Who will emerge as the leader of the opposition?

posted at 12:01 pm on January 10, 2013 by Ed Morrissey

Hugh Hewitt asks a question today that my editor at The Fiscal Times asked me earlier this week, although in slightly different contexts.  Normally after a national-election loss, the banner-carrier would remain as the nominal head of the opposition — even in the US non-parliamentary system.  The media certainly went to John McCain after 2008′s loss, and for a while to John Kerry after the 2004 election, although by that time they had begun to see Hillary Clinton as the future of the Democratic Party.  All of the above had political offices from which to lead, however, regardless of whether they felt inclined to do so.  Mitt Romney has disappeared entirely back into private life, and the only opposition leaders at the moment in place seem to be having difficulty assuming the role:

When President first was elected John Boehner and Mitch McConnell could not actually serve as leaders of the opposition in the traditional American sense of the term because neither man had the ability to even slow down the president and the Democrats.  (Thank goodness the Democrats did so on their own or we’d be burdened with global warming craziness as well as Obamacare.)

After the 2010 elections, some balance returned to D.C. when the House passed into the control of the GOP, but the race to lead the GOP in the presidential election quickly overshadowed all else, and Boehner/McConnell and their teams were excused from opposition duties quickly though the clashes on budget, taxes and debt limit provided background to the presidential campaign.

The two years ahead thrust new roles on both men and their teams.  They can block the president’s more absurd fancies, but they also have to participate in governing to some extent because our system requires the House’s consent to do anything.

The Speaker’s and Leader’s staffs, however, don’t show any obvious signs of understanding the new media order or the relentlessness of the president’s program.  The president or Vice President Biden uses every day to push their agenda forward and belittle or divide the GOP.  Every day.  Yesterday the Obama machine, supported by its permanent allies in the Manhattan-Beltway media elite, acted to get the focus off the Hagel and Lew nominations and the Holder hold-over and they used Joe Biden and his “executive order” on guns to do so.  Today will see a different part of the carnival throwing up different aspects of stories or new story lines altogether.

Yesterday, as the day before and the day before that, there was no sign of any GOP leader anywhere, on the nominations, on the “executive order” on guns, on the key nominations.  No appearances.  No statements.  Just crickets.

In part, as I argue in my column for TFT today, that’s structural — the result of a bad election cycle and of a failed strategy on Boehner’s part.  Neither men have found the kind of resonance within the GOP to provide the kind of national opposition leadership Hugh seeks.  Plus, the necessity of having to negotiate from a position of relative weakness (thanks to those election results) will make it impossible for them to do so, even if they had the necessary qualities.

The next “opposition leader” has to come from outside the established leader positions, and has to be a relatively new voice to have the kind of credibility that the anti-establishment grassroots demands:

In order to be effective in 2014 and in 2016, the Republican Party needs to find a new voice and direction.  Those won’t come from the current class of establishment GOP figures in Washington, John Boehner and Mitch McConnell.  This isn’t meant as a criticism as much as a nod to reality.  As establishment figures in the 2012 failures, neither will have the kind of influence on Republican activists needed to clarify the mission and the message.  Also, neither operates on a clear philosophical basis, which would be difficult for any Congressional leader to do on an extended basis.  Newt Gingrich and Nancy Pelosi were exceptions to the rule; most Congressional leaders have to compromise and cut deals too often to provide that kind of leadership to the national party.

Who will rise within the GOP to provide unity of purpose and direction and return Republicans to a competitive position?  There are five Republicans to watch for their potential to lead, and what their success might mean for the direction of the GOP in the next two cycles.

I list five potential candidates that will assert themselves in 2013 as the leader of the Republican Party, at least in the rhetorical and ideological sense, if not offical.  All five hold office and have significant platforms, and each would take the GOP in different directions if successful.  The one with the best chance to unite the party’s various factions, though, is the most talented of the Class of 2010:

Marco Rubio – Of 2013’s potential leaders, none bridges the gap between the Tea Party and traditional Republican values better than Senator Rubio.  He was easily the most talented of the class of 2010, both politically and rhetorically.  His speech at the Republican convention last year was both the emotional and political high point of the week for the GOP.  Of the five Republicans to watch, Rubio has the talent to provide the most unity in the short term.  He has offered broad support for a strong military, social conservatism, and significant fiscal reform without alienating other factions in the party.  His leadership would also allow for a public image of the Republican Party that moves away in some degree from the perception of a party of old, white men – and could lift Ted Cruz and Susana Martinez, among others, to higher profiles to bolster the shift.  Furthermore, Rubio has the pole position in this leadership change, thanks to his efforts in the last two years in outreach and media strategy.

