San Bernardino city attorney to citizens: “Lock your doors and load your guns”

posted at 9:21 pm on December 3, 2012 by J.E. Dyer

The bankrupt city of San Bernardino, CA voted last week to slash its fiscal-year budget by $26 million, to close up a $52.4 million shortfall.  No, $26 million isn’t enough, and we’ll get to that in a minute.  But the $26 million will have a significant impact on the operating budget for police and fire, and that’s got folks in a tizzy.

The difference in the law enforcement budget won’t mean a big cut in the current sworn police force.  It’s down to 270 today, from a mid-2000s high of 358, but that cutback has already happened.  The new budget figure caps personnel at 260.  As officers retire, they won’t be replaced until the number drops below 260.

Although its crime numbers have declined overall since 2005 (leveling out in 2011 and 2012), San Bernardino remains among the most dangerous cities of its size in the country, posting about twice as many crime incidents as the national average.  Violent crime in San Bernardino is especially high, twice that of California as a whole.  San Bernardino’s 260 officers compare favorably to the 214 on the Gilbert, AZ police force, a city in the same size category (200,000-215,000).  But Gilbert’s crime numbers are lower – much lower.  Cities with crime rates similar to San Bernardino’s, like Spokane, WA, Birmingham, AL, Richmond, VA, and Rochester, NY, have much larger police forces, running to sworn-officer rosters between 700 and 800.

So the San Bernardino city attorney advised citizens at a community meeting in November to “Go home, lock your doors, and load your guns.”  In response to the media furor over this suggestion, James Penman had this to say:

In an interview Thursday, Penman said that he stands behind that advice, and he’s gotten nothing but positive responses from residents since then. He said the only criticism he’s received has been from the media…

“I can understand how people who don’t live or work in the City of San Bernardino and don’t hear the sirens every night, the gun shots, the helicopters overhead, as many San Bernardino residents do, might not understand the significance when you have people being killed in their homes,” he said.

Penman said he is only repeating what police officers have told him: that the city can provide only basic law enforcement services due to recent cuts.

“We need to stop giving people false hope,” Penman said. “We have to start encouraging people to protect themselves. The situation is that bad in San Bernardino.”

Now, I think there is something to be said for parsing Penman’s words.  San Bernardino isn’t letting police officers go.  It’s not like things are going to immediately get worse than they are now.  The point is not so much that things will change, with the new budget, as that things won’t change.  San Bernardino has all the police officers it’s going to have for the foreseeable future.  If crime gets worse – too bad.  The city can’t afford to do more about it.

San Bernardino is also cutting fire department overtime by 35 percent, which ought to be interesting.  It has been very humid over the past week (I live about 35 miles from San Bernardino), but that won’t last.  San Bernardino will see fire season again.

Even the $26 million in spending cuts doesn’t make up half of the city’s shortfall, however.  So San Bernardino is deferring its contributions to CalPERS, the state pension fund in which government workers are invested.  (Their employers, like the city of San Bernardino, contribute to the fund.)  The city plans to renegotiate its other pension-bond obligations with bondholders.  The current-year deferrals will amount to $35 million.

CalPERS has formally objected to the “deferral” plan – adopted as part of the city’s bankruptcy proceeding – because of the virtual certainty that San Bernardino will never make the deferred contributions.  The city’s current unfunded pension obligations are $143 million, a sum larger than San Bernardino’s total general-fund revenues in each of the last ten years.

Of course, CalPERS’ own problems are staggering.  The fund’s invested value declined nearly 5 percentbetween July 2011 and July 2012, which hasn’t helped with the estimated

$398 billion by which CalPERS is underfunded versus future pension obligations.

San Bernardino County got $936 million from the 2009 federal stimulus – $464 per county resident – but that hasn’t improved the economy in the area.  The city of San Bernardino is now the second-poorest large city in America (Detroit is the poorest).

