Videos: Rubio, Ryan lay out vision for future of GOP

posted at 1:51 pm on December 5, 2012 by Ed Morrissey

Two of the rising stars in the Republican Party combined last night to deliver a vision of the future for the GOP, and to stake their claims as leaders who can deliver it.  Paul Ryan introduced Marco Rubio at the Jack Kemp Leadership Award Dinner in Washington DC, and both men stressed the need to find ways to make conservative policies as well as principles relevant to all voters — just as Jack Kemp himself attempted to do.  CNN reported on the remarks this morning:

The Daily Caller’s Alexis Levinson reported on both speeches, and noted that Rubio got specific as well as philosophical in his approach to middle- and working class voters:

The Florida senator identified two specific problems that he said need solving: The “American economy is not creating enough jobs,” and Americans do not have the skills necessary to do many of the jobs that are available.

In the immediate future, Rubio said, Congress and the White House need to reach an agreement to avert the fiscal cliff that includes a plan to pay down the national debt, reform entitlements like Medicare, simplify the tax code and avoid raising tax rates.

High tax rates, Rubio said, would only hurt small businesses and the middle class. 

To spur economic growth, Rubio proposed decreasing “excessive regulation,” increasing domestic energy production and introducing a “predictable monetary policy.”

Rubio proposed a health care system with a Flexible Savings Account in the mold of Congress’s health plan, which “allows families to save tax free money to pay for medical bills.”

The government, Rubio said, should “expand the number of community health centers, as well as work with hospitals to find the best way to integrate them with their emergency rooms to try and get non-life threatening walk-ins to seek treatment there.”

To ensure that Americans are adequately prepared to enter the workforce, Rubio proposed “state level curriculum reform and new investment in continuing teacher training” to improve elementary and secondary schools, school choice as a means of getting kids out of failing public schools and expanded technical and vocational education.

I’ve written about the need to get specific as part of a more energetic outreach to working-class voters.  These are excellent entrées to that effort.  Matched with permanent organizational efforts in the cities that focus on issues to which those voters can relate, this can be a powerful direction for Republicans over the next several years.

Ryan called for a change of thinking in the GOP about how to approach policy as well as voters:

“Both parties tend to divide Americans into ‘our voters’ and ‘their voters,’” Ryan said. “But Republicans must steer far clear of that trap. We must speak to the aspirations and anxieties of every American.”

“I believe we can turn the engines of upward mobility back on, so that no one is left out from the promise of America,” he said.

Ryan said welfare reform in the 1990s reduced dependency and helped people “shape their own destiny.”

The problem now, Ryan said, is that instead of applying a similar model, “we’re still trying to measure compassion by how much we spend – not by how many people we help.”

That model is evidently not working, Ryan said, because “today, 46 million people are living in poverty.”

“We need a vision for bringing opportunity into every life – one that promotes strong families, secure livelihoods, and an equal chance for every American to fulfill their highest aspirations for themselves and their children.” …

The GOP, Ryan said, needs to work on better articulating its ideology.

“We have a compassionate vision based on ideas that work,” he said, “but sometimes we don’t do a good job of laying out that vision. We need to do better.”

Politico’s James Hohmann also noticed the level of detail in Rubio’s speech:

He sought instead to position himself as a substantive, detail-oriented senator, using the phrase “middle class” 34 times in a 30-minute speech packed with a laundry list of ideas to create jobs and opportunity. [Read the full text of Rubio’s speech.]

“Big government has never been able to create and sustain a vibrant and stable middle class,” he said.

Ryan focused on the very poor, used the word “poverty” 15 times in his own 20-minute speech. Rubio used it only once. [Read the full text of Ryan’s speech.]

“When Lyndon Johnson launched the War on Poverty in 1964, he predicted we would eliminate poverty in 35 to 50 years. Here we are, 48 years later, and poverty is winning,” the congressman said.

Hugh Hewitt points out the Catholic connection — and the Catholic approach from both men:

In addition to immigration reform, this Catholic log jam also suggests an emphasis on religious liberty, and not just in the U.S. but abroad and especially in places like Egypt where the emerging Islamist domination calls for the U.S. to insist on the protection of religious minorities as a condition of aid.

Mitt Romney did not win the Catholic vote in November, a consequence of the loss of three out of every four Latino Catholic votes.

Review Marco Rubio’s “fact sheet” for his speech last night. (Very wise to make this available online, btw.  Good practice pointer for future conservative speech makers.)  This is not a “social gospel” per se, but it is close to being a legislative expression of the theological values embedded in much of Catholic social teaching.

The Democrats have become fully and completely the party of big and very secular government, the GOP the party of individuals and religious faith, protected from that state.  The good news is that the GOP as the young superstars.  The bad news is the Demcorats have the purse strings.

The two men have gotten off to a good start.  Let’s see if the rest of the GOP can follow.

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Two young, one arrogant, chaps. Meh!

Schadenfreude on December 5, 2012 at 1:53 PM

Ryan helped with the conservatives’ purge from the budget committee, and supports Boehner’s nonsense from the last few days.

To Hell with both! And Rubio too!

Schadenfreude on December 5, 2012 at 1:54 PM

With the atmosphere here today I’m expecting
this page to burn like flash paper !

Lucano on December 5, 2012 at 1:55 PM

Since Ryan and Rubio are to be blamed for the fiscal cliff, their careers are over…

/

Khun Joe on December 5, 2012 at 1:58 PM

Down with Rubio and the also ran, Oh yeah Ryan.

ChunkyLover on December 5, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Little evidence supports Obama’s pitch that taxing highest earners will cut deficit
http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2012/12/05/little-evidence-supports-obama-pitch-that-taxing-highest-earners-will-cut/

Economists point to then-British Prime Minister Gordon Brown’s proposal in April 2010 to increase the marginal tax rate by 10 percent — to 50 percent — on residents earning more than $1 million. As a consequence, the number of people declaring that amount of income or more dropped from 16,000 to 6,000 in the 2010-2011 tax year, according to Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs, the United Kingdom’s tax collection agency.

