US sailors sue Tokyo Power for masking radiation danger

posted at 4:01 pm on December 29, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

The fallout from the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which devastated Japan is still going on, and now it’s affecting some United States military members. A group of sailors from the USS Ronald Reagan – who participated in rescue efforts during the disaster – are going to court saying that Tokyo Electric Power Company lied about the dangers posed by leaking radiation and have exposed the Americans to irreparable future damage.

Eight US Navy sailors are suing Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) for hundreds of millions of dollars over allegations the Japanese firm lied to them about radiation dangers after a tsunami-triggered meltdown at the Fukushima nuclear plant.

The sailors accuse TEPCO of deceiving their commanders about radiation levels as the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan took part in relief operations following the March 11, 2011 earthquake and tsunami, according to a complaint filed in US federal court in southern California.

I still recall the outrage all over the news about the response of management at the reactor during the crisis. The statements they were releasing to the people of their own nation sounded more like some sort of Soviet propaganda after Chernobyl than responsible reporting and damage control. And for what? Who in this day and age could possibly think that the truth wouldn’t be coming out fairly quickly and that people wouldn’t be held accountable?

There are no specifics in any of the reports coming out thus far about medical problems being experienced today by the sailors from the Ronald Reagan, but we do know that one of them – Kim Gieseking – was pregnant during the operation and her one year old daughter is named as one of the plaintiffs in the case. But it’s apparently not the immediate effects which are the basis for the case.

The complaint further alleges that TEPCO claimed the levels of radiation the sailors would be subjected to “would not cause any different or greater harm to them than they may have experienced on missions in the past,” though the Americans say otherwise.

“At all times relevant times, the defendant, TEPCO, was aware that exposure to even a low dose of radiation creates a danger to one’s health and that it is important to accurately report actual levels,” the defendants say.

“Defendants had actual and/or constructive knowledge of the properties of radiation that would ensure that, once released into the environment, radiation would spread further and in concentrations that would cause injury to the plaintiffs.”

The sailors say they have put themselves in a situation where their potential to develop cancer has been enhanced and that they “face additional and irreparable harm to their life expectancy, which has been shortened and cannot be restored to its prior condition.”

When people show up to help you during a disaster of this magnitude they’re already putting their lives on the line. Assuming the complaint proves true and Tokyo Power knowingly lied about the radiation levels to get the Americans in there and working, this is despicable. It’s also not the sort of thing that money can fix, but that doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t be made to pay for their horrible performance. Of course, that doesn’t even begin to address the disservice they did to their own citizens in the vicinity of the reactor. This is yet another story which looks like there is simply no possibility of a happy ending.


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God HIMSELF cannot save us from IGNORANT IDIOTS like this!

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 4:05 PM

More people have died from organic bean sprouts in Germany, than from the rediation leak at Fukushima.

Wander on December 29, 2012 at 4:05 PM

Anyone ever been to Pax river EMP?

wolly4321 on December 29, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Thorium is the only energy source that makes sense.

But not a single sole died from radiation in Japan. The old technology is relatively safe. Those suing will most likely lose more of their life due to sunbathing radiation than this radiation. We are constantly exposed to radiation. Radon come up from out of the ground all the time. Coal and Natural Gas both also have radiation released when burned as they both contain some. There is no escaping radiation on Earth. The Earth itself is a huge Thorium reactor.

Steveangell on December 29, 2012 at 4:07 PM

Uh, why aren’t they suing obama – he’s the one who sent them in.

Pork-Chop on December 29, 2012 at 4:08 PM

Didn’t they have radiation detectors and badges on the ship? All sailors who were potentially going to be exposed to radiation, regardless of what the Japanese told them, should have been wearing exposure badges. They should have been briefed and monitored.

tom daschle concerned on December 29, 2012 at 4:09 PM

Dumb. And what was a pregnant woman even doing on deployment anyway? In the Army at least being pregnant makes you instantly non-deployable.

pauljc on December 29, 2012 at 4:10 PM

The running joke was all the people that worked on the equipment I did was that we were all balding and half blind. It was kinda true.

wolly4321 on December 29, 2012 at 4:10 PM

Number Of People Who Died From Radiation Sickness Due To Fukushima:

Zero.