We’ll see if other candidates arise that might eclipse these five, or if some of them turn out to be less inclined to exert leadership over the fractious GOP.  I’d bet on Rubio to emerge as the go-to Republican this year, though.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2 3

TxAnn56 on January 10, 2013 at 1:40 PM

Rubio used his book proceeds to pay off his student loans. He mentioned it in his Jack Kemp speech. And I think that having student loans and basically being a “normal” American is one of Rubio’s main selling points. Rubio is able to sell that he understands Average Joe American’s problems because he has dealt with the same problems. (See Clinton, Bill and Reagan, Ronald for comparison.) I have problems with Rubio as a candidate because he is a policy lightweight. I’m not sure what Rubio wants to do as President except he would really like to be President. However, let’s not discount the whole Rubio image because he is darn good at tailoring it.

Illinidiva on January 10, 2013 at 1:58 PM

Marcus Traianus on January 10, 2013 at 1:54 PM

Attacking everyone four years out for not supporting your potential candidate of choice is no way to win over potential voters.

Didn’t we see enough of that around here during the Romney Campaign?

kingsjester on January 10, 2013 at 1:58 PM

The next “opposition leader” has to come from outside the established leader positions, and has to be a relatively new voice to have the kind of credibility that the anti-establishment grassroots demands:

If any of those 5 fit that description, Ed Morrissey wouldn’t be touting them. Sorry, but the truth’s the truth.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 1:59 PM

DAY THREE: SILENCE from Conservatives in Congress about Biden and his threat to use an EXO to destroy the 2nd Amendment.

Not impressed.

PappyD61 on January 10, 2013 at 2:00 PM

I missed this initially because I generally don’t read these insanity riddled rants, but Palin owes us nothing.

We didn’t stand up for her when the media and GOP eviscerated her so why should she continue to be a punching bag? Remember Tucson. Nice support she was given and do I really need a sarc tag for that?

More silliness. Palin continues to do good work in supporting conservative candidates – one of the few out there that bothers to try. We owe her a debt of gratitude, not insane rants.

kim roy on January 10, 2013 at 1:58 PM

Excellent points, Kim. I cannot disagree …

ShainS on January 10, 2013 at 2:00 PM

Why do so many Republicans insist on acting like liberals?

Moesart on January 10, 2013 at 1:47 PM

You mean engaging in stuff like Palin-derangement? Good question there, Moesart.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:01 PM

Ryan’s speech was more dynamic, more powerful and actually had people at their feet. Rubio was all sizzle, little steak and was disappointing in several ways.

Myron Falwell on January 10, 2013 at 1:43 PM

I thought Ryan’s was better as well. I was disappointed with Rubio’s speech because it was basically the same speech that I’ve heard him give already. I think that the Convention exposed both Rubio and Christie’s weaknesses as nominees. Rubio didn’t have anything new to say and Christie’s speech was all about Chris Christie.

Illinidiva on January 10, 2013 at 2:02 PM

“The 5 GOPe-approved saviors of the rubes from the GOPe”. ROFL

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:02 PM

I’d bet on Rubio to emerge as the go-to Republican this year, though.

Next In Line ™.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:04 PM

He’s a loud man who likes to yell at unions. While a lot of us find a certain amount of amusement in that, the rest of his ideas are closer to being liberal. He’s fine in a blue state, but federally? Never.

kim roy on January 10, 2013 at 1:40 PM

why not?would red states vote for someone else?

nathor on January 10, 2013 at 2:07 PM

kingsjester on January 10, 2013 at 1:58 PM

Care to point out specifically where I did that?

Also, please feel free to point out where I stated he was my “potential candidate”?

I am not here to help “win” voters for any candidate. The comments I responded appear to be emotional responses and contra-intellectual reasoning absent facts.

I am willing to have an honest debate about Mr. Rubio’s (or any other “potential” candidates) talents, policies or qualities as a candidate. So should everyone else around here who is honestly a Republican. But frankly, that doesn’t seem to be the way this comment section functions.