“Obama’s main goal in the fiscal cliff negotiations is to impose a class-warfare tax hike,” said Daniel J. Mitchell, a fiscal policy expert at the Cato Institute, a Washington-based, libertarian think tank. “When you’re trying to stick it to the ‘rich,’ you need to understand that they have tremendous control over the timing, level and composition of their income. So unlike the rest of us, they can respond very easily when the government goes after them.”

Galt2009 on December 5, 2012 at 1:59 PM

It won’t be long before an idiot comes along and makes the erroneous assertion that Rubio cannot be President legally – a point that deserves to be ignored.

However, before the bashing gets started in earnest, let me ask: isn’t it a little early to start the circular firing squad for 2016? You know, the one that took out every serious challenger to Romney last year? Yeah, that one.

DRayRaven on December 5, 2012 at 2:00 PM

We really need to talk about spending cuts on the federal level. You cannot convince me that every depart couldn’t take a 10% decrease (not of the rate of increase) and help everyone. I don’t think those conferences in exotic places are the exception and there is more of that kind of stuff that needs to go. Tell the department what their budget cut is and don’t give them the power of getting rid of employees and we would be amazed at the amount of garbage they have in their budgets and is expendable.

Cindy Munford on December 5, 2012 at 2:00 PM

The GOP has a great bench – great depth.

My only thought – MORE WOMEN !!!!

More WOMEN – MORE WOMEN – MORE WOMEN

jake-the-goose on December 5, 2012 at 2:01 PM

Amnesty is the new Conservative and you will like it, you racist rednecks!

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 2:01 PM

Too little, too late.

Like doing CPR on a corpse that had lain in the desert for a decade or two.

The Party of Lincoln, Goldwater and Reagan is deceased.

Both Rubio and Ryan, while differently qualified, might consider lending their efforts to building a third and fourth party in America.

It would serve better our Nation.

coldwarrior on December 5, 2012 at 2:01 PM

DRayRaven on December 5, 2012 at 2:00 PM

If he starts gaining traction, I expect to see this in the courts. It will deplete him of time and money to fight it.

Cindy Munford on December 5, 2012 at 2:01 PM

We need a TRUE Conservative (not these two), to lead the party.

PALIN 2016

ChuckTX on December 5, 2012 at 2:02 PM

Galt2009 on December 5, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Im sorry but for the average Obama voter yours going to need to make a cartoon version of that article, and dont make it too high brow like looney toons.

ChunkyLover on December 5, 2012 at 2:02 PM

Ryan quote from the headlines:

“When 40 percent of all children born into the lowest income quintile never rise above it, what does it say about our country?” the chairman of the House Budget Committee asked at the Kemp Foundation Leadership Award Dinner at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. He argued that schools, families and communities are not doing a good enough job in providing a path out of poverty and that the economy “is failing to provide basic security, much less rising wages.” …

“Americans are a compassionate people. And there’s a consensus in this country about our obligations to the most vulnerable. Those obligations are beyond dispute. The real debate is how best we can meet them. It’s whether they are better met by private groups or by government – by voluntary action or by government action. The truth is, there has to be a balance.”

So apparently he also conceded the basic liberal argument that culture and society, family and communities are no longer able or responsible for dealing with life – we now require a federal government to intercede? What ‘balance’ can be had when by definition an empowered federal government requires a shrunken civil society in which families and the community operate?

I think getting more specific is a good idea and explaining to people how your ideas and policies will benefit them are a good idea but we need to embrace conservative principles and not dilute them with progressivism.

gwelf on December 5, 2012 at 2:02 PM

The problem right now is that aside from the us vs. them Dem/Rep thing, the Democrats are doing a pretty good job of putting up issues that divide the Republicans. We have the center and right factions of the party going at each other. We have a lot of knuckleheads saying things like “I’m going independent or libertarian” which just makes the Democrats crack a wide grin because that is exactly what they are trying to do.

We need to temper the emotions a bit and think in a more strategic manner. We are in a position where if the faction to the right gets their way, we could win a battle but lose the war. We could send the economy over the cliff but then be swept out of the House in 2014 because of it. Telling people that you just threw them out of work on ideological principle and that it’s for their own good doesn’t scale well at the ballot box.

What we need to do is find some deal that both sides will accept for now, probably one that neither side really likes, but that the Democrats can own. This “fiscal cliff” was constructed by the Democrats. What the people probably need right now is a belly full of Democrat policy in order to finally understand just how bad it is.

crosspatch on December 5, 2012 at 2:03 PM

If this “vision” includes amnesty, then there is no future for the GOP. Or America as a free country.

Not that it is now.

Rebar on December 5, 2012 at 2:04 PM

I wish them a lot of luck–they are going to need it. The demographic tidal wave already in place will probably not run its course for another 20-30 years. Short of a complete breakdown in the economy and civil society there is no way that any Repub message will resonate with Blacks and Hispanics. Combine that with the Jewish and Muslim vote and Repubs have very little chance–especially on the national level. These facts have even led the Brookings Institute to mention that Dems won’t even need marginal white votes to control most elections going forward. Repubs are being relegated to the back benches where they previously sat for over 60 years during the 20th century. It is what it is.

patrick neid on December 5, 2012 at 2:07 PM

Good words. Now let’s see their actions to help prevent Boehner from caving.

beatcanvas on December 5, 2012 at 2:08 PM

Amnesty is the new Conservative and you will like it, you racist rednecks!

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 2:01 PM

Yep, pretty much. And amnesty will ensure an even quicker death of the GOP, which may be a good thing in the end. Hispanics are not going to vote Republican. Period. End of discussion. As Heather McDonald said, it’s not immigration policy that creates the strong bond between Hispanics and the Democratic party, the the core Democratic principles of a more generous safety net, strong government intervention in the economy and progressive taxation.

TxAnn56 on December 5, 2012 at 2:09 PM

I see where John Stewart made a big deal about the “white” guys in GOP leadership. Interesting thing to complain about when they beat up women and people of color who are in the GOP. Just can’t win for losing.

