Nine scary bird attacks that really happened

posted at 5:31 pm on December 29, 2012 by Mary Katharine Ham

Yeah, I’m goofing around, but it’s the week after Christmas! And, the dismal suspense of the fiscal cliff isn’t enough to keep me going.

Last week’s Eagle-Steals-Baby viral video, which turned out to be a hoax, was an expression of a pretty common tall tale or legend. The Globe and Mail, in the country that brought us the hoax video, explains:

Stories about eagles carrying off people, especially small children, go back centuries and are found all over the world. In fact, the student’s digital prank is not the first film hoax of an eagle carrying off a baby; no less than Thomas Edison made an early film that depicted an eagle carrying off a baby, as did other early filmmakers. There are also drawings and paintings of eagles attacking children and scores of stories from all over the world with the same motif: It seems to be a falsehood we are compelled to return to.

Last week was an occasion for local wildlife experts to intone on the evening news about just how little danger your infants are in of imminent carrying off by birds of prey. I say pish-posh to all that quelling of fears. Let the panic begin!

Hence, my exhaustive search for bird attacks that really happened. There are two relatively famous American accounts of small children being carried away by large birds. Treated as credible in the cryptozoology community, your mileage may vary. First a newspaper report from the New York Herald-Tribune in 1929:

Somerset, Ky., Sept. 22— George Meece, eight years old, today narrowly escaped death from an attack of a bald eagle which swooped down to the hill on which he and four companions were playing, seized him by his overalls and took him about twenty feet into the air before dropping him. In falling, the boy, who weighs fifty pounds, landed on his head and was stunned. According to the boys, the eagle had about a ten-foot spread of wings. It is thought the shouts of Meece’s playmates frightened the bird and caused it to drop the lad.

The Somerset newspaper has since done enough research to determine the story originally appeared in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and was misreported in the Herald-Tribune version. In the original account, it was the more plausible 35-lb Jim Meece who was picked up, with George among his watching playmates. Descendants of the Meeces believe the story.

The story of the 1977 Lawndale, Illinois Thunderbird had several witnesses, but resulted in not much other than ridicule for its purported victim, Marlon Lowe. Lowe’s family and several neighbors were at a summer cook-out when they report having seen the 10-year-old carried for a short distance by a giant bird that roughly fit the description of an Andean condor. Andean condors can have 10-ft wingspans but are South American and mostly scavengers. Lowe and his mother have stayed true to the story, however, retelling it for a Discovery Channel special in 1997, which is where I first heard about it.

Now, onto more recent attacks and mishaps at the hands of beautiful birds of prey.

Australia, 2007: Paraglider escapes death at hands of killer eagles: (Reported by Reuters)

Britain’s top female paraglider has cheated death after being attacked by a pair of “screeching” wild eagles while competition flying in Australia.

Nicky Moss, 38, watched terrified as two huge birds began tearing into her parachute canopy, one becoming tangled in her lines and clawing at her head 8,200 feet in the air.

“I heard screeching behind me and a eagle flew down and attacked me, swooping down and bouncing into the side of my wing with its claws,” Moss told Reuters this morning.

“Then another one appeared and together they launched a sustained attack on my glider, tearing at the wing.”

The encounter happened on Monday while Moss – a member of the British paragliding team – was preparing for world titles this month at Manilla in northern New South Wales state.

One of the giant wedge-tailed eagles became wrapped in the canopy lines and slid down toward Moss, lashing at her face with its talons as her paraglider plummeted towards the ground.

“It swooped in and hit me on the back of the head, then got tangled in the glider which collapsed it. So I had a very, very large bird wrapped up screeching beside me as I screamed back,” Moss said.

Moss said the attack ended after the second bird freed itself and the glider reached a height of only 100 meters from the ground, taking her outside the territory of the pair, who probably mistook her as a bird intruder.

Wedge-tailed eagles are Australia’s largest predatory birds.

Kazakhstan, 2009: Golden Eagle really doesn’t like the paparazzi

I verified this because the photo looked so incredible. The attack happened at a traditional eagle hunt on the steppe in Kazakhstan, where hunters are armed with Golden Eagles who search out small prey for them. One Golden Eagle did not appreciate his hunt being documented apparently and went after photographer Shamil Zhumatov.

