Missiles, missiles everywhere

posted at 6:51 pm on December 4, 2012 by J.E. Dyer

Back in 2007, when Vladimir Putin promised to rebuild Russia’s military and resume its activities on the world stage, Westerners were complacent.  Russia was an economic basket case, after all.  It would take years for modernization programs to kick in.  And even when they did, they would bring Russian capabilities to no more than what America already has.  Right?

That may be the case for some conventional forces.  But when it comes to “strategic” missiles – missiles used for the purpose of strategic intimidation – it’s 2012 now, and Russia is unquestionably ahead of the United States.  Not in terms of numbers, but in terms of missile capabilities.  The Russians have already fielded ICBMs that are better than anything we have.  These missiles present a much tougher target for our national ballistic-missile defense network than anything has before.  If they are launched against us – and certainly if they’re launched against anyone else – a lot of them are going to get through.

The missile tests popping up all over Asia should be seen in this light.  Everyone’s arming up, starting with Russia.  As we speak, Moscow is rearming missile units with Russia’s most advanced ICBM, the Yars missile, which was first tested in 2007.  The Topol-M missile, tested in 2004, is already deployed.

The US, by contrast, has not developed or tested a new long-range missile system since the Reagan administration.  The US Air Force conducted test launches of the Minuteman III ICBM in February and early March 2012 (the last test launch, in 2011, resulted in the missile being destroyed by the controllers in flight, due to a malfunction, rather than being allowed to proceed to splash-down).  The Minuteman III entered service in 1970.  The MX Peacekeeper ICBM was decommissioned in 2005.  The Navy’s Trident II D-5 ballistic missile, which entered service in 1990, was tested in March 2012.

The Russians plan to complete the modernization of five strategic rocket force units by the end of 2013.  Shortly before the US election, Russia held a big strategic exercise in which long-range missiles were launched from sea and shore.  Russia isn’t resting on her ICBM laurels either; besides putting the new Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) into service, she is developing a new ICBM with a huge, Cold War-style nuclear-payload capacity on a much improved missile body.

But in a very missile-choked continent, Russia is just the biggest kid on the block.  China has her own robust ICBM programs.  On 24 July, 2012, China conducted the first test of her newest ICBM, the DF-41, which can hit all of the United States.  The Chinese have also tested the DF-31A ICBM throughout 2012.  The DF-31A can hit much of (not all of) the United States.  The most recent test was on 30 November, which also happened to be the last day of a joint US-Chinese disaster-relief exercise in Chengdu.

India, with China and Pakistan to worry about, continues her own ballistic missile testing.  In April 2012, India tested the Agni-V, her most advanced ballistic missile, which, with a 3100 (statue) mile range, can reach most of China and all of Pakistan.

India also tested an interceptor missile in November 2012, claiming a successful intercept, although the type of target missile was not reported.

On 28 November, five days after India’s interceptor test and two days before China’s DF-31 test, Pakistan test-launched a Hatf-V medium-range ballistic missile, the newest in Islamabad’s family of nuclear-capable MRBMs.

And, of course, Iran is working hard on improving her MRBM inventory (and testing it to create alarm in the region).

So when you see that North Korea is preparing to launch a ballistic missile, keep in mind the character of the neighborhood.  Because of the danger presented by North Korea, the US and South Korea agreed in early October 2012 that Seoul would double the range of South Korea’s own ballistic missiles from the Hyunmoo series.  This is the kind of thing that would have gotten a lot more coverage if there were a different president in the Oval Office.

Japan is also concerned, of course.  Tokyo is deploying Patriot missile batteries and putting the armed forces on alert in preparation for Pyongyang’s launch.  It may not be long before Japan decides she wants her own ballistic missiles.  Having been capable of putting satellites in orbit for 40 years, the Japanese could develop and deploy ballistic missiles on a very short timeline.

Meanwhile, it’s being reported today that Iran stationed defense personnel in North Korea starting in October 2012.  The deployment of Iranians could well be related to the impending missile launch, but, of course, Iran and North Korea have been linked through their nuclear and missile programs for years.  The two nations signed an agreement on “scientific” cooperation in September 2012, something they hadn’t formally done before (and a signal that Iran isn’t taking Western sanctions seriously).