Cindy Munford on December 5, 2012 at 2:10 PM

Wouldn’t it be great if we had an example to show how conservative principles of low taxes, less regulation, and energy production actually work to produce a growing economy and jobs? Don’t we have a few of those states?

monalisa on December 5, 2012 at 2:11 PM

it’s not immigration policy that creates the strong bond between Hispanics and the Democratic party, the but the core Democratic principles of a more generous safety net, strong government intervention in the economy and progressive taxation.

TxAnn56 on December 5, 2012 at 2:09 PM

Fixed.

TxAnn56 on December 5, 2012 at 2:12 PM

I wish them both well in their party’s politics.

Mr. Arrogant on December 5, 2012 at 2:13 PM

The two men have gotten off to a good start. Let’s see if the rest of the GOP can follow.

LOL, oh my goodness, how many times have I heard that or something like it re: the GOP in the last 20 years?

This coming in the context of Boehner purging conservatives from positions of meaning as well.

Sorry, if these guys are strategically laying a course for leadership of the GOP, they’re polishing the brass on the Titanic while Obama re-arranges the deck chairs.

I’m 49; in my recollection, the GOP has – post Reagan – consistently come to me asking for my conservative vote, then told me to f@#$ off – until they wanted to ask for my vote again.

Until *Boehner*, McCain, etc are themselves ‘purged’, the GOP may want to continue the afore-mentioned cycle, but I will not be participating in it.

Midas on December 5, 2012 at 2:14 PM

Thanks Republicans your spineless completely spineless, next to you a jelly fish has more spine than you do.

ChunkyLover on December 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM

What the heck is going on? Ryan and Rubio are now not good enough? I see people promoting a one term congressman from Florida who just lost(who I like) to run for President in 2016. Losing sucks, but don’t allow yourselves to go completely off the rails.

Donald Draper on December 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM

In fact house Republicans why dont you just pack up and leave congress for all the good you are.

ChunkyLover on December 5, 2012 at 2:16 PM

Both parties tend to divide Americans into ‘our voters’ and ‘their voters,’” Ryan said. “But Republicans must steer far clear of that trap. We must speak to the aspirations and anxieties of every American.

I can’t help but think that Ryan’s tossing his former running-mate under the bus, alluding to the oh-so-terrible “47%” comments. Which is absolutely appropriate, after Romney went to that lunch / kowtowing ceremony with That One.

Mr. Prodigy on December 5, 2012 at 2:17 PM

Telling people that you just threw them out of work on ideological principle and that it’s for their own good doesn’t scale well at the ballot box.

crosspatch on December 5, 2012 at 2:03 PM

Unless… you’re Obama and Democrats, I guess? That’s what they’ve been doing, and are openly saying they’re about to do, and yet… the GOP gets blamed for it?

Midas on December 5, 2012 at 2:17 PM

Galt2009 on December 5, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Im sorry but for the average Obama voter yours going to need to make a cartoon version of that article, and dont make it too high brow like looney toons.

ChunkyLover on December 5, 2012 at 2:02 PM

Yeah, with an animated condom and pretty pictures.

Galt2009 on December 5, 2012 at 2:18 PM

ChuckTX on December 5, 2012 at 2:02 PM

I like Palin a lot, but you’re saying Ryan isn’t a conservative? Not as conservative as me maybe, but c’mon!

Fenris on December 5, 2012 at 2:19 PM

http://conservatives4palin.com/2012/12/governor-palin-cmon-now-gop-dont-go-wobbly-on-us.html

Governor Palin: C’mon Now, GOP, Don’t Go Wobbly on Us

Posted on December 04 2012 – 12:42 PM – Posted by:Stacy Drake | Follow Stacy on Twitter!

Via Facebook:

Please read and pass along this article. We send good conservatives to D.C. to fulfill the promises they made to the electorate, and yet when they stay true to their word the permanent political class in their own party punishes them. This won’t be forgotten come 2014. Right now the GOP establishment is more concerned about the opinion of the media and the Georgetown cocktail circuit than they are “we the people” who hired them. For all this new talk of how the GOP needs a “populist movement,” it would do them good to remember they already have one; it’s called the Tea Party movement, and it won for them the majority they now enjoy in the House.

- Sarah Palin

http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Government/2012/12/03/Boehner-GOP-leaders-purge-conservatives-from-powerful-House-committees

Notice that Hotair no longer quotes Palin. Did this site turn into a version of the House ‘leadership’?

We need a TRUE Conservative to lead the party.

PALIN 2016

ChuckTX on December 5, 2012 at 2:19 PM

What the heck is going on? Ryan and Rubio are now not good enough? I see people promoting a one term congressman from Florida who just lost(who I like) to run for President in 2016. Losing sucks, but don’t allow yourselves to go completely off the rails.

Donald Draper on December 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM

THEY ARE GOOD ENOUGH! AND THEY ARE BOTH SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO DREAMY. AND I READ ON THIS VERY SITE THAT ROMNEY WAS GONNA WAIT TILL THE FINAL WEEKS TO DROP THE BOMB ON BARRY, AND THEN IT WAS ALL GONNA BE OVER FOR HIM AND WE COULD ALL REST EASLIY AFTER THAT CUZ ROMNEY WAS AWESOME AND NEWT SUCKED CUZ HE HAD AN AFFAIR AND WAS A BIG OL’ MEANIE…..

GhoulAid on December 5, 2012 at 2:19 PM

I guess they’re not deriding half of the population as moochers enough for some of you guys.

lostmotherland on December 5, 2012 at 2:20 PM

What the heck is going on? Ryan and Rubio are now not good enough?

Donald Draper on December 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM

Did you read the speeches? Heavy on social justice, redistribution of wealth and amnesty with a verry misguided strategy of buying votes from Catholic Hispanics. You think it’ll work?

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 2:21 PM

Two progressives the moderates in our party declare to be conservative in order to move the party to the left.

astonerii on December 5, 2012 at 2:23 PM

I guess they’re not deriding half of the population as moochers enough for some of you guys.

lostmotherland on December 5, 2012 at 2:20 PM

Awwwwww.. what wrong? Does the truth hurt too much for you?

Tell me – how do you avoid the death spiral of looter’s stealing from their fellow citizens?

How can that possibly work?

