French president actually considering a ban on homework

posted at 3:21 pm on October 16, 2012 by Erika Johnsen

It’s actually come to this. For the sake of creating a more level playing field for students who might not have home lives as conducive to productive learning as others, the national — I repeat, not some local or regional government or association or something, but the national — French government is actually floating a plan that would disallow schools from assigning their pupils homework, via TIME:

Last week, Hollande reaffirmed his pledge to make education one of his main domestic priorities by outlining key strategic changes to revitalize France’s school system. It’s a sweeping package of changes meant to reform a system critics claim is outdated and inefficient, but for headline writers it boils down to one concept: the French President wants to outlaw homework. “Work should be done at school, rather than at home,” Hollande emphasized on Wednesday.

He also proposes reducing the average amount of time a student spends in class in each day, while stretching the school week from four days to four and a half. It’s a bid to bring the country more in line with international standards and to acknowledge some of the current system’s shortcomings. Even the homework isn’t just an empty populist gesture — it’s meant to reflect the fact that many of the lowest-performing students lack a positive support environment at home.

I realize France probably has a different educational culture and customs than what we’re used to, but this is just insanity borne of shooting for “fairness” at every turn. What’s next — will French President Hollande actually propose preventing what he deems to be too-ambitious students from doing extra practice work outside of class on their own personal initiative, because it might give them an unfair advantage? Thankfully, as the WSJ points out, it appears that while this might be every child’s dream come true, most French adults aren’t really into the idea:

Here we begin to wonder: Are the French losing their mind? Fortunately not. More than two-thirds of the country would oppose the ban, according to an Ifop poll, so there’s hope that even in the land of égalité there’s some recognition that state power cannot equalize everything. It’s also reassuring to know that a majority of French adults believe there’s something to be said for instructing children in the need for personal initiative and responsibility, regardless of excuses or circumstances.

I’m not sure how or why trying to apply these kinds of redistributive socialist tactics to education is supposed to “help” French students progress, develop, and learn; the result will be the same as applying socialism in the economic sector, i.e., less wealth/knowledge creation for everybody. I suppose you can try to make everyone’s formative circumstances as fair as possible, but guess what? Life isn’t fair, and learning to adapt to that reality is part of being a mature adult — but then again, as the WSJ concludes, “perhaps [Hollande's] ideas about homework say something about the kind of citizens of the future he wishes to see.”


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I guess life is simpler for the overlords when the peasants remain ignorant.

kim roy on October 16, 2012 at 3:25 PM

Nice move for the French, it’s not as if they aren’t already arrogant enough, now they get to be arrogant and stupid…

Barack Obama and the Green Revolution Losers…

SWalker on October 16, 2012 at 3:25 PM

Hollande, est plein de la merde!

AubieJon on October 16, 2012 at 3:26 PM

All students, from all types of home environments, should have equal time to hang out on the streets and be juvenile delinquents.

Egalite.

cane_loader on October 16, 2012 at 3:26 PM

French class assignment for year:
1.Get white cloth
2.Attach to Stick to look like flag
3.Congratulation, you just graduated!

ConservativePartyNow on October 16, 2012 at 3:26 PM

So would this ban on homework be in honor of Obama?

VorDaj on October 16, 2012 at 3:27 PM

Obama tried that on his first debate and it didn’t work out so well.

tims472 on October 16, 2012 at 3:27 PM

Equalize those outcomes! Equalize them, I say!

Fairness!

* * * * * *

When I was a student in French elementary school, we were in school Mon-Tues-Thurs-Fri and half a day on Saturday. Dunno about this “4 day” stuff; my experience was 4.5 days.

Spannerhead on October 16, 2012 at 3:29 PM

Sometimes it’s ok to elect a crazed Socialist if only to innoculate the next 3 generations against the sheer stupidity of that ideology. Regardless, this looks to be a fantastic train wreck.

JeremiahJohnson on October 16, 2012 at 3:29 PM

Great, less competition to our kids who are dropping out of school…I need cheaper floor sweepers and janitors…

right2bright on October 16, 2012 at 3:29 PM

And in related news Obama is considering a ban on work.

bgibbs1000 on October 16, 2012 at 3:30 PM

OT: That picture of Candy Crowley on Drudge makes her look like Hitchens in drag. Blech!

AubieJon on October 16, 2012 at 3:30 PM

You don’t need to assign any homework, when it comes to 20th Century French history:

The Germans invaded us (again) and we waited for a bunch of miscreant Yanks and Limeys to liberate us (again).