George W. Bush called them the Axis of Evil before it was cool.

J.E. Dyer’s articles have appeared at Hot Air, Commentary’s “contentions,Patheos, The Daily Caller, The Jewish Press, and The Weekly Standard online.

Her home blog is The Optimistic Conservative. She also writes for the new blog Liberty Unyielding


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Sometimes a missilie is just a missile, lady.

rayra on December 4, 2012 at 6:52 PM

As we speak, Moscow is rearming missile units with Russia’s most advanced ICBM, the Yars missile, which was first tested in 2007. The Topol-M missile, tested in 2004, is already deployed.

Pages not found. Bad links.

NotCoach on December 4, 2012 at 6:59 PM

It’s all gonna be OK. The .gov still has all those old films from the 50s, teaching kids how to hide under desks. Just start showing those again and everybody will be prepared to survive in the nuclear wasteland to come.

Of course, some may survive better than others……..
http://www.wnd.com/2008/07/70281/

Solaratov on December 4, 2012 at 7:05 PM

I think the Europeans should learn to speak Russian – stat!

OldEnglish on December 4, 2012 at 7:08 PM

I was thinking last night that nuclear war was coming, and then you post this. RWM put up a humourous post (if you’re into it) where she was making hypothetical appointments, and this one stuck in my head:

22. For Ambassador to Iran:

Former Congressman Ron “if I were an Iranian, I’d like to have a nuclear weapon, too, because you gain respect from them” Paul.

– and it occurred to me that everyone having nuclear arms wasn’t going to stop wars. I know — I can be thick. Anyway, the people attacking us aren’t worried about us using them; but the curve is something exponential, and the stability of the next guy down is way, way down.

At some point, Iran is actually going to war. At some point, North Korea is actually going to war. At some point, every nuclear nation on earth is going to go to war, in one way or another, and nuclear bombs are going to go off, and the window of perception is going to shift such that the new maps will include irradiated areas and war plans will include strategic nuclear detonations.

No point. Just something to say out loud so that 1. if I’m wrong, I can be corrected, and 2. if I’m right, I can get used to the idea. Up until RWM’s #22 last night, I was assuming all that dystopia was more or less behind us. Looks sort of inevitable now.

Axe on December 4, 2012 at 7:09 PM

“The US, by contrast, has not developed or tested a new long-range missile system since the Reagan administration.”

In fact, hasn’t Oblahblah been cutting our missles…?

Seven Percent Solution on December 4, 2012 at 7:11 PM

Sometimes a missilie is just a missile, lady.

rayra on December 4, 2012 at 6:52 PM

.
( kisses hand ) … “Goodnight, everybody !”

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 7:13 PM

In fact, hasn’t Oblahblah been cutting our missles…?

Seven Percent Solution on December 4, 2012 at 7:11 PM

Yes, but JED is concentrating on the fact that we are falling behind in the technology of our missiles, not numbers.

NotCoach on December 4, 2012 at 7:17 PM

Ahhh Mobile missiles give one a great deal of Flexibility, No?

Chip on December 4, 2012 at 7:18 PM

I’m getting prepared.

JPeterman on December 4, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Ahhh Mobile missiles give one a great deal of Flexibility, No?

Chip on December 4, 2012 at 7:18 PM

Doh! I see what you did there!

Axe on December 4, 2012 at 7:20 PM

In fact, hasn’t Oblahblah been cutting our missles…?

Seven Percent Solution on December 4, 2012 at 7:11 PM

And those are defensive missiles. He cut 30 land based ICBMs as well.

I’m thoroughly convinced he would cut them all if he could, regardless of Russia, China, Iran, etc.

Russ86 on December 4, 2012 at 7:20 PM

Very few are talking about just how dangerous this world has become…thanks for the article. And even less are connecting the dots.

thanks for the article.

CoffeeLover on December 4, 2012 at 7:24 PM

But that’s ok, O has it handled. He prefers to Obama Consults with MSNBC Hosts Sharpton, Maddow on Tax Rates

http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/obama-consults-msnbc-hosts-sharpton-maddow-tax-rates_665036.html

CoffeeLover on December 4, 2012 at 7:28 PM

Reagan’s Star Wars initiative in reverse. How’s that “more flexibility” working for you champ…I mean CHUMP!

