Quotes of the day

posted at 10:17 pm on November 9, 2012 by Allahpundit

That Hispanics are the fastest-growing segment of the electorate and a key swing vote in several toss-up states was well-known within the Romney campaign. That Republican opposition to immigration reform helped Democrats increase their appeal in the Hispanic community and take back the House in 2006 was also well established. Yet Romney’s team cultivated an unswerving belief that the torpid economy would sink Obama under its own weight and depress Latino support, even after the administration ordered temporary visas for Dream Act students.

Demographics—and Obama’s superior political machine—won the day. Republicans who have been sounding the alarm for years are wondering if Tuesday’s election will finally resonate as a clarion call.

“If we as Republicans had moved just a few percentage points of the Hispanic vote in states like Florida, Ohio, Colorado, and Virginia, it could have thrown the election to Romney,” said former Sen. Mel Martinez of Florida, a Cuban-American and past chairman of the Republican National Committee who fought for sweeping immigration reform. “This is not a choice. It’s either extinction or survival.”

***

The president captured 48% of the Cuban-American vote in Florida—a record high for a Democrat, according to an exit poll by Bendixen & Amandi International, Mr. Obama’s Hispanic polling firm. Republican Mitt Romney received 52%…

Given his overwhelming support among Florida’s non-Cuban Hispanic voters, who make up a growing share of the electorate, Mr. Obama carried the state’s Latino vote overall by 61% to 39%, exceeding his margin in 2008 by seven percentage points. Together, both trends are accelerating a realignment of the state’s Latino vote, from once solidly Republican to now reliably Democratic, analysts say.

“The president has successfully picked the lock in Florida,” said Fernand Amandi, managing partner at the polling firm.

***

The conservative base is smaller than it has been in three decades, with its share falling to 35% while liberals edged up to 24%, a narrowing advantage further diminished by the fact that about a fifth of that conservative base consists of blacks and Latinos who still overwhelmingly voted for Obama. The Republican conservative base seems perilously close to shrinking to white southern evangelicals, senior white males, and upper income Protestants

To be sure, a better crafted campaign would have filled in Romney’s policy goals more convincingly than the ritualistic invocation of five point plans and generic references to cutting regulation and producing more domestic energy. But that failure is not just a marketing flaw on the part of Romney’s ad men: it is a symptom of a modern conservatism that seems spent and resistant to innovation on some days, purely oppositional and reactive on other days. And the weightiest part of the recent conservative agenda, Paul Ryan’s budget plan, was barely mentioned and its details only intermittently defended. (The details of Ryan’s budget had their share of political pitfalls, but the scant attention to it by the Romney campaign surely contributed to the impression that the Republican wish list was being kept deliberately shadowy.)

***

Each of the key groups in Obama’s coalition of the ascendant is growing in society—which means that they will provide an even greater advantage to Democrats over time unless Republicans start winning more of them. “When you have a younger generation with a different set of ideas, and a changing demographic in the country, there’s going to be a tipping point; and during that tipping point, the two sides are roughly at parity,” says Morley Winograd, a senior fellow at the Democratic advocacy group NDN and coauthor with Michael Hais of two books on the millennial generation. “But at some point, that parity goes away and the direction becomes very clear.… We think this coalition is not only ascendant but will be dominant.”…

After these results, the big question facing the GOP is whether it can improve its performance among minorities, especially Hispanics, without returning to George W. Bush’s support for immigration reform that provides a pathway to citizenship for those living here illegally. That policy shift would face impassioned resistance from conservatives. “Looks like a brawl coming soon,” says longtime GOP strategist Mike Murphy. “The question is: Will the party base accept these facts, since they chose to ignore similar facts after Obama’s election four years ago?”…

“That 28 percent [minority-vote share of the electorate] will be 31 percent probably in 2016, and then it will be 34,” notes Matt Barreto, a founder of Latino Decisions, a polling firm that specializes in Hispanic voters. To win future elections, Republicans will need to either improve their minority performance or win even higher percentages of whites. “So it’s either going to get scarier in terms of those huge racial divides,” he says, “or the Republicans are going to have to sit up and say, ‘How can we cut into the Latino, African-American, and the Asian-American vote?’”

***

Maybe these people are convinced the larger GOP project can be saved simply by caving on just this one issue. That seems cracked. The bulk of the Hispanic electorate appears to instinctively vote Democratic, and not just because of immigration. (“[T]his is just a fairly liberal voting block.”) Maybe they can be wooed over to the Republican side over the course of decades. But by then there will be another wave of new, instinctively Democratic illegal immigrants (lured by the Boehner Amnesty) for Dems to appeal to. And the idea that the GOPs don’t have to change any of their other ideas if only they appease this one ethnic group (making up 10% of the electorate) is highly questionable, as David Frum has argued. … There were plenty of other reasons why Romney lost. (If he’d gotten McCain’s share of the Latino vote … he still would have lost.)…

A much better strategy would be to enact the enforcement measures (including a border fence and a system of employment checks), then wait a few years and see if they survive. If they do, sure, come up with some kind of amnesty. You could calmly pitch that plan to Latinos–it ends in the same place (amnesty). But that’s not the sort of sensible approach you will insist on if you are part of a stampede of panicked pols and consultants whose only goal is to pander to what they think Latinos want to make up for their shortcomings in other areas.

***

If Republicans want to change their stance on immigration, they should do so on the merits, not out of a belief that only immigration policy stands between them and a Republican Hispanic majority. It is not immigration policy that creates the strong bond between Hispanics and the Democratic party, but the core Democratic principles of a more generous safety net, strong government intervention in the economy, and progressive taxation. Hispanics will prove to be even more decisive in the victory of Governor Jerry Brown’s Proposition 30, which raised upper-income taxes and the sales tax, than in the Obama election.

And California is the wave of the future. A March 2011 poll by Moore Information found that Republican economic policies were a stronger turn-off for Hispanic voters in California than Republican positions on illegal immigration. Twenty-nine percent of Hispanic voters were suspicious of the Republican party on class-warfare grounds — “it favors only the rich”; “Republicans are selfish and out for themselves”; “Republicans don’t represent the average person”– compared with 7 percent who objected to Republican immigration stances.

