Video game violence and our bubble wrapped society

posted at 8:31 am on December 22, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

As we saw on Friday morning, NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre didn’t throw the Second Amendment under the bus, which has led to more than a little controversy. While I can appreciate the fact that the NRA is loathe to rush into an ill considered gun grab as a solution to isolated incidents of social, mental and societal collapse in the form of infamous villains, I felt that some of Mr. LaPierre’s comments missed the mark in an important way.

And here’s another dirty little truth that the media try their best to conceal. There exists in this country, sadly, a callous, corrupt and corrupting shadow industry that sells and stows violence against its own people. Through vicious, violent video games with names like “Bullet Storm,” “Grand Theft Auto,” “Mortal Combat,” and “Splatterhouse.”

With all due respect to the NRA and their representatives, attempting to ward off criticism of guns by placing the blame on something else is precisely how we’re going going to lose this argument. This is yet another case of Americans riding out like Arthur and his knights seeking some tool, some toy, some talisman… some Unholy Grail to blame. And if we can only find it and brandish it before the citizenry, we can proclaim, “Here it is! We have found the source of ultimate evil! And we shall have Congress destroy it and then peace shall reign across the land!

This way lies folly. Children can certainly be influenced by their early experiences, and each will react to such stimuli in their own way. But as with all things, humans are generally a lot more resilient than some would imagine. Let us stipulate for the moment that several of the mass shooters since the late nineties – no… let’s say all of the shooters – were players of video games with violent themes. How many were there? A dozen? Let’s say one hundred. How many copies of those video games were sold? Just for a starting hint, more than eleven million copies of the third edition of Grand Theft Auto alone.

If you were researching the cause of a horrible disease which cropped up among one hundred people, and nearly all of them ate mushrooms – along with eleven million other people who also ate the mushrooms and demonstrated no symptoms – would you conclude that you’d found the cause? Or might you look further? This is insanity.

As we briefly discussed on Tuesday, the final arbiter of what entertainment our nation’s children consume is their family. And their parents are the only suitable police for determining what shows they watch, what games they play, and discussing all of the ramifications with them. The other choice is to turn it over the to government – an organization which can hardly claim a winning track record on social construction. Their only tool will be to bring down the ban hammer and shut down access to everything which might possibly contribute to setting off a handful of badly damaged maniacs. And at the same time, that access is cut off to the millions who would not be affected and removing the choice from their families.

As I was saying last night to some friends on Twitter, every generation gives rise to a few monsters. You don’t fix that by shackling everyone else. You stop the monsters. Placing the blame on any range of tools and seeking to solve the issue by removing said tools from the workbench does nothing but bubble wrap our society and eliminate any sense of responsibility from families. This isn’t a solution. It’s a dodge.


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As I was saying last night to some friends on Twitter, every generation gives rise to a few monsters. You don’t fix that by shackling everyone else. You stop the monsters. Placing the blame on any range of tools and seeking to solve the issue by removing said tools from the workbench does nothing but bubble wrap our society and eliminate any sense of responsibility from families. This isn’t a solution. It’s a dodge.

Amen.

itsspideyman on December 22, 2012 at 8:35 AM

video games.

leave it to libs to solve a problem that doesn’t exist, and the NRA to capitalize on their dumbassery

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 8:39 AM

“Here it is! We have found the source of ultimate evil! And we shall have Congress destroy it and then peace shall reign across the land!”

He didn’t say that.
He just suggested that kids absorbed in make-believe violence is a problem.

itsnotaboutme on December 22, 2012 at 8:40 AM

As we briefly discussed on Tuesday, the final arbiter of what entertainment our nation’s children consume is their family. And their parents are the only suitable police for determining what shows they watch, what games they play, and discussing all of the ramifications with them.

True.
But there’s nothing wrong for leaders like LaPierre to advise parents about such things.

We get advice all day from other sources, including from HotAir. Why can’t LaPierre offer advice?

itsnotaboutme on December 22, 2012 at 8:44 AM

“Here it is! We have found the source of ultimate evil! And we shall have Congress destroy it and then peace shall reign across the land!”

He didn’t say that.
He just suggested that kids absorbed in make-believe violence is a problem.

itsnotaboutme on December 22, 2012 at 8:40 AM

LaPierre is a moron if he thinks for a moment that his “suggestion” is going to have any traction.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:46 AM

in our culture………..we are the “Pass-the-Buckers”.

Bush did it.

Quayle supported legislation that allowed this gun tragedy to happen.

Palins’ “Crosshairs” ad “encouraged a climate of violence”.

Big Pharma did it.

Big Oil was at fault.

Evil corporations are denying me the chance.

It’s those Rrrrrrrrrrrrrrich people!!

The ___________ are keeping me from ________.

…….and you ever notice who’s fault it NEVER is?……..The Federal government or the Media.

PappyD61 on December 22, 2012 at 8:47 AM

We get advice all day from other sources, including from HotAir. Why can’t LaPierre offer advice?

itsnotaboutme on December 22, 2012 at 8:44 AM

LaPierre is wrong and a coward. The worst possible combination of the two, even. He can offer me advice and I can tell him to stuff it in his cakehole.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:47 AM

He’s only shifting blame around, and the libs gave him an easy scapegoat. A familiar one stupid people can grasp – video games.

Let’s try not banning stuff. Let’s try not creating more laws that didn’t work in the first place.

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 8:49 AM

Repeat after me, kids:

There is no statistical correlation between video game violence and violent behavior.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:51 AM

LaPierre is a moron if he thinks for a moment that his “suggestion” is going to have any traction.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:46 AM

True enough, but truthfully there was absolutely nothing LaPierre could have said that would have satisfied the Leftist media complex. He could have announced the disbanding of the NRA and that all of its members were turning themselves in to the Department of Homeland Security as accessories to murder and terrorism. After cheering, the Left would have criticized him for not doing it sooner.