Deano1952 on December 4, 2012 at 7:32 PM

I’m getting prepared.

JPeterman on December 4, 2012 at 7:19 PM


http://www.hulu.com/doomsday-preppers


Good source of prepping ideas – even with the leftist bent all over the place.

Chip on December 4, 2012 at 7:32 PM

The Russians plan to complete the modernization of five strategic rocket force units by the end of 2013. Shortly before the US election, Russia held a big strategic exercise in which long-range missiles were launched from sea and shore. Russia isn’t resting on her ICBM laurels either; besides putting the new Bulava submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) into service, she is developing a new ICBM with a huge, Cold War-style nuclear-payload capacity on a much improved missile body.

I can’t imagine why this wasn’t reported at the time. I have no idea at all…

Back in 2007, when Vladimir Putin promised to rebuild Russia’s military and resume its activities on the world stage, Westerners were complacent. Russia was an economic basket case, after all. It would take years for modernization programs to kick in. And even when they did, they would bring Russian capabilities to no more than what America already has. Right?

That may be the case for some conventional forces. But when it comes to “strategic” missiles – missiles used for the purpose of strategic intimidation – it’s 2012 now, and Russia is unquestionably ahead of the United States. Not in terms of numbers, but in terms of missile capabilities. The Russians have already fielded ICBMs that are better than anything we have. These missiles present a much tougher target for our national ballistic-missile defense network than anything has before. If they are launched against us – and certainly if they’re launched against anyone else – a lot of them are going to get through.

Well, I guess it’s a wonderful thing that Jugeared Jesus has already assured PootyPoot that he’s now all flexible and sh!t.

We’ll be damned lucky if we survive “Smart Power.”

hillbillyjim on December 4, 2012 at 7:39 PM

Hey, I know what we ought to do…

… howzabout we turn our backs on even more of our friends and cancel even more anti-missile deployments. Yeah, that’s the ticket. White flags all around!!!

hillbillyjim on December 4, 2012 at 7:42 PM

I recall that Japan has enough plutonium stockpiled that it could churn out up to 4,000 warheads in short order if it feels threatened by North Korea. All that needs to happen here is for Japan to become convinced that the US will no longer guarantee its security – something we came perilously close to demonstrating back in March 2009 (when we parked the massive SBX radar in Hawaii during that NoKo test so as to not “inflame” the situation with Kim).

Personally, I can hardly wait for this to happen. Japan has a thousand years or more of Bushido culture, stoppered by 65 years of imposed pacifism following its personal experience with two nascent nuclear bomb blasts in 1945. Since then we have steadfastly refused to repeat this show of force for fear of escalating tensions during the Cold War. But guess what? The Cold War is long over, and in its place has sprung up a leadership vacuum that is waiting for someone to fill it – and we are increasingly telegraphing to the rest of the world that we really don’t care to hold the reins of leadership anymore.

A nuclear Japan will scare the bejeezus out of every country it invaded during WWII. Arms race? You haven’t even begun to see the kind of arms race that will race forward if Japan tests its own nuke.

Party like it’s 1961, baby!!!

Wanderlust on December 4, 2012 at 7:43 PM

I think the Europeans should learn to speak Russian – stat!

OldEnglish on December 4, 2012 at 7:08 PM

Russian or Arabic?

Steve Eggleston on December 4, 2012 at 7:48 PM

Oh, one more thing, something that JE hasn’t mentioned in the article here.

Russia’s economy is still in tatters following the collapse of the former Soviet Union in the early 1990′s, and its economy is very dependent upon oil and gas exports. Analysts in the mid-2000s estimated that Russia required a Brent oil price of at least $90/bbl to be able to afford modernizing its miliatary. JE will remember that when Russia invaded Georgia in 2008, its special forces were referred to by analysts as being the “sharp tip of a rotted spear”, meaning that although Russia’s special forces troops were well trained and equipped, its regular army is still hopelessly underfunded and ill-equipped.