Eagle attack

Chicago, 2010: Billboard contractor slashed by red-tailed hawk (Reported by the Chicago Sun-Times)

Working on a billboard 60 feet in the air can be a hairy job — especially when a hawk dive-bombs into your head. Craig Busse, a 49-year-old Bartlett resident, would know.

Earlier this month, Busse was up on a catwalk preparing to change an advertisement on a billboard at Interstate 55 and Weber Road in Bolingbrook when he noticed a nest holding two baby hawks, as well as dead mice and rabbits without heads.

Busse moved to the other side of the board — away from the nest — and told co-workers: “Keep your eye out for the bird and move fast.”

Within minutes, a red-tailed hawk — apparently the mom — swooped down and flew full speed into Busse’s head as he knelt on the catwalk. The raptor’s talons sliced open the back of his head and left scratches around his ear.

“I felt like somebody punched me in the head,” said Busse, who went to the hospital for four stitches, a tetanus shot and antibiotics.

“You don’t realize how fast these birds are,” he said. “It shocks you. You’re 100 feet in the air and then next thing you know, you fall forward a little bit, and you’re like, what the hell?”

Luckily he was attached to a safety harness.

Philadelphia, 2000: Tourist attacked by hawk guarding Ben Franklin’s grave (Reported by the Philadelphia Inquirer)

On Friday, a red-tailed hawk, apparently guarding a nest high above the historic graveyard where five signers of the Declaration of Independence are buried, attacked an Ohio tourist.

On Thursday, an unidentified man reported that he was buzzed but not hurt by a similar hawk.

Police said both attacks occurred as each man stood in the upper levels of a six-story parking garage, just south of the Holiday Inn at Fourth and Arch Streets. “I’ve been attacked by one of your Philadelphia eagles,” Ray Thomes, 64, said on Friday night from Pennsylvania Hospital, where he received stitches on his left ear.

A stockbroker from Dayton visiting Philadelphia for the first time, Thomes said he had just parked his car and was on the top level of the garage shortly after 4 p.m., trying to pick out his hotel room window, when the bird attacked.

“It felt like somebody just slapped me on the side of the head,” he said.”I look over, and there’s this big bird sitting on the branch beside me.”

Thomes’ ear required six stitches, and he received a tetanus shot. He said he also had two talon marks on his head.

Boston, 2008: Hawk hates on young fan of America’s pastime (Reported in the Chicago Tribune)

A 13-year-old girl visiting Boston’s Fenway Park on a school trip Thursday was attacked by a resident red-tailed hawk that drew blood from her scalp. Alexa Rodriguez wasn’t seriously hurt.

California, 1992: It’s these golf shirts! She hates these golf shirts! (Reported by the Orange County Register)

Grohall said most golfers who have been attacked were wearing white shirts or white hats, and about three golfers per week have been attacked for the past several weeks.

“She comes down with her talons and kind of just takes a bite and swoops away,” Grohall said. “I had a playing lesson one day, and I was wearing white and the hawk started swooping, so we got out of there. ”

Grohall’s advice to those teeing off from No. 1: “I tell people to hook it off the tee. “

Scotland, 2012: Sheep farmers enraged by theft of lambs by sea eagles (Reported by the Glasgow Herald)

FARMERS and crofters up and down the west coast are increasingly complaining that sea eagles are taking their lambs.
Complaints were previously limited to isolated incidents, but the numbers have grown in recent months.

However, officials at Scottish Natural Heritage and the RSPB still insist sea eagle attacks on sheep and lambs are rare and not a recurring problem.

One crofter on Skye says he now keeps an almost sacrificial stock of sheep out on the hill to prevent the sea eagles coming lower down. Another says the huge birds of prey even try to take hoggs (young sheep) and leave them wounded.

Sea eagles are a close relative of bald eagles.

China, 2012: Revenge is a dish best served on a human’s head Take this one with a grain of salt bigger than a Thunderbird, reported by China Daily:

Two villagers in Muling county, Heilongjiang province, were attacked by a golden eagle several times within two years after they ate a young golden eagle, Heilongjiang Morning Post reported on Tuesday.

