Beyond “traditional” marriage … to traditional values

posted at 4:16 pm on September 16, 2012 by Ed Morrissey

I’ve known Steven Crowder for a few years now, and he’s a regular on my daily Internet show — providing laughs, a sharp perspective, and no small measure of controversial statements, just as he does in his videos and Fox News appearances.  Steven’s an outspoken Christian, and argues for living life by those values for the purpose of being authentically Christian, as well as being an example to the world.  Needless to say, Steven gets a lot of criticism for his perspective and his arguments, but he has not yet been deflected from his principles.

A few years ago at CPAC, I met Steven’s then-girlfriend and now wife, a lovely young woman who is (as all wives are, as my own wife will attest) far too good for her husband, but she married Steven anyway three weeks ago.  We wanted to attend the wedding, since we had the honor of knowing them and even taking them out for breakfast the day after their engagement — joined by Dana and Chris Loesch, actually — but my back surgery kept me grounded.  We missed one heck of a party, but as Steven writes, we missed a very special wedding, too.  Steven and his wife insisted on a courtship and wedding based on their Christian values, and on Friday Steven took a hilarious victory lap in his column for Fox News.

Be sure to read it all, but the most interesting part of the column came from this anecdote that puts their effort into serious perspective:

As my wife (again, still not used to that) and I ate breakfast at a local inn, we discussed how excited we were to start the rest of our lives together, how scary it was that everything was now so different. At the same time, we overheard the table next to us discussing their very own wedding from the night prior. What a coincidence!

“The thing is, nothing’s really changed,” the bride said.

Puzzled, my wife asked, “Did you get married last night too? So did we!”

“Congratulations!” the other dame said. “Yeah we did, just last night.”

“Where’s the groom?” my wife innocently… scratch that, naively asked.

“Oh, he’s sleeping. There was no way he was coming out with me this morning!” She paused and smirked. “Let’s just say that he’s got a lingering headache from a really good time last night.”

My heart sank. Firstly, that poor schmuck’s “good time” was simply getting snookered. Not enjoying the company of close family and long-lost friends with a clear head and clean conscience, not staring in awe at his beautiful new wife, wanting to soak in every glimmer of her eyes as she shot him heart-racing looks from across the dance floor, not taking all of the cheesy pictures as they cut the cake, not even carrying her across that suite threshold as they nervously anticipated their “nightcap.” He probably won’t remember any of it. Instead, he got smashed. He was “that guy”… at his own freaking wedding.

Then I realized something. Our wedding was truly a once in a lifetime event. It was a God’s-honest celebration of two completely separate lives now becoming one. Physically, emotionally, financially and spiritually, everything that made us who we were individually was becoming what bonded us together. Our family traveled from far and wide to celebrate the decision of two young people to truly commit themselves to each other, and selflessly give themselves to one another in a way that they never had before that very night.

The people next to us that morning? Well, theirs was just one big party.  And the morning after? Just another hangover.

Our “weddings” were the same event in name only. They know it, and we know it.

It’s not easy to always live your life according to your religious principles.  I’ve been tested many times, and I’ve failed more often than I’d like to admit outside of a confessional.  There are moments that count more than most others, though, where faith and resolve get severely tested, and eventually one discovers that prayer is absolutely essential for the strength needed to prevail.  I know Steven and his wife are a prayerful couple, and I know that gave them strength for their journey.

I find this an intriguing column, not just because Steven’s a good friend and the column was funny.  In some states, including my own, we’re debating the legal definition of marriage, which is a fair debate over a government policy that should be resolved by the people and not a judge in a courtroom.  But we should set aside the politics from time to time to reflect on the institution of matrimony and the path that leads us there.  Does giving in to the temptations of the world help or hinder us?  Should we not be cheering the Crowders for walking the narrow path and giving testimony to their values, or is it easier to cheer those who stumble because it lets us off the hook for our own shortcomings?  And what is lost to us in that transaction that the Crowders have found?  It’s easy to laugh at the virgins and the committed Christians for being hopelessly unhip and square, but perhaps not so easy to see how those kind of values clarify the other issues under debate.