I recently saw where the $90/bbl figure mentioned several years ago has risen to over $105/bbl. So consider this: for every oil lease that gets prevented by BOEMRE, every time Obama tells another country that if it develops its own oil, “the US will be one of your best customers”, and every attempt EPA makes to constrain development of tight oil and gas, these represent efforts to ensure that the price of oil remains high enough for Russia to continue being able to afford the modernization of its military.

Obama couldn’t do a better job at this if he gave the Russians foreign aid directly earmarked for military use.

But remember, statists abhor a strong America, because only when we are weak economically and strategically can they make the case that its citizens must look to Washington for help.

Thanks, Democrats!

Wanderlust on December 4, 2012 at 7:59 PM

Sure glad we’ve got Barry and Hillary! and their ‘Smart Diplomacy’. Otherwise, I’d be worried.

GarandFan on December 4, 2012 at 8:01 PM

It’s all good. If we get nuked, I’m sure the MSM (or what will be left of it) already have their “it’s the Republican’s fault” stories ready to circulate. If RR was the teflon president, what does that make barry?

djtnt on December 4, 2012 at 8:31 PM

A nuclear Japan will scare the bejeezus out of every country it invaded during WWII.

Wanderlust on December 4, 2012 at 7:43 PM

Yes. Including Red China and Russia. Which already have ICBMs with thermonuclear warheads.

Japan has relied on the American “nuclear umbrella” for 67 years, on the principle of not presenting a big enough perceived threat to those two nations to precipitate a pre-emptive strike.

China is getting proddy over the South China Sea and the oil under it. While Japan might want to “go nuclear” as a precaution, they have to consider the distinct possibility that if they did so openly, the Beijing Boys would simply glass their major cities on the spot, thereby establishing themselves as the sole leader of Southeast Asia- and incidentally eliminating their biggest economic competitor in their export markets, notably the U.S.

China would be encouraged by the fact that they know in advance that Obama’s reaction would be hand-wringing, “reset button”- pushing, and whinging about “a time to heal”. (No doubt after having to first change his mom jeans.)

Which means that whatever Japan does, they will do it secretly. And knowing that they cannot rely on the United States. Not as long as The Self-Exalted One is playing at being President.

If Japan develops a nuclear deterrent at all, I predict it will be one they deny even exists. Rather like Israel’s.

clear ether

eon

eon on December 4, 2012 at 8:32 PM

meh. Mobile missiles are comparatively short-ranged. They are theater ballistic missiles. Europe needs to worry, in range of both Moscow and Iran’s best. Moscow needs to worry (in range of Iran’s best). Japan needs to worry, in range of the Norks’ No-Dong missile.

But hey, three rabblerabbles for the Security Mom’s tome. Now that it’s too f’n late to stop Obama by legal means.

rayra on December 4, 2012 at 8:33 PM

…I got a missile for JugEars!

KOOLAID2 on December 4, 2012 at 8:33 PM

If Japan develops a nuclear deterrent at all, I predict it will be one they deny even exists. Rather like Israel’s.

eon on December 4, 2012 at 8:32 PM

Interesting premise. Yet even in their public denial, they will have to allow something to be seen in the background that is just enough to demonstrate that they should not be taken lightly.

I can’t wait. Between this hot point and Iran, I don’t know whether to pull my lawn chair up to the Strait of Hormuz, or to the South China Sea. It’s like having two good ball games on at the same time, trying to decide which one you want to watch right up front…

Wanderlust on December 4, 2012 at 8:44 PM

It will take me two days to digest this post with all the links. I like it. J.E. rocks.

wolly4321 on December 4, 2012 at 8:50 PM

rayra on December 4, 2012 at 8:33 PM

The best way to disentangle the US from all this mess in the short term is to become self-sufficient in oil and gas. We could do this today if we were allowed to develop resources in areas currently off limits to exploration and drilling.

The best part would be watching the moment the Euroweenies realise that, except for Israel, our disengagement from the Middle East really threatens them more than anything. Around that time we should also remove bases in Germany so that we retain only enough forces in Britain to ensure safe transit of the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and Indian Ocean (the latter by way of retaining the base at Diego Garcia).