A golden eagle attacked a man named Yang for more than 20 minutes when he was harvesting wheat on Saturday morning. After Yang was helped into a police car, the golden eagle continued the attack, diving at the windshield and chasing the car for 700 meters, the report said.

Yang was badly injured in his face, neck and arms, but it was not the worst time he was injured by golden eagles, according to the report. In April 2011, when he was planting in the mountain, a golden eagle attacked him, cutting his head, and he got 21 stitches.

A fellow villager named Wu has also been attacked by the golden eagle several times since August 2010. In April 2011, he received gashes in his head and hands in an attack and piece of flesh was ripped from his forehead. Wu received more than 40 stitches to close his wounds from that attack, the report said. He moved out the village to avoid further attacks.

According to the report, Yang said they had stolen a young golden eagle from its nest and ate it in August 2010, because they heard that eating golden eagles could cure hemorrhoids. Villagers say the golden eagle is seeking revenge.

And, one for darkly comic effect.

Florida, 2002: Hawks traumatize Happiest Place on Earth with indiscriminate feasting on homing pigeons (Reported by the Sun-Sentinel)

Call it the circle of life — hungry hawks swooping in and devouring the pigeons released in a flourish at shows and weddings throughout Disney World.

The pigeons, used in shows such as Cinderella’s Surprise Celebration at the Magic Kingdom and Beauty and the Beast at Disney-MGM Studios, became sitting ducks when red-tailed hawks figured out they could count on an easy meal at the same time every day.

Disturbed by the thought of sending the birds to almost certain death, Disney this week stopped releasing the homing pigeons — ending a tradition that began about 30 years ago.

During the shows, the birds soared over the parks before returning to nearby roosts. It was during these flights that the defenseless birds were grabbed by the hawks’ sharp talons, Disney spokeswoman Diane Ledder said.

It was only recently that the savvy hawks began snatching the birds, Ledder said. No visitors complained about seeing the midair attacks, she added.

Red-tailed hawks, with their wingspread of about 50 inches, thrive in the undisturbed wilderness around the Disney parks, said Geri Hylander, education and volunteer program coordinator at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland.

Hylander said the hawks aren’t especially aggressive, but “they’re opportunistic.”

“When you release a group of birds like that,” she said of Disney’s pigeons, “it’s an invitation to a meal.”

The vast majority of birds of prey are law-abiding and won’t bother you if you don’t bother them, so I don’t think there’s any compelling reason to ban them despite these attacks. The Queensland newspaper in Australia, where apparently bird attacks are a big enough problem to write a piece on how to avoid them, suggests:

“You can also consider carrying an umbrella which can be raised to fend off a sustained attack, and if you’re riding a bike, getting off and walking can help reduce the chance of an attack.

“Don’t try to scare off the bird. Wildlife is protected and this type of action could lead to a more serious and sustained attack.”

Be careful out there, people.

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Blame Tippi Hedren.

;)

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on December 29, 2012 at 5:36 PM

Robert Byrd – KKK

crash72 on December 29, 2012 at 5:38 PM

This really needs some Hitchcock music. And a park bench.

Vanceone on December 29, 2012 at 5:38 PM

Surprised there hasn’t been a Les Mis review yet. It was fantastic. I’m sure Ed would like a lot of the themes in it.

mythicknight on December 29, 2012 at 5:38 PM

Philadelphia, 2000: Tourist attacked by hawk guarding Ben Franklin’s grave

Pretty sure that was Barney Frank on a bender.

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 5:40 PM

There’s a fiscal cliff metaphor in there somewhere!

KS Rex on December 29, 2012 at 5:41 PM

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on December 29, 2012 at 5:36 PM

That movie creeped me out for years.

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 5:41 PM

I say pish-posh…

Heh. This needs to be used more often.

Though I too was attacked by a seemingly territorial bird at a small zoo I was visiting in Tasmania once. I was walking this trail and something hit me over the head. I looked to see what it was then something hit me from the other side. At first I thought someone was messing around but then I happened to glance up slightly and saw the winged menace diving down. I ducked and proceeded to leave the area at a hurried pace. I asked one of the park employees about the bird and he told me it’s not uncommon at all for that bird. Made me wish I had a net or something to catch the offender and then throw it in the Taz Devil enclosure.

Yakko77 on December 29, 2012 at 5:44 PM

Golden Eagle really doesn’t like the paparazzi

That an Eagle!

