his bullhorn “We’re the cops and you have to listen to us!” made me guffaw.
Bishop on February 4, 2013 at 8:26 AM

Agreed. Especially coming after the lame “give peace a chance” ad from Coke.

NebCon on February 4, 2013 at 10:24 AM

Buying anything from the Chrysler group makes about a much sense as driving through a car wash in a convertible with the top down.

They have always been the “me too” company. And now they are trying to wrap themselves in the American flag after having a chunk bit out of them by Fiat, the “me too” company of Europe.

Gatsu on February 4, 2013 at 8:24 AM

Exactly. The bail-out companies took our money and have run with it, mostly overseas. And now, they want to appeal to our patriotism with wizened old farmers, Paul Harvey, and apple pie. Meanwhile back at the ranch, the family farm and the small town have been all but destroyed by corporate farming, regulatory law, and death taxes.

Great commercial? Sure. Because at least half of this country too stupid to see the truth, as evidenced by the Statist-In-Chief’s reelection.

Murf76 on February 4, 2013 at 10:34 AM

CTSherman on February 4, 2013 at 10:02 AM

I know who Paul Harvey is, I am over 50 but it was not a good commercial because it was too long and was a commercial for a truck. As someone who knows advertising, I can tell you that it was not effective because the whole time, one is left wondering who the ad is for. It is like a public service ad for farming and then ends up being for a truck.

The Clydesdale ad was poignant, heartwarming and had a broad appeal. The Clydesdale is the widely known symbol of Budweiser. No one knew who the Harvey ad was for until the end. Sorry, I liked Harvey too but as an ad, this was not the best.

fight like a girl on February 4, 2013 at 10:49 AM

Am I the only one here who did not watch the Superbowl?

Naturally Curly on February 4, 2013 at 8:28 AM

No, you are not alone.

UltimateBob on February 4, 2013 at 10:49 AM

The power outage occurred because they used defibrillators on the entire 49er offense to bring them back from the dead.

michaelo on February 4, 2013 at 11:01 AM

Am I the only one here who did not watch the Superbowl?

Naturally Curly on February 4, 2013 at 8:28 AM

No, you are not alone.

UltimateBob on February 4, 2013 at 10:49 AM

Ditto. Yawn.

txmomof6 on February 4, 2013 at 11:03 AM

fight like a girl on February 4, 2013 at 10:49 AM

As always, to each his own. Carry on.

CTSherman on February 4, 2013 at 11:10 AM

Photoshoppers Go Wild!

Bammy’s Got A Gun

Bammy’s Got A Gun – II

Resist We Much on February 4, 2013 at 11:16 AM

Boy the local radio station is hyping up the video

Good job Dodge

cmsinaz on February 4, 2013 at 11:17 AM

That Go Daddy ad is going to go down as the absolutely most guaranteed to make you cringe into your seat and beg for it to end commercial of all time!

pilamaye on February 4, 2013 at 8:18 AM

Yes, and not because of the people who were in it. I don’t know why every other Super Bowl commercial has to be two people kissing or someone beating the hell out of someone else.

I liked the Leon Sandcastle one and the Paul Harvey ones best.

In addition to the Darth Vader one, here’s one of the best Super Bowl ads of all time:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1fv7xfeaGtc.

bmmg39 on February 4, 2013 at 11:21 AM

Badger40 on February 4, 2013 at 9:11 AM

Kudos to you, Badger. Men like you make our country great. God help us have many more years of men/women like our farmer/ranchers.

avagreen on February 4, 2013 at 11:32 AM

the superbowl: 11 minutes of “sport” that’s repulsive and clownish in equal measure; hours and hours of stomach-churning consumerism; all covered in a thin glaze of syrupy patriotic fervor.

no thanks.

sesquipedalian on February 4, 2013 at 11:35 AM

The Clydesdale ad was poignant, heartwarming and had a broad appeal. The Clydesdale is the widely known symbol of Budweiser. No one knew who the Harvey ad was for until the end. Sorry, I liked Harvey too but as an ad, this was not the best.

Everyone who watched the telecast will remember the Paul Harvey/Dodge ad for a long time. Nobody will even remember the Clydesdale ad. That is the definition of good advertising.

Old Fritz on February 4, 2013 at 11:38 AM

Love Paul Harvey, Dodge trucks, well, do they still have transmission troubles?

Bmore on February 4, 2013 at 11:39 AM

The Paul Harvey commercial was an effective commercial for the small family farmer, like Badger and my father-in-law. It was not truthful ad, however. But, it will play well to the ignorant.

My favorite commercial was the Audi Prom commercial early in the game.