***

To follow up on the question of whether Hispanics are held back from their natural Republican affinities by immigration-reform obstructionism, let’s not forget Obamacare. A Fox News Latino poll in September 2012 found that 62 percent of likely Latino voters backed President Obama’s handling of health care, including the Affordable Care Act. Only 25 percent of those voters wanted the act repealed. The Catholic Church’s strong opposition to the bill’s contraception mandate did not tip the Latino scales against it, dealing another blow to the myth of the “social values” Hispanic conservative. A Romney Spanish-language ad trumpeting Romney’s opposition to the Affordable Care Act showed that his strategists “don’t know what they are doing,” Latino pollster Matt Barreto told USA Today in August…

Out of sheer fatigue, I would almost be willing to support an E-Verify-preceded amnesty (starting with a DREAM Act that, unlike every extant version, disqualifies applicants with criminal records and requires serious educational attainment) in exchange for the elimination of chain migration and its replacement by a skills-based selection process. Congressional Democrats’ recent torpedoing of green cards for foreign Ph.D. science graduates, however, simply to preserve the “diversity” visa lottery shows how deep Democratic commitment to low-skilled immigration is. It would be risky to assume that they don’t know what they’re doing.

***

It is prudent and sensible to favor amnesty for the remaining non-violent, long-term illegal aliens after a fully articulated enforcement system is in place and functioning and proven. But that will require some time, not just to staff up and put the physical and IT infrastructure in place but also to overcome the years-long scorched-earth litigation campaign the ACLU and its comrades will launch to stop all enforcement initiatives. (Or do you think they’ll feel bound by whatever illusory deal their congressional allies are compelled to settle for?)…

The Left understands much better the point of mass immigration. See, for instance, the comments of Eliseo Medina, vice president of the SEIU and an honorary chairman of the Democratic Socialists of America: “[Immigrants] will solidify and expand the progressive coalition for the future. . . . We will create a governing coalition for the long term not just for an election cycle.”

Conservatives shouldn’t be helping them do this.

***

“This is a very, very dangerous area for Rubio if he has national aspirations,” said Roy Beck, head of the anti-immigration group Numbers USA. “You’ve had Republicans trying to do this in the past that really lost their status in the party once they did it.”…

In the aftermath of Tuesday’s elections, many Republicans believe they need to recalibrate and listen to Rubio. But while Rubio may be able to sway his Senate colleagues, his influence among House members is less certain.

“My gut is there are not too many Republicans who have been against comprehensive reform who will change positions,” said longtime pro-immigration activist Rick Swartz, who founded the National Immigration Forum. Reform “is easy to talk about but harder to get it done.”

***

Former presidential candidate Rick Santorum charged Thursday that President Barack Obama and the Democratic Party held off on immigration reform so they could capitalize politically during the election.

“It did not get done, in my opinion, by this president because he wanted this as an issue,” Santorum said on Fox News’s “On the Record with Greta Van Susteren.” “I don’t believe the Democrats are at all sincere about doing anything and compromising with Republicans on immigration.”…

“They would rather have the issue and continue to drive…this wedge between races and creeds and classes or whatever else they want to divide America,” Santorum said of the Democratic approach to the immigration issue. “That’s unfortunate. Let’s see if Barack Obama, in a second term, is serious about solving problems or wants to perpetuate politics.”

***

On Feb. 11, 2011, the person who should have been the Republican nominee laconically warned conservatives about a prerequisite for persuading people to make painful adjustments to a rickety entitlement state. Said Indiana’s Gov. Mitch Daniels: “A more affirmative, ‘better angels’ approach to voters is really less an aesthetic than a practical one. With apologies for the banality, I submit that, as we ask Americans to join us on such a boldly different course, it would help if they liked us, just a bit.” Romney was a diligent warrior. Next time, Republicans need a more likable one.

And one who tilts toward the libertarian side of the Republican Party’s fusion of social and laissez-faire conservatism. Most voters already favor less punitive immigration policies than the ones angrily advocated by clenched-fist Republicans unwilling to acknowledge that immigrating — risking uncertainty for personal and family betterment — is an entrepreneurial act. The speed with which civil unions and same-sex marriage have become debatable topics and even mainstream policies is astonishing. As is conservatives’ failure to recognize this: They need not endorse such policies, but neither need they despise those, such as young people, who favor them.

***

Via WaPo:

***

Amnesty for whoever is here. And it’s gonna be blanket, and it’s gonna be pretty quick. That’s where we’re headed. So I want to get in the game. I want to propose EIB amnesty. And I’ll agree to it. Amnesty for every illegal citizen who is here. There’s just one caveat. In exchange for having all of the laws that have been violated forgiven…

In exchange for blanket automatic citizenship without having to take the test, without having to learn the documents… (You’re here. You’ve been here a number of years so you’re a citizen. That’s where we’re headed.) One caveat: You can’t vote for 25 years. And let’s see how much support that idea gets. Let’s see if amnesty is what really is desired. Let’s see if it’s citizenship that all of these compassionate Democrats really have in mind.

***



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Here is another group to pander to. 85% went for Bark. Put a halal tongue condom on and they might spread their cheeks. It will only cost a little sharia mumbo jumbo whatever that is, and the rubes are yours.

BL@KBIRD on November 10, 2012 at 12:57 AM

Dire Straits on November 10, 2012 at 12:50 AM

Very nice, Dire. Good choice. :)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 12:58 AM

what does Obama do? He panders to the stoners with a campaign commercial featuring Harold and Kumar – then he circumvents state laws and prosecutes marijuana dispensaries! It’s how they win! They pander to stupid people. This is not to say all pot smokers are stupid, just as all women aren’t stupid (even though a whole gaggle of ‘em voted for their lady parts)

Slade73 on November 10, 2012 at 12:58 AM

This election has really exposed a disjoint between the Republicans and reality. And it seems to be continuing in the aftermath. People talking about years and decades before the Repubicans will be back seems like absolute madness to me. The United States of America will be insolvent before then, when the People should have no choice but to swing back to the fiscal sanity of the Right. That is the moment Republicans should be preparing for. Not trying to figure out how to win the Latino vote.

Scopper on November 10, 2012 at 12:12 AM

Agreed. I get that right after an election loss(especially one that seemed like a sure win to many on our side), it’s human nature to wonder what went wrong and what could’ve been done differently. Well here are some undeniable truths according to exit polls that unfortunately appear to have doomed Mitt Romney from day one:

1) Enough voters either thought the economy was improving(albeit slowly) or still blamed Bush for its current state that Obama was able to avoid the fate that befell Carter in 1980. Considering Romney centered his entire campaign around Obama’s mishandling of the economy, that meant he could never gain a decisive edge on the key issue on the minds of voters and thus suffered a close defeat.