Number of People MURDERED by Obama in Benghazi:

OVER Four.

Benghazi “Wins” for Fatality.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 4:14 PM

Number of People MURDERED by Obama in Benghazi:

Where are the thirty people saved by the brave CIA ops?

tom daschle concerned on December 29, 2012 at 4:17 PM

Didn’t they have radiation detectors and badges on the ship? All sailors who were potentially going to be exposed to radiation, regardless of what the Japanese told them, should have been wearing exposure badges. They should have been briefed and monitored.

tom daschle concerned on December 29, 2012 at 4:09 PM

Exactly what I was thinking. If the navy commander said nothing then how is it the responsibility of Tokya Power?

This sounds almost like a money grab.

sharrukin on December 29, 2012 at 4:18 PM

Anyone ever been to Pax river EMP?

wolly4321 on December 29, 2012 at 4:06 PM

No, but I was a zoomy catcher at San Onofre for three years, does that count?

SWalker on December 29, 2012 at 4:23 PM

…they lied?…SO WHAT?…we’ve been lied too for over 4 years!…
where’s the lawsuits?

KOOLAID2 on December 29, 2012 at 4:33 PM

Dumb. And what was a pregnant woman even doing on deployment anyway? In the Army at least being pregnant makes you instantly non-deployable.

pauljc

Getting her “going home” ticket punched. Don’t want to play sailor anymore? Have a meeting with the one-eyed snake. Plenty aboard!

You could also get your going home and getting out ’cause I’m tired of this’ ticket punched by saying you are gay.

No more.

Wander on December 29, 2012 at 4:35 PM

Dumb. And what was a pregnant woman even doing on deployment anyway? In the Army at least being pregnant makes you instantly non-deployable.

pauljc on December 29, 2012 at 4:10 PM

The Navy used to be that way. I got out in ’86, and back then once a female sailor assigned to a ship was discovered to be pregnant, she was immediately transfered to a shore duty station (at San Diego in those days the designated “day care center” was North Island Comm Station). The guys on the tenders didn’t like seeing 20-40% of the females onboard get pregnant in the weeks preceeding a deployment.

Moose Drool on December 29, 2012 at 4:35 PM

No, but I was a zoomy catcher at San Onofre for three years, does that count?

SWalker on December 29, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Did exposure give you super-powers?

(Always works in the comics)

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 4:38 PM

Kind of ironic that americans are sueing Japan about being exposed to radiation after americans nuked two of their cities….just saying

unseen on December 29, 2012 at 4:39 PM

Number of People MURDERED by Obama in Benghazi:

Where are the thirty people saved by the brave CIA ops?

tom daschle concerned on December 29, 2012 at 4:17 PM

BINGO, Baby!!

He is A MURDERER!!!

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 4:47 PM

Of course, that doesn’t even begin to address the disservice they did to their own citizens in the vicinity of the reactor. This is yet another story which looks like there is simply no possibility of a happy ending.

This story doesn’t completely add up IMO.

Why sue TEPCO and not the Japanese government that presumably was on site monitoring radiation levels. Say the San Onofre nuclear plant was leaking radiation, would we not expect FEMA and half a dozen other government agencies to be involved or would we simply take So. Cal Edison’s word about the threat? The facts will come out but part of me thinks this smacks of going out after a company with deep pockets. However, I am not convinced one way or the other after it was proven that Christine Todd Whitman and the EPA flat-out lied about the air quality at Ground Zero following the 9/11/01 atrocities. There may have been similar lies by public officials or TEPCO to quell citizen panic or otherwise minimize the real situation for whatever motive.