Hated the Oreo commercial; though it was stupid.

ksbsnowowl on February 4, 2013 at 11:39 AM

the superbowl: 11 minutes of “sport” that’s repulsive and clownish in equal measure; hours and hours of stomach-churning consumerism; all covered in a thin glaze of syrupy patriotic fervor.

no thanks.

sesquipedalian on February 4, 2013 at 11:35 AM

Someone pizzed in Sesqui’s cornflakes this morning.

Behold, the cheerful Progressive! Not.

Resist We Much on February 4, 2013 at 11:40 AM

The Paul Harvey commercial was an effective commercial for the small family farmer, like Badger and my father-in-law. It was not a truthful ad, however. But, it will play well to the ignorant.

My favorite commercial was the Audi Prom commercial early in the game.

Hated the Oreo commercial; though thought it was stupid.

And I haven’t had my caffeine yet…

ksbsnowowl on February 4, 2013 at 11:43 AM

Tide commercial and the “Montana Stain.” Hands down.

“Go, Ravens!” ZING!

Christien on February 4, 2013 at 11:45 AM

I can tell you that it was not effective because the whole time, one is left wondering who the ad is for.
fight like a girl on February 4, 2013 at 10:49 AM

You’re right! If only they had an ad genius to nix Paul Harvey, the homey message & imagery and go with this unforgettable, endearing style instead! Less expensive to produce, too!!

whatcat on February 4, 2013 at 11:49 AM

the superbowl: 11 minutes of “sport” that’s repulsive and clownish in equal measure; hours and hours of stomach-churning consumerism; all covered in a thin glaze of syrupy patriotic fervor.

no thanks.

sesquipedalian on February 4, 2013 at 11:35 AM

.
Thank you, for your honesty.

I sure hope you feel better, after “venting” that.

listens2glenn on February 4, 2013 at 11:50 AM

I agree that the farmer ad isn’t really a very good ‘ad’, because you remember Paul Harvey but not the truck company that sponsored the ad. Dodge? Who cares about them?

But it still was a great reminder of a way of life that is fast disappearing. In the part of Iowa where I grew up, farmers are having to farm more and more acres just to get by. The wives work outside the home (and in the fields when they get home) and the men work a second job in winter. And when they die, the kids have to pay inheritance taxes by selling some of the land that was farmed by their grandfathers and fathers before them.

Yes, I agree that ethanol should not have the subsidies that make it viable as an energy source. And yes, ethanol is supported by farmers…but it is the only thing that is helping most farmers stay in the black. Give them some other way to get good prices for their crops (commensurate with the risks they take) and a place to work in the off-season and most would switch in a minute.

Some of you who lump the corporate farms with the small every day salt of the earth folks should spend some time in the small towns of Iowa, and talk with ordinary folks, and see if it doesn’t change you views. I recommend Gowrie or Callender or Moorland in Webster County–you’ll meet some great folks, and might learn a thing or two.

mathgal60 on February 4, 2013 at 11:56 AM

The Paul Harvey commercial was an effective commercial for the small family farmer, like Badger and my father-in-law. It was not truthful ad, however. But, it will play well to the ignorant.

ksbsnowowl on February 4, 2013 at 11:39 AM

.
I’m not proud of my “ignorance”, but I am honest about it . . . . . .
.
In what way, HOW … was the Paul Harvey ad “not truthful”?

listens2glenn on February 4, 2013 at 11:56 AM

I sure hope you feel better, after “venting” that.

listens2glenn on February 4, 2013 at 11:50 AM

i do, thanks.

sesquipedalian on February 4, 2013 at 11:58 AM

Advertising has never been simply about selling an actual product, as opposed to associating a product with something else. Most likely because there’s nothing intrinsically great, or even distinguishable, let alone unique, about the vast majority of the products. I won’t second guess the executives whose surveys presumably show that consumers will buy a farm truck if it’s driven by the entire Fonda family, or is wrapped in a flag, or has two coeds frenching in the front seat, or is parked at a Hawaiian luau. It’s just not why I buy things. Or is it?

Seth Halpern on February 4, 2013 at 12:00 PM

It was a touching ad. Just not sure what it has to do with selling sucktastic trucks from a bailed-out Italian car company.

Hayabusa on February 4, 2013 at 12:36 PM

We were at a large family party-over 30 people in the room. There was lots of laughter, joking around, and multiple conversations taking place when this ad started; no one was paying much attention to the TV. As the ad went on the room got more and more quiet. By the end not one person was talking and there were actually a few applause. That, to my mind, is the mark of a good commercial. It literally made people stop and take notice.

PrincipleStand on February 4, 2013 at 12:38 PM

It was a touching ad. Just not sure what it has to do with selling sucktastic trucks from a bailed-out Italian car company.

Hayabusa on February 4, 2013 at 12:36 PM

Who cares? The really important points were not lost on those who have seen it.