See, even the French tots have this down, pat.

OhEssYouCowboys on October 16, 2012 at 3:30 PM

No homework, and everyone gets a participation award simply for showing up.

ITguy on October 16, 2012 at 3:30 PM

I was lectured by an assistant principal, after about 15 of my honor students participated in a homework cheating scandal and I caught them through graphology, not to mention that way too many of my “smart” kids were spelling the island nation of Vanuatu as “Vancoto,” and the nation of Croatia as “Cropia.”

The blowback from parents of college students was bad enough when I failed every single one of them on a 300-point assignment, which, on average, reduced each participant’s final letter grade in the course by a full letter grade.

The assistant principal was even better. She said that had I given them time in class to complete the assignment (a 24-page worksheet that took about a week of homework), and not required them to complete it at home, they would not have had the opportunity to cheat, and so my practices were at fault for hurting the kids’ college chances.

The best part was that I eventually traced the cheating ring back to a student of mine from a prior semester, who had failed the course with a 37% “F.”

The honor students were cheating off of her worksheet.

For that alone, they deserved two letter grades off.

cane_loader on October 16, 2012 at 3:32 PM

Superior performance is unacceptable if it is the product of an inferior system– Hollande

Equalite!, Fraternite!,Vive La Ignorance

KW64 on October 16, 2012 at 3:32 PM

LOL – as if the French aren’t stupid enough already.

Pork-Chop on October 16, 2012 at 3:33 PM

No homework, and everyone gets a participation award simply for showing up.

ITguy on October 16, 2012 at 3:30 PM

This thread was about the French tot system – not America’s affirmative action/Ivy League connection.

;O)

OhEssYouCowboys on October 16, 2012 at 3:35 PM

As go the French, so go the French.

I am stunned the the guy is asking the teachers to work an extra half day.

Jabberwock on October 16, 2012 at 3:36 PM

Why not just give the dumbasses a passing grade and let the workplace sort out who is and is not capable of being productive?

Its worked quite well over here for decades.

BobMbx on October 16, 2012 at 3:36 PM

Year Zero, baby. Let’s cut to the chase.

ConservativeLA on October 16, 2012 at 3:36 PM

No homework, and everyone gets a participation award simply for showing up.

ITguy on October 16, 2012 at 3:30 PM

I don’t see the big deal. Every inner-city school system in the United States already is following this formula. And that participation award? We jokingly call those diplomas. The “graduate” has an eighth grade level of understanding but that is what we send off into the world.

And those “graduates” who go to college? Nearly 20% end up in remedial courses to teach them what that diploma supposedly attests they already know. Nearly a third if the “graduate” is at a community college.

Happy Nomad on October 16, 2012 at 3:36 PM

I totally would have voted for this guy in 6th grade.

Dash on October 16, 2012 at 3:40 PM

Every kid’s dream….

SailorMark on October 16, 2012 at 3:40 PM

This doesn’t surprise me in the least. After all going to school and doing homework increases your intelligence and enables you to be a critical thinker. The socialist French don’t want that for two reasons; first they want the French people to become ignorant peasants again just like before the French revolution so they can keep them in their place and bolster their power.

Second, it’s insulting to be smarter than their soon to be Islamic overlords…can’t have a insolent 10 year old French kid smarter than his/her Islamic Imam overlord…that would make it obvious how backwards and ignorant Islam is!

Goodbye France, it wasn’t really nice knowing you and NO, the USA won’t bail your ass out for a third time…good luck with your new Islamic overlords!

Liberty or Death on October 16, 2012 at 3:41 PM

Okay, when do the Germans come marching in?

Oil Can on October 16, 2012 at 3:41 PM

I was lectured by an assistant principal, after about 15 of my honor students participated in a homework cheating scandal and I caught them through graphology, not to mention that way too many of my “smart” kids were spelling the island nation of Vanuatu as “Vancoto,” and the nation of Croatia as “Cropia.”

The blowback from parents of college students was bad enough when I failed every single one of them on a 300-point assignment, which, on average, reduced each participant’s final letter grade in the course by a full letter grade.

The assistant principal was even better. She said that had I given them time in class to complete the assignment (a 24-page worksheet that took about a week of homework), and not required them to complete it at home, they would not have had the opportunity to cheat, and so my practices were at fault for hurting the kids’ college chances.

The best part was that I eventually traced the cheating ring back to a student of mine from a prior semester, who had failed the course with a 37% “F.”

The honor students were cheating off of her worksheet.

For that alone, they deserved two letter grades off.