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All I heard while reading this article can be summarized very nicely by William Shakespeare.

“The lady doth protest too much, methinks.”

Flashwing on September 17, 2012 at 2:05 AM

Most first marriages do last. It’s the people that get married and divorced 5 times that mess up the statistics.

happytobehere on September 17, 2012 at 1:40 AM

My mother refers to that phenomenon as ‘serial monogamy’.

annoyinglittletwerp on September 17, 2012 at 2:16 AM

You support the conditions that make dictates from Washington inevitable.

You want ‘fried ice’ and it doesn’t exist.

sharrukin on September 16, 2012 at 9:34 PM

If it’s inevitable, then being a small government conservative is useless unless you’re also a Santorum-esque busybody.

Sorry, I don’t believe that.

Good Solid B-Plus on September 17, 2012 at 2:25 AM

The 21st century western male is just a big joke. We went from “Father Knows Best” to “Married With Children” in two generations. Make the reverse statment about wives and see how humorous most women find it.

NeverLiberal on September 16, 2012 at 10:54 PM

And what’s wrong with Al Bundy?

Provides for his family, never cheats…he gripes a lot, but he always pulls his share.

Good Solid B-Plus on September 17, 2012 at 2:27 AM

Funny, if this article had been written by a vegan extolling his or her choice as superior and other choices as wrong, the meat eaters here would just shrug the article off. The subject of the Crowders’ choice must make people feel guilty, or else the reactions from some of the people here wouldn’t be so negative.

Rose on September 16, 2012 at 9:54 PM

No, we’d probably mock the vegan’s smugness and make snide remarks about how we’ll eat two animals for every one he doesn’t eat.

Good Solid B-Plus on September 17, 2012 at 2:30 AM

Except that’s not what he did. He wrote in an article that he wishes everyone could experience the happiness that he has and contrasted his morning after with that of an anonymous couple. Maybe it is your duty to share with the world how much better you feel when you are in shape and at a healthy weight. Maybe you should describe how bad you feel for people struggling to get through their day because they are so heavy and out of shape. Because that is the equivalent to what he wrote.

cynccook on September 16, 2012 at 9:33 PM

I wish every person struggling with their weight was able to get healthy, but I’m not going to get in their faces about it. The best thing you can do is be a good example.

If I wrote in the same tone that Steven did, I would absolutely expect anyone struggling with obesity to feel mocked and condescended to.

I didn’t change my lifestyle because a bunch of people waggled their finger at my weight. I did it because I came to realize the very serious health consequences of being overweight. That’s a decision people need to reach on their own, though.

Good Solid B-Plus on September 17, 2012 at 2:36 AM

Crowder’s tone was not insulting. It was blunt. Big difference.

Sometimes, the truth hurts. And that’s not Crowder’s fault.

CanofSand on September 17, 2012 at 4:00 AM

I wish every person struggling with their weight was able to get healthy, but I’m not going to get in their faces about it. The best thing you can do is be a good example.

Exactly!

There are a bunch of better ways that this article could have been written. It could have simply told his story so a new wave of readers could experience it from the beginning while offering thanks to everyone who has supported him over the years.

But that isn’t the way the article was written because those intentions are not present. What is present is the fact that Mr. Crowder has clearly been thinking about this article for a long time and couldn’t wait to get it posted. I have no doubt he has imagined what the day would be like when he could tell all his detractors and doubters that they were all wrong. He tried to play it off as though he casually wrote this article on the way to his honeymoon as though it was a spur of the moment thought. No doubt the content provided by the other just married woman was fresh, but the concept had been cooking for quite a long time.

There are times I think that Mr. Crowder is trying to convince himself of his material more than the audience.

The problem with declaring yourself moral and virtuous is you allow people to judge you through that very prism. The right thing to do would have been to take the higher road, but instead he put everyone’s face in the mud.

I’m sure Mr. Crowder is an exceptional person and no doubt everything that Ed says he is. That said, this article is beyond a simple victory lap. It goes so far that it makes the reader question whether or not the author really believes what he is saying.