2) Most voters felt that Obama shared their values and concerns. That’s code for Mitt Romney is a rich guy who I can’t relate to and he might take my free stuff from me. Part of this is no doubt due to the negative ad campaign Obama ran against Mitt for months during the summer and fall defining him as a corporate raider and fat cat. But it’s also because Mitt ran on a platform of reducing the size of government, reforming entitlements, and self-reliance and individualism. A bold, big ideas kind of campaign, but one that obviously a slight majority of the electorate was not receptive to.

3) This is just my personal opinion(though I know I’m right on this), but I still maintain that too many Americans did not want to fire the first (half)black President. The optics would’ve been horrible for them and thus they looked for any excuse to keep him on board for another 4 years despite their reservations about his lackluster first term performance. So they convinced themselves the economy was getting better or that Bush was still the reason it sucked or that his handling of Sandy was brilliant or that he cared about them more than Mitt. Or in the case of about 12 million or so voters from 2008, they merely stayed home and abstained.

In summary, going forward the GOP can take solace in the fact that the economy is very likely to not be too good come 2016 if Obama’s agenda is left unchecked. And most folks are not gonna be receptive to “blame Bush” 8 years after he left office, thus the Dems will receive the vast majority of the heat. All of the early Republican contenders for 2016 aren’t worth $200 million or even 1/10 that amount, so the vulture capitalist attack ads won’t work. They can further blunt the “he only cares about the rich” narrative the Dems love to trot out if the House GOP gives Obama tax hikes for people making 200 grand a year or more. Take that talking point off the table, please! And finally, unless the Dems plan on running Deval Patrick or a very inexperienced Cory Booker for President in 2016, they have no black candidate to succeed Obama. Their crop of Latino contenders is almost non-existent as well. Tony Villar has a horrible record, and Julian Castro hasn’t done anything yet. That leaves a few governors, Bite Me, and Hillary vying for the nod. That crop is unlikely to succeed like Obama did in luring young voters and minorities to the polls in the same numbers, particularly if the economy is still depressed for those groups.

So hang in there, don’t cave on your principles, improve the GOTV effort, and bring in some marketing consultants instead of these sorry ass DC insiders to figure out how to tailor your message to young’uns, minorities, and single women. Do all that and 2016 will be for the GOP what 2008 was for the Dems.

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 1:00 AM

I meant ridiculous in the sense of Walker trying to act as if she’s innocent. This isn’t even subtle cheating. FL’s Secretary of State is Ken Detzner, and he’s the one who should be responsible for asking her what’s going on down there. I looked him up and he was a Dem who became a Republican in 1984 so I assume he was a Reagan Dem who became a Reagan Republican.

If this has been in the works for a long time, then the Dems idea of GOTV has taken on an entirely different meaning.

INC on November 10, 2012 at 12:45 AM

Was that what I saw on Fox this a.m.? The election officials (ladies) making statements that they were overwhelmed by the mess, with one of them in tears saying “she will try harder next time”.

Something is horribly wrong.

JPeterman on November 10, 2012 at 1:00 AM

Just don’t let the negative feelings overwhelm you. We need you in this fight!!

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 12:56 AM

It’s a great point. I will try. I promise.

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:00 AM

For Friday.

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:02 AM

Falcon46 on November 10, 2012 at 12:24 AM

What was that rule the Romney people rammed through at the convention?

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:04 AM

For Friday.

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:02 AM

I’m thinking more along these lines.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:06 AM

No, JP, a tinfoil hat doesn’t become me. I prefer the tinfoil crown.

TXUS on November 10, 2012 at 12:57 AM

It’s always good to think big.

JPeterman on November 10, 2012 at 1:06 AM

xblade on November 10, 2012 at 12:56 AM
both good points..
and no one has mentioned puerto rico..
im sure statehood isnt going to be 50% dem 50% rep…

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 1:06 AM

Somethin’s wrong here

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:07 AM

*the tuuuuuuurkey, the mashed potatooooooooooes, we’re gonna have a good time*

it’s stuck in my head!

Slade73 on November 10, 2012 at 1:07 AM

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:06 AM

Awesome!
(I opened your link in a new tab. As soon as I heard the first notes, I moved the mouse to the lower-right corner. Had to crank it all the way up!)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:10 AM

Knock it off, stupid voters (and candidates)!

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:10 AM

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:10 AM

:)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:12 AM

hey

we took a bunch of clowns, picked one, then pushed the Most Powerful Man in the World to the brink. So much so he spilled Kenyan tears when his viciously deceitful strategy payed off. Elections with incumbents aren’t usually this close. I hardly think we need to blow up the framework.

Slade73 on November 10, 2012 at 1:12 AM

I love how so many Repubs are pulling a Barry. Overnight, all these pundits are evolving with regards to immigration/amnesty.

As far as I’m concerned, it’s pretty much another “Squirrel!” moment. Just latch onto something and run with it.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 12:08 AM

Yep, it’s nuts. We will not get any Latino votes by supporting amnesty – but we WILL further alienate our own base. All you’ve got to do is go back to 1986 and look at Reagan’s numbers, after he gave out some amnesty. I think in 1988 he got a little bump and drew 37%. Then when George H.W. Bush ran in 1992, the numbers fell back to a more normal 32%

Hispanics, like everyone else, are motivated by “free stuff.”

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:13 AM

How about this repeat?
(Always makes me feel better.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 12:55 AM

There is a ton of talent in that video..:)

PS..I agree GH rules!!..:)

Dire Straits on November 10, 2012 at 1:15 AM

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:12 AM

How about how I felt after the vote, Tuesday.

(PS–Turn it up, ’cause that’s MORE like how I felt.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:15 AM

They defeated us with the early vote by an average of 10 points… I am aware of the Gallup polls showing us winning the early vote but I have hard time believing it… Every other poll showed Obama winning the early voters by a large margin…

mnjg on November 10, 2012 at 12:29 AM

That needs to be fixed. I find it ludicrous that the Dems are just simply better at getting out the early vote compared to Republicans. We’re sitting here stereotyping a lot of Dem voters as lazy and unmotivated, yet somehow they’re the ones who show up and wait in line weeks before Election Day or request absentee ballots and fill them out. Yes, voter fraud probably accounts for some of the early padding of their lead, but that can’t explain all of it. Otherwise they would’ve stolen the 2010 midterms as well.