Long quote but I thought this interesting. After 14 years killing myself in the real world post Bachelor’s, I just started on my MBA this semester and the biggest part of culture shock for me was how adamant and serious everyone is about plagerism and cheating….has it become so rampant these days in schools? I suppose the advent of smart phones, everyone has a laptop, the internet being full of everything, stands to reason.

Texas74 on October 16, 2012 at 3:41 PM

1. Stop having kids
2. Import lots of muslims
3. Stop educating your children
4. ????
5. Socialist paradise!

gwelf on October 16, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Is it true that in their French classes, the tots are required to first learn German?

OhEssYouCowboys on October 16, 2012 at 3:44 PM

Heh. When I was “un petit garcon” and rebelling against homework, I guess I was French.
Now I guess growing up is underrated!

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 3:45 PM

Don’t get what the deal is with dat. But I do know that the 75% income taxes, and a growing wealth tax at what 3% (?) that together is causing the job creators and tax payers to rush for the exits is stupid. Idiocy though is something France is famous for. Remember the Maginot Line before WWII? Brilliant. The French should do more studying and homework, not less.

anotherJoe on October 16, 2012 at 3:45 PM

Why not just give the dumbasses a passing grade and let the workplace sort out who is and is not capable of being productive?

Its worked quite well over here for decades.

BobMbx on October 16, 2012 at 3:36 PM

I lived in New Orleans for a while. Arguably the worst school system in the nation. What you saw was that families where education was a priority sending their kids to private schools or a handful of the many parochial schools. Then they all left the state for college.

Ability will always shine through- unless you’re talking about government jobs where seniority not merit matter.

Happy Nomad on October 16, 2012 at 3:45 PM

while stretching the school week from four days to four and a half.

Four and a half days a week is an improvement? Au revoir, France!

pookysgirl on October 16, 2012 at 3:46 PM

Okay, when do the Germans come marching in?

Oil Can on October 16, 2012 at 3:41 PM

The French would love for the Germans to come marching in (and at some point they’ll probably end up petitioning the EU make it happen).

The joke is on the Germans. The Germans will need to build walls to keep other European countries from coming after their banks.

gwelf on October 16, 2012 at 3:46 PM

Idiocy though is something France is famous for. Remember the Maginot Line before WWII? Brilliant. The French should do more studying and homework, not less.

anotherJoe on October 16, 2012 at 3:45 PM

Remember funemployment? The spin early on in 2009 that losing one’s job wasn’t so bad because it gave hard-working people the opportunity to chance for a little personal time. Well, France is funemployment as a national program.

Happy Nomad on October 16, 2012 at 3:47 PM

Pres Chroom taking notes.

Dingbat63 on October 16, 2012 at 3:48 PM

I don’t know what all the fuss is about.

Why don’t we just lower an “A” to a 25% score on any test and be done with it. We’ll graduate millions of brilliant kids. Of course, they won’t know anything, but there mostly teenagers; they’re not supposed to know much. If they want to learn stuff, they can do it on their own time. Jeez.

IndieDogg on October 16, 2012 at 3:48 PM

I am curious.
In the Netherlands school is year-round, is it like that in other nations in Europe?

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 3:49 PM

For that alone, they deserved two letter grades off.

cane_loader on October 16, 2012 at 3:32 PM

rock on cane_loader

DanMan on October 16, 2012 at 3:49 PM

Long quote but I thought this interesting. After 14 years killing myself in the real world post Bachelor’s, I just started on my MBA this semester and the biggest part of culture shock for me was how adamant and serious everyone is about plagerism and cheating….has it become so rampant these days in schools? I suppose the advent of smart phones, everyone has a laptop, the internet being full of everything, stands to reason.

Texas74 on October 16, 2012 at 3:41 PM

Adamant about plagiarism, how funny, Elizabeth Warren (Harvard Professor), Senatorial candidate in Taxacheuttes… Guilty… Lawrence Tribe… (Harvard Professor)…guilty…

When the professors are guilty of plagiarism themselves, it’s difficult to take seriously that Academia considers plagiarism a serious issue.