I would call it largely a combination of emotional therapy, rumors, personal musings, baseless comments, ad hominems, moby half-wittiness and troll bait interrupted occasionally by a few intellectual posts or honest folks who are then attacked incoherently with fervor…

Marcus Traianus on January 10, 2013 at 2:09 PM

Marcus Traianus on January 10, 2013 at 1:54 PM

Well I found Rubio’s speech to be uninspiring, vapid, and vehemently disagree with him on immigration/amnesty, so I was responding to that statement of yours. But, Rubio, you, the OP, and me can all be part of the party because we don’t have to agree on everything.

On the subject of amnesty, Reagan said that he greatly regretted it in his time. If/when a Rubio-backed amnesty goes through, The US will turn into California.

sauldalinsky on January 10, 2013 at 2:10 PM

If it is not a Governor from a Red State then I don’t want to here about them. The only exception that I will grant myself would be a Governor from a blue/purple state who governs as a Constitutional minded Conservative. FWTW

D-fusit on January 10, 2013 at 2:11 PM

Care to point out specifically where I did that?

Also, please feel free to point out where I stated he was my “potential candidate”?

I am not here to help “win” voters for any candidate. The comments I responded appear to be emotional responses and contra-intellectual reasoning absent facts.

Marcus Traianus on January 10, 2013 at 2:09 PM

Please. We’ve been there already. Rubio could come out for blanket immigration amnesty tomorrow, and any opposition voiced to that — especially opposition that adds that Rubio isn’t going anywhere as a presidential candidate — would be said to be coming from a bunch of idiotic “purists” who have no idea how to win elections.

We. Know. The. Drill.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:14 PM

why not?would red states vote for someone else?

nathor on January 10, 2013 at 2:07 PM

In a primary? After his BS with Obama and his crying about Springsteen? What do YOU think? He does have to get through a primary and a lot of long knives will be out for him. Might even wake up the TEA Party.

You want to see the base stay home? Run Christie as the GOP candidate.

I wouldn’t be the least bit surprised if he took Charlie Crist’s route and went full democrat after being shunned by most conservative voters.

kim roy on January 10, 2013 at 2:14 PM

I would call it largely a combination of emotional therapy, rumors, personal musings, baseless comments, ad hominems, moby half-wittiness and troll bait interrupted occasionally by a few intellectual posts or honest folks who are then attacked incoherently with fervor…

Marcus Traianus on January 10, 2013 at 2:09 PM

Yet here you are.

(thank God we have you…I have a hard time decerning”intellectual posts”, and could really use a moderate, principle-free squish to educate me)

Tim_CA on January 10, 2013 at 2:17 PM

Remember Tucson. Nice support she was given and do I really need a sarc tag for that?

kim roy on January 10, 2013 at 1:58 PM

There is no single issue that makes me more mad than hell than this incident. And it goes way, way beyond defending Palin. The MSM created a story out of whole cloth. They took a shooting by a nutcase with no political motive, and turned it into an indictment of Palin and the Tea Party. And like a tag team wrestler, Obama then jumps into the ring and flys out to Arizona to give a speech about civility in our political discourse, implying that even if the shooter was not a Tea Partier or a Palin supporter, our political discourse is just getting a little too hot, and we need to cool things down. And of course, the MSM will inform us about just who it is that needs to turn down the heat.

Obama should have been raked over the coals by GOP leaders for this shameless exploitation of an act of violence for political gain. And yet, not only did we not hear one single word from any GOP politicians, but equally disheartening, the best anyone in the Conservative media, including all the blogs (HotAir as well), could come up with was a snarky chuckle about “let’s see how long this civility stuff lasts for”.

MAJOR, MAJOR FAIL!

I’m becoming more and more convinced that we need a 3rd party consisting of true Conservatives that aren’t terrified of losing elections and making the MSM hate them more than they already hate them. Even if it’s only purpose is to educate the public.

ardenenoch on January 10, 2013 at 2:25 PM

Here’s Rubio trying to split the baby on Arizona’s immigration law. He’s against it, thinks it’d create a police state, thinks state’s should not be allowed to pass laws on immigration (it’s a federal issue)…but he’d have voted for it anyway if he was in Arizona. Principled!