Secondly, if the commanding officer of the USS Ronald Reagan and the commander of the battle group were not doing everything to monitor exposure of these sailors then let the courts martials begin. At a minimum they should have been monitoring radiation levels and each sailor should have had a radiation dosimeter to measure exposure. If that wasn’t being done, why aren’t these sailors suing the United States Navy?

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 4:49 PM

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 4:38 PM

unseen on December 29, 2012 at 4:39 PM

I had a German Shepherd that died 20 years ago who – even TODAY – thinks better that either of you.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Dumb. And what was a pregnant woman even doing on deployment anyway? In the Army at least being pregnant makes you instantly non-deployable.

pauljc on December 29, 2012 at 4:10 PM

It’s a new Navy. Not only do gays get to openly serve, being preggers doesn’t automatically get you off sea duty. That being said, if the woman knew she was pregnant, what the hell was she doing going anywhere near radiation exposure?

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 4:52 PM

I had a German Shepherd that died 20 years ago who – even TODAY – thinks better that either of you.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 4:50 PM

im sure you were making a point there somewhere but I couldn’t figure it out. sry about your dog.

unseen on December 29, 2012 at 4:53 PM

Secondly, if the commanding officer of the USS Ronald Reagan and the commander of the battle group were not doing everything to monitor exposure of these sailors then let the courts martials begin. At a minimum they should have been monitoring radiation levels and each sailor should have had a radiation dosimeter to measure exposure. If that wasn’t being done, why aren’t these sailors suing the United States Navy?

It seems many of the veterans reading this topic have the same opinion–in the end, neither the Japanese government nor TEPCO had/have responsibility for the health and well-being of these sailors. That responsibility falls to the US Government, most immediately the sailors’ chain of command. The US military certainly has RADHAZ monitoring capability, and if it was not deployed, then they were negligent. If it was deployed, and the sailors were exposed nevertheless, then the sailors’ chain of command, up to and including the President, should be able to make the case in a US court that the urgency of the mission merited the risks to which the sailors were exposed. After all, you *did* sign up knowing that your service could get you killed. The VA hospitals are full of men and women who have lost limbs and worse in their service, and not always to enemy action. If there was criminal negligence, the chain of command was negligent. Negligence needs to be proven in a court of law, however.

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 4:55 PM

I had a German Shepherd that died 20 years ago who – even TODAY – thinks better that either of you.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 4:50 PM

lol

What was his name?…

and how long have you been consulting a twenty-years-dead dog?

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 4:56 PM

Moose Drool on December 29, 2012 at 4:35 PM

At Long Beach, the pregnant women were put on as gate guards. Made you feel real secure as you drove in to the base. The practice only ended when a car being chased by police blew through the main gate and the pregnant “guard” wasn’t able to waddle out of the shack quick enough to be of any particular use.

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 4:56 PM

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 4:55 PM

pretty much sums up my thinking.

unseen on December 29, 2012 at 4:58 PM

Kind of ironic that americans are sueing Japan about being exposed to radiation after americans nuked two of their cities….just saying

unseen on December 29, 2012 at 4:39 PM

You’re right. I guess you think the United States Navy, which BTW does have bases in Japan, shouldn’t have rendered any sort of assistance. God forbid the nation does something that is ironic based on events from nearly 70 years ago.

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 4:59 PM

More people have died from organic bean sprouts in Germany, than from the rediation leak at Fukushima.

Wander on December 29, 2012 at 4:05 PM

It’s stupidity like this comment that give conservatives the wacko label.

The corruption at TEPCO was systemic. Read about it. There is no excuse for it and putting the lives of millions at risk.

Example #1 of why stricter regulation of that industry is a necessity and why when the regulators fall asleep at the switch or are bought off, everyone suffers.

rickyricardo on December 29, 2012 at 5:01 PM

Ace takes a differing view, to wit that they served on a NUCLEAR Aircraft Carrier…that their exposure was monitored ON THE CARRIER, that was never near the reactor.