James A. Mackay, a Scottish historian, was forced to withdraw all copies of his biography of Alexander Graham Bell from circulation in 1998 because he plagiarized the last major work on the subject, a 1973 work. Also accused of plagiarizing material on biographies of Mary, Queen of Scots, Andrew Carnegie, and Sir William Wallace, he was forced to withdraw his next work, on John Paul Jones, in 1999 for an identical reason.[3][4]
Marks Chabedi, a professor at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa, plagiarized his doctoral thesis. He used a work written by Kimberly Lanegran at the University of Florida and copied it nearly verbatim before submitting it to The New School. When Lanegran discovered this, she launched an investigation into Chabedi. He was fired from his professorship, and The New School revoked his Ph.D.[5]
Historian Stephen Ambrose has been criticized for incorporating passages from the works of other authors into many of his books. He was first accused in 2002 by two writers for copying portions about World War II bomber pilots from Thomas Childers’s The Wings of Morning in his book The Wild Blue.[6] After Ambrose admitted to the errors, the New York Times found further unattributed passages, and “Mr. Ambrose again acknowledged his errors and promised to correct them in later editions.”[7]
Norman Finkelstein has charged Alan Dershowitz with committing plagiarism by using material from Joan Peters’s 1984 book From Time Immemorial in his book The Case for Israel, without giving proper credit.[8] See “Dershowitz–Finkelstein affair”.
Author Doris Kearns Goodwin interviewed author Lynne McTaggart in her 1987 book The Fitzgeralds and the Kennedys, and she used passages from McTaggart’s book about Kathleen Kennedy. In 2002, when the similarities between Goodwin’s and McTaggart’s books became public, Goodwin stated that she had an understanding that citations would not be required for all references, and that extensive footnotes already existed. Many doubted her claims, and she was forced to resign from the Pulitzer Prize board.[9][10]
Mathematician and computer scientist Dănuţ Marcu claims to have published over 383 original papers in various scientific publications. A number of his recent papers have been shown to be exact copies of papers published earlier by other authors.[11]
A University of Colorado investigating committee found Ethnic Studies professor and activist Ward Churchill guilty of multiple counts of plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification. After the Chancellor recommended Churchill’s dismissal to the Board of Regents, Churchill was fired on 24 July 2007.[12][13]
Physicist and Vice Chancellor of Kumaon University, India, Prof. B.S. Rajput resigned in 2003 after he and a student were found guilty of plagiarism of a paper (which formed part of the student’s thesis).[14][15]
In 2007 researchers of Anna University Chennai in Madras published a paper in the Journal of Materials Science,[16] an exact copy of an article from the University of Linköping published in PNAS[17][18]
In April 2008, James Twitchell, a professor of literature at the University of Florida, admitted having plagiarized and falsified the works of multiple authors.[19]
In June 2008, Columbia University announced that Madonna Constantine, a professor of psychology and education at Columbia University’s Teachers College, was to be fired (with immediate suspension) on grounds of plagiarism.
In March 2010, Manuel V. Pangilinan, a prominent Filipino businessman and Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Ateneo de Manila University, was found to have given a commencement speech that contained numerous lines lifted from speeches of other prominent public figures. Pangilinan offered to resign from his post at the university, which was rejected by the Board of Trustees,[20] a move which garnered controversy.
In March 2010, Prof. Wang Hui of Department of Chinese Language and Literature, Tsinghua University, was charged by Wang Binbin, a professor of literature from Nanjing University, of plagiarism found in his doctoral dissertation on Lu Xun.[21][22] Wang Binbin also sampled one chapter in Wang Hui’s four-volume magnum opus The Rise of Modern Chinese Thought, and accused Wang Hui of abuse of the sources.[23]
In May 2011, Bruno Frey was written to by the editor of the Journal of Economic Perspectives, pointing out similarities in four articles indicating possible self-plagiarism. He offered apologies in a letter, also published within the journal.

SWalker on October 16, 2012 at 3:50 PM

France builds the “No Homework Line”; Individual Achievement Is No Longer A Threat To French Workers

BobMbx on October 16, 2012 at 3:52 PM

Four and a half days a week is an improvement? Au revoir, France!

pookysgirl on October 16, 2012 at 3:46 PM

Actually the schools around here are on a 4.5 day schedule. That extra half day is teacher time. The school system claims it is so that teachers can do stuff like grade papers and meet with parents. The reality is that teachers are working that many hours less each week and they oftentimes beat the school busses out of the parking lot. And BTW, this is considered one of the nation’s best school systems in one of the most affluent counties in the United States.

Happy Nomad on October 16, 2012 at 3:52 PM

For the sake of creating a more level playing field for students

Then teachers should also teach at the pace that the slowest learners can keep up with. Can’t let any of those kids that are quick to grasp new concepts get too far ahead of the others….that just wouldn’t be fair!

lynncgb on October 16, 2012 at 3:52 PM

France builds the “No Homework Line”; Individual Achievement Is No Longer A Threat To French Workers

BobMbx on October 16, 2012 at 3:52 PM

French workers- now there’s an oxymoron.