Galt2009 on December 5, 2012 at 2:26 PM

I guess they’re not deriding half of the population as moochers enough for some of you guys.

lostmotherland on December 5, 2012 at 2:20 PM

Yeah, I should always choose the doctors who are too politically sensitive to tell me the diagnose.

Archivarix on December 5, 2012 at 2:30 PM

Did you read the speeches? Heavy on social justice, redistribution of wealth and amnesty with a verry misguided strategy of buying votes from Catholic Hispanics. You think it’ll work?

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 2:21 PM

I’m not sure that you read the speeches. From Ryan:

With a few exceptions, government’s approach has been to expand bureaucracy and spend lots of money on bloated, top-down anti-poverty programs.

The mindset at work here is that a nation should measure compassion by how much it spends – by the sheer size of its government.

The problem is, starting in the 1960s, this approach created a debilitating culture of dependency. It wrecked families and tore communities apart. This was so obvious to everyone that when we reformed welfare in the 1990s, the law was passed by a Republican Congress and signed by a Democratic president.

And what happened? Welfare enrollment dropped dramatically. Millions of people gained new lives of independence. Child-poverty rates fell over 20 percent in four years. And more single mothers found jobs. Fewer welfare checks going out meant more money for states to spend on child care, so more moms could go to work and support themselves.

What exactly is your problem with that?

beatcanvas on December 5, 2012 at 2:30 PM

My vision of the future of the GOP led me to re-register NPV (Non-Party Voter).

UODuckMan on December 5, 2012 at 2:30 PM

There is no such thing as “their” voters. The Democrat party is made up of moochers, takers, and other parasites that are bleeding society dry with their greed and selfishness. I hate them all and am not in the mood with making nice to a bunch of people who have no redeeming value to society.

Happy Nomad on December 5, 2012 at 2:30 PM

The GOP has a great bench – great depth.

My only thought – MORE WOMEN !!!!

More WOMEN – MORE WOMEN – MORE WOMEN

jake-the-goose on December 5, 2012 at 2:01 PM

You mean like Kelly “There’s no US anymore” Ayotte, or her mentor Susan “I’ll miss my twin” Collins?

Steve Eggleston on December 5, 2012 at 2:31 PM

I listen to these politicians who are the “future” of
the Republican Party, and all I hear is back peddling,
apologetic scolding of ourselves.

I seem to recall, in 2004 immediately after the re-election
of George W. Bush, the Democrats went all in to the LEFT.
They doubled down on their attacks and did not budge on
Policy. What happened? Why they clobbered Republicans
in 2006, and 2008. That’s what happened.

But we are supposed to Moderate our policy positions further.

Jesus H. Christ, these people are pathetic.

ToddPA on December 5, 2012 at 2:31 PM

I guess they’re not deriding half of the population as moochers enough for some of you guys.

lostmotherland on December 5, 2012 at 2:20 PM

You’re wrong. It’s more than half. It’s the land of the majority of fools. Obama lives it up, at your expense, fools. He laughs his half black azz off at you.

Starve the Looters, in turn the stupid moochers.

Schadenfreude on December 5, 2012 at 2:33 PM

I guess they’re not deriding half of the population as moochers enough for some of you guys.

lostmotherland on December 5, 2012 at 2:20 PM

No. But entitlements are bankrupting our country at the federal and state and local level. Ryan and Rubio talk about the need for a safety net for those who are unable to care for themselves and for those who cannot get back on their own feet etc and that welfare should promote self-reliance and discourage dependency but they don’t address the fact that Democrats are always redefining what counts as poverty and constantly trying to expand the number of people who qualify for government hand outs. They both know we have serious financial issues facing us that taxation cannot fix and this needs to be part of their message. They talk about the need for reforming entitlements but also that a more powerful federal government doesn’t solve the problem and that ultimately these problems can only and are best be dealt with by families and communities closest to those needing help. Instead of distinguishing themselves from the typical progressive drivel they seem to be trying to co-opt it.

gwelf on December 5, 2012 at 2:33 PM

I guess they’re not deriding half of the population as moochers enough for some of you guys.

lostmotherland on December 5, 2012 at 2:20 PM

So are you suggesting that anybody who supported Obama is not a moocher, taker, or parasite? Seriously, you’ll have to prove that they contribute to society in some manner before I see them anything more than botched abortions. They are a greedy and selfish blight on this planet. I’ll be damned if I treat them as human beings. Instead I’ll show them all the respect they’ve shown by their words and actions.

Happy Nomad on December 5, 2012 at 2:34 PM

Welcome to AmeriKa

Schadenfreude on December 5, 2012 at 2:36 PM

What exactly is your problem with that?

beatcanvas on December 5, 2012 at 2:30 PM

I think that overall Ryan and Rubio do a good job of talking about good policy solutions but I think they run into some trouble when they use the same language as liberals and touch on ‘points of agreement’. When liberals talk about welfare and entitlement they see it as a system of redistribution and a way of life while conservatives who think there should be some form of a safety net view it only as meant to help the truly destitute (and not 20-50% of the population). I’d also argue that a truly conservative perspective would want the federal government out of the welfare business altogether and leave it to the states and municipalities.

gwelf on December 5, 2012 at 2:37 PM

What the heck is going on? Ryan and Rubio are now not good enough?

Donald Draper on December 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM

Not when they are pandering to the moochers and takers. The GOP is supposed to stand on principles not trying to out Santa Claus the left. It’s one thing to talk about improving failing schools it is another thing entirely to whine about the inherent inequities in inner-city school systems. That’s talking like a filthy Democrat.

Happy Nomad on December 5, 2012 at 2:38 PM

The Florida senator identified two specific problems that he said need solving: The “American economy is not creating enough jobs,” and Americans do not have the skills necessary to do many of the jobs that are available.

Rubio is clueless. The skill gap is bull, and I’m getting tired of clueless leaders. Don’t believe me? Want someone who runs a blog to say it? Fine here it is:

Skills Don’t Pay the Bills

The above columnists express widely believed economic hooey.

In contrast, Adam Davidson, in his New York Times column, Skills Don’t Pay the Bills, precisely summarizes the problem in four deep thoughts.

Deep Thoughts

There is no skills gap.
Who will operate a highly sophisticated machine for $10 an hour?
Not a lot of people.
As a result, there is going to be a skills gap.

