“Gangnam Style” rapper: Sorry about how those lyrics about killing U.S. soldiers and their families “could be interpreted”

posted at 7:49 pm on December 7, 2012 by Allahpundit

C’mon. If you’re going to own it, own it. The background:

[I]n 2004, a Korean missionary was captured in Iraq by Islamists who demanded that South Korea not send troops to aid America in the war in Iraq. Seoul refused to negotiate and the missionary was beheaded. The result: massive protests throughout Korea against both Muslim extremism and the U.S. military for indirectly bringing this fate upon a Korean missionary.

As part of the protests, PSY and several other popular Korean musicians put on a live performance of a Korean rock band’s song “Dear American.” When PSY’s turn came, he rapped:

Kill those fucking Yankees who have been torturing Iraqi captives
Kill those fucking Yankees who ordered them to torture
Kill their daughters, mothers, daughters-in-law and fathers
Kill them all slowly and painfully

According to MTV, the word he used at the time was “bitches,” not “Yankees,” but the intent was clear enough. Today, having earned untold riches in part by penetrating the lucrative bitch/Yankee media market, he’s sorry. Kind of:

“As a proud South Korean who was educated in the United States and lived there for a very significant part of my life, I understand the sacrifices American servicemen and women have made to protect freedom and democracy in my country and around the world.”

“The song in question – from eight years ago – was part of a deeply emotional reaction to the war in Iraq and the killing of two Korean schoolgirls that was part of the overall antiwar sentiment shared by others around the world at that time. While I’m grateful for the freedom to express one’s self I’ve learned there are limits to what language is appropriate and I’m deeply sorry for how these lyrics could be interpreted. I will forever be sorry for any pain I have caused anyone by those words.”

“I have been honored to perform in front of American soldiers in recent months – including an appearance on the Jay Leno show specifically for them – and I hope they and all Americans can accept my apology. While it’s important we express our opinions, I deeply regret the inflammatory and inappropriate language I used to do so. In my music I try to give people a release, a reason to smile. I have learned that though music, our universal language we can all come together as a culture of humanity and I hope that you will accept my apology.”

He did indeed perform for the troops on Leno’s Thanksgiving show; skip to 3:25 of the first clip below and watch him do the horse dance with full military backing. That looks twice as surreal today as it did then and it looked darned surreal at the time, but his PR team will use it to full effect to buy him some forgiveness with the public. He’ll get leeway too from the fact that he is, after all, the goofy horse-dance guy. A musician known for more introspective work would be held to full account for his political opinions but this is a bit like finding out that LMFAO thinks 9/11 is an inside job. (They don’t. I’m speaking hypothetically.) Between that and the fact that he apologized, sort of, for how the song “could be interpreted,” Obama’s spokesman felt safe enough to say this afternoon that O still plans on attending the upcoming TNT benefit concert at which Psy is scheduled to perform. Fearless prediction: That’ll change if people are still talking about this on Monday, not so much in terms of POTUS’s attendance as Psy’s.

Two clips for you here, one the Leno bit and the other (from 2002) a little taste of what South Korean pop culture can look like when it’s going through one of its periodic bouts of anti-Americanism. Content warning.



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PSY looks kind of FAT. MICHELLE would not approve. Maybe he can be extradited to North Korea where he can become THIN.

percysunshine on December 8, 2012 at 8:45 AM

itsnotaboutme on December 7, 2012 at 8:10 PM

Are Kia and Hynudai Korean models ?

Hyundai = Here’s whY yoU Never Drive An Import

cableguy615 on December 8, 2012 at 9:01 AM

Hyundai = Here’s whY yoU Never Drive An Import
cableguy615 on December 8, 2012 at 9:01 AM

So now this is a Korea-bashing thread? You guys are pathetic.

bluegill on December 8, 2012 at 10:17 AM

bluegill on December 8, 2012 at 10:17 AM

Back in the 80′s Korea singled out the U.S. car market
by putting a $10,000 Tariff on all imported U.S. made cars. Really ticked me off at that time. Not bashing, just reminiscing.

deptofredundancydept on December 8, 2012 at 10:48 AM

I served in South Korea (’73-’74) and enjoyed my time there. The majority of Koreans (especially the older generation)were very appreciative of what the U.S. had done for them and thanked me for being there. Just like America, not everyone agrees so there are some, especially younger citizens who either haven’t been taught history, or have been convinced the history they were taught is a lie. That is a problem with the education system.