After creating brief notoriety for the county, the idea of using eminent domain to seize underwater mortgages and modify them – i.e., reduce the mortgage amount to the current market value of a property – has gone silent.  But interest in the idea is still there, and advocates will be pushing it again in 2013.  Declining revenues from properties with non-performing mortgages are a big annoyance for local governments.

J.E. Dyer’s articles have appeared at Hot Air, Commentary’s “contentions,Patheos, The Daily Caller, The Jewish Press, and The Weekly Standard online.

Her home blog is The Optimistic Conservative.  She also writes for the new blog Liberty Unyielding.


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I see. Your liberal bigotry just couldn’t get past that part, and kept stuttering in shock that Jewish and Christian sources should be included in the mass of historical documents. You poor thing, I was being so inconsiderate in not preparing you for an unbiased view of the world.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:30 AM

You’re projecting.

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 12:34 AM

Another huge factor in white flight from the cities was forced busing in the 60s and 70s.

A complete family works hard to be able to afford a house in a good neighborhood with good schools, determined to help their kids learn then what does the cancer of Liberalism do? It forces kids to ride a school bus over to the ghetto-run-and-managed school in the worst part of town where the parents (if they can track them down) could care less about their by product of indifferent bed hopping while waiting for the cradle-to-grave welfare check. How things have changed!

viking01 on December 4, 2012 at 12:43 AM

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:30 AM

You’re projecting.

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 12:34 AM

Dante, the guy is handing your ass to you. Give it up.

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 12:44 AM

libfreeordie on December 3, 2012 at 11:04 PM

Small businesses which employ in the range of 60 – 70% of Americans are not Corporations in the way you are thinking. But of course your humanities degree did not equip you with any research or economics training.

chemman on December 4, 2012 at 12:44 AM

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 12:24 AM

.
You poor thing, I was being so inconsiderate in not preparing you for an unbiased view of the world.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:30 AM

.
Don’t let it happen again.

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 12:44 AM

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 12:34 AM

.
Dante, the guy is handing your ass to you. Give it up.

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 12:44 AM

.
( Shhhhhh . . . . . . . he doesn’t know it, yet )

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 12:47 AM

Don’t let it happen again.

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 12:44 AM

I don’t believe in God, but how do you arrive at a place in life where you refuse to utilize ancient documents to understand history? Why should such sources be disregarded? Do they honestly believe that non-Jewish, non-Christian sources are free of the same influences and corruptions that can occur to any source material?

It’s just bizarre.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:51 AM

It’s just bizarre.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:51 AM

Is Dante’s ass heavy sharrukin?

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 12:52 AM

I have heard a number of different theories as regards the source for the bible and I am as yet unconvinced by most. Clearly there were cross currents of influence both in style and content, but given the world wide prevalence of some of the themes in the bible. I suspect it may be different cultures describing some of the same events through their own understanding and cultural lens.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:27 AM

Torah is nothing but a compressed Sumerian chronicles. Accadian texts were also based on Sumerian tablets as were Egyptian chronicles, all came after Sumer. Hebrew is based on Sumerian language, many words are very close in sound and meaning. Most are, actually. And let’s not forget that Abram (Abraham) came from Ur, a SUMERIAN city. Which recent times’ digs confirmed as existing. A number of digs were actually started after translating Sumerian texts (tablets), main reason historians now have a better view of ancient world.

Problem with translating Torah is that a number of key words were interpreted using just one meaning out of multiple available. For example, so called “snake” has 2 other meanings in both ancient Hebrew and Sumerian, meanings that make way more sense that
“snake”, people decided to use the least meaningful one. Not sure why.

Its a long discussion along the lines of EloHIM above. Elohim, as opposed to Eloh, is a multiple, Eloh is singular. Too bad so many refuse to admit the obvious. According to both Sumerian texts and Torah we were created by EloHIM, a FEW “gods”, not just one. Same as you pointed out above, Egypt had its own history and “gods” (Toth, Ra, Osiris, etc). Jews had YHWH, those living in what is today Lebanon had Baal, etc, etc, etc. Approach history and Old Testament with open eyes, its a great historical account. Nephilim (YHWH, Ball, Toth, Ra, etc.) and all that jazz… Again, a multiple (NephiLIM)
.
.
.
.
As to someone’s question above, my Hebrew is just fine, thank you. Too bad others’ isn’t.

riddick on December 4, 2012 at 12:53 AM

Anyway, have a good night.

riddick on December 4, 2012 at 12:55 AM

Is Dante’s ass heavy sharrukin?