JimLennon on December 22, 2012 at 8:54 AM

It is far easier to blame an inanimate object for the cause of any tragedy because to face the real cause is something many cannot confront. To do so means they would have to admit that it is their failed policies and regulations enacted by the liberal, nanny-state, friends they elected to the legislatures around the country; the biased rhertoric from the state run, left-leaning, cheerleaders in the media; threats of lawsuits from the ACLU (Anti-Christian Lawyers Union) bullying small communities into compliance to their agenda; the movie and video game industry that celebrates mass murder with the use of weapons they are so ready to deplore. These people fail to realize evil is in this world and is far more prevalent than they want to admit. To do so might mean they have to admit that maybe God’s Word really is the truth and that the false gods they follow are lies. The assault rifle or a pistol is so much easier to villify.

iamsaved on December 22, 2012 at 8:55 AM

Jazz, I think you’re looking at specifics in a generalist argument.
.
It’s not the violence in video games that’s the problem, nor was it what Wayne was talking about, it is the glorification of violence that is the problem.
That glorification urges some to become famous via repugnant means.
He cited a few examples (and I’ve already seen but what about… used as an ineffective counter) of games, movies, and the media’s worshiping of the uberviolent.
That’s what Wayne sees as the problem, the media hosannas for the grotesque, the violent, and the titillating.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:57 AM

Europe plays the same video games as the US, sees the same movies, videos, listens to the same music….
…and yet the homicide rate is a fraction of that in the US…and not rising.

80-90% of gun shot victims are caused by criminals shooting other criminals (gang violence).

albill on December 22, 2012 at 8:57 AM

To me it all comes down to what kind of America have we become; where do we want to go, and what are we doing now that has resulted in the America we have today. Are the movies and video games filling our culture with high order noble thoughts, or tickle the base level responses? The wonder load of base sensory junk filling the idle hours is at an all time high and we are becoming a sick place compared to the place. I say look at everything.

DumboTheAvenger on December 22, 2012 at 8:57 AM

Jazz, I think you’re looking at specifics in a generalist argument.
.
It’s not the violence in video games that’s the problem, nor was it what Wayne was talking about, it is the glorification of violence that is the problem.
That glorification urges some to become famous via repugnant means.
He cited a few examples (and I’ve already seen but what about… used as an ineffective counter) of games, movies, and the media’s worshiping of the uberviolent.
That’s what Wayne sees as the problem, the media hosannas for the grotesque, the violent, and the titillating.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:57 AM

Apparently it didn’t sink in the first time, so I’ll repeat it again:

There is no statistical correlation between video game violence and violent behavior.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:59 AM

There is no statistical correlation between video game violence and violent behavior.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:51 AM

.
Way to argue what wasn’t stated.
I think that’s called a Strawman argument.
I’ll look it up after I send another donation to the NRA.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:59 AM

Jazz, I think you’re looking at specifics in a generalist argument.
.
It’s not the violence in video games that’s the problem, nor was it what Wayne was talking about, it is the glorification of violence that is the problem.
That glorification urges some to become famous via repugnant means.
He cited a few examples (and I’ve already seen but what about… used as an ineffective counter) of games, movies, and the media’s worshiping of the uberviolent.
That’s what Wayne sees as the problem, the media hosannas for the grotesque, the violent, and the titillating.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:57 AM

Apparently it didn’t sink in the first time, so I’ll repeat it again:

There is no correlation between video game violence and violent behavior.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:59 AM

I love it when I hear someone blaming the violence in society on everything from videogames to Sunday afternoon football. What I rarely if ever hear is the possible cause being the gradual disintegration of the family in society.

I do believe you rarely have cases of violence when there is a father and mother in the family actually doing the job of raising the children, and not either a single mother raising her kid while trying to support her crack habit or a single father who is away most of the time working three jobs and leaving the kid at home to feign for themselves.

Where you have a strong family unit, you rarely hear of instances of what happened with someone like Adam Lanza.

pilamaye on December 22, 2012 at 9:00 AM

Way to argue what wasn’t stated.
I think that’s called a Strawman argument.
I’ll look it up after I send another donation to the NRA.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:59 AM

I’m not arguing the truth of what LaPierre stated. I am questioning his heed to state it in the first place. Since there is no correlation between fantasy violence and violent acts in any meaningful sense, I can only conclude that LaPierre is ceding rhetorical ground to the leftists.

Stemming the “glorification of violence,” whatever the hell that’s supposed to mean, wouldn’t have stopped Adam Lanza from killing and you know it!

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:02 AM

who gives a sh!t about video games? Besides Morning Joe?

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:03 AM

who gives a sh!t about video games? Besides Morning Joe?

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:03 AM

Apparently now Wayne LaPierre does. I think I’m going to go play me some Halo 4. Cause I just love me some red-hot covenant-killing violence!

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:05 AM

He didn’t say that.
He just suggested that kids absorbed in make-believe violence is a problem.

itsnotaboutme on December 22, 2012 at 8:40 AM

Yes, because cops and robbers and other ‘violent’ games ruined generations of children.

Timin203 on December 22, 2012 at 9:06 AM

I think with a lack of family and structure people are more violent.

I grew up in the drive-ins in the 70′s…That was worse than what kids see today.

We are drones to technology.

tomas on December 22, 2012 at 9:09 AM

With all due respect to the NRA and their representatives, attempting to ward off criticism of guns by placing the blame on something else is precisely how we’re going going to lose this argument.

To be fair, Democrats ward off criticism by blaming something else and have been winning for decades.

Spliff Menendez on December 22, 2012 at 9:09 AM

O/T I can’t go to the Daily Caller, it’s blocked but when you go the report, there is no reason.

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 9:09 AM

To be fair, Democrats ward off criticism by blaming something else and have been winning for decades.

Spliff Menendez on December 22, 2012 at 9:09 AM

They win because they’re liberals, not because they have a superior argument.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:09 AM

To do so might mean they have to admit that maybe God’s Word really is the truth and that the false gods they follow are lies. The assault rifle or a pistol is so much easier to villify.

iamsaved on December 22, 2012 at 8:55 AM

Please keep your superstitions out of a serious conversation. I’ve heard nothing about this kids religious beliefs, and I hardly see how that matters.