Good Eagle!

Schadenfreude on December 29, 2012 at 5:45 PM

None have an affinity for US politicians?

There are no good-ending stories any more :(

Schadenfreude on December 29, 2012 at 5:46 PM

Hence, my exhaustive search for bird attacks that really happened.

I once had a flock of seagulls follow me for a block or so, trying to poop on me. They hit my friend, but I escaped with a clean coat. We never did anything to them, so it was a totally unprovoked attack.

sharrukin on December 29, 2012 at 5:47 PM

“Don’t try to scare off the bird. Wildlife is protected and this type of action could lead to a more serious and sustained attack.

Attack from whom? The government?

Defend yourself against an animal and you’ll find yourself in jail. How far civilization has come. Oh well … we’re all used to this in the West, already.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on December 29, 2012 at 5:52 PM

That dodo in the White House has done quite a bit of damage.

trubble on December 29, 2012 at 5:53 PM

That movie creeped me out for years.

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 5:41 PM

Still takes my breath away: About a minute in, when the car explodes and Tippi Hedren is filmed frozen at the diner window in a series of horrified poses.

:)

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on December 29, 2012 at 5:54 PM

There was a great New Yorker cartoon (Charles Addams?) in which a man is being carried off by some giant bird. His wife is yelling up at him from the ground, “George, drop the car keys!”

Drained Brain on December 29, 2012 at 5:58 PM

Must be George Bush’s fault after all he was a pilot. And the left accused him of being a chicken hawk. Chickenhawks coming home to roost.

stormridercx4 on December 29, 2012 at 6:01 PM

said most golfers who have been attacked were wearing white shirts or white hats, and about three golfers per week have been attacked for the past several weeks.

“She comes down with her talons and kind of just takes a bite and swoops away,”

…can we get JugEars to golf there?……………..with those ears!…

KOOLAID2 on December 29, 2012 at 6:03 PM

Drained Brain, the follow up.

Schadenfreude on December 29, 2012 at 6:06 PM

This Spring a man was kayaking in a retention pond when he was attacked by a swan. The man tipped over and fell in the water. The swan was relentlessly attacking the man. The man could not make it to shore and drowned. Happened about 15 minutes from my house.

http://www.suntimes.com/11923182-417/man-drowns-in-kayak-after-coming-too-close-to-swan.html

Ted Torgerson on December 29, 2012 at 6:09 PM

my grandma (God rest her soul) got hit in the head by an owl that was after the fuzzy ball on her stocking hat. She thought she was going crazy or had been mugged.

ted c on December 29, 2012 at 6:09 PM

The vast majority of birds of prey are law-abiding and won’t bother you if you don’t bother them, so I don’t think there’s any compelling reason to ban them despite these attacks.

Can we just ban high capacity claws?

rbj on December 29, 2012 at 6:14 PM

Drained Brain

Around the time of “The Birds” film, a cartoon woman on the ground shouts up to her husband who is being carried away by a predatory avian, “George, George! Drop the car keys!”.

Schadenfreude on December 29, 2012 at 6:14 PM

Busted…Big Bird. You must listen.

Schadenfreude on December 29, 2012 at 6:17 PM

I was chased by some geese once…does that count?

lynncgb on December 29, 2012 at 6:24 PM

Eagle takes down Russian paraglider in India, 2011

Kenosha Kid on December 29, 2012 at 6:25 PM

Birdemic full movie

tom daschle concerned on December 29, 2012 at 5:51 PM

arrrgh! don’t do it! Think of the children, etc…..

apostic on December 29, 2012 at 6:28 PM

One more.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pecV8i8M2J0

derft on December 29, 2012 at 6:36 PM

AP attacked me for talking about “rights” yesterday yet he uses a quote explicitly using rights language with regard to adoption.

ninjapirate on December 29, 2012 at 6:46 PM

Whoops… wrong topic.

ninjapirate on December 29, 2012 at 6:47 PM

Good idea for HA to change its format to something more like buzz clips.

I wonder if comments are down just as I expect viewership for FoxNews is down.