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 12:52 AM

Oh come on, you say that like it’s an accomplishment. Who hasn’t kicked him around the block a few times? He doesn’t exactly bring logic to an argument does he?

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:56 AM

Torah is nothing but a compressed Sumerian chronicles. Accadian texts were also based on Sumerian tablets as were Egyptian chronicles, all came after Sumer. Hebrew is based on Sumerian language, many words are very close in sound and meaning. Most are, actually. And let’s not forget that Abram (Abraham) came from Ur, a SUMERIAN city. Which recent times’ digs confirmed as existing. A number of digs were actually started after translating Sumerian texts (tablets), main reason historians now have a better view of ancient world.

Do you have any online sources for the Sumerian-Hebrew links? I find this sort of thing very interesting and have seen Sumerian linked to Turkish, Semitic, Dravidian, Magyar, and Indo-European and there doesn’t as yet seem to be any consensus.

Problem with translating Torah is that a number of key words were interpreted using just one meaning out of multiple available. For example, so called “snake” has 2 other meanings in both ancient Hebrew and Sumerian, meanings that make way more sense that
“snake”, people decided to use the least meaningful one. Not sure why.

riddick on December 4, 2012 at 12:53 AM

I have noticed that with the New Testament translations so I can easily see it happening with the older sources as well.

When you say ‘snake’ I assume you mean the account in Genesis. What other meaning are you suggesting as a possibility?

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 1:04 AM

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 12:44 AM

.
I don’t believe in God, but how do you arrive at a place in life where you refuse to utilize ancient documents to understand history? Why should such sources be disregarded? Do they honestly believe that non-Jewish, non-Christian sources are free of the same influences and corruptions that can occur to any source material?

It’s just bizarre.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:51 AM

.
It’s all related to motivation. Dante’s one of the most defiant ones here, when it comes to “recognition of God”.

You on the other hand, are not motivated to shout/yell/SCREAM … in defiance, every time someone else give recognition to the existence of God.

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 1:06 AM

It’s all related to motivation. Dante’s one of the most defiant ones here, when it comes to “recognition of God”.

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 1:06 AM

It’s almost as if he just isn’t sure of his own lack of faith and needs to keep attacking as a way of shoring up what he claims not to believe.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 1:09 AM

Is Dante’s ass heavy sharrukin?

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 12:52 AM

Oh come on, you say that like it’s an accomplishment. Who hasn’t kicked him around the block a few times? He doesn’t exactly bring logic to an argument does he?

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:56 AM

I sit corrected.

Carry on.

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 1:11 AM

listens2glenn on December 4, 2012 at 1:06 AM

It’s almost as if he just isn’t sure of his own lack of faith and needs to keep attacking as a way of shoring up what he claims not to believe.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 1:09 AM

Actually, I think he “needs” for there to be no God to justtify his beliefs. Or to “excuse” his beliefs. There’s not room for both. Like his rationalization of theft of intellectual property.

JHMO

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 1:14 AM

Is Dante’s ass heavy sharrukin?

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 12:52 AM

Weight varies with how much buckshot is in it.

viking01 on December 4, 2012 at 1:15 AM

Its a long discussion along the lines of EloHIM above. Elohim, as opposed to Eloh, is a multiple, Eloh is singular.

riddick on December 4, 2012 at 12:53 AM

There is no “Eloh” in the Torah. The word is “El”.

And it’s interesting how you can state that it is so obvious that “Elohim” means many gods when the first commandment and the most important is that there is but one G-d.