Read more at http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/2012/11/obama-to-close-skills-gap-where-how-why.html#E9oKp7t1ZWj7rM5b.99

Be sure not to miss this link from the article.

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 2:38 PM

Ryan and Rubio talk about the need for a safety net for those who are unable to care for themselves and for those who cannot get back on their own feet etc and that welfare should promote self-reliance and discourage dependency but they don’t address the fact that Democrats are always redefining what counts as poverty and constantly trying to expand the number of people who qualify for government hand outs.
gwelf on December 5, 2012 at 2:33 PM


From Ryan’s speech
:

Here’s the problem: We haven’t applied the welfare-reform mindset with equal vigor across the spectrum of anti-poverty programs. In most cases, we’re still trying to measure compassion by how much we spend – not by how many people we help.

Just last year, total federal and state spending on means-tested programs came to more than one trillion dollars. What does that mean in practical terms? For that amount of money, you could give every poor American a check for $22,000. Instead, we spent all that money trying to fight poverty through government programs.

What do we have to show for it? Today, 46 million people are living in poverty. During the last four years, the number of people on food stamps has gone up by 15 million.Medicaid is reaching a breaking point. And one out of every four students fails to earn a high-school diploma. In our major cities, half of our kids don’t graduate. Half.

When Lyndon Johnson launched the War on Poverty in 1964, he predicted we would eliminate poverty in 35 to 50 years. Here we are, 48 years later, and poverty is winning. We deserve better.

youngTXcon on December 5, 2012 at 2:39 PM

youngTXcon on December 5, 2012 at 2:39 PM

Thanks for pointing that out.

gwelf on December 5, 2012 at 2:43 PM

I hear a lot of government-is-the-solution rhetoric in those speeches, but Rubio in particular.

That model is evidently not working, Ryan said, because “today, 46 million people are living in poverty.”

!? Really?

Dongemaharu on December 5, 2012 at 2:45 PM

Notice that Hotair no longer quotes Palin. Did this site turn into a version of the House ‘leadership’?

We need a TRUE Conservative to lead the party.

PALIN 2016

ChuckTX on December 5, 2012 at 2:19 PM

thanks for posting her Wobbly facebook commentary.

One of my favorite Palin quotes from CPAC.

“these folks campaign on going to DC to clean up
the cesspool…then they get there and decide
it’s a HotTub.”

Brutal comment.

ToddPA on December 5, 2012 at 2:45 PM

Here’s the problem: We haven’t applied the welfare-reform mindset with equal vigor across the spectrum of anti-poverty programs. In most cases, we’re still trying to measure compassion by how much we spend – not by how many people we help.

youngTXcon on December 5, 2012 at 2:39 PM

I am for doing good to the poor, but I differ in opinion of the means. I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. In my youth I travelled much, and I observed in different countries, that the more public provisions were made for the poor, the less they provided for themselves, and of course became poorer. And, on the contrary, the less was done for them, the more they did for themselves, and became richer.

Ben Franklin

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 2:48 PM

Ryan and Rubio talk about the need for a safety net for those who are unable to care for themselves and for those who cannot get back on their own feet etc and that welfare should promote self-reliance and discourage dependency but they don’t address the fact that Democrats are always redefining what counts as poverty and constantly trying to expand the number of people who qualify for government hand outs.
gwelf on December 5, 2012 at 2:33 PM

From Rubio’s speech:

Government has a role to play. And we must make sure it does its part. But it’s a supporting role: to help create the conditions that enable prosperity in our private economy. That’s a crucial role but a necessarily limited one. It can’t substitute for what it is meant to enable– a thriving free economy. It is not the ever expanding reach of government, but rather having access to the benefits of thriving economy that allows the poor to rise into the middle class. Not by making rich people poorer, but by making poor people richer.

To do that we need a limited and effective government. And you can’t have one without the other. Big government is not effective government. Big government has never worked. The promise of more government as the answer to all our problems is easy to sell. But when it is put in practice, it fails every time. Big government has never been able to create and sustain a vibrant and stable middle class.

If any people on earth should know that, it is us. For most of us, we need to look no further than our own communities to see where the answers to our challenges lie. It starts with strong and stable families. It continues with a vibrant civil society filled with people working together to improve their country, and with a thriving free enterprise economy that creates good paying jobs and can draw upon people with the skills to do those jobs.

Government’s role is to support those institutions and policies that strengthen the family and the community. To implement pro-growth policies that support a vibrant free enterprise economy that creates middle class jobs. And to provide access to schools that teach our people the skills they need to fill those jobs.

youngTXcon on December 5, 2012 at 2:49 PM

The problem is that the country is very much divided among ‘our voters’ and ‘their voters’… the latter outnumbering us by five million or so votes.

One side (generally) believes in big government, central economic planning, punitive redistribution, environmentalism, unionization, gay marriage, gun control, subsidized and unlimited abortion-on-demand, progressive taxation, hyper regulation. And that’s just domestic policy.

The other side (generally)believes in self-government, entrepreneurial capitalism, the traditional definition of marriage family, enforcement of immigration laws, full bore 2nd Amendment, at least some restriction on abortion as birth control, limited government under the constitution, individual responsibility, etc.

These views are not reconcilable. That our reps are constantly having to invoke “the middle class” explains why we’ve already lost the rhetorical battle.

SAMinVA on December 5, 2012 at 2:55 PM

Ryan, rubio Yawn!!!!

Danielvito on December 5, 2012 at 2:59 PM

The GOP has a great bench – great depth.

My only thought – MORE WOMEN !!!!

More WOMEN – MORE WOMEN – MORE WOMEN

jake-the-goose on December 5, 2012 at 2:01 PM

Palin/Noem 2016 and men will vote as many times as their little blue pill will allow.

Nutstuyu on December 5, 2012 at 2:59 PM

Government has a role to play. And we must make sure it does its part. But it’s a supporting role: to help create the conditions that enable prosperity in our private economy.

Politicians would do well to learn from sports. The government should be in two roles: groundskeeper and umpire. One makes sure the playing field is level and meets the fairness standards of every team, the latter makes sure the rules are followed. But you never see either group actually playing the game.