Why is it so hard to get Republicans to show up early to vote? If they need to be targeted by GOTV efforts, so be it. But the more early votes we bank, the more fencesitters we can target on Election Day so that we don’t have to sweat next time losing a layup like Florida by 50,000 votes.

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 1:15 AM

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 1:00 AM

The reason Romney lost is because the two parties are evenly divided and Romney sucks even worse than McCain did, and always has since he signed Romneycare and lead the gun-grabbing movement.

FloatingRock on November 10, 2012 at 1:16 AM

Two things to consider folks:
1. If amnesty was the solution, we wouldn’t be having this discussion today, would we? It would have been fixed with the 86 amnesty.
2. Democrats aren’t desperate to get amnesty passed because they think it will help Republicans. Don’t forget that.
xblade on November 10, 2012 at 12:56 AM

Exactly!

bluegill on November 10, 2012 at 1:16 AM

Hispanics, like everyone else, are motivated by “free stuff.”

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:13 AM

everyone loves em some santa..!!
look over there …they are giving away free stuff…
im goina go get me some…

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 1:17 AM

There is a ton of talent in that video..:)

PS..I agree GH rules!!..:)

Dire Straits on November 10, 2012 at 1:15 AM

True. True.
(And, there’s not too many left. Did you see the Rolling Stone with the reporter BEGGING Bob Dylan to endorse Bark? It was kinda funny, though I never expected him to hold out indefinitely.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:18 AM

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:15 AM

LOL. Got it cranked up right now. Most excellent choice.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:18 AM

r keller on November 10, 2012 at 12:35 AM

Social club for Old, Angry, White Guys? :)

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:18 AM

Very nice, Dire. Good choice. :)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 12:58 AM

Gotta believe..We just can’t give up..:)

Dire Straits on November 10, 2012 at 1:19 AM

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:18 AM

LoLz..I hear you..:)

Dire Straits on November 10, 2012 at 1:21 AM

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 1:15 AM

I would say more Republicans and conservatives have jobs, families, and real lives. That might make it harder for them to get out early.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:23 AM

This country (and the Republican party) needs a REMEDY!

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:24 AM

The reason Romney lost is because the two parties are evenly divided and Romney sucks even worse than McCain did, and always has since he signed Romneycare and lead the gun-grabbing movement.

FloatingRock on November 10, 2012 at 1:16 AM

Well, if McCain/Palin got the vote out better than Romney, it was because of Sarah. There was not that much enthusiasm for McCain – that I recall.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:25 AM

Gotta believe..We just can’t give up..:)

Dire Straits on November 10, 2012 at 1:19 AM

Amen, brother! Love that song and it’s very appropriate.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:27 AM

Indeed, but have you thought about this, that he didn’t get mixed up with them, but signed up to keep an eye on them?

TXUS on November 10, 2012 at 12:39 AM

I guess it’s possible. If so, he’s playing a dangerous game with those Chicago clowns.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:28 AM

Social club for Old, Angry, White Guys? :)

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:18 AM

i should qualify my story a bit. Fist, no, there were some ‘middle aged’ ladies there too. This is a township that extends to a very D area..and we’re just in a smallest rump area. We border a large township that is Red…so i’ve been to their meetings too. big diff. the Red township can pack then in…and it is younger, probably more active. but it is a further drive…and they kinda hinted that i should go to MY township (but they were very nice)

i probably just live in a dud of a township.

r keller on November 10, 2012 at 1:29 AM

I would say more Republicans and conservatives have jobs, families, and real lives. That might make it harder for them to get out early.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:23 AM

BS. The wife and I both work and we have a 2 year-old. We made time to go vote a week and a half before Election Day. We also voted early in 2010. It’s not that difficult to do.

I will concede that there are many folks out there who simply aren’t aware of when and where they can vote early and that’s where the GOP’s GOTV effort can make a difference. But don’t tell me most people can’t set aside an hour of their time to go vote ahead of Election Day.

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 1:35 AM

Well, if McCain/Palin got the vote out better than Romney, it was because of Sarah. There was not that much enthusiasm for McCain – that I recall.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:25 AM

I agree. I believe Romney was a much better candidate than McCain. Most voters, myself included, were excited to cast a vote for HER.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:35 AM

This country (and the Republican party) needs a REMEDY!

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:24 AM

I knew it!

Lol. Great pick. (That tune kinda “winds up”–like a spring, IMO.
Dunno if my meaning is clear, but I love (what I perceive to be) the building tension in that song.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:36 AM

Good evening!! I just wanted to pop in and tell everyone that I am not missing because I am in some deep dark depression (although I am bummed) but I have a bunch of company coming for the next couple of weeks. I have to make this place look like humans live here. If any the pre-election contributors are lurking, come back, there will be plenty to talk about.

Cindy Munford on November 10, 2012 at 1:37 AM

Well, if you ask me its obvious we have to do something about the Hispanic vote. My knee jerk reaction was to offer some sort of amnesty, but after thinking about it for awhile, I think it’d be unwise to leap to any decisions that we may regret later.

We have a little time to think this over. During that time, I think we need to take a good long hard look at how the Texas Republican Party handles elections.

From what I’ve read, the Texas Republican Party does better with African American and Hispanic Voters than any other state in the nation. It wouldn’t hurt to take a look and see what it is they do exactly to hold down the margins on these voting blocks. I mean, they’ve got to know something, they would’ve become a swing state years ago if they hadn’t figured out SOMETHING to make inroads with these groups.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:37 AM

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:35 AM

Yep. Sarah Palin, SP, SparkPlug, SP

I voted for HER.

SparkPlug on November 10, 2012 at 1:38 AM

but i just looked up the numbers of the last several elections..since 88

raw numbers of Rs and Ds voting in presidential elections. the Raw count of Ds has gone up every year…even with perot.

so Ds go up every year…until this year.

Rs not so much. goes down, then up, then down.

since 2000 r’s

50, 62, 58, and i guess this year 58

92 and 96 had Rs with big drop from 88.

(btw, Dole ran for vp in 76…then prezy in 96…bush in 88, 92, 00, 04…let me just say straight out..that is a BIG problem, weak party)

r keller on November 10, 2012 at 1:38 AM

Yep, it’s nuts. We will not get any Latino votes by supporting amnesty – but we WILL further alienate our own base. All you’ve got to do is go back to 1986 and look at Reagan’s numbers, after he gave out some amnesty. I think in 1988 he got a little bump and drew 37%. Then when George H.W. Bush ran in 1992, the numbers fell back to a more normal 32%

Hispanics, like everyone else, are motivated by “free stuff.”