The Ten Commandments do not come from the Egyptian Book of the Dead. And the ten commandments are only the beginning – there are 613 commandments.

Your analysis certainly sounds like Soviet-style history. Yes, there were interactions between all these ancient peoples and things were taken from here and there – as they always are. But you make ridiculous jumps to conclusions based on very little.

The Sumerians – and all the peoples – had many gods. Jews had one G-d. Minor difference to you. Sure. ANd just the tip of the iceberg. You consider it nothing more than the misinterpretation of everyone for thousands of years, I guess. Okey doke.

Yes, Hebrew derives from Sumerian and Hebrew is now the oldest continuous written language in the world. Sumerian is … gone. But that doesn’t mean that everything Hebrew is just Sumerian. That’s silliness. I use Hindu numerals but I have no attachment to Hinduism and nothing I write with Hindu numerals says anything about what Hindus think or do. In a thousand years, though, some riddick will be interpreting my Hindu numerals and equations as nothing more than Hindu stuff …

Dude, there are vast stretches of time between what you put as the source and what appears as the Torah. There are vast stretches of time between Abraham in Ur (yes, we all know that he came from Sumeria) and the Torah in Sinai. You act as if they all happened at the same time and appeared together.

You have your view about things. Fine. You believe it, so that’s good for you. Seeing how things get twisted within decades, now, even with writing and digital memories, I think you need to re-evaluate how simple you think it is to have things transmitted intact over centuries – where you like to move between millenia as if they were one week to the next.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on December 4, 2012 at 1:23 AM

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 12:52 AM

Weight varies with how much buckshot is in it.

viking01 on December 4, 2012 at 1:15 AM

:-)

hawkdriver on December 4, 2012 at 1:36 AM

And it’s interesting how you can state that it is so obvious that “Elohim” means many gods when the first commandment and the most important is that there is but one G-d.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on December 4, 2012 at 1:23 AM

Elohim is also not exclusive to God. It can mean a judge, or a mighty one as well. In Exodus 7:1 Moses is made Elohim to Pharaoh, which I would assume in context means ‘judge’. There do appear to be a reference to multiple elohim, but it’s not easy to determine the exact meaning or intent of many passages.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 1:39 AM

Can we please stick to the topic of the article? Is it just me or does Hot Air have the most annoying commenters of any conservative website?

Jerry Bear on December 4, 2012 at 3:09 AM

…when the trolls really have to start answering questions…they always disappear…e v e r y time!…(*turdfreeordie*)<—you always see it with that one!…that's why they are a waste of time!

KOOLAID2 on December 4, 2012 at 3:39 AM

KOOLAID2 on December 4, 2012 at 3:39 AM

This is why it’s nice to have your own mental “ignore” button–I see certain names (people who can’t construct a reasonable, evidence-based argument, people who can’t be civil, etc.) and just skip right over their posts.

DrMagnolias on December 4, 2012 at 4:25 AM

Elohim is also not exclusive to God. It can mean a judge, or a mighty one as well. In Exodus 7:1 Moses is made Elohim to Pharaoh, which I would assume in context means ‘judge’. There do appear to be a reference to multiple elohim, but it’s not easy to determine the exact meaning or intent of many passages.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 1:39 AM

One of the things I like to look at is the contextual relationship in the post-Sumerian myth cycle (Ea/Enlil/Marduk) and that the names of two deities in different locations have a same root and apparent position in their respective mythos cycles: YHWH (also YHW) of the Israeli/Semitic tradition and the more northern Assyrian cycle that starts out with YW. There appears to be a high degree of correspondence between YHWH and YW (Yah*weh or Yahu in abbreviation/ Yaw or Yam) and a position of judge and having the rivers and seas under their domain (which gives much of the imagery of Genesis).