Timin203 on December 22, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Apparently it didn’t sink in the first time, so I’ll repeat it again:

There is no statistical correlation between video game violence and violent behavior.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 8:59 AM

I don’t believe anyone is saying that there is a direct correlation between violent video games and using firearms to commit mass murder. But by the same token, one can’t arguably say that it isn’t a factor. There are many factors that go into the twisted minds of people who commit these violent acts. Sometimes the biggest factor will never be known because the fantasy that lives in their mind will never be known by anyone but themself.

I gather from your vociferous defense of video games that you and/or your children play them quite frequently.

iamsaved on December 22, 2012 at 9:10 AM

I don’t believe anyone is saying that there is a direct correlation between violent video games and using firearms to commit mass murder. But by the same token, one can’t arguably say that it isn’t a factor. There are many factors that go into the twisted minds of people who commit these violent acts. Sometimes the biggest factor will never be known because the fantasy that lives in their mind will never be known by anyone but themself.

I gather from your vociferous defense of video games that you and/or your children play them quite frequently.

iamsaved on December 22, 2012 at 9:10 AM

I can and will say that video games are no more of a factor then the fact that he was a vegan, or that he was a techy nerd. As in, probably not a factor at all.

Timin203 on December 22, 2012 at 9:12 AM

Stemming the “glorification of violence,” whatever the hell that’s supposed to mean, wouldn’t have stopped Adam Lanza from killing and you know it!

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:02 AM

.
Wow you really can argue against what I didn’t say well.
.
There was no “one” reason that crazy Connecticut boy did what he did. Hence the reason Wayne’s speech was long, there were a lot of issues that contributed to his final melt down.
Nor is there “one” fix to the issue.
Even though the libs seem to think “just one more law,” is the answer to every problem.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:15 AM

Blaming video games or lack of god or whatever is no different then blaming guns. Instead of blaming external factors, why not blame the guy? He was a sick individual and something was clearly wrong with him. There will be nut jobs in any society at any time, there’s nothing anyone can do about it.

Millions of people play video games, millions of people don’t believe in god (again, we don’t know this kids religious leanings anyways), and 99.9999% of them do not shoot up elementary schools.

Timin203 on December 22, 2012 at 9:15 AM

I gather from your vociferous defense of video games that you and/or your children play them quite frequently.

iamsaved on December 22, 2012 at 9:10 AM

In the interest of full disclosure, I don’t have children. But I was born in 1978 in the heyday of video arcades. I was steeped in various forms of what politicians would consider “violent imagery.” And I am to this day. But I am a productive member of society, certainly not an immediate danger to anyone in my greater community.

My axe to grind considering this particular issue has more to do with the fact that we’re in search of a problem for the solution. “We don’t know with any certainty, but it may be a factor, so we should do something” is not what I would normally consider a conservative way of thinking on any issue. Doing something — anything — so we can feel good about ourselves is the kind of knee-jerk reaction I would expect from liberals.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:15 AM

ban violent video games

watch the violence skyrocket. Then the libs will say the games were a healthy outlet for violence, and must be reintroduced. Laws beget more laws. A liberal’s freakin’ dream. Yay!

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:15 AM

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:57 AM

An interesting, reasoned and well stated response.

Jazz Shaw on December 22, 2012 at 9:16 AM

He just suggested that kids absorbed in make-believe violence is a problem.

itsnotaboutme on December 22, 2012 at 8:40 AM

Maybe it people who want toblame video games that only adults are allowed to buy that are the problem? You know, since kids have been shooting rocks, BBs, nerf toys, spit balls, pellets, rubber bands, snow balls, cap guns, paint balls, and arrows at each other since forever. Now they do it by pushing a button instead of getting their fat asses outside.

Spliff Menendez on December 22, 2012 at 9:18 AM

It seems more to me that LaPierre blamed this so-called ‘gun culture’ on the media as a whole; more skewering them than actually going after violent computer games. While I don’t believe video games are a cause for psycho killers any more than Wile E. Coyote makes otherwise normal kids violent, the media are complicit in how they report stories. And, of course, how much they hide when things don’t fit the liberal meme.

Know what’s different in the MSM about this latest murder spree? They didn’t try blaming the Tea Party out the gate. I guess they learned the last time they had to eat crow and wipe egg off their faces. Next best liberal meme is guns. The left is itching for a big win after so many losses with the ‘Teas are to blame’ crapola.

At first the liberals tried dancing around Adam Lanza’s autism as the cause. That wasn’t going to fly very long, because autistic people usually aren’t violent and that it’s ‘insensitive’ to blame mental health issues. Mental health care is too big a problem to tackle right away, and very costly. To actually do what’s likely needed will result in liberals screaming abut civil rights violations and all. As we know, the ACLU defeated a CT bill to do precisely what gun-grabbers started out saying about mental health care but quickly dropped.

So they set their sights on guns again. And, as usual, the NRA and every legal gun owner in the country. Of course they ignore the illegal guns in the hands of street gangs; no calls about dealing with those first even though multiple murders are common in Detroit, Chicago, LA, and every other liberal mecca in the country. Those places remind me of a very violent mining town in the Old West that had the unofficial motto, “A dead man with breakfast every morning.”

Then, too, are the calls from liberals to shoot every NRA member and execute its leadership. Nah–that’s not crazy, is it?

Now, libs are trying to say the guns were never secured from Lanza, but a family friend says his mom had a gun locker. There is no claim Adam had free access, so no one knows if he got the weapons without permission. The only one who knows was killed by him first. So the libs move the goalpost: the guns weren’t secured enough. And, they’re out there lying by saying Nancy Lanza was a ‘Republican card-carrying NRA member’. Again, no witnesses have said either way about either issue and it’s a BS line anyway. She’s not the shooter.

The real and proper target of blame is Adam Lanza. The last person liberals have blamed for a killing is George Zimmerman, going so far as to edit his 911 call to make their case. If LaPierre tried laying the blame where it belongs, on Adam Lanza, the left would be screaming about his insensitivity and trying to deflect blame on a poor misguided and troubled boy. Even after they earlier tried blaming his autism themselves!