Nutstuyu on December 5, 2012 at 3:01 PM

Haters much… Two really good speeches…

Here are some thoughts.

1. Yes.. Ryan was addressing the infamous 47% with our voters and their voters. However, he did so in a way that didn’t dump on Romney. He did go out of his way to praise Romney quite a bit. The indictment was more general. Much more effective than some of the ways that other R figures have addressed it (Jindal?)

2. Any good diners in NH and IA? Hee.

3. Both men are running in 2016 and they aren’t even being coy about it. Losses lead to our greatest victories indeed.

4. Ryan probably did approve the purge of the Budget Committee, which I’m perfectly fine with. Ot was politically tone deaf for the members in question to vote against the Chairman’s pet bill, which he is using to further his political career.

Illinidiva on December 5, 2012 at 3:02 PM

Notice that Hotair no longer quotes Palin. Did this site turn into a version of the House ‘leadership’?

We need a TRUE Conservative to lead the party.

PALIN 2016

ChuckTX on December 5, 2012 at 2:19 PM

thanks for posting her Wobbly facebook commentary.

One of my favorite Palin quotes from CPAC.

“these folks campaign on going to DC to clean up
the cesspool…then they get there and decide
it’s a HotTub.”

Brutal comment.

ToddPA on December 5, 2012 at 2:45 PM

PALIN/NOEM 2016.

FIFY.

BUCK FARACK.

Nutstuyu on December 5, 2012 at 3:03 PM

You’re wrong. It’s more than half. It’s the land of the majority of fools. Obama lives it up, at your expense, fools. He laughs his half black azz off at you.

Starve the Looters, in turn the stupid moochers.

Schadenfreude on December 5, 2012 at 2:33 PM

The comments of either of these guys beats those of the last campaign*.

From the definition of campaign in Wikki: . Most campaigns prefer to keep the message broad in order to attract the most potential voters.

Offhand, I would say it is harder to get elected when you put down half of the voters.

More than that, it wasn’t a reasoned comment about the better way being capitalism and real jobs and production against living like cattle under gov’t care.

Then we had the genius of foreign accounts and a complete inability to explain how cutting taxes on dividends get people to invest so we can keep making the few items still produced in this nation.

I use and * as it is hard for me to describe the Republican effort in 2012 as a campaign. That word usually means movement toward goals and an aggressive posture.

From Wikipedia:

Ambiguity
Since a word marked with an asterisk could mean either “unattested” or “impossible”, it is important in some contexts to distinguish these meanings. In general, authors retain asterisk for “unattested”, and prefix ˣ, **, or a superscript “?” for the latter meaning.

IlikedAUH2O on December 5, 2012 at 3:04 PM

PALIN/NOEM 2016.

FIFY.

BUCK FARACK.

Nutstuyu on December 5, 2012 at 3:03 PM

Oh darn!

Former Governor Palin ran for POTUS in 2012 and I missed it. The bus was driving around too fast.

IlikedAUH2O on December 5, 2012 at 3:06 PM

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 2:48 PM

I am not seeing the contradiction. You need to look at the entire speech.

youngTXcon on December 5, 2012 at 3:07 PM

One side (generally) believes in big government, central economic planning, punitive redistribution, environmentalism, unionization, gay marriage, gun control, subsidized and unlimited abortion-on-demand, progressive taxation, hyper regulation. And that’s just domestic policy.

SAMinVA on December 5, 2012 at 2:55 PM

I believe your assumptions are all wrong. Look at what you just listed: socialism, environmentalism and a few other isms. Do you really think the average voter mulls over those concepts? You’re giving them way too much credit.

The GOP lost the NE white vote with their stance on off shoring of jobs. It’s simple math. The GOP is against entitlements and voted to get rid of their nice manufacturing jobs. What did you leave them? Hell, the GOP wants a smaller government so you’re even wanting to shrink the chance of getting a cushy government job. While the Democrats give lip service to made in the USA, support unions, and support big government(jobs). From a purely self interested point of view they offer everything and you offer nothing.

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 3:13 PM

Oh darn!

Former Governor Palin ran for POTUS in 2012 and I missed it. The bus was driving around too fast.

IlikedAUH2O on December 5, 2012 at 3:06 PM

awww.

Bluegill, you have a Playdate here.

ToddPA on December 5, 2012 at 3:13 PM

The government, Rubio said, should “expand the number of community health centers, as well as work with hospitals to find the best way to integrate them with their emergency rooms to try and get non-life threatening walk-ins to seek treatment there.”

This is conservative how?

The entire movement has lost its freaking mind.

ConservativeLA on December 5, 2012 at 3:14 PM

But Republicans must steer far clear of that trap.

Yet… here he is caught in the trap.

We need some better politicians. Ours are stupid.

faraway on December 5, 2012 at 3:15 PM

Not when they are pandering to the moochers and takers. The GOP is supposed to stand on principles not trying to out Santa Claus the left. It’s one thing to talk about improving failing schools it is another thing entirely to whine about the inherent inequities in inner-city school systems. That’s talking like a filthy Democrat.

Happy Nomad on December 5, 2012 at 2:38 PM

You MUST win before you can govern. End of story

Redford on December 5, 2012 at 3:16 PM

The problem is that the country is very much divided among ‘our voters’ and ‘their voters’… the latter outnumbering us by five million or so votes.

I think the problem is “their voters” get out to vote, and vote for their “gifts”. I can’t begin to tell you how many people I know that don’t vote, never have, and they don’t run in the taker category.

When you fail to give people a reason to vote for them, they don’t. Many look at politics/politicians as an incestuous group of power loving whores. Hard to argue when it’s been both the GOP and Dems that put the country on the edge of a 2,500 foot cliff over the past 20,30,40,50 years. It started with Johnson and it’s continued through every administration since.

As someone quoted Palin upthread “these folks campaign on going to DC to clean up the cesspool…then they get there and decide
it’s a HotTub.”

So true.

CTSherman on December 5, 2012 at 3:16 PM

I am absolutely astounded how quick some of us are to embrance a slightly smaller version of Big Government. Absolutely astounded.