We are all pretty tired of all of your empty tongue wagging (and I’m not just talking about losers like Carl Rove, Dick Morris, but just about all the talking heads on Fox, and bloggers who leach off of our misery like motor mouth Michelle Malkin…yeah and we are tired of all of your books, too).

You punks have failed us completely.

Like I said, good idea to switch formats.

Sherman1864 on December 29, 2012 at 6:49 PM

Leech that is….

Sherman1864 on December 29, 2012 at 6:50 PM

This sounds like a job for elder stateshag, Dianne Feinstein – it is definitely time for an ATTACK BIRD BAN.

Pork-Chop on December 29, 2012 at 6:50 PM

to this day I get a little nervous even when small birds are around. When I was about 8 or 9 I was walking alone to baseball practice when I walked under a tree that apparently had a bird’s nest in it. The mama bird, a robin I believe, didn’t appreciate me getting so close to her young so she literally started dive bombing at me. I threw my equipment down and ran like hell and it kept after me for quite some time. Not my proudest moment, but my fleet of foot allowed me live through this near death experience and embarrass myself by telling you all today.

dookphan on December 29, 2012 at 6:50 PM

Whoops… wrong topic.

ninjapirate on December 29, 2012 at 6:47 PM

LOL.

I do this all the time.

Sometimes I actually get lucky and it works out.

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 6:52 PM

Not birds of prey but man Don’t piss off crows. They NEVER forget. I think they even pass the grudge down to their descendants.

DoubleClutchin on December 29, 2012 at 6:54 PM

Eagle takes down Russian paraglider in India, 2011

Kenosha Kid on December 29, 2012 at 6:25 PM

I believe that was a vulture not an eagle and it was an accident not a deliberate attack. That said, it’s great video.

hepcat on December 29, 2012 at 7:03 PM

You know what eagles like?

Ham.

hepcat on December 29, 2012 at 7:06 PM

Many years ago, I was free climbing a cliff, when about 300 feet up I got to a point that I could no longer proceed, retreat or move laterally…. Unfortunately this was about eight feet from a hawk’s nest.

Spent the next half hour waiting for my buddy to run back to the vehicle, grab a climbing rope and climb up the easy way and toss me the rope to get past the bad spot: there I was, hanging on with just one hand grab and one foot rest, while my other hand held my belt, swinging the buckle as my only weapon against the strafing mama hawk.

Fortunately no baby hawks starved, no mama hawks got bashed, and I didn’t fall off the non-fiscal cliff.

But that was the last time I did any free climbing just for fun.

LegendHasIt on December 29, 2012 at 7:10 PM

Yawn. Wake me up when there is a video of a golden eagle taking revenge upon a windmill contractor.

Decoski on December 29, 2012 at 7:16 PM

About 9 years ago I was out walking on a country road(Chicago far south suburbs) and when suddenly I heard a ‘whooshing’ noise above my head. I looked up to investigate and experienced momentary terror,as I realized that I was being dive-bombed…by swallows. They never touched me-but at their lowest, they practically could have. Evidently, I had gotten to close to a swallow nest. If you’re in the same zip code as a swallow nest, you’re too close. ///

annoyinglittletwerp on December 29, 2012 at 8:07 PM

Canadian geese can get mean.

But I shot him, plucked him, and roasted him.

wolly4321 on December 29, 2012 at 8:17 PM

I can see that MKH has a future writing for Cracked

ajacksonian on December 29, 2012 at 8:17 PM

Hey, guys,,, you see the size of that chicken?

/peyote off/

wolly4321 on December 29, 2012 at 8:24 PM

because they heard that eating golden eagles could cure hemorrhoids.

Ah, they wanted the Colon Eagle not the Golden Eagle.

BL@KBIRD on December 29, 2012 at 8:55 PM

That movie creeped me out for years.

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 5:41 PM

Still takes my breath away: About a minute in, when the car explodes and Tippi Hedren is filmed frozen at the diner window in a series of horrified poses.

:)

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on December 29, 2012 at 5:54 PM

I grew up in the Bay Area and had been to Bodega Bay where they filmed many times. Been to the old school house and have an autographed picture of Hendron with a big black crow on her shoulder. Awesome movie and still gives you the creeps, especially the guy they find with his eyes pecked out.

Liberty or Death on December 29, 2012 at 9:13 PM

I meant Hedren not Hendron.