LaPierre did the best he could, I think. No matter what he said, the media would disregard it. Already, the ‘fact checkers’ are on the job, to keep the liberal line from being too closely examined by those who have no axe to grind. Liberals’ minds are made up, so anything goes to support their predetermined contentions even if they have to lie to do it.

When libs start calling for police to sweep high-crime urban neighborhoods to confiscate illegal guns, and it happens, maybe we can talk more about this matter. But we know they won’t, because they likely fear being called racist. Or maybe it’s because people of color are killing each other and that doesn’t matter to them?

With all that, I don’t see much more to discuss here with the liberals.

Liam on December 22, 2012 at 9:18 AM

Even though the libs seem to think “just one more law,” is the answer to every problem.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:15 AM

Let me be real clear here about a few things:

Connecticut is one of six states with no state-level provision for Assisted Outpatient Therapy (AOT). No involuntary committal. I believe there should be a law in place in every state for just such an eventuality.

Nancy Lanza begged the state to take some kind of action. She knew that Adam was a ticking time bomb, and the ACLU torpedoed every attempt she made throughout most of 2012 to get her son some kind of help.

Instead of talking about “the glorification of violence,” LaPierre and every other pundit with an opinion (but I repeat myself) should be asking why Adam Lanza’s “due process rights” were important enough for the lives of 20 children to be sacrificed to.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:19 AM

Let us stipulate for the moment that several of the mass shooters since the late nineties – no… let’s say all of the shooters – were players of video games with violent themes. How many were there? A dozen? Let’s say one hundred. How many copies of those video games were sold? Just for a starting hint, more than eleven million copies of the third edition of Grand Theft Auto alone.

BUT here’s the refined and actual point of the problem of these “mentally ill shooters”:

IF AND WHEN you have a child, and a male child especially, who is troubling you to such an extent that you and/or entire family have engaged in “counseling” and other professional helps to “try and deal with it” (“it” being troubled behavior by a troubled child) — Lanza’s mother is quoted as saying she didn’t want him to “be alone” EVEN WHEN a babysitter had to use the bathroom (how that was managed, I have no idea) — THEN as part of that problem, contending with a troubled child, a parent (AND/OR COUNSELOR, ADVISOR, RELATIVE) should be watching what “gaming” they’re engaged with.

It’s not the “violent video games” per se but what they do to further agitate the minority among users who are unstable, especially those who are unstable-trending-toward-antisocialism.

The two Columbine shooters had so many indicators occurring as to their potential for and eventual planning of gun violence (and their suicides by guns) that it’s horrible no one put any radical breaks on both of their daily behaviors AND associations. They instead went about working at a pizza parlor and laughing with one another about very dark, very violent, shared ambitions, which was ongoing behavior that SOME adult should have noticed but didn’t.

So it’s not the “violent video games” per se that are the problem but that we’re all too numb about their violence, or, rather, that their level of violence is considered “ordinary” and “fun” and that encourages people to avoid taking action with the minority who use them who are unbalanced and further influenced to “act-out” violently against society (and themselves).

An effective rating system for “violent video games” wouldn’t hurt. One that works. Not 18? You don’t get to purchase or use certain video games. Under thirteen? Same applies.

An effective rating system would be a big start to how “violent video games” are accessed and by whom. And keener observations by adults as to those young males (though girls can also be mentally unwell – it’s usually boys in teen years who are the violent ones or pose the greatest potential for violence), especially, who are causing certain concerns to flare in others.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:21 AM

Now they do it by pushing a button instead of getting their fat asses outside.

Spliff Menendez on December 22, 2012 at 9:18 AM

heh

not my kids. They’re gonna hit you with something real, and real hard.

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:21 AM

Timin203 on December 22, 2012 at 9:15 AM

.
There are two distinct and separate questions here, “Who’s responsible,” and “Why did the melt down occur.”
The first is crazy Connecticut boy, the second has lots of answers.
Libs and the ignorant try and conflate the two questions to dodge responsibility.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:23 AM

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:15 AM
I think we’re in agreement. Knee jerk reactions and the exploitation of natural or politically created “crises” by our lawmakers or media pundits is not the answer.

My comment about your defense of video games wasn’t meant to be offensive. Many people tend to staunchly defend the things they enjoy doing while condemning the things they don’t.

Sort of like when someone ridicules another’s beliefs by calling them superstitions because they are still wandering around in the dark and don’t know any better.

iamsaved on December 22, 2012 at 9:24 AM

Jazz Shaw on December 22, 2012 at 9:16 AM

.
Thanks

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:25 AM

Forget an assault weapons ban. We need a BFG ban. Too many kids playing Doom is leading to violence.

/

Doughboy on December 22, 2012 at 9:26 AM

There are two distinct and separate questions here, “Who’s responsible,” and “Why did the melt down occur.”
The first is crazy Connecticut boy, the second has lots of answers.
Libs and the ignorant try and conflate the two questions to dodge responsibility.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:23 AM

I don’t think it’s as complicated as you believe it is.

Adam Lanza’s mother spent months begging the state of Connecticut to help her with her violent son, and Connecticut couldn’t/wouldn’t, until Adam discovered that she was trying to put him away, and ergo went on a killing jag at the elementary school his mother used to volunteer at.

Looks like the most glaring failure in this instance is the State of Connecticut. But you wouldn’t know that if you depend on the LSM for your information about it.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:26 AM

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:19 AM

.
Absolutely agree with you, and IIRC that was one of the many things Wayne discussed.
Again my original point was that Jazz was attacking specifics in a generalist argument.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:27 AM

My comment about your defense of video games wasn’t meant to be offensive. Many people tend to staunchly defend the things they enjoy doing while condemning the things they don’t.

Sort of like when someone ridicules another’s beliefs by calling them superstitions because they are still wandering around in the dark and don’t know any better.

iamsaved on December 22, 2012 at 9:24 AM

No offense taken.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:28 AM

But the Left calling for violence upon NRA members is them being utterly, completely, utterly MENTALLY ILL.