Cleombrotus on February 4, 2013 at 12:42 PM

The Paul Harvey commercial was an effective commercial for the small family farmer, like Badger and my father-in-law. It was not truthful ad, however. But, it will play well to the ignorant.

ksbsnowowl on February 4, 2013 at 11:39 AM

HEY!…..I resemble that remark!

tencole on February 4, 2013 at 12:43 PM

This ad brought a tear to my eye.
Too bad Dodge is part of Government Motors, but I may give the Ram a second look…I;m close, but when I retire finally I will be a full time farmer.

I’ll also send to my European Colleagues that think we’re a bunch of gun toting killers.

seesalrun2 on February 4, 2013 at 12:45 PM

The Paul Harvey tribute to farmers is magnificent.

The Dodge added tag line at the end “To the farmer in all of us” definitely not so much. In fact, all I could see in my mind was Barack Obama shooting a shotgun.

As Cathy would say, “Bleaaaaaaaaaaah.”

parke on February 4, 2013 at 1:20 PM

Farmers and Chrysler… Two things that live almost solely off government money.

Kaptain Amerika on February 4, 2013 at 1:20 PM

whatcat on February 4, 2013 at 11:49 AM

I am not dissing Paul Harvey or how it was presented. Yes, it was nostalgic and good but it did not link to the ad buyer, Chrysler. Many people today are saying they liked the Paul Harvey ad but they don’t know who the ad was for. Therefor, it was a nice piece but not a good ad. And you are wrong about the Budweiser commercial. Their Clydesdale ads are some of the most remembered Super Bowl commercials. When you see a Clydesdale, you think of Budweiser. When you hear Paul Harvey talking about farmers, you don’t think Ram trucks.

fight like a girl on February 4, 2013 at 1:41 PM

I am not dissing Paul Harvey or how it was presented. Yes, it was nostalgic and good but it did not link to the ad buyer, Chrysler.

Then how do you know it was a Chrysler ad? No one here seems to be confused about it and I don’t know anyone who is confused on that account.

Many people today are saying they liked the Paul Harvey ad but they don’t know who the ad was for.

“Many people”? Who?

Therefor, it was a nice piece but not a good ad.
fight like a girl on February 4, 2013 at 1:41 PM

I think where you’re confused is in the nature of targeted advertising – especially during a Super Bowl. They could have run the same Ram truck commercial they run during their usual year round ad buys. But the accounting dept might frown on paying out 8 million bucks just to provide Super Bowl viewers with a bathroom break.

More importantly, though, is the fact that Super Bowl ads aren’t about selling soap. They’re selling images and beliefs via targeted advertising. If the Ram truck ad had been to get tween girls’ attention it would have featured Justin Beiber doing a duet with the pop-diva du jour. However, that wasn’t what Dodge was shooting for – they surely know their consumer demographics. And, for that demographic, it worked perfectly. Read PrincipleStand’s report in a comment above and you’ll see what I mean.

whatcat on February 4, 2013 at 3:25 PM

I’m not proud of my “ignorance”, but I am honest about it . . . . . .
.
In what way, HOW … was the Paul Harvey ad “not truthful”?

listens2glenn on February 4, 2013 at 11:56 AM

One, small family farmers like the ones depicted, would have a damn hard time affording a $30,000+ vehicle. None of my FIL’s equipment was new when he bought it. Best car he ever had was a used Honda pilot with 80k miles on it.

Two, the idea of bail-outs from the .gov runs counter to the way of thinking of most small farmers (though admittedly the government has done a good job of slowly getting a lot of them onto the subsidy teat).

Basically its “untruthfulness” is merely via its association with Dodge. As I said, it was a good advertisement for small family farmers.

ksbsnowowl on February 4, 2013 at 4:06 PM

The farmer ad was great until the ending. Here they lay out all the reasons why farmers are amazing dedicated people and then it concluded with:

“saluting the farmer in all of us ”

All of us?

Way to miss your own point.

Not all of us have a farmer inside. In fact, judging from the last election too many of us don’t.

Not the woman demanding her free Obamaphone.

Not the person demanding that I pay for her birth control.

Not the guy going on social security disability because it sure beats working.

Not the guy asking me to pay for his second mortgage.

Not any of the voters thinking that the goal of government is to get the OTHER GUY to pay your way.

no there is not a farmer in every one of us.

And we cheapen that message when we imply that the noble and courageous is just the common.

We all may wish to be that way, but too few of us are willing to pay the price that true character and nobility of spirit demand.

PackerBronco on February 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM

all covered in a thin glaze of syrupy patriotic fervor.

no thanks.

sesquipedalian on February 4, 2013 at 11:35 AM

Now I know who you are-you’re that whiny Leftist hag who “wrote” the bitter article last week about how American sporting events are “too patriotic”. Limbaugh had a field day with that steaming heap during today’s show.