Side note: there was a report a few weeks ago of a Nato base on one of the small islands in the Atlantic off the coast of Spain being put up for closure, where the Chinese have suddenly taken a keen interest in taking up residence there. If that happens, Europe has let the fox in among the [largely unarmed] henhouse. Love it.

Wanderlust on December 4, 2012 at 8:53 PM

Let me be the first to coin the phrase:

“Flexibility Gap”

BobMbx on December 4, 2012 at 8:59 PM

Austin Millbarge: Find a rock! Go the the SatScram terminal! Smash that thing!

[Fitz-Hume smashes terminal]

Emmett Fitz-Hume: OK it’s broken.

Austin Millbarge: Bring it here…Not the rock….

JetBoy on December 4, 2012 at 9:03 PM

Wanderlust on December 4, 2012 at 8:53 PM

we’ve already let China take up management of the Panama Canal. They’re already drilling closer to Florida than our own government will allow american companies. AND while that same Obamunist govt gives our tax dollars to maxican and brazilian national oil companies to drill in the Gulf.

I don’t agree with the doper-libertarian global retreat, or the progressives conversion of our forces to global aid-relief delivery / wealth redistribution. But I think we do need a major realignment of forces and particularly a massive dose of realpolitik in our global relations. And a nuking of the entire State Dept as comprised. Purge the arabists and moron ‘engagement’ liberals. What we need is a Pax Americana, dealt from a position of strength. Peace and prosperity for our cooperative allies and death and ruin for our enemies (with NO ‘nation-building’ afterward). Destroy Pakistan. Destroy Iran’s mullahs. Destroy the House of Saud and empty the Empty Quarter. Put all our natural gas wealth on the world market and destroy the Soviets (again).

rayra on December 4, 2012 at 9:19 PM

Mobile missiles are comparatively short-ranged. They are theater ballistic missiles.

Nope.

hillbillyjim on December 4, 2012 at 9:37 PM

Meanwhile, it’s being reported today that Iran stationed defense personnel in North Korea starting in October 2012.

The Iranians have posted military personnel to North Korea since the early 1990′s. And, North Korean technicians have been posted to Iran in a non-diplomatic technical assistance program since before the 1990′s. That this is public knowledge, and made so by Iran, is what is significant. What was once sub rosa is now in plain sight. [Didn’t the towel-headed mullahs in Tehran get the memo? Obama’s direct involvement with Iran and the sanctions Obama touts have crippled Iran’s capability to produce any sort of weapons, missiles, nukes, clubs and truncheons. Besides, Iran is a tiny country. Not a threat to us at all. Obama said so. It has got to be true.]

What Putin is doing in Russia is all due to a huge loophole in the various SALT provisions we’ve signed over the years and something this Administration has chosen to ignore. If one wholesale completely replaces an entire class of missiles in one’s inventory, then one can do so, so long as the magic number is not exceeded. Expensive, cost-prohibitive, of course, which is why such language was allowed. Was figured that neither us nor them could afford such an expenditure. But, that was before Tsar Vladimir I learned that he could spend oil/gas/diamond, chromium, and rare earth revenues whenever he wanted and on whatever he wanted. He has.

We, on the other hand have chosen to mothball or destroy old systems, and through attrition bring the number of launchers down, well below that magic number and we’ve done precious little to enhance the delivery vehicles. Paying for social programs and green energy schemes is where our priorities are at…not this troglodyte military stuff, that is sooo Reaganesque, so 1980′s. And tanks and artillery pieces and fighters and missiles do not vote.

In terms of technology, we are early early generation (mostly 1970-80′s technologies) while the Russians, Chinese, Indians, and a few others are pretty much 5 or 6 generations ahead of us.

But, Obama has their respect, and a Nobel Peace Prize, so everything is cool. Not to worry. UN Ambassador Rice is on it. Hillary and Medvedev and Putin and the rest of the Russian oligarchs/mafia are all BFF’s. They just loves her.

coldwarrior on December 4, 2012 at 9:41 PM

As we speak, Moscow is rearming missile units with Russia’s most advanced ICBM, the Yars missile, which was first tested in 2007. The Topol-M missile, tested in 2004, is already deployed.

Pages not found. Bad links.