The article is rather opaque, it never says the crewpersons were near Fukushima, only that the USS Ronald Reagan was exposed. IF, you weren’t at the reactor site, you got no case….

*WAH* there was radiation…and there was radiation from the ship’s reactor, too…and the ship never reported dangerous or hazardous levels of radiation…so if they were on the ship they weren’t exposed to JACK.

“At all times relevant times, the defendant, TEPCO, was aware that exposure to even a low dose of radiation creates a danger to one’s health and that it is important to accurately report actual levels,” the defendants say. and we DON’T know that…we don’t know 1 rad/year=.1 rad for ten years. And by serving on the USS Ronald Reagan they exposed themselves to avfuel and explosives and a list of volatile chemicals that also are carcinogenic…will they get to sue the USN next, Jazz?

I’d save the outrage, Jazz.

JFKY on December 29, 2012 at 5:03 PM

No, but I was a zoomy catcher at San Onofre

SWalker on December 29, 2012 at 4:23 PM

That was a fun beach back in the day.

Not unusual at all to see folks surfing over by the trail-heads.

And dogs were ALWAYS allowed (as was beer…if you were’nt a blatant ass about it).

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 5:05 PM

Example #1 of why stricter regulation of that industry is a necessity and why when the regulators fall asleep at the switch or are bought off, everyone suffers.

rickyricardo on December 29, 2012 at 5:01 PM

You do realize that Montgomery Burns and the Springfield Power Plant are both fictional right?

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 5:08 PM

It’s stupidity like this comment that give conservatives the wacko label.

The corruption at TEPCO was systemic. Read about it. There is no excuse for it and putting the lives of millions at risk.

Example #1 of why stricter regulation of that industry is a necessity and why when the regulators fall asleep at the switch or are bought off, everyone suffers.

Annnnnndddd….so what? Maybe the Japanese government and TEPCO lied to the Japanese citizenry. The US Navy had the capability and responsibility to make an independent determination of radiation levels in the deployment area, and to decide if the mission was important enough to outweigh any risks they found. Exposure of sailors to harmful radiation is on the US Government, not anyone in Japan. Note that I am NOT saying that such exposure was the result of negligence. People who take the Oath of Enlistment run the risk of being put in harm’s way in furtherance of the US Government’s policies. Says so right on the label.

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 5:09 PM

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 4:59 PM

What are you talking about?

If the Navy and their chain of command thought it was worth american lives to render assistance than that is a decision made by the navy and the chain of command and these people’s complaints should be directed towards them. When you put armed forces in harm’s way you are responsible for their well being not some other government nor some other forgien company. I don’t see many of Japan’s citizens sueing the USA army for radiation posioning or the companies that supplied parts for the manufacture of the bomb.

I guess we are all just one small world now and no one has responsibility for their orders, commands and/or actions.

The fact of the matter is the POTUS ordered the USS Reagan into harm’s way and sailors got hurt. Yes its tough its sad but that is part of being in the navy. The CIC orders you to go and you go. Don’t like it don’t join. It’s not required for you to join the armed forces.

And maybe the navy and army isn’t the best force to use to save lives. or to render assistance. Maybe if those responsibile the Navy commanders and the POTUS were held accountable for their orders this won’t happen in the future. these young men and women entrusted their health and well being to the POTUS and their country. If thier are health problems from doing their service it is up to us the taxpayers to see they are taken care off. It is up to the USA congress and USA armed forces and USa POTUS to provide for their well being. Not Japan and not some corp in Japan.

we don’t expect the USA to cover costs of our nukes in Japan and We should not expect Japan nor her companies to cover the costs of us rendering assistance to them.

unseen on December 29, 2012 at 5:17 PM

If someone lies to you, but you know they’re lying when they tell it, and you know what the truth really is, do you have grounds for a lawsuit?