People who have exceptional morals and values don’t brag about it, they live their life as the example. The more people brag about being this or that the more they are anything but.

I would say that Mr. Crowder would do himself and his audience a better service by not starting his marriage out by trashing every single person who doubted him, but instead serve as an example for those person to follow.

Flashwing on September 17, 2012 at 4:09 AM

So I take all of the people crowing about how Crowder should have just “been an example” instead presumably would have had him write NOTHING AT ALL to soothe their consciences.

I read Crowder’s article. If you have a problem with it, get over yourself. Compared to Crowder’s usual fare this is mild in its chiding (and I say this as someone who loves his intense riffs). Every day we’re told by the same progressive filth that toxify the airwaves our children listen to that the choice Crowder and his wife made is “too hard” or “unrealistic.” That “you’re trying to remember a time that never existed.”

Well, it did exist, and no amount of progressive social failure after social failure after social failure is going to change that. No matter how far into the depths they drag our culture led by their own hedonistic, self-ingratiating charge they can’t change history.

Yes, your choices should be judged. Crowder’s were, and I’m glad he’s crowing about it now. For decades conservatives have tried the “do the right thing and tell no one, just be an example” and the result is a leftist-controlled academia and media that spit at honesty and decency.

Throw it in their faces. They richly deserve it, and they wouldn’t show you the same courtesy if the situation were reversed.

BKennedy on September 17, 2012 at 6:03 AM

Try thelookingspoon, lmaobama, quickmeme, and don’t be afraid of /pol/ on 4chan, it’s a lot of libtards but there’s also plenty of righties with fresh memes and they are brutal.

Go RBNY on September 17, 2012 at 12:21 AM

Yes, thelookingspoon is good. I’ll check out the others you mention. Thanks.

I agree, trying to debate them is a waste of time. They operate off emotion, not rationality. Use emotion and mockery to repress their votes.

petefrt on September 17, 2012 at 7:26 AM

Its wonderful if this person is happy. But what’s inexplicable about this column is his assumption that other people’s weddings, relationships and sex lives are less satisfying than his. I think we *all* can think of examples of people who waited until marriage….and then got divorced or were supremely unhappy in their marriages. Clearly, for this guy, this marriage isn’t just about joining with his life, its about imagining that everyone is miserable. One wonders, if he could ever be convinced that non-virgins who marry are happy would it destroy his happiness in his own marriage?

libfreeordie on September 16, 2012 at 4:26 PM

Dude … Why are YOU judging HIM?

Arssanguinus on September 17, 2012 at 7:27 AM

The subject of the Crowders’ choice must make people feel guilty, or else the reactions from some of the people here wouldn’t be so negative.
Rose on September 16, 2012 at 9:54 PM

His behavior convicts them – their insecurity takes over from there.

tommyboy on September 17, 2012 at 7:28 AM

Throw it in their faces. They richly deserve it, and they wouldn’t show you the same courtesy if the situation were reversed.

If that is your true belief, then be sure to get in the face of every liberal you can after Romney gets elected. Be sure to gloat, beat your chest and tell everyone “I won” when discussing the election. Then, try and convince them to repent of their evil ways and become conservative.

Let me know if you have any success. It didn’t work for me and I’m a damned excellent communicator so I’d be shocked if many other people enjoyed success with the humiliate and conquer method.

Crowder was clearly out to convince people of the validity of his lifestyle otherwise he wouldn’t have gone to the trouble of authoring an article about it. This article, instead of capitalizing on the opportunity to push his ideas further, just comes off as angry and spiteful. I’m sure there were plenty of readers who were out there thinking “gosh he sure showed me!” I don’t think I or anyone else commenting here are the ones that need to get over ourselves.

I think Steve has a really positive message about his experiences that he SHOULD share with people but doing so with this level of arrogance and smugness totally distracts from his message.

I’m not telling all the conservatives out there to turn the other cheek since there are times when people need a counter punch to the face. I am saying that if you intend for detractors of your beliefs to be receptive to them, you’re going to have an easier time convincing them when you’re not also insulting them.

I’m cool with the live and let live aspect of all this. That said, when you post your gloating on one of the internet’s biggest news sites, then the whole “don’t read it” argument goes out the door.