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:13 AM

I think the plan with Romney was to replace the GOP base with independents. The “moderates” succeeded in winning the independents but got blown out in the election since a chunk of the base failed to turn out. Their next “brilliant” plan is to do amnesty. The sudden rush for amnesty is probably also motivated in part to find an excuse for their failures, to avoid being punished for their incompetence.

Doomberg on November 10, 2012 at 1:39 AM

Cindy Munford on November 10, 2012 at 1:37 AM

Hiya, Cindy. Hey, while you’re in the cleaning mode/mood, you could head on over to my place. I’ll pay you in chocolate. :)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:40 AM

PS..I agree GH rules!!..:)

Dire Straits on November 10, 2012 at 1:15 AM

He seems real nice but doesn’t post much. There is another GoHogs but That on is a liberal. The conservative one is Hawgs, not hogs.

SparkPlug on November 10, 2012 at 1:41 AM

Dunno if my meaning is clear, but I love (what I perceive to be) the building tension in that song.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:36 AM

Lol. I figured it out! The secret lies in the black ladies singing the chorus. THEY are the BUILDERS!

Great stuff, Grace.

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:41 AM

since 2000 r’s

50, 62, 58, and i guess this year 58

hmmmmm…forgot the M…these are Millions of votes

r keller on November 10, 2012 at 1:41 AM

Repubs are going to have to give up something if they expect to be relevant.

The Dems have essentially given up on fighting gun control, death penalty and welfare…..for long term strategic reasons or not. It was a paradigm shift for them.

Conservatives will have to let go of a few issues and simply fight to shape them.

Its grow up time.

rickyricardo on November 10, 2012 at 1:41 AM

Lol. Great pick. (That tune kinda “winds up”–like a spring, IMO.
Dunno if my meaning is clear, but I love (what I perceive to be) the building tension in that song.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:36 AM

Yes, I know what you mean. It’s just a really great tune. Always makes me want to dance. Not quite like the lead…but close. :)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:42 AM

Obamacare can be shaped with law suits, especially by religious groups. Obamacare, however, is here to stay.

rickyricardo on November 10, 2012 at 1:43 AM

I sure hope Cindy comes back soon.

SparkPlug on November 10, 2012 at 1:43 AM

Good evening!! I just wanted to pop in and tell everyone that I am not missing because I am in some deep dark depression (although I am bummed) but I have a bunch of company coming for the next couple of weeks. I have to make this place look like humans live here. If any the pre-election contributors are lurking, come back, there will be plenty to talk about.

Cindy Munford on November 10, 2012 at 1:37 AM

Lol. I tried to stay away. (I was waiting for the Obama trolls to leave. They’re not going anywhere.)

Let me know if you need me. I’ll take a Greyhound and play butler.
(My English accent is actually passable.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:44 AM

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:40 AM

Very very tempting.

Cindy Munford on November 10, 2012 at 1:45 AM

Not quite like the lead…but close. :)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:42 AM

Lol. Hope you’re not as skinny as that fella!

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:45 AM

Well, if you ask me its obvious we have to do something about the Hispanic vote. My knee jerk reaction was to offer some sort of amnesty, but after thinking about it for awhile, I think it’d be unwise to leap to any decisions that we may regret later.

We have a little time to think this over. During that time, I think we need to take a good long hard look at how the Texas Republican Party handles elections.

From what I’ve read, the Texas Republican Party does better with African American and Hispanic Voters than any other state in the nation. It wouldn’t hurt to take a look and see what it is they do exactly to hold down the margins on these voting blocks. I mean, they’ve got to know something, they would’ve become a swing state years ago if they hadn’t figured out SOMETHING to make inroads with these groups.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:37 AM

Well as a resident of Texas since 1984, I can tell you that a lot of it is likely due to culture. Conservatism is not a dirty word or foreign concept down here. We have no state income tax and are damn proud of that. We like oil since we’re right on the Gulf. And we take border security seriously given our location geographically.

Add all that up and this is just an area of the country that’s receptive to the Republican platform. And it’s not like Texas is some all-white enclave. I live in Houston which is extremely diverse. Yet somehow this state still went for Romney by nearly 17 points and easily elected Ted Cruz to the Senate.

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 1:46 AM

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:37 AM

Interesting. I live in Texas, but have never given that much thought. I wonder if it has to do with the size of the state. Houston, DFW, Austin are typically Dem country, but there are just so many rural areas. Perhaps, to some degree, it depends on what part of the state minority groups choose to call home.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:47 AM

SparkPlug on November 10, 2012 at 1:43 AM

I’ll be around, just not consistent or constant. First guest is my daughter so I can be on the computer next to the guest room. Later guests might be annoyed by my crazy hours, so I will be pretending to be normal then.

Cindy Munford on November 10, 2012 at 1:48 AM

I think the plan with Romney was to replace the GOP base with independents. The “moderates” succeeded in winning the independents but got blown out in the election since a chunk of the base failed to turn out. Their next “brilliant” plan is to do amnesty. The sudden rush for amnesty is probably also motivated in part to find an excuse for their failures, to avoid being punished for their incompetence.

Doomberg on November 10, 2012 at 1:39 AM

Sorry to break it to you, but while Romney won the independent vote, the independent vote was DOWN, dramatically over 2008. It looks like at least some of those missing white voters may have been Independent voters that stayed home.

So, no, this analysis is flawed I’m afraid. The rush to offer Amnesty is a response to two things. First, its a result of the simple fact that, according to exit poll data, 60% of Americans want a path to citizenship. Second, because Obama went from getting 60% of the Hispanic Vote in 2008, to getting 70% in 2012.

We can function and win elections at 60%, even with an increased Hispanic turnout we would’ve won narrowly if only sixty percent voted for Obama. At seventy percent, we have no chance of winning the Presidency. Even winning Florida is an incredibly uphill battle under those conditions, and without Florida we have NO path to the Presidency.