NotCoach on December 4, 2012 at 6:59 PM

Yars…
http://missilethreat.com/missiles/rs-24/?country=russian-federation#russian-federation

Topol-M…
http://missilethreat.com/missiles/rs-12m1-topol-m-ss-27/?country=russian-federation#russian-federation

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 10:06 PM

coldwarrior on December 4, 2012 at 9:41 PM

Some seem to think that because we enjoyed a technological and economic advantage over Russia for a few years, that it would always be so.

These same people think that if the government takes more of our money, then the government will end up with more money.

The world is not static.

Almost every technological advantage we have gained over our would-be adversaries is negated within months, not years, due to our openness and our woeful lack of security in regards to defense technology.

Our economic advantage has already been erased by our insanely profligate spending.

Our president’s message to Putin that he would be in a position to be more flexible after the election is tantamount to saying: “Hey, Vlad, wait just a bit, and once I’m unaccountable to the plebes, I’ll be in a position to accommodate your wishes. Just give me a little time, then I’m your bitch.”

Instead of his usual bowing, this time he has completely bent over and grabbed his ankles, and the world knows it.

Ojesus has seen to it that we have become a paper tiger — deliberately, in my opinion.

hillbillyjim on December 4, 2012 at 10:07 PM

Hate to admit it, but the Russians may be the realists: with all the wee kookie nookies out there, you just will probably have to flatten a few of them to survive. For real.

AshleyTKing on December 4, 2012 at 10:10 PM

coldwarrior on December 4, 2012 at 9:41 PM

Some seem to think that because we enjoyed a technological and economic advantage over Russia for a few years, that it would always be so.

These same people think that if the government takes more of our money, then the government will end up with more money.

The world is not static.

Almost every technological advantage we have gained over our would-be adversaries is negated within months, not years, due to our openness and our woeful lack of security in regards to defense technology.

Our economic advantage has already been erased by our insanely profligate spending.

Our president’s message to Putin that he would be in a position to be more flexible after the election is tantamount to saying: “Hey, Vlad, wait just a bit, and once I’m unaccountable to the plebes, I’ll be in a position to accommodate your wishes. Just give me a little time, then I’m your b!tch.”

Instead of his usual bowing, this time he has completely bent over and grabbed his ankles, and the world knows it.

Ojesus has seen to it that we have become a paper tiger — deliberately, in my opinion.

hillbillyjim on December 4, 2012 at 10:10 PM

And as much as I depise Putin, I do not fear him. It is the Kim Son Ill-breds of the world who will have to eat Plutonium sandwiches.

AshleyTKing on December 4, 2012 at 10:12 PM

meh. Mobile missiles are comparatively short-ranged. They are theater ballistic missiles.

rayra on December 4, 2012 at 8:33 PM

RS-24
Road-mobile
Range:10,500 km
Accuracy (CEP) 250m

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 10:15 PM

So when you see that North Korea is preparing to launch a ballistic missile,
=========

Officials: If fueling of North Korean rocket takes place this weekend, rocket is expected to be launched between Dec. 10-12 – @YonhapNews

14 mins ago from english.yonhapnews.co.kr by editor

http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2012/12/05/54/0200000000AEN20121205005800315F.HTML
========================================

North Korea completes installation of long-range rocket on launch pad – @YonhapNews

35 mins ago by editor
=========================

http://www.breakingnews.com/topic/north-korea-planned-rocket-launch-december-2012

canopfor on December 4, 2012 at 10:16 PM

Of course, some may survive better than others……..
http://www.wnd.com/2008/07/70281/
Solaratov on December 4, 2012 at 7:05 PM

From Solartov’s article

“We’re told that the feds bought the entire container of canned butter when it hit the California docks.

Not to worry… They are just trying to make sure that MoochHell 0bama doesn’t run out of stuff to in which to dip her lobsters.