Happy Nomad on October 16, 2012 at 3:53 PM

Note to Germany: Attack now.

Goldenavatar on October 16, 2012 at 3:53 PM

Can’t have the masses educated, now, can we?

hadsil on October 16, 2012 at 3:54 PM

according to an Ifop poll,

Heh. Foppish, indeed.

Christien on October 16, 2012 at 3:56 PM

Effin’ French… you will not be allowed to work, and you will not be able to by a home… now smoke cigarettes and drink wine on this patio…

phreshone on October 16, 2012 at 3:57 PM

Might as well eliminate any lotion of work in France. And as an aside

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/financialcrisis/9610717/French-business-erupts-in-fury-against-disastrous-Francois-Hollande.html

Hollande raised capital gain tax from 34.5% to 62.2%. This compares with 21% in Spain, 26.4% in Germany and 28% in Britain. When business and Market collapse, 62% of zero equals zero.

bayview on October 16, 2012 at 3:58 PM

The blowback from parents of college students was bad enough when I failed every single one of them on a 300-point assignment, which, on average, reduced each participant’s final letter grade in the course by a full letter grade.

I just saw that I admitted a key modifier:

“College-bound” students is what I meant to type.

cane_loader on October 16, 2012 at 3:58 PM

Lol! The French have become a caricature of themselves. Their’s too many students succeeding, we have to dumb them down to the same level for the Idiocracy to maintain the proper growth. I mean, seriously, What can you say about such a ridiculous proposition. Why not just make the schools daycare’s & be done with teaching them to be stupid!
Update on How to take on the Enemy media & Win: http://paratisiusa.blogspot.com/2012/09/an-open-letter-to-those-who-should-know.html?spref=tw

God Bless America!

paratisi on October 16, 2012 at 3:58 PM

dang- I omitted a key modifier.

OK, been working outside, tired, I better sign off until my brain catches up!

PIMF

cane_loader on October 16, 2012 at 3:59 PM

Happy Nomad on October 16, 2012 at 3:52 PM

If I was a teacher – that would definitely be me!
I suppose a lot of the teachers might be more at ease if they have more time to grade papers, prepare lessons, etc., at their homes. If the kids can get the same or better education in less time, everyone wins.

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 3:59 PM

Out – Idiocracy is here.

In – Idiocracy is not here. It’s in France.

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 4:00 PM

according to an Ifop poll,

Verdict: Full of crepe

Christien on October 16, 2012 at 4:01 PM

And so, if we follow Hollande’s logic, naturally beautiful people should have to use excessive cosmetics and wear ugly, ill fitting clothing and very bad hair styles to make themselves less beautiful and therefore more equal to those who are less attractive.

Those with naturally superior athletic ability should, perhaps, be forced to wear ankle weights, weighted belts, wrist weights, or even be physically injured in some way to make them more equal to those who are physically less coordinated or athletically gifted.

Perhaps those with intelligence levels that test out at or above the genius level should be given drugs to make them more equal to those who are at or below average intelligence level.

Those who are gifted artists, who can draw, or sculpt, or paint should, doubtless, under Mr. Hollande’s ideology, be sent to work in factories assembling mechanical components on an assembly line all day, and writers should be clerks in bureaucrats offices, forbidden to compose so much as a grocery list or write a post card so that they, too, are more equal to those who are less artistically gifted.

Mr. Hollande’s ideas of ‘fairness’ and ‘equality’ in his vision of a utopian society , in practice, provide for a gray and dismal world, where no one achieves, no one excels, no cures for disease are discovered, no beauty is created or appreciated, and no new frontier is ever explored.

For the sake of humanity, it is my sincere hope that Mr. Hollande and all those who seek his brand of ‘equality’ either become disabused of these disastrous notions, or fade from society, rejected and reviled, as quickly as possible.

thatsafactjack on October 16, 2012 at 4:01 PM

Harrison Bergeron, age fourteen,” she said in a grackle squawk, “has just escaped from jail, where he was held on suspicion of plotting to overthrow the government. He is a genius and an athlete, is under-handicapped, and should be regarded as extremely dangerous.”

Huh. I never knew that some of the high school reading selections about the distopian future would come to pass in my lifetime… 1984, Animal House, Atlas Shrugged and Harrison Bergeron.