This does not mean that offering amnesty is the right decision. However, there is absolutely ZERO doubt that we have, HAVE to do something about the Hispanic vote.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:48 AM

3) This is just my personal opinion(though I know I’m right on this), but I still maintain that too many Americans did not want to fire the first (half)black President. The optics would’ve been horrible for them and thus they looked for any excuse to keep him on board for another 4 years despite their reservations about his lackluster first term performance. So they convinced themselves the economy was getting better or that Bush was still the reason it sucked or that his handling of Sandy was brilliant or that he cared about them more than Mitt. Or in the case of about 12 million or so voters from 2008, they merely stayed home and abstained.

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 1:00 AM

I think you’re right on the money with this. In a way you could say it’s “white guilt.” Given the history of African-Americans in this country, I think it’s normal for people to want to see the first black president to succeed – so they are liable to give him pass . . . after pass.

You could see this with a lot of the liberal media too. Since Barry is the first black president, I think they have gone to great lengths to prop him up and cover for him – much more than they would for a white Democrat like Bill Clinton.

For me personally, I think it’s actually condescendeing and a bit racist to go to treat someone so different based on his race. I think Obama should be held to the same standard that you would hold any president.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:48 AM

Yep. Sarah Palin, SP, SparkPlug, SP

I voted for HER.

SparkPlug on November 10, 2012 at 1:38 AM

Aha! Now it all makes sense. SP & SP. Smart, attractive, witty…must be in the initials. ;)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:49 AM

Lol. Hope you’re not as skinny as that fella!

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 1:45 AM

Ha, nope. I’m slim, but not like that.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:54 AM

Interesting. I live in Texas, but have never given that much thought. I wonder if it has to do with the size of the state. Houston, DFW, Austin are typically Dem country, but there are just so many rural areas. Perhaps, to some degree, it depends on what part of the state minority groups choose to call home.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:47 AM

Well, from what I’ve read, Perry and the other GOP candidates there get about 40% of the Hispanic vote. This is about the same percentage that Bush got nationally, and about the same percent that McCain managed.

The more I think about it, the more I think that members of Bush’s campaign staff must have been helping McCain with the Hispanic vote somehow. I mean, I had kinda attributed it to McCain being known for wanting some form of Amnesty himself, but Obama was offering to give it with fewer strings attached. Between that and Bush fatigue, you’d have thought that McCain would’ve captured less of the Hispanic vote than Bush did. Instead he managed to about tie it.

Obviously, SOMEBODY out there has SOME sort of strategy for at least keeping the margins down a little. Somehow, we have to figure out what it is and start implementing it, NOW.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:54 AM

Doomberg on November 10, 2012 at 1:39 AM

If the GOP leadership decides to support amnesty – they’re nuts. It will hurt us more than help us.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:54 AM

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:47 AM

rural space matters…but its those darn cities..
without the big cities this place is red
from top to bottom and right to left….red

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 1:56 AM

If the GOP leadership decides to support amnesty – they’re nuts. It will hurt us more than help us.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:54 AM

Bingo! That’s it in a nutshell.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 1:58 AM

This does not mean that offering amnesty is the right decision. However, there is absolutely ZERO doubt that we have, HAVE to do something about the Hispanic vote.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:48 AM

Well, the solution I keep hearing is Marco Rubio. Amazingly, he was in Iowa today. I like Rubio; he’s charismatic for sure. But he worries me because he’s got no executive experience.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:58 AM

rural space matters…but its those darn cities..
without the big cities this place is red
from top to bottom and right to left….red

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 1:56 AM

Exactly. The first time I saw a US electoral map–by county–it blew my mind. Awash in red.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:00 AM

This does not mean that offering amnesty is the right decision. However, there is absolutely ZERO doubt that we have, HAVE to do something about the Hispanic vote.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:48 AM

One more thing – it might be fun to run him, since it would drive the Dems crazy. They would hate to see the GOP nominate the first Hispanic.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:01 AM

I think you’re right on the money with this. In a way you could say it’s “white guilt.” Given the history of African-Americans in this country, I think it’s normal for people to want to see the first black president to succeed – so they are liable to give him pass . . . after pass.

You could see this with a lot of the liberal media too. Since Barry is the first black president, I think they have gone to great lengths to prop him up and cover for him – much more than they would for a white Democrat like Bill Clinton.

For me personally, I think it’s actually condescendeing and a bit racist to go to treat someone so different based on his race. I think Obama should be held to the same standard that you would hold any president.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 1:48 AM

I missed Doughboy’s original post.

I’m not sure of the accuracy of your opinions. What I’m about to say is fairly controversial.

My view is that our current media and popular opinion propels the notion that what black folks (especially black males) do is not debatable. When we question any of their actions, it’s because we have racism in our hearts. They are not responsible for their wrongs, for they (their ancestors, actually) have been wronged in the past. It has become taboo to question a black man’s actions and/or thoughts.

I’d be insulted, if I were black.

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:03 AM

Well, from what I’ve read, Perry and the other GOP candidates there get about 40% of the Hispanic vote. This is about the same percentage that Bush got nationally, and about the same percent that McCain managed.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:54 AM

Maybe it’s being from the South. Bush did well with Hispanics when running for Governor and he did well in his Presidential bids. Perry’s done well. Both are Texans. McCain did better than Romney. The former is from Arizona. The latter from the northeast. I’m just spitballing here, but that could at least have something to do with it.

Another possibility with regard to Bush specifically is that he was a proud social conservative and frankly a fiscal liberal. If you look at the exit polling, that sounds like what a lot of Hispanics consider themselves. That’s a conundrum for the GOP, but it is possible to market conservatism in a way that doesn’t scare minorities into thinking it’s a call for little or no government(i.e. libertarianism).

Then again, at the rate we’re going financially, there won’t be a safety net left for ANYONE in a few years, so both parties will have to retool their messaging.

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 2:05 AM

One more thing – it might be fun to run him, since it would drive the Dems crazy. They would hate to see the GOP nominate the first Hispanic.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:01 AM

That’s just it, though. When we run a minority, they’re not really a minority. They are deemed a sellout and worse.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:06 AM

Our chances would improve if we could put my magic 8 ball in charge of the GOP strategery.

Magic 8 Ball is very charismatic and knows how to win.

SparkPlug on November 10, 2012 at 2:06 AM

we need to explain s.l.o.w.l.y with little words
to the city folk…why our ideas are better for
them than just ‘free stuff’
like:…hammer the per person debt was the day BHO got into
office and what it was the day befor he got re-elected..
hammer the cost of a green agenda and how many watts
does it really deliver compaired to coal or nat gas…
hammer the cos of gas befor and after…drilling and mining
make sence because….its …ideas…properly explained,,,

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 2:07 AM

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:03 AM

Forgot my main point: The idea is that blacks are not responsible for their actions. (Liberal whites act as if they are savages who can’t control themselves.)