I think not.

I see eight sailors looking to cash in. I’d be very interesting at getting a peek at their service records. My guess is those records tell a different story about the intentions of this group.

BobMbx on December 29, 2012 at 5:19 PM

do suggest that the POTUS, on behalf of the citizens of the US, join this suit. I am led to believe that much of the low growth and economic distress flows from the tsunami, and I believe the POTUS ought to get compensation for us.

JFKY on December 29, 2012 at 5:20 PM

And by serving on the USS Ronald Reagan they exposed themselves to avfuel and explosives and a list of volatile chemicals that also are carcinogenic…will they get to sue the USN next, Jazz?

Word. Did anyone else who served bother to read the MSDS sheets that were provided with every single chemical we were exposed to? Carcinogens, mutagens, tertagens…I was constantly exposed to FRH–Fire Resistant Hydraulic Fluid, due to chronic leakage from my LAV’s turret. FRH contains a neurotoxin, and its effects are cumulative (no, I have not yet experienced any ill effects from such exposure, but it may manifest years or decades down the road). We used rags to mop it up from the bottom of our turret basket, with no protective equipment whatsoever. I don’t even want to know what was in the gunk we used to clean the main gun. Oh yeah, and right after mopping up the neurotoxin and cleaning the gun, break open your MRE for a quick meal on the go and shove food into your mouth with your contaminated hands. When you enlist, you’re exposed to Bad Things. Shiznit happens, wear a helmet.

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 5:22 PM

unseen on December 29, 2012 at 5:17 PM

You must be a liberal. You defend your original stupid post by throwing out all sorts of non-sequitors hoping that something will stick and cover for your original stupidity.

I can’t address all the stupidity but this is a pretty representative example:

The fact of the matter is the POTUS ordered the USS Reagan into harm’s way and sailors got hurt.

Where has it been proven that those eight sailors on a Nimitz class aircraft carrier (which BTW has a total complement of around 6,000) have been hurt. They are suing for potential harm.

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 5:29 PM

I see eight sailors looking to cash in. I’d be very interesting at getting a peek at their service records. My guess is those records tell a different story about the intentions of this group.

BobMbx on December 29, 2012 at 5:19 PM

I agree completely. As I posted above, I’m willing to see what can be proven but this lawsuit doesn’t add up at first blush. My first thought was a small bunch of career First Class Petty Officers and an opportunistic ambulance chasing attorney found one another.

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 5:33 PM

Quickstrike98, I am an Associate at the firm of Dewey, Cheatham & Howe. I believe you have a solid case against the US Government. Please give us a ‘phone call at 1-886-GET-RICH. Tell them you want to speak to “Slick Rick”. Also, you helmet may be the cause of migraines, we may have a supplemental case.

I assume, on an LAV, you were one of Uncle Sam’s Misguided Children? Tell me why did the you have a chronic leak? You did own a Turret Mechanic, right? I mean didn’t someone get tired of refilling the hydraulic system?

I mean this as no insult, really…I just live in awe of the stories I hear about maintenance issues. Thank you for your service, BTW.

JFKY on December 29, 2012 at 5:41 PM

I assume, on an LAV, you were one of Uncle Sam’s Misguided Children? Tell me why did the you have a chronic leak? You did own a Turret Mechanic, right? I mean didn’t someone get tired of refilling the hydraulic system?

I froze my a$$ off 2 winters in a row because our vehicle’s crew heater never came in to replace the one that caught fire. Mechanics can only do so much without adequate parts. And the vehicles weren’t exactly brand new.

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 5:44 PM

I believe vehicle heaters are merely a cruel semantic joke played upon their crews. Seldom do I hear of them working.

JFKY on December 29, 2012 at 6:13 PM

They do work to some extent. When you’re cruising down the interstate with your upper torso sticking out of a hatch at 60 mph in subzero weather, you’re gonna be cold, yes. But the heater at least keeps the interior a little warm, especially the metal. When the heater is on the fritz, the metal on the turret floor sucks the body heat right through the soles of your boots like a vampire. Hello, incipient hypothermia.