Not sure if the Republican Party and its apologists have left me yet, but they’re certainly walking toward the door.

ConservativeLA on December 5, 2012 at 3:17 PM

What exactly is your problem with that?

beatcanvas on December 5, 2012 at 2:30 PM

No problem with reducing welfare. Ryan places too much credit in the 90′s. Instead, the primary credit for welfare reform should go to Reagan for the prosperous ’80s, campaigning heavily against welfare, and setting up the winning conservative coalition hostile to welfare.

Ryan’s explanations of history are also spotty and dangerous here

“When Lyndon Johnson launched the War on Poverty in 1964, he predicted we would eliminate poverty in 35 to 50 years. Here we are, 48 years later, and poverty is winning,”

This contradicts the Ryan you’d quoted earlier(that conservative governance for most of the past 40 years has led to prosperity) and is dangerous in giving in to the leftist worldview. Poverty is America is in no way “winning”. I’ve volunteered at quite a few housing projects and homeless shelters in Chicago, NY, and elsewhere. Poverty in 21st century America quite often involves obesity, Xboxes, and gleaming new schools. Most of our problems have to do with excess (drugs,fast food, well-funded teachers unions). This is because of the success of capitalism (duh), American’s enormous charity, and, oh, mostly conservative governance for the previous 40 years. Now that Obama and the liberals are set to destroy America as we know it… Rubio and Ryan concede the liberal worldview (social justice) because they think it’ll buy a few votes from Hispanics. This is not conservative and will inevitably fail because they’re destroying what’s left of the Reagan coalition in their mad scrambling. For reasons TexAnn points out above, Hispanics will not vote R in exchange for amnesty.

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 3:20 PM

Hispanics will not vote R in exchange for amnesty.

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 3:20 PM

They certainly didn’t in California after the last amnesty that was given to them by a Republican president. You’d think that if that strategy could have worked then California would be voting GOP by now.

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 3:24 PM

Im sorry but for the average Obama voter yours going to need to make a cartoon version of that article, and dont make it too high brow like looney toons.

ChunkyLover on December 5, 2012 at 2:02 PM

Even then, if the cartoon version is not presented on dancing with the stars, they’ll never see it.

Alabama Infidel on December 5, 2012 at 3:31 PM

3. Both men are running in 2016 and they aren’t even being coy about it. Losses lead to our greatest victories indeed.

And when they do run, they will have to figure out how to conquer the mighty “Get Out the Vote” machine (i.e., massive voter fraud) of the left, the complicit media that will brand both of them mean/stupid/sexist/hateful, and the influence of conservative-hating GOP consultants who don’t have our best interests at heart anymore than the Marxist left does.

That is, if there’s a country left by 2016 and/or actual free elections by then.

Right Mover on December 5, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Ryan looks conservative, compared to Boehner and most of the other RINOs in congress. But he is a team player and our team’s primary objective is to give the other side what they want and still keep their jobs.

As for Rubio, anyone who thinks that giving citizenship to 30 million low skilled illiterate illegal aliens will help the GOP, should join the democrat party.

Alabama Infidel on December 5, 2012 at 3:47 PM

The Land of Oz

Schadenfreude on December 5, 2012 at 3:52 PM

I think it’s hilarious how Paul Ryan, one half of an embarrassingly ineffective ticket against the most beatable Dem incumbent in a century, and who really did nothing to help that ticket, is still talked up as a “rising star”. I seem to recall that Sarah Palin was dismissed as damaged goods with zero political future even before the votes were counted in 2008.

Sorry, people aren’t going to be force-fed any more smorgasbord of “rising GOP stars”.

ddrintn on December 5, 2012 at 3:55 PM

By the way, is Rubio starting to do the combover thing? That’s fatal right there.

ddrintn on December 5, 2012 at 3:59 PM

And when they do run, they will have to figure out how to conquer the mighty “Get Out the Vote” machine (i.e., massive voter fraud) of the left, the complicit media that will brand both of them mean/stupid/sexist/hateful, and the influence of conservative-hating GOP consultants who don’t have our best interests at heart anymore than the Marxist left does.
Right Mover on December 5, 2012 at 3:43 PM

We always see clear examples of democrat voter fraud, but we never go after them for it. Think for a moment if RR had won with the exact same number of votes and the same percentages in the close states. No way the democrat would have accepted the results. They would have quickly found a federal judge to certify the results invalid in the close states. And they would have recounted until they had enough to steal the election. Remember Norm Coleman?

And the headlines would read: “We’re in our 28th day of riots across the country, with no let up in sight”.

Alabama Infidel on December 5, 2012 at 4:03 PM

HEY … MARCO, … PAUL … try this:
.

Government (programs) isn’t the solution to the problem, Government (programs) IS the problem.

.
The last politician that used that message, did pretty well.

listens2glenn on December 5, 2012 at 4:04 PM

The best thing I can say about Paul Ryan is that he isn’t a liberal RINO like Rubio. Just ’cause Ryan’s laying out a liberal vision for the GOP this time around doesn’t mean he won’t be a conservative in his next speech. The guy shaved an hour off his marathon time, he’ll just say whatever he thinks sounds good at the time.

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 4:08 PM

4. Ryan probably did approve the purge of the Budget Committee, which I’m perfectly fine with. Ot was politically tone deaf for the members in question to vote against the Chairman’s pet bill, which he is using to further his political career.

Illinidiva on December 5, 2012 at 3:02 PM

Oh, you didn’t get the memo. It is no longer important to have real conservatives as Chairmen of these powerful committees, it is more important to have backbench rookies on them that Sarah Palin likes.

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:11 PM

We always see clear examples of democrat voter fraud, but we never go after them for it.

Alabama Infidel on December 5, 2012 at 4:03 PM

Dems have played the vote fraud game for a long, long time, and Republicans have still managed to win elections. This is one of the four or five standard excuses heard every time some moderate GOPer predictably loses nationally. It’s similar to all the b1tching and moaning from Dems after 2004 about how Karl Rove bought and paid for all those votes in Ohio.

If the GOP would field a candidate that the base is excited about — a little more often than, say, once in a century — all these excuses would be irrelevant.

ddrintn on December 5, 2012 at 4:13 PM

You mean 2 RINOS vie for the future of the GOP?