I visited South Korea in 2003, and was advised that sentiment against Americans was still possible because of the deaths of the two schoolgirls and what seemed like a callous disregard for human life on the part of Americans. I encountered no difficulties, nor was anyone outwardly hostile to me. Of course, I understand that every country has its own culture and what is valued in one country may have a different value in another. Koreans value their children extremely highly. They don’t have a Social Security System to support them in their old age, they have their children.

I’m not familiar with the details of the accident, and I doubt very many of the rest of Hot Air readers and writers are either, so I don’t know if the army acted correctly or not.

Yes, our troops have been there for decades and most Koreans understand the importance of our presence there. That does not give young Americans license to abuse the culture, or the people of their host country. Germans aren’t all that happy with American presence, and if you were to poll any country where we’ve been implanted for decades I think you’d find some people’s patience wearing thin.

As for Psy, I liked his Gangnam style video. It’s a hilarious dig at wealthy Koreans and what they value. I’ve looked at a few other of his videos and he definitely has a sense of humor, but he is also a patriotic Korean – nothing wrong with that. His words about killing people slowly and painfully are horrid, and have made me think less of him, but I also remember he is an entertainer, not someone who is directing the future of this or any other country, so I would put him in the same category as any other entertainer who says stupid stuff.

In order to be totally transparent you should know I married a South Korean girl that I met while stationed in Korea. She and her mother would come to my place of employment (the post chapel) to babysit American children while their parents were in church worshiping. If you marry a Korean you will probably get to know even more Koreans through the friendships of your spouse. We’ve been married 36+ years and recently our oldest daughter married a Korean man from California. So, I know a little about Koreans and their attitudes towards America. Psy’s comments from the past are NOT representative of the majority of Koreans (so stop hating them)and I have never owned any car with a foreign name. Although, I did once own a BSA motorcycle (British)and once had a Honda motorcycle (Japanese). Now, I ride a Harley Davidson (good old USA).

Some of you may try to characterize me as biased – I’m not. I’m more familiar with the topic (Koreans) than you are.

“But I say to you who hear, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.
(Luke 6:27-28 NASB)

Know It All on December 8, 2012 at 11:06 AM

freedomfirst on December 7, 2012 at 11:25 PM

Sorry, nine years later, I answer. I do remember, very well!!

Cindy Munford on December 8, 2012 at 12:41 PM

bluegill on December 8, 2012 at 10:17 AM

What’s pathetic about buying American cars? Must you try to kiss every ass?

Cindy Munford on December 8, 2012 at 12:44 PM

Typically selfish actions that surprises no one. Follows Hanoi Jane’s “apology” tactic:

Now, four decades removed, sitting in the lap of luxury, Fonda has decided that the pictures on the anti-aircraft gun were a mistake. Not the actual visit – she stands by that. “I did not, have not, and will not say that going to North Vietnam was a mistake,” she said. “I have apologized only for some of the things that I did there, but I am proud that I went.”

But when it comes to those gun photos, then she wishes she’d done something different: “Sitting on that gun in North Vietnam. I’ll go to my grave with that one.” Of course, as John Nolte of Big Hollywood points out, that’s “a step up from what we learned in Patricia Bosworth’s biography, ‘Jane Fonda,’ where the star reportedly said: ‘My biggest regret is I never got to f*** Che Guevara.”

socalcon on December 8, 2012 at 2:15 PM

I am sick and tired of insecure, cowardly foreigners spewing such hate towards my country. America is blamed for everything, it doesn’t even have to have any relevance. The younger generation of Koreans is increasingly anti-American, most likely because of left wing dominated media and education system, so if they hate us then we need to get out of their country and leave them to their own devices.

South Korea is the product of American blood spilled; North Korea is what they would have looked like without that blood. If the Koreans don’t acknowledge this, then we leave. That’s how wars of liberation should work, eventually you have to leave.