Joyce Carol Oates, author, for example, priding herself on twitter about what she considers enjoyment, pleasure, at the idea of NRA members being “shot themselves” and Bette Midler, actress, expressing similar…

Oates, especially, what she tweeted was not only troubling to read and witness but utterly scary given her social and professional influence as an author (and screenwriter, meaning, she’s involved in filmmaking). And Midler with her “pretend on screen to be a humorist” acts while revealed to be utterly creepy in lack of ethics, not to mention sanity, expressing glee at the idea of “NRA members” being shot.

Those are but two among many on the Left who have expressed similar views.

The only people writing “crazy” views, opinions are the Left, the “anti gun” crowd. Interesting to note is how they ALL rely on armed guards and are responsible for so many anti-gun laws in the states of CA and NY, while they seem reliant themselves on armed guards.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:30 AM

I kinda lost my relationship with the NRA. Or rather they lost me. I have some very quality guns, beautiful tools for hunting, many different calibers. One of my favorite, my Marlin, .35 cal. Great all around deer rifle. Great for most game in that size range. Lever action holds nine. With that said, I own many guns that are very good for killing. I never use them for hunting. They are strictly defense type weapons where as I am concerned. All quality, top of the line, both in design and function. Trying to explain my ownership of such weapons based around using them to hunt is less then forthright. I have them for exactly what they are designed for. My hope is that they will never be needed. Besides, .50 cals make an awful mess out of a perfectly good deer. Well pretty much anything really.

Bmore on December 22, 2012 at 9:30 AM

With all due respect to the NRA and their representatives, attempting to ward off criticism of guns by placing the blame on something else is precisely how we’re going going to lose this argument. This is yet another case of Americans riding out like Arthur and his knights seeking some tool, some toy, some talisman… some Unholy Grail to blame…

Jazz nails it.

LaPierre doesn’t. And I almost never criticize NRA leadership. Attempts at digging up scapegoats to take the blame, like video games, simply reeks of nonsense. One doesn’t need a video game to see violence…just turn on the evening news almost any given day and you’ll get all the real life violence one could want.

JetBoy on December 22, 2012 at 9:30 AM

Absolutely agree with you, and IIRC that was one of the many things Wayne discussed.
Again my original point was that Jazz was attacking specifics in a generalist argument.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:27 AM

Was that one of the things he discussed? If it was, I shouldn’t be surprised it wasn’t covered by the media.

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:31 AM

P.s. I did play pong once.

Bmore on December 22, 2012 at 9:32 AM

SHAW you are reading this wrong. The point the NRA makes is, blaming an object VS someones behavior is an invalid argument. The NRA says a culture of violent upbringing is not helping.

TX-96 on December 22, 2012 at 9:32 AM

And Midler with her “pretend on screen to be a humorist” acts while revealed to be utterly creepy in lack of ethics, not to mention sanity, expressing glee at the idea of “NRA members” being shot.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:30 AM

What do you expect from a woman who would sleep with Geraldo Rivera?

Liam on December 22, 2012 at 9:33 AM

P.s. I did play pong once.

Bmore on December 22, 2012 at 9:32 AM

I for one am glad we have pong experts with 50 cals on our side

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:35 AM

Isn’t it a sin that the lives of the innocents and the heroes that tried their best to protect them, has come down to this? They are getting lost in these battles, none of which have anything to do with their death. One lone crazed miserable kid, who isn’t representative of anything but his own private He!!!

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 9:35 AM

The NRA says a culture of violent upbringing is not helping.

TX-96 on December 22, 2012 at 9:32 AM

So what’s the solution? Banging my toe with a hammer isn’t helping either, but that doesn’t mean we’re going to legislatively ban banging one’s own toe with a hammer.

THIS is why LaPierre bugs me when he talks like this. Discussion of mental health issues and the disaster that was deinstitutionalization should be front-and-center, and instead it’s a freakin afterthought!

gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:36 AM

Was that one of the things he discussed? If it was, I shouldn’t be surprised it wasn’t covered by the media.
gryphon202 on December 22, 2012 at 9:31 AM

.
I was driving yesterday and heard most of it “live.”
Notice the media didn’t comment on the protestors or the one tools (journalists) asking Wayne after the second one was dragged away, “how does that manke you feel?”

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 9:36 AM

Bette Midler and Geraldo?

that’s a mustache in a diaper

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:37 AM

Hey, sorry to go off-topic but just this morning in snowy Council Bluffs, IA my dog and I were out for a walk and saw a bald eagle. There was another eagle too but it did not have a white head. I read on the net that the adult females have white heads too. So I’m assuming the other one was a teenager eagle that had not grown white feathers. At first I thought it was a mate, but then read up on it and guess it was not quite fully adult.

I feel kind of lucky seeing one. I didn’t even know they hung around Iowa.

I guess they are migrating or something.

By the way, it ain’t the video games, but the lack of any moral upbrining that emphasizes the needs, feelings, welfare of OTHERS.

Introvertion combined with no morals is a bad mix.

It is the numbing of concern for others that is at the heart of the problem.

Boys also that have no father to help them mature to manhood are more suseptible too. There are exceptions, but when you destroy families, it is devastating to boys. Look at all our cities in decline. Why? Destroyed families.

And cackling white feminist women continuing to undermine a father’s love and responsibilities to raise their boys to men is another big problem.

What we are finding out in trickles is that the killer’s mother was also at fault as she brought guns into the home, introduced them to the killer, etc. etc. etc. Something you don’t do with the mentally unhinged.

I have a niece who is bi-polar. NO WAY could you have firearms near her because she might not take the medication, and she has already been arrested and spent time at a facility in CA for people with that problem. She knows that if she goes off the medication, she becomes unglued.

I will say though that many people are OVER-medicated when young and this has its own problems.

Mental health and illnesses are so numerous and complex. You can’t fix it by simply passing a law, the Dem/Prog way.