Flashwing on September 17, 2012 at 7:29 AM

His behavior convicts them – their insecurity takes over from there.

tommyboy on September 17, 2012 at 7:28 AM

That notion is hilarious. Perhaps those of us who are critical don’t turn off our principles about how people behave just because they share our viewpoint. I don’t care who you are, if you act smug or superior then you need to get torn down. No one is any better than anyone else. People are simply separated by the choices they make and the experiences they have.

Flashwing on September 17, 2012 at 7:41 AM

His behavior convicts them – their insecurity takes over from there.

tommyboy on September 17, 2012 at 7:28 AM

Ugh, my apologies. You were talking about the individuals who gave Crowder grief. In that context, I agree with your statement. If these people were truly secure in their beliefs then they wouldn’t have any reason to do anything but give him encouragement.

Sorry for typing first and reading later.

Flashwing on September 17, 2012 at 7:43 AM

Sounds awful defensive to me. Someone’s conscience is nagging them.

tommyboy on September 17, 2012 at 7:45 AM

i love being lectured by our moral betters.

sesquipedalian on September 17, 2012 at 8:00 AM

It’s unfortunate he thinks his wedding was somehow more special than mine or anyone elses.

jhffmn on September 17, 2012 at 8:21 AM

sesquipedalian on September 17, 2012 at 8:00 AM

.

jhffmn on September 17, 2012 at 8:21 AM

.
Both of you are soooJUDGED.

listens2glenn on September 17, 2012 at 8:30 AM

Well, after reading this, I am really glad my husband and I chose a hotel with room service for our honeymoon and got breakfast in bed for our first meal as a married couple. Mr and Mrs Crowder sound like wonderful dining companions and all, but seeing as I am really not a morning person, I am really glad I skipped out on the morning after ‘you are a harlot and your husband is a drunk’ breakfast chit chat at the ‘local inn’.

bitsy on September 17, 2012 at 8:50 AM

Both of you are sooo … JUDGED.

listens2glenn on September 17, 2012 at 8:30 AM

Haha, I also ended up getting drunk on my wedding day too.

Look, my wife and I met when I was 23 and she was 22. I was a college dropout and she was finishing her degree in business but was too shy and quiet to make much of it. We ended up working at the same place, I was waiting tables and she was hosting. We dated for about 6 months before moving in together out of wedlock. Oh, and waiting for marriage? Forget about it.

But a crazy thing started to happen. We started thinking about the future and our life trajectory changed. We got the silly idea to move away together and go back to school and we did. It was hard, we both had to work full time. I finished my degree in math/CS (I was originally earning a liberal arts degree in skirt chasing). She finished up her pre-reqs for a nursing degree.

Then we got the silly idea to go to graduate school together. It would be fun! We worked and supported ourselves through out all of it. It got rough when she had to have open heart surgery and I had to take care of her. We were very very poor. But we survived.

We waited until we both had landed jobs and had scrapped up a little money for a wedding. We decided to have our wedding back home, returning far different people than when we had left together 5 years earlier. Our wedding was a huge party celebrating not only our life to come but the life we had already made for ourselves. The reception also lasted for a very long time. We were all loud and “snookered”.

Crowder could have very well have written this piece in response to meeting my wife.

Today, my wife and I are living the life we always wanted. Our love for each other has made us both stronger and better people. I wish Crowder the best of luck in his life to come. But if he thinks his wedding night was somehow more special than ours, I can only laugh at him.

jhffmn on September 17, 2012 at 8:58 AM

According to a new study by Heritage, marriage itself is good for our nation financially, not just morally.

If, say, eating arugula had as much benefit on society, our government & the media would make sure everyone knew it…and we might even be forced to partake.

But since it’s a conservative solution, you won’t hear about it except from a few conservative voices.

Instead, the government & the media cheer for homosexuality, which is measurably unhealthy in a number of ways.

http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2010/09/marriage-america-s-greatest-weapon-against-child-poverty

itsnotaboutme on September 17, 2012 at 9:06 AM

i love being lectured by our moral betters.

sesquipedalian on September 17, 2012 at 8:00 AM

Your sarcasm is an attempt to lecture.