Faramir on December 5, 2012 at 4:13 PM

This contradicts the Ryan you’d quoted earlier(that conservative governance for most of the past 40 years has led to prosperity) and is dangerous in giving in to the leftist worldview. Poverty is America is in no way “winning”. I’ve volunteered at quite a few housing projects and homeless shelters in Chicago, NY, and elsewhere. Poverty in 21st century America quite often involves obesity, Xboxes, and gleaming new schools. Most of our problems have to do with excess (drugs,fast food, well-funded teachers unions). This is because of the success of capitalism (duh), American’s enormous charity, and, oh, mostly conservative governance for the previous 40 years. Now that Obama and the liberals are set to destroy America as we know it… Rubio and Ryan concede the liberal worldview (social justice) because they think it’ll buy a few votes from Hispanics. This is not conservative and will inevitably fail because they’re destroying what’s left of the Reagan coalition in their mad scrambling. For reasons TexAnn points out above, Hispanics will not vote R in exchange for amnesty.

sauldalinsky on December 5, 2012 at 3:20 PM

$30 trillion has been spent on “anti-poverty” programs since 1964. But today we have more poor people than ever before. We have a majority of the country brainwashed to believe that making people a little bit more comfortable in that poverty woth a couple of handouts is more compassionate than getting them real jobs to get them out of poverty.

I’d say poverty is winning.

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:15 PM

You mean 2 RINOS vie for the future of the GOP?

Faramir on December 5, 2012 at 4:13 PM

Paul Ryan is a RINO now????

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:16 PM

4. Ryan probably did approve the purge of the Budget Committee, which I’m perfectly fine with. Ot was politically tone deaf for the members in question to vote against the Chairman’s pet bill, which he is using to further his political career.

Illinidiva on December 5, 2012 at 3:02 PM

Oh, you didn’t get the memo. It is no longer important to have real conservatives as Chairmen of these powerful committees, it is more important to have backbench rookies on them that Sarah Palin likes.

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:11 PM

Well, the memo read between the lines that it’s always ALWAYS “politically tone deaf” to do whatever the GOPe and its lackeys find distasteful and anything that might embarrass them in their dealing with the MSM, with whom they are continually engaged in suck-up, please-don’t-hurt me maneuvers. Funny how the arbiters of poltical tone-deafness are habitual political ineffectives at best, abject losers at worst.

ddrintn on December 5, 2012 at 4:20 PM

Paul Ryan is a RINO now????

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:16 PM

What was his vote on TARP? Now I suspect that Ryan is much more conservative, secretly, than he feels he can get away with in the NE, but that’s just a personal feeling.

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 4:22 PM

We have a majority of the country brainwashed to believe that making people a little bit more comfortable in that poverty woth a couple of handouts is more compassionate than getting them real jobs to get them out of poverty.

I’d say poverty is winning.

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:15 PM

From where to you plan to produce these jobs? I agree with your sentiment but you need to look at the other side and incorporate that into your position.

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 4:25 PM

.
The last politician that used that message, did pretty well.

listens2glenn on December 5, 2012 at 4:04 PM

In an electorate that was 85% white.

In 2016, no one under the age of 50 will have ever voted for Ronald Reagan, and almost none will have any recollection of how bad things were under Jimmy Carter.

It’s time to put Reagan to bed and recognize how much this country has changed. Republicans have lost the popular vote in 5 of the last 6 elections. If you can’t deal with that, then stop bitching while the next generation of leaders in the Republican Party tries to.

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:27 PM

I seem to recall that Sarah Palin was dismissed as damaged goods with zero political future even before the votes were counted in 2008.

ddrint

She is damaged goods with zero political future. What’s your point?

Sorry, people aren’t going to be force-fed any more smorgasbord of “rising GOP stars”.

ddrintn

And Palin still won’t get anywhere near the White House unless it’s a stop on her next bus tour.

xblade on December 5, 2012 at 4:28 PM

Paul Ryan is a RINO now????

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:16 PM

Schadenfreude on December 5, 2012 at 4:29 PM

Paul Ryan is a RINO now????

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:16 PM

What was his vote on TARP? Now I suspect that Ryan is much more conservative, secretly, than he feels he can get away with in the NE, but that’s just a personal feeling.

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 4:22 PM

Well, I think you mean upper-Midwest, but Ryan is a decent guy with some good ideas but no real record of accomplishing any sort of reform. I think I’m not alone in distrusting any list of pre-approved “rising stars” from the loser GOPe complex and its punditocracy appendages. Won’t work anymore. Sorry.

ddrintn on December 5, 2012 at 4:29 PM

1. Get over the whole voter fraud thing already. We lost fair and square.

2. If Conservatives want to win, they’d better address all of America and make your ideas to everyone. There is the Bobby Jindal way of doing it clumsily denouncing Romney after the election or the Paul Ryan way of doing it making it a broad statement about both parties. It’s intriguing because Ryan can easily point to Barry’s infamous bitter clingers remark.

Illinidiva on December 5, 2012 at 4:31 PM

From where to you plan to produce these jobs? I agree with your sentiment but you need to look at the other side and incorporate that into your position.

DFCtomm on December 5, 2012 at 4:25 PM

Not from government, and that’s what Ryan and Rubio are saying. Government needs to get the hell out of the way so the private economy can grow and people can get jobs to support themselves and get out of poverty. But we can’t sell that as an immediate and exclusive solution while millions are getting government checks and are scared of losing them. There has to be some transition, which can be handled in similar ways to how we did welfare reform in the 1990s – condition federal aid on working or getting training for a real job, and end benefits after a certain time so people know they have a safety net but not a hammock.

rockmom on December 5, 2012 at 4:32 PM

Where was Paul Ryan when conservative members of his own committee that he headed were purged off of it? Why is he silent? Because he is a “go along to get along” Republican and there’s no excuse for that – he could have stood up and said “no this is wrong, I’m not with you guys, we shouldn’t act like Stalinist Democrats”

‘Silent’ Paul

journeymike on December 5, 2012 at 4:34 PM

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