KirknBurker on December 22, 2012 at 9:38 AM

I’m speculating that we as a species are ALWAYS going to produce a few among us who are mentally deranged. There isn’t any magic pill that is ever going to eradicate the creation of a kid with a troubled mind and even among the sane and well balanced, adolescence is often a difficult time.

SO, placing concerns first and foremost on the as-yet unarmed locations/situations that these troubled types target is the sensible thing, and the practical thing, to do.

Schools especially make for targets for troubled types who are — even on normal circumstances — bearing resentments against SOMEone in school during adolescence: a teacher, the school itself, counselors there, ex-boy/girl friend/s, peers…though, granted, it’s only the troubled few who take up weapons against others.

In that sense, LaPierre is correct in his strategy: address the safety conditions at schools which so far have been the unarmed and non-defended locations mentally ill people have targeted. LaPierre’s idea of HOW that should be accomplished is arguable, but it’s certainly a sensible idea to consider: no longer leaving schools available as “undefended target locations” for those few who act-out in such sick fashion as to try and gun down others there.

Once there’s an awareness of a people who are armed, then violent attempts against them cease (they stop being targeted because the awareness exists that they’re not without defenses).

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:39 AM

People are such hypocites. Supposedly shows like Glee are destroying our youth, but shoot-em-up video games are fine and dandy.

RedRedRice on December 22, 2012 at 9:41 AM

Reported Attack Page!

O/T I can’t go to the Daily Caller, it’s blocked but when you go the report, there is no reason.

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 9:09 AM

This web page at dailycaller.com has been reported as an attack page and has been blocked based on your security preferences.

Attack pages try to install programs that steal private information, use your computer to attack others, or damage your system.Some attack pages intentionally distribute harmful software, but many are compromised without the knowledge or permission of their owners.

This is the message I got. Seems like the Daily Caller has an ongoing problem with this.

Night Owl on December 22, 2012 at 9:45 AM

Jazz: Is that a new addition to your family?

Blake on December 22, 2012 at 9:45 AM

People are such hypocites. Supposedly shows like Glee are destroying our youth, but shoot-em-up video games are fine and dandy.

RedRedRice on December 22, 2012 at 9:41 AM

shows like Glee are destroying our youth. But only cause they see unoriginal crap is rewarded by liberals if you have a gay character that gets bullied.

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Attempts at digging up scapegoats to take the blame, like video games, simply reeks of nonsense….

Wrong. It’s right and realistic to identify whatever SHARED BEHAVIORS these troubled individuals engage in. And then discuss those shared behaviors, those activities to try and flush-out whatever may be of “mutual affect”.

LaPierre ALSO mentioned violent media, didn’t limit his complaints as to issues to video-games, but also mentioned “Hollywood” as in, films, tv, VIOLENCE AS ENTERTAINMENT.

IT’s the “enterainment” value thing that is the concern, because it’s established a rather non-plussed attitude by observers TO and about violence as entertainment.

It’s not saying that violence in entertainment is all-wrong or all-responsible for the few who take up guns to run amok against others in society, it’s only saying that, look at that, it’s something those who DO and have run amok with guns against others all had in common.

LaPierre’s mention of violent-Hollywood and that one particular violent video game was in the context of criticizing Leftmedia, who has denied the problem even exists (violence in video games as possible bad influence to certain mentally vulnerable or mentally persuadable users) while LaPierre, as he said, had no problem easily locating one particular game that was gratuitously violent yet deemed “entertaining”.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Liberals are already opposed to armed police in schools, saying guns make for a hostile learning environment and, “What–more guns on the street?” Police are ‘more guns on the street’? How crazy can liberals get? And who says the police can’t be plainclothes?

How about this: multiple armed plainclothes police, and every teacher is trained to use and carries a taser? Even if a teacher suddenly goes off the deep end, he/she won’t be armed to kill the instant a snap occurs.

If I can figure out things like this, why can’t those who claim to be such expects get a clue?

Liam on December 22, 2012 at 9:48 AM

Night Owl on December 22, 2012 at 9:45 AM

Thanks, I finally noticed the icon around it. When you look at the rundown as why it has been reported, there are no problems, so my guess it is a “joke” by some liberal.

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 9:49 AM

@RedRedRice Have you ever played any “hoot-em-up video games”? If you did, did you want to go shoot someone after playing it?

albill on December 22, 2012 at 9:49 AM

People are such hypocites. Supposedly shows like Glee are destroying our youth, but shoot-em-up video games are fine and dandy.
RedRedRice on December 22, 2012 at 9:41 AM

Have you ever played any “shoot-em-up video games”?
If you did, did you want to go shoot someone after playing it?

albill on December 22, 2012 at 9:50 AM

I agree.

I played Madden four years ago, and went on a tackling spree.

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:51 AM

This is the message I got. Seems like the Daily Caller has an ongoing problem with this.

Night Owl on December 22, 2012 at 9:45 AM

They likely have a tracking cookie or a few with either their site templates or their advertisers on their site. I stopped visiting them in IE because their site takes so long to access (too much crud on the site causes the site to take too long to load) BUT in Firefox with secure-visits enabled, the site’s templates don’t load and none of their advertisers do, either. Thus, you can read their words-only if you’re after articles there.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:52 AM

without the Daily Caller, how would we know about a speech Obama gave in 2007 that was already expansively covered, and thus also know Obama is a shameful racist?

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:54 AM

But as with all things, humans are generally a lot more resilient than some would imagine.

I agree. But if you notice it is the not the more so called “resilient” people who are commiting the mass killings. I am weary of hearing liberals blame guns for violence and giving a pass to the entertainment industry that creates some of its most exciting games/movies based upon violence with weapons.

DaveDief on December 22, 2012 at 9:55 AM

What we need is a shoot em up game based in the “Glee” world.

Bishop on December 22, 2012 at 9:55 AM

KirknBurker on December 22, 2012 at 9:38 AM

Congratulations on your sighting, it’s exciting! You are so right on all the possibilities and the way it’s being handled, “DO SOMETHING!” is not a helpful reaction but it is probably human nature.