Liberty or Death on December 29, 2012 at 9:15 PM

As a falconer for the past 40 years I can appreciate the absurdity of most of these stories. Bald eagles prefer carrion but will fish. A six to eight pound fish can easily drown an adult female.

Golden eagles on the other hard are just nasty by nature and can and will wreck havoc. I had the misfortune of possessing a pair for a year when I was in west TX. First time I put the female (10.4#) up on a west TX jackrabbit she immediately swooped on one of my shorthairs and killed it. She killed three dogs during her time with me and I carry scars on both shoulders and my scalp due to her talents.

Redtails rarely put on a full on defense of the territory including active nests but will buzz repeated to drive intruders away.

Accipiters (Coopers Hawks, Sharp-shinned Hawk and Goshawks) will attack with vigor to protect an active nest site. It can be quite helpful to wear a motorcycle helmet when hunting with a Cooper’s (experience)

Owls – even smaller ones – will actively protect both territory and active nesting sites. That one cost me a week in the hospital with a very unpleasant injury.

koaiko on December 29, 2012 at 9:22 PM

I can see that MKH has a future writing for Cracked…

ajacksonian on December 29, 2012 at 8:17 PM

First thing that came to mind seeing the list format, but this is too well done here. She needs to learn how to half-arse her research and be willing to write the occasional article listing anecdotes everybody knows about video games she’s never played.

Gingotts on December 29, 2012 at 9:36 PM

These may be apocryphal, but when I worked in aviculture (there’s a new word for ya), I heard two stories about bird-caused deaths– a person beaten and drowned by mute swans, and a wildlife biologist who was stabbed through the the eye into the brain by a young great blue heron. You should look into these, MKH. I always wore safety glasses around herons. They are eye pokers.

The reports of birds lifting children are completely bogus, but the ones with birds of all kinds defending nests are very common. Heck, even a mockingbird will attack humans and cats near their young. I’ve been beat on by male swans and male geese with young. They are extremely defensive of young animals.

I knew an old-timer who as a boy in West Texas managed to catch some buzzards (turkey vultures, a large bird), and tied them to his baby sister’s basket carrier, to see if they could carry her off. The birds together only managed to drag the baby for a short distance. Ah, the good ol’ days.

juliesa on December 29, 2012 at 9:56 PM

Here’s a recent death by swan

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/headlines/2012/04/killer-swan-blamed-for-mans-drowning/

juliesa on December 29, 2012 at 10:01 PM

Ted Torgerson on December 29, 2012 at 6:09 PM

You beat me to it. Years ago I was told about a similar fatal mute swan attack in the US, but I couldn’t find it online.

Of course we haven’t even mentioned ostriches, emus and cassowaries. Cassowaries have one huge Jurassic Park claw on each foot that can do serious damage.

juliesa on December 29, 2012 at 10:12 PM

Eagle takes down Russian paraglider in India, 2011
Kenosha Kid on December 29, 2012 at 6:25 PM
I believe that was a vulture not an eagle and it was an accident not a deliberate attack. That said, it’s great video.
hepcat on December 29, 2012 at 7:

What matters is that the bird attacked a Russian aircraft.

Way to go!!

Sherman1864 on December 29, 2012 at 10:26 PM

koaiko on December 29, 2012 at 9:22 PM

Wow, the eagle was killing good sized dogs? That’s badass. How awful. I haven’t been around raptors much at all, but I did once help feed the harpies at a zoo where I did a work exchange. We locked up the eagles first–no contact. The female was especially scary looking.

I see comments here about other types of birds that reference only the mama bird, but in my experience with large waterfowl and penguins, the male is extremely protective of the young and more aggressive than the female. Male geese and swans will even defend kittens and puppies.

juliesa on December 29, 2012 at 10:26 PM

These may be apocryphal, but when I worked in aviculture (there’s a new word for ya

Not really.

Sherman1864 on December 29, 2012 at 10:27 PM

<

>koaiko on December 29, 2012 at 9:22 PM<

Pretty cavalier with your dogs, aren’t you?

Sherman1864 on December 29, 2012 at 10:30 PM

Sherman1864 on December 29, 2012 at 10:27 PM

Thats good. I’ve had to define it for most people, even my once for my own company’s HR department, who called it the agriculture department.

juliesa on December 29, 2012 at 10:33 PM

Awesome movie and still gives you the creeps, especially the guy they find with his eyes pecked out.