Just say you disagree & drop the hypocrisy, OK?

itsnotaboutme on September 17, 2012 at 9:10 AM

jhffmn on September 17, 2012 at 8:58 AM

We had a “traditional” marriage, too. I got pregnant and we got married. We celebrated our thirty year anniversary this past August. Crowder’s still young. Much happiness to him and his bride, who I’ve seen in person. She is stunning. He is blessed.

Fallon on September 17, 2012 at 9:23 AM

“Oh, he’s sleeping. There was no way he was coming out with me this morning!” She paused and smirked. “Let’s just say that he’s got a lingering headache from a really good time last night.”

My heart sank. Firstly, that poor schmuck’s “good time” was simply getting snookered. Not enjoying the company of close family and long-lost friends with a clear head and clean conscience, not staring in awe at his beautiful new wife, wanting to soak in every glimmer of her eyes as she shot him heart-racing looks from across the dance floor, not taking all of the cheesy pictures as they cut the cake, not even carrying her across that suite threshold as they nervously anticipated their “nightcap.” He probably won’t remember any of it. Instead, he got smashed. He was “that guy”… at his own freaking wedding.
——-

How the f*ck does Crowder know anything about what happened that night?

Did he demand proof that they were virgins too?

What a steaming pile of monumentally stupid, self-righteous and judgemental sh*t.

Dave Rywall on September 17, 2012 at 9:29 AM

Today, my wife and I are living the life we always wanted. Our love for each other has made us both stronger and better people. I wish Crowder the best of luck in his life to come. But if he thinks his wedding night was somehow more special than ours, I can only laugh at him.

jhffmn on September 17, 2012 at 8:58 AM

.
Oh crap . . . . . now I’ve got to consult the “Judgement Manual” to see how I go about un-judging, or de-judging . . . . . something.
.
Congratulations to you and your wife.

listens2glenn on September 17, 2012 at 9:52 AM

Then we got the silly idea to go to graduate school together. It would be fun! We worked and supported ourselves through out all of it. It got rough when she had to have open heart surgery and I had to take care of her. We were very very poor. But we survived.

We waited until we both had landed jobs and had scrapped up a little money for a wedding. We decided to have our wedding back home, returning far different people than when we had left together 5 years earlier. Our wedding was a huge party celebrating not only our life to come but the life we had already made for ourselves. The reception also lasted for a very long time. We were all loud and “snookered”.

jhffmn on September 17, 2012 at 8:58 AM

Great story. Much respect.

dedalus on September 17, 2012 at 10:04 AM

Dave Rywall on September 17, 2012 at 9:29 AM

Your post reminded me of this:

Bart: Hey, Dad. Heard you were swearing. Mind if I join in? Crap, boobs, crap!

Fallon on September 17, 2012 at 10:11 AM

I wish Crowder the best of luck in his life to come. But if he thinks his wedding night was somehow more special than ours, I can only laugh at him.

jhffmn

He didn’t say that, he said:

The people next to us that morning? Well, theirs was just one big party. And the morning after? Just another hangover.

Our “weddings” were the same event in name only. They know it, and we know it.

Crowder

Crowder makes some assumptions about the other couple’s relationship, but so do you. I would respectfully suggest that it’s every bit as likely that your wedding was as different from the wedding Crowder described the other couple having as Crowder’s was – at least in its meaning to its respective participants, which was his whole point, after all.

Knott Buyinit on September 17, 2012 at 10:57 AM

My husband and I had the same traditional marriage as Steven Crowder…..in 1987! 25 years and going strong. The “other guys” who partied it up have been through numerous divorces and remarriages. Go ahead and call me old fashioned but whenever I see someone getting married in their bathing suits at the beach, underwater, outside of a church wedding I have a hard time believing that they will be part of the 50% that make it. Good for Steven and his lovely wife. The best of luck to them. I can be pretty positive that they will be on the winning side of the 50% as well.

neyney on September 17, 2012 at 11:00 AM

Dave Rywall on September 17, 2012 at 9:29 AM

Your post reminded me of this:

Bart: Hey, Dad. Heard you were swearing. Mind if I join in? Crap, boobs, crap!