Fallon on October 16, 2012 at 4:02 PM

The fairness article is just for the rubes. Imagine the children of the bureaucrats promulgating these rules. Do you think that those children won’t get private schools or private tutors in place of the homework. When it comes time to sit for examinations for college, who will be better prepared to gain entrance? If you limit the number of college seats to what you need for the next generation of bureaucrats, you sow the seeds for a new nobility, namely the bureaucrats. They and the elite can have an advantage that will follow them through their lives. Meanwhile, the children of immigrants can rejoice in not having to do homework.
Claims of fairness often mask a desire to favor a different group than the one currently in favor.

yetanotherjohn on October 16, 2012 at 4:04 PM

Note to Germany: Attack now.

Goldenavatar on October 16, 2012 at 3:53 PM

Dear Goldenavatar:
Thanks, but the French just don’t have anything we need and certainly nothing worth fighting over.
Sincerely,
Germany

swinia sutki on October 16, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Oh heck, why stop there? Let’s just ban thinking! Totally equalized.

WhatSlushfund on October 16, 2012 at 4:08 PM

Comment dit-on “Harrison Bergeron” en français?

Mary in LA on October 16, 2012 at 4:09 PM

Most American high school students would get the shock of their lives if they entered a French classroom.

Erika’s comments and many other here display a complete ignorance of the topic and just how ruthless French education is. There is no egalite in the French classroom and the proposed reforms are sensible given what constitutes homework in French schools.

lexhamfox on October 16, 2012 at 4:13 PM

Wait . . . French schools are only four days a week?!?

That explains so much.

Pablo Snooze on October 16, 2012 at 4:16 PM

lexhamfox on October 16, 2012 at 4:13 PM

You’re missing the forest for the trees.
“Egalite” is not always a good thing.
If you read the post, you might have missed the part that most French parents are opposed to Holande’s idea.
And Holande is a unrepentant socialist – so any crazy reforms he proposes are likely intended to advance his socialist agenda – with unintended and unfortunate consequences.

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 4:21 PM

Most American high school students would get the shock of their lives if they entered a French classroom.
Erika’s comments and many other here display a complete ignorance of the topic and just how ruthless French education is. There is no egalite in the French classroom and the proposed reforms are sensible given what constitutes homework in French schools.
lexhamfox on October 16, 2012 at 4:13 PM

Wow. All that educational ruthlessness, and yet you cheese-eating surrender monkeys can’t do a damn thing right, and your President is a total idiot. Face it Pierre, your country just plain sucks.

WhatSlushfund on October 16, 2012 at 4:23 PM

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 4:21 PM

The French system is far more competitive than the US and many other education systems. If you fail the exams and you don’t go on. You can’t keep up or you disrupt the class then you are out on your ass.

It is ruthless and disciplined. The vast majority of French homework is memorization.

Outside of everyone getting an initial shot at the start, it is the opposite of Socialism.

lexhamfox on October 16, 2012 at 4:27 PM

He also proposes reducing the average amount of time a student spends in class in each day,

That’s it! Keep ‘em STUPID! They’ll be sure to vote socialist!

GarandFan on October 16, 2012 at 4:27 PM

There is no egalite in the French classroom and the proposed reforms are sensible given what constitutes homework in French schools

lexhamfox on October 16, 2012 at 4:13 PM

He also proposes reducing the average amount of time a student spends in class in each day, while stretching the school week from four days to four and a half. It’s a bid to bring the country more in line with international standards and to acknowledge some of the current system’s shortcomings. Even the homework isn’t just an empty populist gesture — it’s meant to reflect the fact that many of the lowest-performing students lack a positive support environment at home.

Odd, the quote from the Time artice, supra, indicates that it’s not the “insensibility” of “what constitutes homework in French schools,” but that his concerns are based upon “the fact that many of the lowest-performing students lack a positive support environment at home.”

So, apparently, the sought after measures, regarding homework, are to make everybody equal … the always sought after goal of Socialists … in other words, to bring everybody down to the lowest common denominator.

I see nothing regarding the draconic rigors of academics being the problem.

OhEssYouCowboys on October 16, 2012 at 4:27 PM

French president actually considering a ban on homework

Pure 1920s “progressive” thought.

Of course, a lot probably don’t do it anyway assuming their kiddos are anything like many over here, so it’s possibly a moot point.

Dr. ZhivBlago on October 16, 2012 at 4:30 PM

I am no fan of socialism or the French in general, but to be fair my understanding is that the intention is not to prevent some from doing well, but rather to use the class time more productively and thus obviate the need for homework. I don’t believe anyone is suggesting banning independent work done outside of school, just to improve the system so that such extra work would not be essential.

whoishe on October 16, 2012 at 4:33 PM

If you fail the exams and you don’t go on.

lexhamfox on October 16, 2012 at 4:27 PM

Go away, or I will taunt you again.