(This is what would insult me, were I black.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:08 AM

The Dems have essentially given up on fighting gun control, death penalty and welfare…..for long term strategic reasons or not. It was a paradigm shift for them.

Conservatives will have to let go of a few issues and simply fight to shape them.

Its grow up time.

rickyricardo on November 10, 2012 at 1:41 AM

On gun control, says who? There’s been plenty of whispering about the UN Small Arms Treaty as of late, and the entire point of F&F was to try to drum up support for gun control. It most certainly is not off the table.

So, no, this analysis is flawed I’m afraid. The rush to offer Amnesty is a response to two things. First, its a result of the simple fact that, according to exit poll data, 60% of Americans want a path to citizenship. Second, because Obama went from getting 60% of the Hispanic Vote in 2008, to getting 70% in 2012.

We can function and win elections at 60%, even with an increased Hispanic turnout we would’ve won narrowly if only sixty percent voted for Obama. At seventy percent, we have no chance of winning the Presidency. Even winning Florida is an incredibly uphill battle under those conditions, and without Florida we have NO path to the Presidency.

This does not mean that offering amnesty is the right decision. However, there is absolutely ZERO doubt that we have, HAVE to do something about the Hispanic vote.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 1:48 AM

The problem with this response is that amnesty will just essentially throw millions and millions of fresh votes into the Democrats camp while gaining us nothing. There is this weird assumption among some “moderates” that if we just give them amnesty they’ll all vote for us, but history shows us this isn’t true. I’m fine, in theory, with “Hispanic outreach,” but it’s usually code words for various lesser forms of partial legalization or else welfare, which are also unlikely to work.

The bottom line is “giving them something” is the Democrats’ game and something they will always, always beat us at. If we’ve truly reached the point where we can no longer win elections without expanding government, we might as well give up and quit being involved with politics given how close we are to national bankruptcy and try to pick up the pieces after the economy has collapsed.

I also have zero confidence given that the same people who were completely wrong about Romney are now telling us amnesty or various forms of “partial legalization” is a “sure thing.” These are the folks who have been caving into the Democrats and increasing spending at a slower pace for decades.

Doomberg on November 10, 2012 at 2:08 AM

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:03 AM

I think we’re saying the same thing actually. I try to follow Martin Luther King’s wish – that people be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin.

I’ll also say that Barack Obama will definitely use his race in situations he thinks will benefit him. He’ll play the race card – and usually get one of his surrogates to do it.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:09 AM

SparkPlug on November 10, 2012 at 2:06 AM

I concur. Added bonus, you would become rich by being the Magic 8 Ball’s manager.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:11 AM

That’s just it, though. When we run a minority, they’re not really a minority. They are deemed a sellout and worse.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:06 AM

LOL. Well, if that’s the case then we can’t win. But I think the “historic” nature of running someone like Rubio is bound to help us a little.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:13 AM

That’s just it, though. When we run a minority, they’re not really a minority. They are deemed a sellout and worse.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:06 AM

But we’ve never fielded a minority candidate at the top of a Republican Presidential ticket before. Let’s say Marco Rubio runs in 2016 and wins the nomination(he’d be the odds-on favorite if he entered the primaries). If the Democrat/media complex starts to trash him as a token Hispanic and lobs insults(like calling him a coconut), they’re risking alienating Hispanic voters which is suicidal for them electorally.

BTW, I’m not advocating identity politics. Rubio’s resume will be thin compared to the likes of Walker, Jindal, Daniels, Ryan, and yes the “beloved” Jeb Bush(although it will be superior to Obama’s in 2008). But he probably would have the best shot at actually winning since he’d steal enough of the Hispanic vote and possibly the young’uns given his age to make it very difficult for the Dems to hold onto the White House(especially after 8 years of Obamanomics).

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 2:14 AM

The Dems have essentially given up on fighting gun control, death penalty and welfare…..for long term strategic reasons or not. It was a paradigm shift for them.

rickyricardo

When did this happen?

And it’s not like Texas is some all-white enclave. I live in Houston which is extremely diverse. Yet somehow this state still went for Romney by nearly 17 points and easily elected Ted Cruz to the Senate.

Doughboy

You mean this Ted Cruz?

“I am categorically opposed to amnesty,” Ted Cruz said in a television appearance uploaded to YouTube by his campaign in June. “Amnesty is wrong, it’s contrary to rule of law and it’s unfair to the millions of legal immigrants who waited in line and came here legally.”

Cruz also opposes President Barack Obama’s directive to exempt most immigrants brought here illegally as children from deportation—an action Cruz called “illegal” during a televised debate last month.

Can’t be. The GOP assures us this isn’t possible.

xblade on November 10, 2012 at 2:15 AM

I think we’re saying the same thing actually. I try to follow Martin Luther King’s wish – that people be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:09 AM

I think MLK’s “dream” is one of the most poetic in our nation’s history. It’s too bad it was forgotten as soon as it was uttered.

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:15 AM

Was that what I saw on Fox this a.m.? The election officials (ladies) making statements that they were overwhelmed by the mess, with one of them in tears saying “she will try harder next time”.

Something is horribly wrong.

JPeterman on November 10, 2012 at 1:00 AM

I didn’t catch Fox. I can tell you that each county in FL has an elected supervisor of elections. That person, whether male or female, hires and trains poll workers. They are usually women—I assume because the work is seasonal with an occasional man who looks old enough to be retired. We have a man who is always sitting down outside the door—I assume to call the cops if there is trouble. I think there’s also a couple of people at a table behind the tables.

Everywhere I’ve been in FL there are tables with signs containing letters of the alphabet telling you where to stand in line. It’s always been very orderly. Maybe slow, but orderly. You step up, show ID, it’s checked out, you sign and then you’re handed a ballot.

And as Yoda said, “Do or do not, there is no try.” The work is not that hard. There may be crowds, and a long day, but it shouldn’t resemble a bargain sale with people haphazardly wandering around. There should be no mess.

INC on November 10, 2012 at 2:16 AM

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 2:14 AM

I get your point, but I think that then we are falling into a trap of sorts. We need to up our portions of the Hispanic vote? Why then, we’ll run an Hispanic.