Daemonocracy on December 8, 2012 at 2:30 PM

I visited South Korea in 2003, and was advised that sentiment against Americans was still possible because of the deaths of the two schoolgirls and what seemed like a callous disregard for human life on the part of Americans. I encountered no difficulties, nor was anyone outwardly hostile to me. Of course, I understand that every country has its own culture and what is valued in one country may have a different value in another. Koreans value their children extremely highly. They don’t have a Social Security System to support them in their old age, they have their children.

I’m not familiar with the details of the accident, and I doubt very many of the rest of Hot Air readers and writers are either, so I don’t know if the army acted correctly or not.

This isn’t 1973 anymore, and because you married a Korean doesn’t mean other Koreans love you.

Why did you bring up that Koreans value their children highly? Every parent values their children highly whether they have a social security system or not. Do Koreans look at their children as a retirement fund? Is that what you are saying? Because that’s not love, and I find that remark mind boggling.

If you are unfamiliar with the details of the accident, then use the internet to look it up before you write such a long winded comment full “maybe” and “I’m not sure”. The South Koreans were upset these girls were killed but would not accept that it was a tragic accident, this shows a complete lack of trust in the American military on their part. So if they weren’t happy with the acquittal, what was the reason? Did they think Americans murdered the two girls? Did they think the military was hiding something, such as them being drunk? Or has the anti-Americanism gone so deep that they immediately jump to malice as a motivation for the girl’s death instead of it being a tragic accident? From everything I have read, it is the consequence of hardened anti-American resentment. American troops can do bad things on an individual level, there are rapists and thugs in every element of society, but the younger generation of Koreans have been hating on America for a while now and are behaving like angst ridden teenagers rebelling against their parents. It’s time to leave and pull all funding, we’re long overdue.

Conservatives and liberals alike claim they want to stop giving money to countries who hate us, well South Korea is one of those countries now that the older generations have died off.

Daemonocracy on December 8, 2012 at 2:47 PM

Oh and one more point, just because Koreans didn’t express open hostility to you while you were there does not mean they don’t hate you. Hatred can be quite polite and disguises itself very well, just look at this pudgy pop star as an example.

Daemonocracy on December 8, 2012 at 2:49 PM

“But I say to you who hear, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.
(Luke 6:27-28 NASB)

Know It All on December 8, 2012 at 11:06 AM

We can do all those things without spending billions in military aid.

Daemonocracy on December 8, 2012 at 2:50 PM

I would just be happy to watch the youtube videos of PSY’s doing a 2 year long tour of North Korea. A couple years of PSY as a Nork would make a reality show worth watching. I hope the watching public would get to vote on how he makes his departure from his extended homeland.

Parabellum on December 8, 2012 at 3:03 PM

This isn’t 1973 anymore, and because you married a Korean doesn’t mean other Koreans love you.

Yes, I know it is now 2012 and just so you know, back when I married my wife Koreans would not have loved me for doing so. They were a very homogenous country which frowned upon marriage to anyone who was not Korean. My wife has suffered mildly from that even in this country. You could even call the nation slightly racist. If you did, you might as well lump in every older Italian, Irish, French, etc. parent from the last century, as they would have similar feelings about wanting their children to marry someone from their own culture and nationality.

Why did you bring up that Koreans value their children highly? Every parent values their children highly whether they have a social security system or not. Do Koreans look at their children as a retirement fund? Is that what you are saying? Because that’s not love, and I find that remark mind boggling.

I brought up their love for their children because some people seem to be ignoring the fact that their anger was because two schoolgirls were killed by some soldiers. Culturally, parents have relied on their children for care in their old age. It’s a tradition. Whether we see it as odd or mind boggling might be because we’ve grown up expecting Social Security to be there for us when we’re old, rather than families caring for each other. The fact that children willingly do care for their parents in their old age is testament to the love they have for their parents in following the traditions that make them unique. So,no, they don’t look at their children as a retirement fund.