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 6:16 PM

I don’t know, maybe they have a good case but based on the evidence I seen so far it looks like: “We joined the U.S. Navy and found it might involve being put into dangerous situations, now we are suing the Japanese…”

I say right now I am really skeptical…

William Eaton on December 29, 2012 at 6:22 PM

Uh, why aren’t they suing obama – he’s the one who sent them in.

Pork-Chop on December 29, 2012 at 4:08 PM

Because that would be racist.

Solaratov on December 29, 2012 at 6:25 PM

Example #1 of why stricter regulation of that industry is a necessity and why when the regulators fall asleep at the switch or are bought off, everyone suffers.

rickyricardo on December 29, 2012 at 5:01 PM

Absolutely! If there’s one thing that the nuclear power industry needs more than anything…it’s more regulation.

Solaratov on December 29, 2012 at 6:45 PM

I had a German Shepherd that died 20 years ago who – even TODAY – thinks better that either of you.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 4:50 PM

lol

What was his name?…

and how long have you been consulting a twenty-years-dead dog?

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 4:56 PM

LoL – you’re a Genius, aren’t you? Are you going to learn reading soon?

I NEVER said I “consulted” him – I just said he died twenty years ago. He’s decayed matter in dirt – or perhaps in our atmosphere. DESPITE the fact that he no longer exists as a living entity – he STILL thinks better than you. That is because decayed matter and DIRT think better. This is not to mention how much smarter than you he was while he was alive.

He actually understood english words, and could respond to them.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 6:46 PM

rickyricardo on December 29, 2012 at 5:01 PM

You not even registering as “conscious” on the reality meter….

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 6:48 PM

Secondly, if the commanding officer of the USS Ronald Reagan and the commander of the battle group were not doing everything to monitor exposure of these sailors then let the courts martials begin. At a minimum they should have been monitoring radiation levels and each sailor should have had a radiation dosimeter to measure exposure. If that wasn’t being done, why aren’t these sailors suing the United States Navy?

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 4:49 PM

My feelings exactly. Does the Navy even bother with CBR training and if so, do they have anything like the IM 93 dosemeters we used to use in the Army?

CC Senor on December 29, 2012 at 6:52 PM

He actually understood english words, and could respond to them.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 6:46 PM

Gotcha.

but he never actually spoke to you, right?

(even when alive, I mean)

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 6:57 PM

you’re a Genius, aren’t you?

Um…I sincerely doubt it….but never been tested.

Are you going to learn reading soon?

probably not…I’m a product of the Inglewood Unified School District.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 6:46 PM

What exactly has your panties in a twist sparky?

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 7:03 PM

Hello, incipient hypothermia.

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 6:16 PM

Not to seem unsympathetic, but perhaps if you had meditated a bit on the condition of the Marines at the Chosin Reservoir in Nov/Dec 1950, you would have felt warmer…or, at least luckier.

:)

Solaratov on December 29, 2012 at 7:05 PM

Not to seem unsympathetic, but perhaps if you had meditated a bit on the condition of the Marines at the Chosin Reservoir in Nov/Dec 1950, you would have felt warmer…or, at least luckier.

:)

Quite aware of my service’s history, thanks. But as we said in the Corps, “You don’t have to train to be miserable. It just comes naturally.”

quikstrike98 on December 29, 2012 at 7:23 PM

I read a little about this a few days ago and determined early on that something smells. The Ronald Reagan certainly had the equipment, personnel and training to perform their own monitoring and radiological controls. As someone pointed out earlier if they didn’t monitor and control the exposure of their involved personnel then it’s on the ship’s command. Been a few years since I was in the canoe club but I can assure you that we would have been doing our own monitoring and there would have been no reliance on somebody else. Not the Japanese government and not the utility. We didn’t have women on ships back in my day but knowing what the civilian regulations involving pregnant women are I cannot even imagine allowing one anywhere near any place where she could be exposed to radiation above background. Something is just not right.