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 9:56 AM

without the DC

how would we know what color Tucker Carlson’s suspenders are?

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:56 AM

Night Owl on December 22, 2012 at 9:45 AM

Thanks, I finally noticed the icon around it. When you look at the rundown as why it has been reported, there are no problems, so my guess it is a “joke” by some liberal.

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 9:49 AM

Try Firefox with “don’t want to be tracked” feature selected and disallow Java on sites that seems suspicious, AND use private browsing (get the DO NOT TRACK addon with Firefox).

IE is a problem with some sites that aren’t hooked into Microsoft’s “lists” and such and I get tired of having to constantly “surf with IE’s permission”…so to speak.

Firefox has it’s hangups, too, but it makes for easier site visiting when all one wants to do is read — can be preventive on image access, however, but at least you’re more secure when you’re just after reading material.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:56 AM

Men being respnsible fathers is far more important than anything said in LaPierre’s media rant. Absent or abusive fathers are far more determinant in violent behavior than video games. That’s why I think we have to look at everything before we start assigning treatment options that include banning guns and violent media.

DumboTheAvenger on December 22, 2012 at 9:58 AM

What we need is a shoot em up game based in the “Glee” world.

Bishop on December 22, 2012 at 9:55 AM

Ryan Murphy’s going down. And that’s for The New Normal. He copied everything but the funny from Modern Family.

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 9:59 AM

But as with all things, humans are generally a lot more resilient than some would imagine.

I agree. But if you notice it is the not the more so called “resilient” people who are commiting the mass killings. I am weary of hearing liberals blame guns for violence and giving a pass to the entertainment industry that creates some of its most exciting games/movies based upon violence with weapons.

DaveDief on December 22, 2012 at 9:55 AM

What DaveDief wrote ^^.

I am weary of hearing liberals blame guns for violence and giving a pass to the entertainment industry that creates some of its most exciting games/movies based upon violence with weapons.

So many celebrities are so quick to speak out in condemnation of “guns” and our 2nd Amendment Right/s yet they make their wealth and celebrity out of acting-out on screen as violently as can be imagined, and sometimes, worse.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:59 AM

My sons have played those games with their friends for years. I don’t remember ANY violence from their group during this time frame. Overall this is a joke. Sure there are a handful that have issues with these games but I fail to see proof of causation.

CW on December 22, 2012 at 10:00 AM

Men being respnsible fathers is far more important than anything said in LaPierre’s media rant. Absent or abusive fathers are far more determinant in violent behavior than video games. That’s why I think we have to look at everything before we start assigning treatment options that include banning guns and violent media.

DumboTheAvenger on December 22, 2012 at 9:58 AM

I agree! And often overlooked: responsible fathers present and active in their children’s development and lives will and do often limit access to heavy “violent video game” use. Meaning, parental engagement with the lives of their children, especially as to adolescent males, is key to giving the children a better opportunity to good development as adults later.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:02 AM

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:56 AM

Thanks, I do use Firefox. The message has a list of “bad” things that can be the problem and according to them, Daily Caller has no reports of any of those bad things, it doesn’t make any sense.

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 10:04 AM

Way to argue what wasn’t stated.
I think that’s called a Strawman argument.
I’ll look it up after I send another donation to the NRA.

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:59 AM

The same NRA that made it’s own strawman argument about videogames?

I suppose I should give them credit for digging up Splatterhouse; that game is over 20 years old. But hey, it’s got a scary name, so..

From what I heard from the rest of the speech, I thought it was fine. But like J-Shaw, my mind is blown that we’re still going after videogames. Mind-numbing.

Reaps on December 22, 2012 at 10:04 AM

My sons have played those games with their friends for years. I don’t remember ANY violence from their group during this time frame. Overall this is a joke. Sure there are a handful that have issues with these games but I fail to see proof of causation.

CW on December 22, 2012 at 10:00 AM

By “those games” what do you mean, specifically? And what titles at what ages?

It’s really a case of potential to incite the unbalanced. If not unbalanced (using titles appropriate to competency and maturity of a user’s psychological functional level), then, fine, entertaining, but the issue overall about “violent video games” is the DESENSITIVITY they have created to what I’d call “extreme” violence.

Blowing up someone’s head and laughing about it isn’t a good indication of normalacy by anyone. The issue is what’s considered to be “entertainment” … to a troubled mind, gratuitous violence is “funny”.

Not everyone has a troubled mind. But there does exist developmental stages in the human brain (and mind) and that’s the issue. Even a well balanced person, if provoked to some extreme compared with their ability to cope, can be “driven crazy” and respond “crazily” against others.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:06 AM

Geez Lourdes

is there anything that doesn’t drive you to Big Government begging for a solution?

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 10:09 AM

Not everyone has a troubled mind. But there does exist developmental stages in the human brain (and mind) and that’s the issue. Even a well balanced person, if provoked to some extreme compared with their ability to cope, can be “driven crazy” and respond “crazily” against others.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:06 AM

AND IN THE CONTEXT OF ADOLESCENTS, they are of the type of human who “can’t escape” or cannot easily IDENTIFY HOW TO COPE with certain violent aggression, except by doing what someone without exit can do: they retaliate.

Kids, adolescents, don’t have the options (yet) available to them as do adults. They don’t consider HOW to “leave” or make plans to do so, they’re still EMOTIONALLY and PSYCHOLOGICALLY dependent on the conditions they’re in.

If and when they’re in bad conditions, ones that are threatening to them of some sort, they’re going to respond by both self-loathing (they blame themselves) and/or violence against whatever is, in their minds, causing them pain.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:10 AM

Reaps on December 22, 2012 at 10:04 AM

Yep, a stupid move but not surprising when they are being cast as all that is evil in the world.

Cindy Munford on December 22, 2012 at 10:10 AM

This video has been going around this week:

Tragedy and Video Games

ScoopPC11 on December 22, 2012 at 10:14 AM

Lourdes is an adolescent psychologist

she knows, and knowing is half the battle

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 10:14 AM

From what I heard from the rest of the speech, I thought it was fine. But like J-Shaw, my mind is blown that we’re still going after videogames. Mind-numbing.