Military personnel in Korea have, from time to time, broken Korean law, whether it be murder (as occurred when I was there) or drunken public brawling, etc. Because of the SOFA agreement we have with Korea, most of the time the military personnel are remanded to custody of the American military for judgement and punishment. In cases where a Korean citizen loses their life because of something a visiting military person has done, I can understand the Koreans being upset when those individuals escape the Korean judicial system. Changes to the SOFA could alter that, but that is between our government leaders and theirs. If, for some reason Mexico had 37,000 troops stationed in our country – in your neighborhood, and they behaved in a thoughtless manner – even if accidental, I think you might have a different perspective on where they should be tried. We have never had to live with a foreign army in our midst, so we don’t know what that feels like.

If you are unfamiliar with the details of the accident, then use the internet to look it up before you write such a long winded comment full “maybe” and “I’m not sure”.

Which bothered you more, the long winded, or the “maybe” and “I’m not sure”? I tend to qualify my statements if I don’t have absolute first hand knowledge. I did look up the story before I wrote, but the article I read the first time didn’t give a lot of details. Since then, I’ve looked for more and found this lengthy but informative article:

http://rokdrop.com/2008/06/13/gi-myths-the-2002-armored-vehicle-accident/

The South Koreans were upset these girls were killed but would not accept that it was a tragic accident, this shows a complete lack of trust in the American military on their part. So if they weren’t happy with the acquittal, what was the reason? Did they think Americans murdered the two girls? Did they think the military was hiding something, such as them being drunk?

It seems S. Korea has politically far left people in it just like America. They were the main instigators of the unrest.

Or has the anti-Americanism gone so deep that they immediately jump to malice as a motivation for the girl’s death instead of it being a tragic accident? From everything I have read, it is the consequence of hardened anti-American resentment. American troops can do bad things on an individual level, there are rapists and thugs in every element of society, but the younger generation of Koreans have been hating on America for a while now and are behaving like angst ridden teenagers rebelling against their parents. It’s time to leave and pull all funding, we’re long overdue.

Conservatives and liberals alike claim they want to stop giving money to countries who hate us, well South Korea is one of those countries now that the older generations have died off.

S. Korea is a long way from being an America hating country. In their subways (the cleanest I’ve ever seen) there are signs encouraging Koreans to be more like Americans in certain ways. As a nation, they don’t hate us. People in Great Britain, France, Germany, etc., complain about us as well. Shall we stop giving money to them also?

Before we pull funding from our allies, I’d rather see us withdraw it from those places like Libya, Egypt, etc. that we do not have an alliance with. I’d also like Americans to realize the world is not made up of Americans (and BTW, I’ve traveled a little – this IS the best country in the world) so we should understand that not everyone thinks or behaves the way we think is correct. They have opinions too.

Final note. The articles I’ve read indicate that Korean police were guarding U.S. bases to protect Americans. They were also protecting our embassy from demonstrators. Does that sound like a nation of American haters?

Know It All on December 8, 2012 at 6:02 PM

Oh yeah! FEIGN THAT OUTRAGE folks!

As for me, I Iike this guy because he’s entertaining not for his political opinions.

DaveS on December 8, 2012 at 8:22 PM

S. Korea is a long way from being an America hating country. In their subways (the cleanest I’ve ever seen) there are signs encouraging Koreans to be more like Americans in certain ways. As a nation, they don’t hate us. People in Great Britain, France, Germany, etc., complain about us as well. Shall we stop giving money to them also? Know It All on December 8, 2012 at 6:02 PM

Of course we should. Why should we be subsidizing these sovereign countries? To keep in step with Zbigniew Brzezinski’s Grand Chessboard Foreign policy? They should be self sufficient and self reliant and we can still maintain a strategic military and trade alliance with them.

Before we pull funding from our allies, I’d rather see us withdraw it from those places like Libya, Egypt, etc. that we do not have an alliance with. I’d also like Americans to realize the world is not made up of Americans (and BTW, I’ve traveled a little – this IS the best country in the world) so we should understand that not everyone thinks or behaves the way we think is correct. They have opinions too.

And they can have their opinions without our money.

Final note. The articles I’ve read indicate that Korean police were guarding U.S. bases to protect Americans. They were also protecting our embassy from demonstrators. Does that sound like a nation of American haters?

When a government has to protect Americans from its own people…yeah, that’s exactly the type of nation it sounds like.