The cycles do differ strongly due to local influences or lack of same, with the Assyrian varying the greatest amount due to influences and amalgamation with other pantheons. That is where Dagon and his son Ba’al Hadid come from and gives an important reference point to the reduction of the Canaanite Priesthood of Ba’al by the Israelites. This is not just the defeat of a localized sect, but one that attempts to place itself above that of YW. The trail of YW leads through a traditional one of father/son-ascendent, that is highly at odds with YHWH becoming the ascendent deity alone. For all of that, up to the time of the early Second Temple, the worshipers of YW were welcomed in Israel and they even left totems and other items associated with YW at the Second Temple.

The best part of this examination is at the time of Solomon, just after the conversion of the Queen of Sheba (Axum) which is that after she places her sun on the Axumite throne, she walks out of the Bible. She re-appears in one set of texts and traditions from her time period in what we would now call China. That is post-Yellow Emperor and her appearance as Queen Mother of the West and her teachings correlate strongly with Sheba and where she could get to via known Axumite and allied trade routes. Now if I were her, at that time, having converted to a new religion, wouldn’t the interest be to see where it came from? She already knows Egypt, the Kingdom of Sheba on the Arabian Peninsula, and presumably the civilizations of the Two Rivers and would have some idea where to go to track down where this all started. Really, she didn’t have to go out on an archaeological expedition, just keep on asking questions and following the answers ever backward since what we know as archaeological sites were actually towns and cities with people in them (or remnants of population) in her time.

For that she goes through Western China then home to a people called Dacians/Daxians and known to the Greeks as Scythians. The Chinese called them Yuezhi. Now that word can have many derivations and translations, but if later Chinese linguistic tradition stretches back this far then that is closer to an actual transliteration, which is as close as the Chinese can come to the actual word used in a foreign language.

Although the Yuezhi left long before modern historic times, their slow reduction is noted in Chinese chronicles both before and after Sheba arrives and the Yuezhi, themselves, considered themselves to be ‘border people’ and more than willing to migrate. And the Chinese recorded that these people looked nothing like themselves being somewhat taller, having larger noses, and far more hair color variety along with paler skin. They may also have been the originators of bronze working and traded that secret to the Yellow Emperor along with cultivation of the four grains.

Fun stuff that!

ajacksonian on December 4, 2012 at 6:49 AM

This is why we need gun control, so liberal voters will vote for fiscal conservatives.

DeathtotheSwiss on December 4, 2012 at 8:08 AM

LE in general is worthless. We should go back to Sheriffs and deputies and let the general population protect themselves on a day to day basis.

Mr. Arrogant on December 4, 2012 at 8:25 AM

The best part of this examination is at the time of Solomon, just after the conversion of the Queen of Sheba (Axum) which is that after she places her sun on the Axumite throne, she walks out of the Bible. She re-appears in one set of texts and traditions from her time period in what we would now call China. That is post-Yellow Emperor and her appearance as Queen Mother of the West and her teachings correlate strongly with Sheba and where she could get to via known Axumite and allied trade routes. Now if I were her, at that time, having converted to a new religion, wouldn’t the interest be to see where it came from? She already knows Egypt, the Kingdom of Sheba on the Arabian Peninsula, and presumably the civilizations of the Two Rivers and would have some idea where to go to track down where this all started. Really, she didn’t have to go out on an archaeological expedition, just keep on asking questions and following the answers ever backward since what we know as archaeological sites were actually towns and cities with people in them (or remnants of population) in her time.

For that she goes through Western China then home to a people called Dacians/Daxians and known to the Greeks as Scythians. The Chinese called them Yuezhi. Now that word can have many derivations and translations, but if later Chinese linguistic tradition stretches back this far then that is closer to an actual transliteration, which is as close as the Chinese can come to the actual word used in a foreign language.

Although the Yuezhi left long before modern historic times, their slow reduction is noted in Chinese chronicles both before and after Sheba arrives and the Yuezhi, themselves, considered themselves to be ‘border people’ and more than willing to migrate. And the Chinese recorded that these people looked nothing like themselves being somewhat taller, having larger noses, and far more hair color variety along with paler skin. They may also have been the originators of bronze working and traded that secret to the Yellow Emperor along with cultivation of the four grains.