When I was first asked about it, I strongly criticized the law and said it raised the specter of a police state. But as I learned more about the situation in Arizona, the provisions of the law, and the modifications that had been made to it, I softened my opinion. I still didn’t support state immigration laws, and I didn’t want a law like Arizona’s enacted in Florida. But I understood why Arizonans supported it. If I had been in their shoes and my state had been overrun by cross-border violence, I probably would have voted for it, too.

He’s another Senator Squish who says whatever he thinks will get him votes.

sauldalinsky on January 10, 2013 at 2:29 PM

why not?would red states vote for someone else?

nathor on January 10, 2013 at 2:07 PM

Not all red states are made the same… There are some states like Arkansas and West Virginia that are traditionally Democratic states which have just “flipped” R. These states will vote for a Hillary Clinton over a Chris Christie. Christie doesn’t play there culturally. Where do you think that he is going to make those losses up? New Jersey and New York will mindlessly vote Democrat as they always do. And he plays about as well in Midwestern swing states as he does in WV.

Illinidiva on January 10, 2013 at 2:30 PM

Rand Paul – he is the most underated politician out there. His Conservative/Libertarianism brand of politics is exactly what the country is looking for. It blends what the American youth wants (libertarianism), with the fiscally conservative desires of the Tea Party, and mixes it with a style even the more moderate wing of the party can live with.

Tater Salad on January 10, 2013 at 2:31 PM

Here’s Rubio trying to split the baby on Arizona’s immigration law. He’s against it, thinks it’d create a police state, thinks state’s should not be allowed to pass laws on immigration (it’s a federal issue)…but he’d have voted for it anyway if he was in Arizona. Principled!

When I was first asked about it, I strongly criticized the law and said it raised the specter of a police state. But as I learned more about the situation in Arizona, the provisions of the law, and the modifications that had been made to it, I softened my opinion. I still didn’t support state immigration laws, and I didn’t want a law like Arizona’s enacted in Florida. But I understood why Arizonans supported it. If I had been in their shoes and my state had been overrun by cross-border violence, I probably would have voted for it, too.

He’s another Senator Squish who says whatever he thinks will get him votes.

sauldalinsky on January 10, 2013 at 2:29 PM

Exactly. But he’s the Newly Anointed Frontrunner. The only thing is, that “anointed” game is OVER.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:33 PM

Rand Paul – he is the most underated politician out there. His Conservative/Libertarianism brand of politics is exactly what the country is looking for. It blends what the American youth wants (libertarianism), with the fiscally conservative desires of the Tea Party, and mixes it with a style even the more moderate wing of the party can live with.

Tater Salad on January 10, 2013 at 2:31 PM

I don’t think Rand Paul’s going anywhere either. He’d inherit his dad’s 10% and not much else. Frankly of those 5 pre-approved saviors I think only Jindal would have a shot.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:34 PM

I don’t think Rand Paul’s going anywhere either. He’d inherit his dad’s 10% and not much else. Frankly of those 5 pre-approved saviors I think only Jindal would have a shot.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:34 PM

rand paul does not have the negatives of his father…

nathor on January 10, 2013 at 2:49 PM

The Leader of the Opposition (a British term BTW) leads. The only one I saw doing that for the last four years, come wind, come weather, was Sarah Palin. I’d also like to mention that as far as I know she never piled on Romney after the election as some did.

Of the five mentioned by Ed:

Christie: ThePrimordialOrderedPair called him the “Leader of the Vichy Right.” That pretty much says it all.

Perry: Needs to get his act together on his immigration policy or he’ll never fly. Other than that, he’s the best of the five.

Paul: He’s a nice flamethrower with words, but he seems to be trying to maneuver to keep his dad’s followers and haul in conservatives. Won’t happen.

Jindal: I’ve been really disappointed at what I consider to be some opportunistic statements last fall. He and Perry have shown the most moxie in standing up to Obama when it counts.

Rubio: As a Floridian let me tell you I don’t consider him to be a statesman, but an opportunistic politician who is playing his looks, background and speaking ability for all they’re worth. On illegal aliens, he’s a mini-McCain in the making.