Christien on October 16, 2012 at 4:35 PM

We as Nations deserve the Presidents we elect. The French deserve him. Besides in a few short years there will be no France as we formerly recognized it.

Bmore on October 16, 2012 at 4:36 PM

Who is John De Gaulle?

sorry…

warden on October 16, 2012 at 4:38 PM

Clouseau, is the only associated French word I know for this guy.

FlaMurph on October 16, 2012 at 4:39 PM

We as Nations deserve the Presidents we elect. The French deserve him. Besides in a few short years there will be no France as we formerly recognized it.

Bmore on October 16, 2012 at 4:36 PM

The problem with that is, I’m sure that neither you, nor I, voted for the more equal Pig in the Oval Office.

We just have to endure the fact that the cattle elected The Commie, and pray that our votes can change things – before our nation is lost – permanently.

OhEssYouCowboys on October 16, 2012 at 4:40 PM

Four and a half days a week is an improvement? Au revoir, France!

pookysgirl on October 16, 2012 at 3:46 PM

The French kids spend more hours a day in school than the American ones…the classes start at 8.30 am and finish approx at 4.30 pm, including for the youngest ones…so, during a school year, they spend approx 840 hours in school, the American kids about 770 hours or so I am talking elementaryschool kids).

jimver on October 16, 2012 at 4:40 PM

Hollande is the France’s equivalent of the United States’ Obama…just one big “Oooops! What did we do to ourselves!?!”

albill on October 16, 2012 at 4:41 PM

Clouseau, is the only associated French word I know for this guy.

FlaMurph on October 16, 2012 at 4:39 PM

The Belgians are jealous :)

jimver on October 16, 2012 at 4:42 PM

Perfect plan.

Keep them stupid and illiterate, yet arrogant.

And they’ll all riot in the streets when the educated rich leave because they don’t want to foot the bill anymore.

BacaDog on October 16, 2012 at 4:42 PM

Pure 1920s “progressive” thought.

Of course, a lot probably don’t do it anyway assuming their kiddos are anything like many over here, so it’s possibly a moot point.

Dr. ZhivBlago on October 16, 2012 at 4:30 PM

It pre-dates the 20′s and I think some schools in Maryland experimented with it recently and the results are mixed with improved results for older students and reduced results for younger children in standardized tests.

Then again you have to take into account what constitutes homework in the US and French systems… it isn’t the same.

I have no doubt that Americans would be up in arms if US schools proposed getting rid of playtime and sports. The French don’t do any of that and focus solely on academics with a two hour lunch break. If you are sitting the entrance exam (le bac) then you are going to have about 40hrs of class a week. It’s pretty brutal.

lexhamfox on October 16, 2012 at 4:43 PM

More than two-thirds of the country would oppose the ban

The other 30-33% either didn’t understand the question or they are children.

mdenis39 on October 16, 2012 at 4:44 PM

This is a lesson for this side of the pond. France elected a good president but replaced him with a socialist.
If Romney gets elected in a few weeks, Obama is replaceable and the liberals will find someone who would be as bad as him. We have to stay engaged and fighting for a long time. This mess didn’t happen overnight so it won’t be fixed overnight.

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 4:46 PM

Hollande is the France’s equivalent of the United States’ Obama…just one big “Oooops! What did we do to ourselves!?!”

albill on October 16, 2012 at 4:41 PM

Yep, and here’s a preview of what awaits us if we re-elect this dumbass.

jimver on October 16, 2012 at 4:46 PM

I am no fan of socialism or the French in general, but to be fair my understanding is that the intention is not to prevent some from doing well, but rather to use the class time more productively and thus obviate the need for homework.

That can be done. It could even be done here in the USA, if we could get back to academics in school and away from all the federally-mandated BS indoctrination.

I don’t believe anyone is suggesting banning independent work done outside of school, just to improve the system so that such extra work would not be essential.

whoishe on October 16, 2012 at 4:33 PM

I don’t think that’s why Hollande is advocating no homework — but even if that is the reason, it’s not the job of the President of the country (at least from my American Federalist perspective) to mandate educational policy from the very top. Education seems to work best when it’s controlled at the lowest possible level — the local level, or at most the county level for large states — and when parents have the most involvement.

Mary in LA on October 16, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Franch schools sound really hardcore–to which I say, “Lighten up, Francois.”