Reaps on December 22, 2012 at 10:04 AM

Would you rather “they go after” guns instead?

It’s just one aspect to be considered, “violent video games.” I haven’t read anyone damning video gaming in general.

Most the Left is “damning” gun owners and “guns” in general without any specificity or explanation beyond the hysterical.

The involvement of violent gaming by a handful of mentally ill people certainly is a condition that needs to be, and should be, examined. It doesn’t mean that people are asking for video gaming to be damned, it just means that mentally unwell kids, especially, should be reconsidered as to their level of involvement and exposure to certain gaming genres.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:14 AM

Jazz nails it.

LaPierre doesn’t. And I almost never criticize NRA leadership. Attempts at digging up scapegoats to take the blame, like video games, simply reeks of nonsense. One doesn’t need a video game to see violence…just turn on the evening news almost any given day and you’ll get all the real life violence one could want.

JetBoy on December 22, 2012 at 9:30 AM

Many children are witnessing violence in their own homes,the victims of violence and other abuses by “loved ones” and in their neighborhoods on a daily basis. A daily diet.
My work with violent and aggressive/disturbed youth, usually had that correlation/link attached.
Not playing violent video games,movies,tv shows,music or anything else.
People want to blame something for the horrific violence by our youth today. Something-anything.
My experience-back to the family unit and home.

bazil9 on December 22, 2012 at 10:18 AM

Wrong. It’s right and realistic to identify whatever SHARED BEHAVIORS these troubled individuals engage in. And then discuss those shared behaviors, those activities to try and flush-out whatever may be of “mutual affect”.

LaPierre ALSO mentioned violent media, didn’t limit his complaints as to issues to video-games, but also mentioned “Hollywood” as in, films, tv, VIOLENCE AS ENTERTAINMENT.

IT’s the “enterainment” value thing that is the concern, because it’s established a rather non-plussed attitude by observers TO and about violence as entertainment.

It’s not saying that violence in entertainment is all-wrong or all-responsible for the few who take up guns to run amok against others in society, it’s only saying that, look at that, it’s something those who DO and have run amok with guns against others all had in common.

LaPierre’s mention of violent-Hollywood and that one particular violent video game was in the context of criticizing Leftmedia, who has denied the problem even exists (violence in video games as possible bad influence to certain mentally vulnerable or mentally persuadable users) while LaPierre, as he said, had no problem easily locating one particular game that was gratuitously violent yet deemed “entertaining”.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Sorry, I just don’t buy that at all.

It seems finding something to take the blame for these horrible acts, like CoD and GTA, is a liberal idea…like blaming Big Gulps and McDonalds for childhood obesity. Or blaming booze for drunk drivers. Or legislating stricter and stricter gun laws until the 2nd amendment becomes a distant memory.

JetBoy on December 22, 2012 at 10:18 AM

@RedRedRice Have you ever played any “hoot-em-up video games”? If you did, did you want to go shoot someone after playing it?

albill on December 22, 2012 at 9:49 AM

People can watch films about cannibalism and not go out and eat people. But some do. It’s the “some” who do that need to be discussed, not the ones who don’t. And the context of a show about cannibalism: if it’s done to excite and “make cannibalism fun,” then it’s gratuitous not to mention crazy. And it’ll attract crazy people.

Not everyone’s nuts, however, and aren’t we fortunate that there are more humans who aren’t than there are those who are.

THE POINT isn’t “gaming” but MENTALLY UNSTABLE PEOPLE engaged in using it, especially to replace socialization otherwise.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:20 AM

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Sorry, I just don’t buy that at all.

It seems finding something to take the blame for these horrible acts, like CoD and GTA, is a liberal idea…like blaming Big Gulps and McDonalds for childhood obesity. Or blaming booze for drunk drivers. Or legislating stricter and stricter gun laws until the 2nd amendment becomes a distant memory.

JetBoy on December 22, 2012 at 10:18 AM

I’m not advocating “legislating” anything.

You again persist in utterly misperceiving my points made.

For you, a very broad generalist, you have limitations in what specifics you seem capable of comprehending.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:22 AM

Sorry, I just don’t buy that at all.
JetBoy on December 22, 2012 at 10:18 AM

I’m not selling anything. Have a nice day.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:23 AM

THE POINT isn’t “gaming” but MENTALLY UNSTABLE PEOPLE engaged in using it, especially to replace socialization otherwise.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:20 AM

well, it’s a stupid point. And you’ve made it.

Slade73 on December 22, 2012 at 10:24 AM

The same NRA that made it’s own strawman argument about videogames?
I suppose I should give them credit for digging up Splatterhouse; that game is over 20 years old. But hey, it’s got a scary name, so..
From what I heard from the rest of the speech, I thought it was fine. But like J-Shaw, my mind is blown that we’re still going after videogames. Mind-numbing.
Reaps on December 22, 2012 at 10:04 AM

.
From my original post

Jazz, I think you’re looking at specifics in a generalist argument.
LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 8:57 AM

What Jazz replied

An interesting, reasoned and well stated response.
Jazz Shaw on December 22, 2012 at 9:16 AM

There was also a nice discussion between myself and gryphon202 over this same subject. What Wayne cited were examples, not causes.
He was taking the media and Hollywood to task for glorifying violence, not stating, “if you play this game you will become a raving lunatic.”

LincolntheHun on December 22, 2012 at 10:24 AM

People want to blame something for the horrific violence by our youth today. Something-anything.
My experience-back to the family unit and home.

bazil9 on December 22, 2012 at 10:18 AM

Parental involvement, parental supervision, what I mentioned earlier.

An involved father, especially, is going to set limits for children, and especially limits with a credible example for adolescent males.

Goes back to “what” is considered “entertainment” and what isn’t…limits established and maintained by good parenting.

I agree that the conditions at home are the most influential for children. For all of us in our lives.

Lourdes on December 22, 2012 at 10:25 AM

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