So are you going to also whine about the “religious” Paul Harvey Ram Trucks ad? A ton of your fellow Leftist Bitter Atheist Clingers are doing that at the youtube upload, which has already gone viral:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AMpZ0TGjbWE

Discuss.

Del Dolemonte on February 4, 2013 at 6:53 PM

Meh.

flataffect on February 4, 2013 at 7:07 PM

Just watched a similar Paul Harvey speech about Police Officers but the pictures are not as good. Kudos to Dodge Ram for making a commercial I want to watch over and over. Thanks Ed for posting this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sEvZBKwvE0k

mike_NC9 on February 4, 2013 at 7:23 PM

Am I the only one here who did not watch the Superbowl?
Naturally Curly on February 4, 2013 at 8:28 AM

Didn’t watch. Especially avoided Beyonce. Because:

Why would FLOTUS be proud of a halftime show?
changer1701 on February 4, 2013 at 9:10 AM

Because it is the first time in the history of our slave nation that someone who gave the GOP candidate the finger, with a ‘Take that, *itches’ got to do an encore on prime time. Isn’t that what highlighting her at the inaugural was about, too?

It was Jeep, narrated by Oprah, and almost as big a propaganda piece as Bloombergs “We’re going to take your guns” propaganda. On the surface it was okay but the underlying idea is that the nation is no longer engaged in combat- all peace and prosperity- and that simply isn’t the case. It is the rat-eared wonder’s supporters trying to rewrite the narrative even as we still have Americans being killed in Afghanistan.
Happy Nomad on February 4, 2013 at 8:18 AM

Agree. I assume this is a second reason FLOTUS was hot flashing

I miss Harvey, so loved to hear him again. I love Clydesdales, but was that pretty boy really its trainer? He looked like he belonged in the Ice Capades. I enjoyed the VW commercial. “respect Boss-man” cracked me up

entagor on February 4, 2013 at 9:36 PM

Basically its “untruthfulness” is merely via its association with Dodge. As I said, it was a good advertisement for small family farmers.

ksbsnowowl on February 4, 2013 at 4:06 PM

.
I can understand small family farmers not being able to afford a new pick-up truck, from any manufacturer.
But I failed to see the “pro-government subsidy” angle you’re talking about, in the commercial.

I don’t believe there’s much disagreement between us, only a mis-perception of a piece of the commercial on my part.

listens2glenn on February 4, 2013 at 10:05 PM

fight like a girl on February 4, 2013 at 10:49 AM

I agree that the Clydesdale ad was the best commercial for a product, but damn was that Paul Harvey tribute to the Farmer moving, especially with all the other crap tossed at us during the commercials and the halftime show.

Daemonocracy on February 5, 2013 at 4:14 AM

It is a shame that a tax payer bailed out auto company used the late Harvey’s words, but then again farm subsidies are big business too.

Daemonocracy on February 5, 2013 at 4:15 AM

The only thing that’s sure is that we nearly saw the greatest comeback in Super Bowl history, but it fell five yards one correctly called pass interference penalty short.

I fixed it for you. :)

Theophile on February 5, 2013 at 5:13 AM

Not all of us have a farmer inside. In fact, judging from the last election too many of us don’t.

And even if we did, we’d most likely get in trouble with the city or a Homeowners’ Taliban if we tried to start raising crops in our yard.

TMOverbeck on February 5, 2013 at 9:03 AM

no there is not a farmer in every one of us.

And we cheapen that message when we imply that the noble and courageous is just the common.

We all may wish to be that way, but too few of us are willing to pay the price that true character and nobility of spirit demand.

PackerBronco on February 4, 2013 at 6:11 PM

Well said.

ksbsnowowl on February 5, 2013 at 11:16 AM

Real farmers drive Ford trucks. Ford didn’t take any government handouts bribes.

Cherokee on February 5, 2013 at 2:45 PM

The absolute brilliance of over a half an hour electrical light failure and we had to sit and watch people scratch them selves and without one commercial. When it cost millions of dollars to show one at a Super Bowl, where were all the geniuses of the media when they could have run ads back to back and collected the revenue.

mixplix on February 5, 2013 at 4:11 PM

This commercial was real to me.
We love our animals. We love our land.
And yet, there are those who dare say the opposite of us.
Who have never walked in our boots.

Badger40 on February 4, 2013 at 9:11 AM

And you, kind, hardworking Sir, are wonderful. Thank you!

If that ad made even one coastal/urban leftie rethink their own views of all of us in flyover country it was well worth it. ‘Geez, maybe I’m a bit off in thinking they’re all hicks, rubes, bitter clingers, etc.’

For me, this ad and Bud’s were like a breath of fresh air, particularly when juxtaposed against all the bad and ugly, the crass and tasteless. .

Opinionator on February 5, 2013 at 5:25 PM

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