Fallon on September 17, 2012 at 10:11 AM
——

Aww, sorry for using those words, little girl.

Dave Rywall on September 17, 2012 at 11:10 AM

I swear people take things too personally. This whole thread is an indication of it. Crowder thinks his wedding is better blah, blah, blah.

If you think your marriage is as good as Crowder’s and your wedding was special then you shouldn’t be so damn touchy about this article. Why should you care what Crowder thinks?

My wedding sucked and my reception was worse, but my 21 year marriage has been wonderful.. I wish the Crowders the best and have respect for them waiting- Period.

melle1228 on September 17, 2012 at 11:26 AM

My wedding sucked and my reception was worse, but my 21 year marriage has been wonderful.

melle1228 on September 17, 2012 at 11:26 AM

.
You are to be congratulated, as well.

listens2glenn on September 17, 2012 at 11:36 AM

Well, Crowder seems to have missed out on that whole humility side of Christianity. Or in modern parlance, don’t act like a pompous azz.

This aside, kudos to him for standing up for what he believes in and I wish him and his lovely bride many years of happiness.

JohnAGJ on September 17, 2012 at 11:41 AM

I think this article must offend Muslims somehow. Anyone up for attacking the embassy in the tropical location of Crowder’s honeymoon?

Nutstuyu on September 17, 2012 at 12:34 PM

(S)orry for using those words…

Dave Rywall on September 17, 2012 at 11:10 AM

Apology accepted.

Fallon on September 17, 2012 at 1:01 PM

The people next to us that morning? Well, theirs was just one big party. And the morning after? Just another hangover.

Bite me. What a stupid and prissy thing to say.

John the Libertarian on September 17, 2012 at 1:14 PM

Did Crowder identify someone, and say something false or irrelevant, inappropriate, vulgar or vicious or degrading about that person’s private life? No. The floozies and false men he mentions could be anyone. The drunken groom and his bride are the only people who mightknow who the drunken groom is.

Crowder is judging choices–not people. But some of us are reacting to this article like cigarette smokers who are afraid the policy about smoking breaks at work will change if too many people quit.

ansonia on September 17, 2012 at 1:24 PM

re: Ansonia at 1:24
Or like drunks who are afraid their drinking will be conspicuous, and viewed with disapproval, if too many of their buddies sober up.

ansonia on September 17, 2012 at 1:46 PM

I’m surprised at the debate here over Crowder’s writing style. His style hasn’t changed. No one should be surprised.

There’s a difference between advice and an intervention. Sometimes, something more attention getting is appropriate.

The American public isn’t all that alert. If Crowder got through to a few people, he did some good.

Pythagoras on September 17, 2012 at 1:49 PM

The subject of the Crowders’ choice must make people feel guilty, or else the reactions from some of the people here wouldn’t be so negative.
Rose on September 16, 2012 at 9:54 PM

His behavior convicts them – their insecurity takes over from there.

tommyboy on September 17, 2012 at 7:28 AM

It’s funny. As one of the people who took issue with the tone and word choices in that it was nasty and angry you must think that I’m insecure/feel guilty/jealous/whatever.

No. Why would what a boy (I’m 45) says upset me? Because I commented on a comment board? I think he diminished his bride and his wedding by using it as a club to beat his naysayers with. Just my opinion. He wrote a paragraph that was stunning and then surrounded it with anger and gloating. *shrug*

I have no need to convince anyone that I’m never going meet that my life choices worked for me so I won’t bother. I’d just like to remind people that sometimes a comment is just a comment and not some sort of psychic wound that must be healed.

kim roy on September 17, 2012 at 2:07 PM

Haha, I also ended up getting drunk on my wedding day too.

Look, my wife and I met when I was 23 and she was 22. I was a college dropout and she was finishing her degree in business but was too shy and quiet to make much of it. We ended up working at the same place, I was waiting tables and she was hosting. We dated for about 6 months before moving in together out of wedlock. Oh, and waiting for marriage? Forget about it.