Oldnuke on December 29, 2012 at 7:53 PM

Just a few random thoughts here. I’m just guessing of course but I’ll bet that none of these folks are nukes. I’d also be willing to wager that none of them are even aware of what precautions, tests or monitoring were done by ship’s personnel. I also have a feeling that they’re about to be shredded in court. Then again I do know of one case of a laborer getting a doctor to give him a sick slip citing xenon poisoning. He had heard some of the operators talking about it and thought it would be a swell way to get some paid time off.

Oldnuke on December 29, 2012 at 8:00 PM

What exactly has your panties in a twist sparky?

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 7:03 PM

No panties…..and no twists. Just amusing myself. Don’t be so easy, dude!

Just to show you I have no hard feelings, here’s the formerly living dog’s name: Mingus.

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 9:53 PM

Just a few random thoughts here. I’m just guessing of course but I’ll bet that none of these folks are nukes. I’d also be willing to wager that none of them are even aware of what precautions, tests or monitoring were done by ship’s personnel. I also have a feeling that they’re about to be shredded in court. Then again I do know of one case of a laborer getting a doctor to give him a sick slip citing xenon poisoning. He had heard some of the operators talking about it and thought it would be a swell way to get some paid time off.

Oldnuke on December 29, 2012 at 8:00 PM

Don’t “break cover” here, dude…..it might have negative consequences!

williamg on December 29, 2012 at 9:56 PM

No, but I was a zoomy catcher at San Onofre for three years, does that count?

SWalker on December 29, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Contractor or staff?

Oldnuke on December 29, 2012 at 10:16 PM

Anyone else appreciate the irony of Americans suing Japanese for radiation damage?

Daemonocracy on December 29, 2012 at 10:26 PM

Just a few random thoughts here. I’m just guessing of course but I’ll bet that none of these folks are nukes. I’d also be willing to wager that none of them are even aware of what precautions, tests or monitoring were done by ship’s personnel. I also have a feeling that they’re about to be shredded in court. Then again I do know of one case of a laborer getting a doctor to give him a sick slip citing xenon poisoning. He had heard some of the operators talking about it and thought it would be a swell way to get some paid time off.

Oldnuke on December 29, 2012 at 8:00 PM

I’m not a navy guy but I would think that not only would the crew have to have access to personal radiation dosimeters on a NUCLEAR POWERED ship; there would also have to be radiation sensors on the ship itself – particularly considering that these ships are supposed to be designed to use and defend against the use of nuclear weapons.

Operating in a known radiation risk area means that the Navy has, or ought to have extensive radiation exposure data.

Rich H on December 29, 2012 at 10:38 PM

Yeah, because nuclear-powered ships don’t have any monitoring systems for dangerous radiation levels.

andycanuck on December 29, 2012 at 10:55 PM

They are suing Japan because there is a greater opportunity of being compensated. There is little chance of getting a settlement from the US govt. or every war vet would be suing for not being properly outfitted on the battlefield.

Socmodfiscon on December 30, 2012 at 8:37 AM

Another sleazebag suit. Forget USN’s lack of proximity to the site, what case can these gullible sailors have if even Fukushima plant workers themselves don’t come down with anything — so far none have outside of a slight sunburn for one.

jamesgreenidge on December 30, 2012 at 8:45 AM

From a retired Nuclear Engineer…

I call BS. They’re looking for a deep pocket and big bucks. Don’t tell me that the US Navy is incapable of adequately measuring radiation exposure and that these people (or at a minimum the individuals who were with them) were not badged and carrying the same GM counters you or I would have had in the same circumstances. Out blogger isn’t reacting to full data. Or he really does believe that any exposure is actually dangerous as this piece states. Incorrectly. This has been the alarm sounded by nuclear critics since long before the Manhattan project. The song hasn’t been changed for seventy years, despite its having been shown to be false again and again. Why change? It ALWAYS works. Harumph.