INC on January 10, 2013 at 2:54 PM

I don’t think Rand Paul’s going anywhere either. He’d inherit his dad’s 10% and not much else. Frankly of those 5 pre-approved saviors I think only Jindal would have a shot.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:34 PM

rand paul does not have the negatives of his father…

nathor on January 10, 2013 at 2:49 PM

Well, he hasn’t accrued that many positives yet either. Rand Paul strikes me as a little too opportunistic. He has been planning on taking over his dad’s fan base ever since he was elected to the Senate. I’m not only tired of political dynasties, I’m tired to death of people who come across as if they’d sell their firstborn in order to get the GOP presidential nomination. As Mark Steyn wrote in 2009:

Most of those who sneer at Sarah Palin have no desire to live her life. But why not try to — what’s the word? — “empathize”? If you like Wasilla and hunting and snowmachining and moose stew and politics, is the last worth giving up everything else in the hopes that one day David Letterman and Maureen Dowd might decide Trig and Bristol and the rest are sufficiently non-risible to enable you to prosper in their world? And, putting aside the odds, would you really like to be the person you’d have to turn into under that scenario?

National office will dwindle down to the unhealthily singleminded (Clinton, Obama), the timeserving emirs of Incumbistan (Biden, McCain), and dynastic heirs (Bush). Our loss.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:57 PM

I’d also like to add, who has been encouraging people to hang in there and fight?

Perry and Jindal have done it by example. Palin has done it by example and with words. No one else on the national scene has had to face the wrath and opposition of the Dems, the GOP, and the media as she and her family have, yet she has not withered.

Red state governors are the most likely group of leaders. Forget Congress.

INC on January 10, 2013 at 2:59 PM

Well, he hasn’t accrued that many positives yet either. Rand Paul strikes me as a little too opportunistic. He has been planning on taking over his dad’s fan base ever since he was elected to the Senate. I’m not only tired of political dynasties, I’m tired to death of people who come across as if they’d sell their firstborn in order to get the GOP presidential nomination.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 2:57 PM

yep, I also dislike these political dynasties. still, rand shown a willingness to follow part of his father political brand.

nathor on January 10, 2013 at 3:03 PM

Former VP candidates get little love in the Republican Party …

ShainS on January 10, 2013 at 12:04 PM

You have to be careful with that persons name, they come out of the wood work.

KBird on January 10, 2013 at 3:12 PM

Anyway, by 2016 Rubio will be affectionately known as Senator Combover. That won’t play well.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 3:23 PM

A couple of points to make here. First, I love Rubio and feel he’s been a great Senator for FLorida and a much better man than Crist would have been. HOwever, Romney lost Florida with all the Rubio support he got. Perhaps Marco needs some seasoning. Having said that, anyone would be better than McConnell.

Also, there was a comment above about the White House changing after the 2010 election. That’s false, they n ever changed except to attack the tea party more and insist on not passing any budgets. They’ve gotten away with their bloated spending because of the lame Republicans.

We need leadership from people who understand the problems and are willing to do what it takes to deal with them. They also have to be aable to articulate the problems so the American people understand them. Finally, they need to understand that Pravda and Izvestia are not their friend and will not report the truth to the American people so they’d better be forceful and treat them like the enemy they are.

bflat879 on January 10, 2013 at 3:24 PM

monalisa on January 10, 2013 at 2:26 PM

Thanks for the link. Jindal has been my choice for a long time.

Lightswitch on January 10, 2013 at 3:24 PM

In Rand Paul’s favor, he doesn’t come off as some sort of firebrand that turns people off. I can see the average joe watch him on TV thinking that well, actually, I agree with most of what he says. Maybe it’s his droll delivery. (A lot better than smug IMHO)

The same went for Ron Paul. People from all perspectives always liked portions of what he said and disregarded other things (left and right) as just “well, thats just Ron Paul”.

Still think a governor is the best bet in 2016 though.

can_con on January 10, 2013 at 3:31 PM

The Right has no apparatus to achieve these goals.

The Right has been beaten.

faraway on January 10, 2013 at 3:37 PM

I don’t think I’ll ever vote again in a national election.

Rational Thought on January 10, 2013 at 3:53 PM

Rubio running would bring out some flagrant racism from the Dems – slap a taco out of a brother’s hand like racism.

Imagine the Clarence Thomas treatment on bath salts.