Fun stuff that!

ajacksonian on December 4, 2012 at 6:49 AM

The Yellow Emperor would have pre-dated the Shang Dynasty (1600 BC) and the queen of Sheba would be dated around to around 1000 BC. There is simply no way that she could have visited China at that time. She would have been contemporaneous with the early Zhou Dynasty.

Yes, the Rong peoples to the west are described as being red-haired and blue-eyed and they may well have influenced, or founded the northern Chinese states. The Tarim mummies seem to confirm this physical description. This influx of Iranian chariot nomads would have been close to the same time that the Aryans entered India and possibly including the Mitanni influx into the middle east as well.

The Yuezhi however come much later in history with the earliest date being c.1000 BC and more accepted dates being around 300 BC. If that early date is correct, then the Queen of Sheba could have visited them, but they (presumably now called Scythians) would not have displaced the Cimmerians on the steppe until around 700 BC. This would also assume that the Yuezhi are to be identified as the Tocharians. The Yuezhi are normally said to be related to the Kushan invasion. Daxia in the Chinese records is normally said to be identified with Bactria (Old Persian Baxtris). This is around the time flowing Alexander the greats invasion of Persia. The Dacians were already to be found among the related Thracian peoples in 500 BC, and likely well before 700-1000 BC.

just after the conversion of the Queen of Sheba (Axum) which is that after she places her sun on the Axumite throne

Axum/Aksum comes much later than the time of the Queen of Sheba so I must admit to being somewhat confused by the association with her, unless you mean the Sabean influx that created the subsequent kingdom of Axum?

There is a lot of flexibility in some of the dating. Far more in my opinion than most historians are willing to concede, but I just don’t see how the queen of Sheba could realistically have made such a journey, or why.

She re-appears in one set of texts and traditions from her time period in what we would now call China.

What do you mean by this with regards to the Chinese records?

The Queen Mother of the West is dated to the Shang Dynasty. Do you see this as inaccurate, or that the Queen of Sheba being co-mingled with an already existing myth?

She already knows Egypt, the Kingdom of Sheba on the Arabian Peninsula, and presumably the civilizations of the Two Rivers and would have some idea where to go to track down where this all started.

Are you suggesting that the monotheistic Israelite faith originated in China, or among the Persians (Zarathustra) being brought in with the chariot invasions?

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 8:45 AM

Yipee Ky Yay! Is he going to allow open carry? How ’bout suspending the law for concealed? Does he want the Raiders to move there? Can’t have a lot of guns without an NFL team.

Kissmygrits on December 4, 2012 at 8:58 AM

I don’t believe in God, but how do you arrive at a place in life where you refuse to utilize ancient documents to understand history? Why should such sources be disregarded? Do they honestly believe that non-Jewish, non-Christian sources are free of the same influences and corruptions that can occur to any source material?

It’s just bizarre.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 12:51 AM

You’re arguing a straw man. The point is that the archaeological record does not support the written record. The written record alone is not evidence.

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 9:07 AM

It’s almost as if he just isn’t sure of his own lack of faith and needs to keep attacking as a way of shoring up what he claims not to believe.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 1:09 AM

More projecting.

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 9:10 AM

The point is that the archaeological record does not support the written record. The written record alone is not evidence.

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 9:07 AM

What archaeological record could you possibly expect to find of such an event? You claim that we are supposed to ignore the Jewish and Christian written historical sources, and impose a new demand that the Egyptian written record also be ignored.

If we dug up the pharaohs army with a hieroglyph chipped on the side of one of the chariots saying…’lets go kill Moses‘ and we found the pharaoh himself clutching a hastily engraved tablet saying…the waters flow back and cover all the chariots and horseme…ending abruptly, you would then demand that we ignore that too.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 9:18 AM

I live smack dab in the middle of the U.S., in the cornfields of Indiana. Earlier in the year, I took my first journey out west and hopefully my last. I’ll be happy to stay here and die here in Indiana, one of the last stongholds of a decent civilization.