DarrelsJoy on December 30, 2012 at 9:15 AM

Say the San Onofre nuclear plant was leaking radiation,…..

Happy Nomad on December 29, 2012 at 4:49 PM

That’s easy, it is.

Feds do not consider San Onofre nuclear powerplant safe

TugboatPhil on December 30, 2012 at 1:51 PM

Absolutely! If there’s one thing that the nuclear power industry needs more than anything…it’s more regulation.

Solaratov on December 29, 2012 at 6:45 PM

Especially when it was the Japanese nuke company that lied – and he wants to come down on the American industry.

I’m not a navy guy but I would think that not only would the crew have to have access to personal radiation dosimeters on a NUCLEAR POWERED ship; there would also have to be radiation sensors on the ship itself – particularly considering that these ships are supposed to be designed to use and defend against the use of nuclear weapons.

Rich H on December 29, 2012 at 10:38 PM

Nope. In 3 1/2 years of riding every east coast carrier at least once, I never even saw a dosimeter, except on the guys who actually worked the powerplant. I can’t speak for the other sensors, but there was no personal metering. That would change if there were a problem, but everyday ops are “safe” enough to not do that.

GWB on December 30, 2012 at 4:01 PM

Pretty much only sailors involved in the operation of the reactors would carry individual dosimeters with them on board.

Sailors who flew rescue and relief missions to the Japanese mainland would almost certainly have carried dosimeters, along with sensors mounted on board aircraft that they flew in.

The carrier itself bristles with very sensitive detectors. There was a story at the time that the George Washington, docked 200 miles away, picked up slightly increased radiation levels not long after the disaster.

All readings are recorded.

So I have no idea what these 8 people are basing their suit on.

Tomblvd on December 30, 2012 at 5:34 PM

GWB on December 30, 2012 at 4:01 PM

Tomblvd on December 30, 2012 at 5:34 PM

When I was in only personnel with access to the engineering spaces carried personal dosimetry. The rest of the crew didn’t need them. Back then we had film badges, today they have thermo luminescent dosimeters, TLD for short. Film badges actually had to be developed to get the dose a TLD you just stick into a reader and it gives you the dose almost instantly. Direct reading dosimeters were/are only used for certain evolutions when you needed a quick reading instrument to give you an estimate of accumulated dose.

A sea story about sensitivity. Back in the 60s we were in the yards for a refueling overhaul. We started picking up a lot of low level contamination in our reactor compartments. We searched for a couple of days to find the source to no avail. Finally one bright HP tech figured it out. The contamination wasn’t originating in the reactor compartments it was being carried in from outside. After doing some wide ranging general area surveys we determined that there was a lot of contamination all over the base. Nothing dangerous but detectable and measurable. We took precautions to prevent further contamination of our reactor compartments and then settled down to figuring out where the contamination came from. Didn’t take long. By our calculations the only possible source for some of the isotopes we were picking up was an atomic bomb, a rather dirty one. Only place it could have possibly come from was China. We were all gathered together and given a brief/debrief, congratulated on figuring it out and then told to “Shut up about it” no sense in causing a panic along the West Coast. I later learned that one of my nuke buddies on the Enterprise got the chore of leading the decon party for the recon plane that flew through the cloud taking air samples. Rad levels on the plane were high enough that the pilot and backseater were not allowed to deplane until decon was complete. He said the air intakes were intense. Not sure what happened to the engines but I’m guessing they got a burial at sea.

Oldnuke on December 30, 2012 at 8:06 PM

Pregnant broads serving aboard our combatant ships nowadays? That’s it we’re about done.

D-Bar on December 31, 2012 at 5:09 AM