CorporatePiggy on January 10, 2013 at 4:27 PM

Ah yes lets keep promoting minorities to represent the Republicans to placate the ever-growing hostility of the establishment. Has this ever worked, I ask you? Promoting this amnesty supporter would be a catastrophic mistake. RAND PAUL should be the leader, not this neocon-amnesty shill. It’s time to restore America, not export sham “democracy” abroad.

flawedskull on January 10, 2013 at 5:03 PM

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) wrote, through SarahPAC, a letter to supporters today thanking and reminding them of the victories of Gov. Palin.
“As you know, I am not the first or the only candidate to benefit from Gov. Palin and SarahPAC’s courageous support for conserativism. SenatorsDeb Fischer, Jeff Flake, Tim Scott, Marco Rubio, Kelly Ayotte, Rand Paul and other common-sense conservatives are proof that Americans are ready to return to our nation’s founding principles.
I look forward to working alongside these and other strong conservatives to stand up to the big government bureaucracy that is entrenched in Washington, DC. Every American deserves the opportunity to build a better life for our children and grandchildren, and together we will fight for the conservative ideals of liberty and opportunity that made this country the greatest on Earth.
I am humbled and grateful for the continuing support of patriots like you.”

Some are doing more than others

KBird on January 10, 2013 at 5:03 PM

New Repub leader?
I’m all for it.
How about the first one to stand up in public and emphasize that the 2nd Amendment “shall not be infringed“!!!!

dentarthurdent on January 10, 2013 at 5:22 PM

If any of those 5 fit that description, Ed Morrissey wouldn’t be touting them. Sorry, but the truth’s the truth.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 1:59 PM

He will if it’s in his weekly talking points memo from the RNC.

bw222 on January 10, 2013 at 5:36 PM

KBird on January 10, 2013 at 5:03 PM

Now you’ve done it – mentioned the dreaded SP word – the Mittlers will be here in full attack mode.

bw222 on January 10, 2013 at 5:38 PM

Anyway, by 2016 Rubio will be affectionately known as Senator Combover. That won’t play well.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 3:23 PM

Maybe he can get a “rug” and end up looking like the Hispanic Trent Lott, George Will or Sam Donaldson.

bw222 on January 10, 2013 at 5:41 PM

If you consider the Republican Party to be the opposition, I have no problem with these 5. However, I believe Palin is the true opposition leader. She has been laying low for the past couple of months.

Leaving politics or formulating her strategy? I expect a major announcement within 6 months. Mid-terms are coming up.

huckleberryfriend on January 10, 2013 at 6:19 PM

Justin Amash

dom89031 on January 10, 2013 at 6:58 PM

If any of those 5 fit that description, Ed Morrissey wouldn’t be touting them. Sorry, but the truth’s the truth.

ddrintn on January 10, 2013 at 1:59 PM

He will if it’s in his weekly talking points memo from the RNC.

bw222 on January 10, 2013 at 5:36 PM

Haha! Exactly right! Ole Ed is a tool for the GOP.

Justin Amash

dom89031 on January 10, 2013 at 6:58 PM

I like what I’ve read and listened to so far. However, I don’t know enough about him yet.

air_up_there on January 10, 2013 at 10:25 PM

Perhaps Marco could answer a question: What is justice?

The rule of law? Or making a special interest group happy?

Speakup on January 10, 2013 at 11:19 PM

Sarah Palin/Rand Paul
2 0 1 6

KOOLAID2 on January 10, 2013 at 11:38 PM

After seeing what the rino idiots in the repub party tried to
do to Ted Cruz and others, how they shunned Sarah Palin, The
Tea Party and other conservatives, how they took leadership positions away from conservatives in the house, etc. etc. etc.
you think I care who they come up with for the next election?

It won’t be a conservative so I don’t give a rat’s a$$. I am
not worrying or fighting for another rino.

Until they address the issue of massive voter fraud the point
of a repub candidate for pres is laughable.

Amjean on January 11, 2013 at 10:46 AM

One of these guys needs to huddle for a long time with DeMint over at Heritage Foundation. Heritage is going to begin to shape the message and make inroads in the media. Am thinking maybe the GOP needs to cover all factions with a brand change to the “Heritage Party”. Hard to demonize “Heritage Party Member” with too easy nasty REPUBLICAN label.

kens on January 11, 2013 at 11:58 AM

Will it take yet another national loss to convince the establishment “grass roots” pseudo-conservatives to realize that Rubio is just another example of racial politics? He is one of the most prominent poseurs du jour. And y’all chastise Leftists for consistently playing the race card.
Marco Rubio is waaaaaaaaay down the list of qualified CEOs.
*sigh*
All thanks to the continuing knee-jerk reaction(s) of alleged conservatives.
We don’t need Marco Rubio for anything but an Ambassadorship. Meanwhile, the GOP needs to put up a national candidate who can WIN for a change.
(and it aint a rubio)
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on January 11, 2013 at 12:22 PM

I’m sure all of the HA readers already know that Hillary Clinton is the 2016 nominee. I really thought she was done…NOT

The media started a few months ago getting on the ‘first woman president’ bandwagon.