Christien on October 16, 2012 at 4:51 PM

I SUPPORT IT!!!!!!!!!!!

Sachiko on October 16, 2012 at 4:59 PM

Something to think about the next time you board an Airbus aircraft.

Lickmuffin on October 16, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Since Hollande was elected, I have been getting a lot of use out of this quote:

“Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake.”
― Napoleon Bonaparte

Over50 on October 16, 2012 at 5:11 PM

I SUPPORT IT!!!!!!!!!!!

Sachiko on October 16, 2012 at 4:59 PM

Ah, I see you were a “non-traditional student”, too. :-)

It is possible to teach in such a way that students learn well without a lick of homework. However, our schools aren’t set up to do that, because our Prussian-inspired educational system wasn’t really designed as an environment for kids to learn in. Our school system is the direct descendant of one designed expressly to homogenize disparate elements of society, meant to teach kids to conform to expectations, obey rules, sit for hours in straight rows, and carry out orders given by an authority figure.

Mary in LA on October 16, 2012 at 5:11 PM

They’re gonna lower the retirement age to 7.

BigWyo on October 16, 2012 at 5:22 PM

They will never lose the “cheese eating surrender monkey” image as long as they elect flamboyant gays like that guy in the picture. He looks like a stereotyped caricature of a gay man.
They actually elected this person??

Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Mimzey on October 16, 2012 at 5:23 PM

Okay, when do the Germans come marching in?

Oil Can on October 16, 2012 at 3:41 PM

Why would they want to?

Solaratov on October 16, 2012 at 5:29 PM

Wow! Unbelievable!

Are these white elites hell bent on ruining the white race as well as their countries?

vnohara on October 16, 2012 at 5:38 PM

Why should I care if the French want to institutionalize their stupidity?

Socratease on October 16, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Out – Idiocracy is here.

In – Idiocracy is not here. It’s in France.

22044 on October 16, 2012 at 4:00 PM

I beg to differ. It IS here – Hollande is just moving faster than Obummer.

Not only are they punishing the successful people who actually create the jobs, now they will also ensure that future generations are too stupid to become successful.

“If I had a twin brother, he would act just like Hollande.” /Barky

dentarthurdent on October 16, 2012 at 5:41 PM

I beg to differ. It IS here – Hollande is just moving faster than Obummer.

Not only are they punishing the successful people who actually create the jobs, now they will also ensure that future generations are too stupid to become successful.

“If I had a twin brother, he would act just like Hollande.” /Barky

dentarthurdent on October 16, 2012 at 5:41 PM

Yes: French business erupts in fury against “disastrous” François Hollande

“The immediate bone of contention is Article 6 of the new tax law, which raises the top rate of capital gains tax from 34.5pc to 62.2pc. This compares with 21pc in Spain, 26.4pc in Germany and 28pc in Britain. ”

The proggies’ attacks on Governor Romney make it plain that they want capital gains and dividends treated the same as ordinary income.

slickwillie2001 on October 16, 2012 at 5:52 PM

Ah, I see you were a “non-traditional student”, too. :-)

It is possible to teach in such a way that students learn well without a lick of homework. However, our schools aren’t set up to do that, because our Prussian-inspired educational system wasn’t really designed as an environment for kids to learn in. Our school system is the direct descendant of one designed expressly to homogenize disparate elements of society, meant to teach kids to conform to expectations, obey rules, sit for hours in straight rows, and carry out orders given by an authority figure.

Mary in LA on October 16, 2012 at 5:11 PM

While I disagree with some of your description of what our educational system was supposedly designed to do, some are valid – although stated with a demeaning slant. The fact is, that traditional education system helped create many of the greatest minds – business people, scientists, engineers and such the world has ever known. It has only gone down hill since the “progressives” (which by your statement you appear to be) started pushing “non-traditional” methods.

My son was identified for math “talented and gifted” (TAG) in 6th grade. After 1 year in our school’s math TAG curriculum, he could no longer successfully do basic division, fractions, and such. Their “non-traditional” methods emphasized making up their own creative ways to do math instead of learning what the human race has learned over millenia that actually works. As a result, many of the kids (mine included) could no longer perform standard math functions. We took him out of math TAG after one year, and he was forever behind in his math skills.

dentarthurdent on October 16, 2012 at 5:53 PM

@Mary in LA

Agreed – the best way to handle education is to get the government out as much as possible and leave it to the ingenuity of the market.

whoishe on October 16, 2012 at 5:59 PM

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