Carried to the extreme (which is how the Dems play), we would need to run a single, female, bi-sexual, Hispanic. Oh, and she better believe in Global Warming/Climate Change.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:20 AM

we ran strong conserv candidates of color and lost…
love and west..
we ran moderates and lost tommy thomson and allen…
we ran rinos and lost…brown
the point is…you cant seel one thing everywhere and
expect it to work in such a diverse country..
everyone doesnt like hot dogs…
somewhere there are more burger eaters and to
run for hot dogs is a looser…

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 2:21 AM

INC on November 10, 2012 at 2:16 AM

Well, without paging back and re-reading, I think what JP is talking about is a ton of voter fraud by the Dems. (In his post you quoted, I think he was getting at the lady’s general ineptness.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:21 AM

The Dems have essentially given up on fighting gun control, death penalty and welfare…..for long term strategic reasons or not. It was a paradigm shift for them.

Conservatives will have to let go of a few issues and simply fight to shape them.

Its grow up time.

rickyricardo on November 10, 2012 at 1:41 AM

Well, Obama makes me nervous on that issue because he doesn’t have to face the voters again. I’ve heard rumors he wants to reimpose the Assault Weapons Ban. Knowing our despot-in-chief, he’s liable to do it by executive order, and dare Boehner to do something about it.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:21 AM

No to Rubio. Absolutely not until he proves himself.

The other thing. Every time a moderate loses, there’s always a cry to drop issues. The logical disconnect is astounding. If conservatives let go of issues, then they’re no longer conservatives.

INC on November 10, 2012 at 2:22 AM

Carried to the extreme (which is how the Dems play), we would need to run a single, female, bi-sexual, Hispanic. Oh, and she better believe in Global Warming/Climate Change.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:20 AM

Umm…Is she hot?

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:22 AM

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:20 AM

My point being, just nominate the person who can best articulate conservatism to ALL voters. We haven’t done a good job on that score.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:24 AM

one of the beauties of 9-9-9 was it was simple..
im not saying i agree with it but it was easy
for the ‘not paying attention’ crowd to understand..
ive got a 52 point plan on my website thats boring to
read and you have to be smart to understand…
not so easy to sell….it requires a personal effort..

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 2:24 AM

we ran strong conserv candidates of color and lost…
love and west..
we ran moderates and lost tommy thomson and allen…
we ran rinos and lost…brown
the point is…you cant seel one thing everywhere and
expect it to work in such a diverse country..
everyone doesnt like hot dogs…
somewhere there are more burger eaters and to
run for hot dogs is a looser…

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 2:21 AM

The Dems specifically targeted them, especially West. I’m not sure West got any help from the RNC. Anyway, last I heard he’s involved in a court-ordered recount. It’s in that St. Lucie country where Barry got 141% of the vote.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:25 AM

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 2:21 AM

And oh yeah, I’ve been trying to find out how Mia Love lost in Utah. I didn’t know there was any Democrats at all in Utah.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:26 AM

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:21 AM

I was talking about FL a couple of hours ago with JP and others.

I don’t know if he meant the poll workers or the elections supervisor. The supervisor is responsible for the integrity of the vote for his or her county. The reason I’m ranting about this is as I mentioned back on another page I have an aunt who is a retired elections supervisor. She is a tough, smart, organized woman of integrity.

Elections are long hard work, but a supervisor knows what’s coming. St. Lucie has already been through a R presidential primary, D presidential primary, and FL primaries. That’s three elections even if there are no random city or county things going on. The supervisor had plenty of time to practice! I have no idea how long she’s been doing the work. My aunt had worked in the elections office for about five years before she ever ran for supervisor.

INC on November 10, 2012 at 2:27 AM

Umm…Is she hot?

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:22 AM

ROFL. OK, RC. Just for you. Yes, she is hot. :)

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:27 AM

It’s in that St. Lucie country where Barry got 141% of the vote.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:25 AM

i wondered if that was his district…thanks..
and i know that target us….look at m bachmann…
they almost got her..

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 2:27 AM

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:24 AM

Perhaps. I fear that you’re wrong. That the populace, in general, is simply too dimwitted to understand any of that. That they just want free stuff–damn the details.

(I see nothing to assuage me.)

RedCrow on November 10, 2012 at 2:28 AM

Doomberg on November 10, 2012 at 2:08 AM

Like I said, amnesty may not be the right route. My knee jerk reaction was to try it, but I’ve since pulled back a little from it in the coming days. I’d LOVE to remove immigration as a wedge issue between ourselves and Hispanics, but unless we can either get around all the additional Hispanic voters it adds to the registers, or get the Hispanic vote split 50/50, it’d do more harm than good.

Like I said though, SOMETHING has to be done.

Doughboy on November 10, 2012 at 2:05 AM

I’m not convinced that is entirely the reason McCain and Bush did so well among Hispanics, but those are all probably major contributing factors.

So, we need somebody that comes from a southern state, somebody whom is a social conservative, but still a fiscal small government conservative.

The three names that immediately spring to mind are, Perry, Rubio, and Susana Martinez. Perry, is probably too damaged by the image of all his debate gaffs, but I suppose in four years he may have recovered from that. Martinez is a little inexperienced with national politics, but in four years that could change. Rubio is an excellent choice, though being Cuban American wouldn’t help as much as being a Hispanic American. Best thing you can say about Rubio is that it’d put Florida back firmly into our pocket by bringing the Cuban American vote back into our side firmly.

Still, I’m not convinced its ONLY a matter of choosing the right candidate. I think we have to re-examine our message, and also find a few things to offer short of amnesty to at least break the ice a little. You are right that Democrats will always offer more, but, seeing as we’ve lost ten percent of the Hispanic vote, we need to do something to at least start regaining a little of the ground we’ve lost.

WolvenOne on November 10, 2012 at 2:29 AM

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:26 AM
thats what im saying ….how could love loose…?
bright ….well spoken…great ideas….great past
(that i know of anyway)….
id like to know if she had good RNC backing…

going2mars on November 10, 2012 at 2:29 AM

My point being, just nominate the person who can best articulate conservatism to ALL voters. We haven’t done a good job on that score.

4Grace on November 10, 2012 at 2:24 AM

There ya go. It usually works.

TarheelBen on November 10, 2012 at 2:30 AM

Where the hell is Jackson tonight???

Lanceman on November 10, 2012 at 2:30 AM

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