Your personal affinity for South Korea is, in my opinion, clouding your judgment on this. They were liberated, they are free, and they are pissed off, so it’s time to go. I’ll still enjoy Korean cinema over Hollywood trash, and I still support free trade and a military alliance with South Korea, but when their future generations and current politicians scapegoat us as occupiers and colonists then let them guard their own border. I’ve been following this for a while now, and I’ve had it. Our promise to the older generations that we will protect them is no longer relevant because that generation is no longer alive.

Aside from your personal connection to the nation itself, I have yet to hear a compelling reason as to why exactly we should stay. No matter how ignorant may be, if they are seeing us as occupiers and imperialists, then it is time to go but still maintain the strategic alliance. If we want to maintain a presence in the region to balance out Asia, we have numerous alternatives. That is my main point.

Daemonocracy on December 8, 2012 at 9:12 PM

I’ve only known 3 Koreans and all three were(are)chip on thier
shoulder punks.

Hope I’m wrong thinking they’re all scum but that’s batting 100
against so far .

Texyank on December 8, 2012 at 10:49 PM

this is a bit like finding out that LMFAO thinks 9/11 is an inside job. (They don’t. I’m speaking hypothetically.)

I don’t know who or what LMFAO is but I’m getting tired of “911 was an Inside Job” being used as the archetypal conspiracy theory. Whatever 911 was, it was NOT 3 skyscrapers falling down from plane damage & fires.

Just go to the AE911truth website for the views of architects & engineers on the three building collapses. Buy a DVD. Far too many experts & PhDs lined up against the official story that planes dropped those buildings.

Rivers of molten metal, multiple explosions, evidence destroyed… Something more happened and we are being misled. At the very least acquaint yourself with their arguments so you may intelligently debate.

So Allah, can we please find another example of vacuous conspiracy theorising that is actually a conspiracy theory? Thank you so much…

Liam1304 on December 8, 2012 at 11:31 PM

In my music I try to give people a release, a reason to smile.

Well, I’m sure a ton of liberal/progressives here in America are smiling about those lyrics.

I have learned that though music, our universal language we can all come together as a culture of humanity

Killing “those f’ing Yankees” and their families are how he suggests we all “come together”? And just whose “humanity” was he referring to? Apparently not Americans.

I was sick of this whole “gangham style” idiocy when it first started; everyone and their mother making videos of themselves doing that stupid dance.
Now I am really just sick of him!

Sterling Holobyte on December 9, 2012 at 1:37 AM

Oh yeah! FEIGN THAT OUTRAGE folks!

As for me, I Iike this guy because he’s entertaining not for his political opinions.

DaveS on December 8, 2012 at 8:22 PM

It always amazes me how some people will trash their principles; their nation; their morals; etc. on account of “liking” some actor or singer.

Not to worry though, DaveS, I am sure the media will help this story die a quick death since the target of the hate is America. So you can continue to ignore his America-bashing and go back to listening to him sing “…whomp, whomp, whomp” and other smart and “entertaining” lyrics.

Sterling Holobyte on December 9, 2012 at 1:44 AM

Liam1304 on December 8, 2012 at 11:31 PM

Go buy a DVD to find out the truth™?

LMFAO dude….

tom daschle concerned on December 9, 2012 at 9:55 AM

Well!! I was drafted and sent to Korea in 1951/1952 and then Japan
in 1953. My memories if Korea are NOT GOOD. Lost sight of one eye and almost deaf. Run across rice paddies, fire at Chinese when “on line”, run into live fire when some stupid Lt. says GO, I could go on @ on. Korean girls, the ones I knew were whores on a mattress
with long lines waiting , no thank you. BUT I was not with normal
Korean people SO my recollections may not be the same as some others
Japan was a different story had a great time there Japanese people
look down on the Koreans called them dogs.I almost married a Japanese girl I did not BUT my son did three beautiful boys

The whole thing was crazy. Today USE DRONES NOT YOUNG MEN, what a waste that all was

carlr144 on December 10, 2012 at 11:50 AM

One more comment I could not help myseelf
JANE FONDA What a disgrace I think she is a phony pig
What she did is treason and she should have gone to jail
BUT maybe because she is so stupid ???? what can I say
OR because of Henry ??? She should be forced (exiled) to go live in Vietnam

P— on her

carlr144 on December 10, 2012 at 11:56 AM

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