LegendHasIt on December 4, 2012 at 11:25 PM

It’s all good. If we get nuked, I’m sure the MSM (or what will be left of it) already have their “it’s the Republican’s fault” stories ready to circulate. If RR was the teflon president, what does that make barry?

djtnt on December 4, 2012 at 8:31 PM

The upside, all those blue democratic-base inner cities that manufacture so many votes will be gone.

slickwillie2001 on December 4, 2012 at 11:37 PM

rayra on December 4, 2012 at 8:33 PM

Outdated, rayra. Yars and Topol-M are both global ICBMs that can hit every inch of North America. The Russians intend to have these mobile missiles make up 80% of their land forces, with the 10-warhead MIRVed Bulava missile, launched from submarines, ensuring additional stealth for their strategic rocket forces as a whole.

The times have changed. The US decided in the 1980s not to make our land-based ICBMs mobile. Russia and China have forged ahead with mobile ICBMs, which have become the backbone of their forces.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 10:06 PM

Thanks, sharrukin. I don’t know why the links in the post don’t work.

J.E. Dyer on December 4, 2012 at 11:48 PM

If RR was the teflon president, what does that make barry?

djtnt on December 4, 2012 at 8:31 PM

A useful idiot jackwagon.

ghostwalker1 on December 4, 2012 at 11:58 PM

The Russians don’t need missiles. They’ve got Obama!

MaiDee on December 5, 2012 at 12:30 AM

Damned ninnies, the Topols are half expired / past their expiration date. We’ve to 450 Minuteman 3s with the same range just waiting to launch.
And our Ohio-class SSBNs can literally launch and strike all their targets while sitting pierside in their home ports, with a similar longer range than the Topol.
The keyword in my post was “comparatively” and the gainsayers seemed to have missed it.

rayra on December 5, 2012 at 12:32 AM

We have a strike force of nuclear weapons that is unparalleled. Stealth bombers. Submarines………… and our aircraft carriers. All this along with our land based missile forces. You want a couple of new missiles to be added to our forces. I am sure that it would not take long before we could have them in production. Frankly, I am more interested in getting our fiscal house in order.

SC.Charlie on December 5, 2012 at 5:55 AM

Frankly, I am more interested in getting our fiscal house in order.

SC.Charlie on December 5, 2012 at 5:55 AM

More powerful than any nuclear force…

Our systems, year after year, are maintained, it has been shown time and again, the other countries build, but don’t maintain. At any given time, just a fraction of what Russia, China, Korea has would be functioning…but still enough to inflict total damage, as we would be able to do the same.

A strong economy is what brought down Russia, it is the one force that is non confrontational, but devastating…owning an economy, you own the country.

right2bright on December 5, 2012 at 9:19 AM

These missiles present a much tougher target for our national ballistic-missile defense network than anything has before. If they are launched against us – and certainly if they’re launched against anyone else – a lot of them are going to get through.

Nearly ALL of them will get through if launched. As publicly stated by DoD, we are not building the missile defense systems to shield against the missiles Russia and China have. We are building theater level defenses and strategic defenses to handle the “rogue nation” (i.e. North Korea, Iran) threat.

dentarthurdent on December 5, 2012 at 12:07 PM

Back in 2007, when Vladimir Putin promised to rebuild Russia’s military and resume its activities on the world stage, Westerners were complacent. Russia was an economic basket case, after all. It would take years for modernization programs to kick in. And even when they did, they would bring Russian capabilities to no more than what America already has. Right?

That may be the case for some conventional forces. But when it comes to “strategic” missiles – missiles used for the purpose of strategic intimidation – it’s 2012 now, and Russia is unquestionably ahead of the United States. Not in terms of numbers, but in terms of missile capabilities. The Russians have already fielded ICBMs that are better than anything we have. These missiles present a much tougher target for our national ballistic-missile defense network than anything has before. If they are launched against us – and certainly if they’re launched against anyone else – a lot of them are going to get through. – from the article

Face it, we still live a world with the doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction, when it comes to Russia and China and ICBMs.

SC.Charlie on December 5, 2012 at 12:35 PM

I’m getting prepared.

JPeterman on December 4, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Take a look at the expedient shelter designs in this book:

http://www.oism.org/nwss/

They were devised and thoroughly tested by Cresson H. Kearny of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Most of them can be constructed in under 48 hours by 2-4 people. There is a lot of other useful information in there if nuclear war is a concern of yours.

WeekendAtBernankes on December 5, 2012 at 2:42 PM