You thought the love affair with Obama was bad and continues a slobbering affair, we haven’t seen nothing yet. Hillary will be pushed into the WH, just like the first ‘black president’

Nobody in the GOP has a chance, unless Rand Paul is on the ticket..not the top. My choice Rubio/Paul. We have to excite young people and we better face it, a white male at the top won’t do it. The Dems will never run a white male again. History.

Watch for Cory Booker to be Hillary’s VP. Booker is the liberal dream. Research him. You’ll know why.

Redford on January 11, 2013 at 12:38 PM

Someone mentioned Bobby Jindal as a good candidate. I have been impressed with him for a good while. I also like Nikki Haley of South Carolina. Bobby didn’t wait for federal help after that last storm hit Louisiana; he got out and started working. He is proactive on taxes, and is not just talking. One of the threads lamented the white men the president is nominating for his cabinet. I wonder if white Republicans as a whole would support 2 minority candidates? I wonder if Nikki would be attacked as viciously as was Sarah Palin? Both governors seem to be busy governing their own states. We DO have talented people, but we have a current administration and press corps who like to draw blood. The probability of character assassination stops too many from daring to try.

asouthernbelle on January 11, 2013 at 12:40 PM

We need to STOP looking for leadership in Washington. Republicans now control a majority of the states. That is where our real leaders are. It’s where our next President is.

rockmom on January 10, 2013 at 12:12 PM

I would consider any input from Demint, Rand, Cruz, Perry, Palin, Walker & Jindal worthwhile. All other squishes (Rubio), RINOs (latourette), CINOs( McVain) etc need to cross over and join the dem party along with Mittness (gone into hiding).

Otherwise, why bother with the GOP and let’s get started with a new party. The GOP will never get another vote from me, ever, as long as the GOPe is involved.

AH_C on January 11, 2013 at 12:58 PM

Haha! Exactly right! Ole Ed is a tool for the GOP.

air_up_there on January 10, 2013 at 10:25 PM

I guess you missed it when he shilled for T’Paw early on. No matter how Ed tried to spin it, you couldn’t get past Carbon Credits, Mileage taxes via embedded GPS trackers, mass transit, AGW and a host of progressive ideas.

Rooting for the hometown boy is one thing, but spinning a progressive as conservative. Pthew.

AH_C on January 11, 2013 at 1:12 PM

Some are doing more than others

KBird on January 10, 2013 at 5:03 PM

I would still vote for Palin. Her family has her cornered. If she got the job, she would be great

I would vote for Rand Paul, as it stands now, although a primary would be the test. Ron dad was in the primary just to kill off the SoCons, for what? He practically got a group hug from the Rinos for his good work there. At this stage, can’t read the tea leaves

Cruz is great, as others in the newbie group but they all need testing. A RINO obstacle course will prove them

Jindal is a very good governor, and speaks to the public well, now. His umbilical to the Rinos would have to be tested.

Voting Perry would be like voting McCain.

If Rubio is moved to the Presidential race, he will be countered with a DEM minority, probably Mexican. This will negate his Latin roots. His problem is amnesty. He put it in writing, and with that, they are going to have to run him like McCain. Didn’t work so well for Romney.

Rubio walks a fine line between RINOs and Teapers. He has it in him to be a Senate leader, and few do. That is a lot to walk away from

entagor on January 11, 2013 at 9:43 PM

Can’t we get a regular American to run? I’m so tired of this. Marco Rubio is NOT ELIGIBLE to run for president. Get a natural born citizen and start over.

Redteam on January 12, 2013 at 4:44 AM

Cruz is not an American, Jindal and Rubio are not natural born citizens, please stop this crap and get an American to run.

Redteam on January 12, 2013 at 4:46 AM

Comment pages: 1 2 3