Liberty or Death on December 29, 2012 at 9:13 PM

Think I first saw the movie at about 8 years old (on TV of course)…I had nightmares about that friggin’ scene.

In his pajamas…up against the wall…eyes gone…lol, scared the cr@p out of me.

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 11:20 PM

Think I first saw the movie at about 8 years old (on TV of course)…I had nightmares about that friggin’ scene.

In his pajamas…up against the wall…eyes gone…lol, scared the cr@p out of me.

Tim_CA on December 29, 2012 at 11:20 PM

Same here, I was 7 or 8. My little sibs and I were scared crapless. We had two pet parakeets in a cage, and we covered the cage so the little birds wouldn’t get any ideas. We really did that. Kids are so funny.

juliesa on December 29, 2012 at 11:31 PM

DeLaviega Golf Course in Santa Cruz, California. The 18th hole has a dogleg to the left. Right at the dogleg there is a pond with a couple of enormous geese. Being a righty, I could keep an eye on the pond with the geese, because they were very aggressive. My buddy Larry was a lefty and he would have to turn his back to that pond as he chipped up the green. It just about gave him a nervous breakdown to play that hole. It was even money whether he’d get his shot off or one of the geese would tag him in the a…

Good times.

trigon on December 30, 2012 at 12:52 AM

Ladysmith CulchaVULCHA

Everyone get your umbrellas out!

Shy Guy on December 30, 2012 at 1:12 AM

This Spring a man was kayaking in a retention pond when he was attacked by a swan. The man tipped over and fell in the water. The swan was relentlessly attacking the man. The man could not make it to shore and drowned. Happened about 15 minutes from my house.

http://www.suntimes.com/11923182-417/man-drowns-in-kayak-after-coming-too-close-to-swan.html

Ted Torgerson on December 29, 2012 at 6:09 PM

“Yawn. It could have been worse. At least the swan didn’t get hurt.”
-Any PETA member

Sterling Holobyte on December 30, 2012 at 2:15 AM

Not birds of prey but man Don’t piss off crows. They NEVER forget. I think they even pass the grudge down to their descendants.

DoubleClutchin on December 29, 2012 at 6:54 PM

LOL! That made me laugh.

Though if I ever see a crow on my lawn again, I will do whatever it takes to get rid of it. If possible for good.
A while back, I noticed a crow digging in the grass on my lawn. It was throwing some fluffy stuff with its beak, and then pulling things out of the ground. I then noticed that those things were wriggling, but not for very long, as the crow would jab at them. I ran out there and shooed the crow away, but it was too late for the baby bunnies that the mommy rabbit had apparently tried to hide by making her home in a hole under some foliage near a small tree.
I don’t know how the crow even knew that they were there, because I never knew we had rabbits under that tree, and I had worked around it alot.
And the crow didn’t just kill and try to take one, it took them ALL out and just killed them.

Damn crow. I understand all about birds needing to eat, survival of the fittest, and all that, but… damn crow.

Sterling Holobyte on December 30, 2012 at 2:30 AM

I knew an old-timer who as a boy in West Texas managed to catch some buzzards (turkey vultures, a large UGLY(fify) bird), and tied them to his baby sister’s basket carrier, to see if they could carry her off. The birds together only managed to drag the baby for a short distance. Ah, the good ol’ days.

juliesa on December 29, 2012 at 9:56 PM

Wait a minute. He just attached them to the carrier, without the baby sister in it, right? Otherwise, he probably had some ‘splain’n to do to his parents, as well as to his sister after she grew up. ;)

Sterling Holobyte on December 30, 2012 at 2:36 AM

About 9 years ago I was out walking on a country road(Chicago far south suburbs) and when suddenly I heard a ‘whooshing’ noise above my head. I looked up to investigate and experienced momentary terror,as I realized that I was being dive-bombed…by swallows. They never touched me-but at their lowest, they practically could have. Evidently, I had gotten to close to a swallow nest. If you’re in the same zip code as a swallow nest, you’re too close. ///

annoyinglittletwerp on December 29, 2012 at 8:07 PM

Oh heck, they do that all the time, even when they are not trying to scare you off. They buzz around like jet-fighter pilots, chasing after bugs(that, and I think they fly around like that just because they can). I love watching them fly. Real acrobats they are.