Sure, the “creeping crud” has begun to infect many of our midwestern towns and cities, but we have been able to minimize it to a manageable level. I figure I have about 20 years to live if I follow in my father’s footsteps, so if we can contain the worst of the decline until then, I’ll be thankful.

My trip out west was an Amtrak adventure, and “adventure” hardly begins to describe what I encountered. But I’ll leave that story for another time. I will say that I was extremely disappointed in the landscape and the culture of the people west of the Mississippi. Again, I understand that the midwest has it’s own questionable culture, but the worst of it is kept out of sight for the time being. However, traveling out west is an eye opener for sure, especially on an Amtrak train. It’s like someone laid all the track through an endless junkyard, complete with all the profanity-laced graffiti one could ever imagine. And yes, that track travels through San Bernardino, CA.

I’ll have to say that I am saddened for the decent, hard-working, God-fearing, law-abiding citizens of this country under the age of 60. The entire state of California is a photocopy of what is in store for the rest of the United States. This “creeping crud” from out west will cover the country from coast to coast and it cannot be stopped at this point. We are too far down the road to total anarchy and destruction of what was once a great country. I am not sure if we can ever rise from the ashes to rebuld. San Bernardino is finished and may be the flashpoint that will begin the final days of the great U.S.

metroryder on December 4, 2012 at 9:20 AM

You’re arguing a straw man. The point is that the archaeological record does not support the written record. The written record alone is not evidence.

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 9:07 AM

THere has never been one spadeful of dirt turned over that has discredited or disproven the Word of God.

I’m not going sick around to ‘debate’ you because you are a fool and a destroyer.

tom daschle concerned on December 4, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Are the SB residents going to get “free” guns and ammo (along with their contraceptives and Obamaphone)?

I wonder what will happen when Illinois cities start going bust, since Illinis doesn’t recognize the 2nd Amendment like the other states.

krome on December 4, 2012 at 9:43 AM

Declining revenues from properties with non-performing mortgages are a big annoyance for local governments.

— Dyer

Sorry Sir, but you are conflating two items. Mortgages have nothing to do with local government revenue. It is property valuation that has something to do with government revenue. The fact that a homeowner is underwater is immaterial. If the property is booked at $300k by the tax district then that is its tax bill regardless. Now if the homeowner can’t pay the bill is one thing but that is the case whether there is a lien or not on the property. If the homeowner can’t pay the bill and there is a lien, most likely the mortgage will trigger a first assumption clause by the lien holder to protect their position (least it does in Texas) followed by foreclosure procedures. In the meantime the lien holder will intercede to forestall any tax sale of the property, ie pay it.

Dr. Dog on December 4, 2012 at 10:02 AM

You claim that we are supposed to ignore the Jewish and Christian written historical sources, and impose a new demand that the Egyptian written record also be ignored.

sharrukin on December 4, 2012 at 9:18 AM

Where did I make the claim that “we are supposed to ignore the Jewish and Christian written historical sources, and impose a new demand that the Egyptian written record also be ignored”?

I didn’t; that’s a straw man argument.

Dante on December 4, 2012 at 10:06 AM

Is it just me, or do I see a duplication of Headlines stories when I switch back and forth from Drudge Report to Hot Air?

metroryder on December 4, 2012 at 10:49 AM

, San Bernardino remains among the most dangerous cities of its size in the country, posting about twice as many crime incidents as the national average. Violent crime in San Bernardino is especially high, twice that of California as a whole.

Non-Hispanic Whites were 19.0% of the population in 2010, compared to 65.6% in 1970.

Kungfoochimp on December 4, 2012 at 1:02 PM

Non-Hispanic Whites were 19.0% of the population in 2010, compared to 65.6% in 1970.

Kungfoochimp on December 4, 2012 at 1:02 PM

Surprise, surprise, when you let grab bags of brown criminals over the border, law and order takes a hit. Whodathunkit?

MelonCollie on December 4, 2012 at 1:18 PM

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