A country bird that will dive-bomb you is the red-winged blackbird. Many a time while riding my bike in the country did those birds come after me. They must nest close to the road because you don’t have to be off the road to get them agitated. They don’t do too much; Just squawk, dive toward you a little, and they may even follow above you until you get out of their territory, but I have never been touched by one.

Sterling Holobyte on December 30, 2012 at 2:49 AM

Speaking of birds, could you guys at Hot Air do a story about Cheri Ami, the pigeon who saved 200 American Soldiers during World War I despite being shot.

SoulGlo on December 30, 2012 at 3:24 AM

Wait a minute. He just attached them to the carrier, without the baby sister in it, right? Otherwise, he probably had some ‘splain’n to do to his parents, as well as to his sister after she grew up. ;)

Sterling Holobyte on December 30, 2012 at 2:36 AM

Yeah, they are ugly, lol.

No, the baby was in the carrier, is what he told me. The birds dragged it down the road a bit.

It might have been a tall tale, but you know back before satellite dishes, kids in remote areas were very resourceful at entertaining themselves.

juliesa on December 30, 2012 at 10:50 AM

A sea gull snatched an egg roll out of my hand once. They’re greedy, thieving little bastiches.

RebeccaH on December 30, 2012 at 11:18 AM

Eagles going haywire? It’s all Michael Vick’s fault (plus global warming, environmental pollution and the proliferation of assault rifles.)

MaiDee on December 30, 2012 at 12:05 PM

A sea gull snatched an egg roll out of my hand once. They’re greedy, thieving little bastiches.

RebeccaH on December 30, 2012 at 11:18 AM

A llama once bit my sister.

(c’mon…..anybody?)

Tim_CA on December 30, 2012 at 12:14 PM

The only proven, preventive action we can take is to put more air, hot or cold, into our tires.

joeeddie on December 30, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Though I too was attacked by a seemingly territorial bird at a small zoo I was visiting in Tasmania once.

Yakko77 on December 29, 2012 at 5:44 PM

“You can also consider carrying an umbrella which can be raised to fend off a sustained attack, and if you’re riding a bike, getting off and walking can help reduce the chance of an attack.”

On Guam, it’s the drongo bird. They are incredibly territorial and love to attack joggers and cyclists moving through their territory. Joggers there carry all manner of stuff to swing and fend them off (frying pans, tennis racquets, sticks, umbrellas,etc.). They dive-bombed me, too, but never close enough to be within arm’s reach. They and the boonie dogs recognized that I was the real predator in each situation.

I was chased by some geese once…does that count?

lynncgb on December 29, 2012 at 6:24 PM

I weep for mankind whenever I hear of people being chased by geese. (I will excuse it if you were small.) People, we didn’t fight for millenia to be at the top of the food chain to let prey chase us! We have flocks of Canadian geese that descend on us this time of year – they poop on the sidewalks and wander in the road. I have seen people stop their car and wait for the goose to move out of the way! When I drive down that road, on the other hand, the geese move out of the road. And, ones giving me any attitude when I’m walking simply have to hear one simple word to know that I am not to be trifled with: pate.

I once had a flock of seagulls follow me for a block or so

sharrukin on December 29, 2012 at 5:47 PM

Wow, most groupies follow the group, not the other way around! ;)

GWB on December 30, 2012 at 4:40 PM

Anybody ever get caught in the middle of a hummingbird war? hundreads of humming birds ZIPPING through the iar and impaling their enemy humming birds and falling to the ground. This happened to me at Lake Valecito in colorado on a fishing trip. I had my red Texas Rangers ball cap on, and the danged things kept zooming up to my head and hovering in front of me then tearing ass off into the woods near the cabin. My friend said “they think you’re a flower, take the hat off and put it under your jacket.” Then we stepped back from the edge of the woods adjcent to the cabin and witnessed a 10-15 minute melee. Afte it was over we counted about fifty dead humming birds. I hear those little guys are fiercely territorial, but DAYUM!!

44Magnum on December 31, 2012 at 4:52 PM