But a crazy thing started to happen. We started thinking about the future and our life trajectory changed. We got the silly idea to move away together and go back to school and we did. It was hard, we both had to work full time. I finished my degree in math/CS (I was originally earning a liberal arts degree in skirt chasing). She finished up her pre-reqs for a nursing degree.

Then we got the silly idea to go to graduate school together. It would be fun! We worked and supported ourselves through out all of it. It got rough when she had to have open heart surgery and I had to take care of her. We were very very poor. But we survived.

We waited until we both had landed jobs and had scrapped up a little money for a wedding. We decided to have our wedding back home, returning far different people than when we had left together 5 years earlier. Our wedding was a huge party celebrating not only our life to come but the life we had already made for ourselves. The reception also lasted for a very long time. We were all loud and “snookered”.

Crowder could have very well have written this piece in response to meeting my wife.

Today, my wife and I are living the life we always wanted. Our love for each other has made us both stronger and better people. I wish Crowder the best of luck in his life to come. But if he thinks his wedding night was somehow more special than ours, I can only laugh at him.

jhffmn on September 17, 2012 at 8:58 AM

Thank you so much for this. I hope you and your wife have a blessed and loving LONG life together. :)

kim roy on September 17, 2012 at 2:12 PM

Count me as one of the many who wish they had waited until marriage. My life would have had so much less heartbreak if I had done what I wanted and planned to do, which was to “save it” for marriage.

Heartiest congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Crowder. They stuck to their principles, and they didn’t cave in even under the pressure of others’ mockery. That is admirable in itself, and sadly very rare.

If Mr. Crowder speaks his mind too frankly for the tastes of some, well, there’s no Constitutional right not to be offended.

Mary in LA on September 17, 2012 at 5:41 PM

What I am a steaming pile of monumentally stupid, self-righteous and judgemental sh*t.

Dave Rywall on September 17, 2012 at 9:29 AM

FIFY, loser.

Mary in LA on September 17, 2012 at 5:42 PM

I don’t care who you are, if you act smug or superior then you need to get torn down.

Why does the person “need” to get torn down? How does that benefit anyone? Isn’t it better to figure out why the person is acting smug or superior, and see what the basis for that behavior is? If they’re overcompensating for some other deficiency, that’s important to know so as to modulate our own behavior or even (gasp!) help them. If not, then maybe that person is really onto something.

No one is any better than anyone else.
[...]
Flashwing on September 17, 2012 at 7:41 AM

That is 100% untrue, and you know it. You and I, for example, are orders of magnitude better than Hitler or Stalin or Mohammed (oops, I went there! Call the FBI!).

And I know for a fact that there are many people better than I am. I don’t feel compelled to tear them down because of it — rather, I am humbled by them and try to follow their example.

Mary in LA on September 17, 2012 at 5:51 PM

Another problem is that Steven Crowder never has been funny. Or particularly sharp. He does everything with that arrogant, self-superior, mocking, immature tone. Now, with his latest “my marriage is the real deal while yours sucks” mess of judgemental, cringe-worthy, self-rigtheous B.S., the kid has really jumped the shark. He gives both Christians and conservatives a bad name with his easily-mockable “at least my wife isn’t a floozy like you” insult and comes across as extremely unlikeable. I regularly see HotAir comments that are wittier and funnier than anything I’ve ever seen from Crowder.

Apparently Crowder rose to semi-prominence (and got the Fox News job) because he was one of the only “young” conservative YouTube comedians making videos and with any kind of following. People started linking to him not necessarily because he was amazingly good (he’s obviously not), but rather because he was pretty much the only one of his kind.

Simply put: we need better young conservative satirists. There is a huge market out there for someone to exploit.

We can do A LOT better than Steven Crowder.

bluegill on September 17, 2012 at 6:14 PM

Before all this Crowder came off as a smarmy know-it-all with all the finesse of Cliff Clavin but none of the charm. An unfunny comic whose over-sized high-school ego was continually stroked by conservatives desperate for any bit of humor from the right. Turns out he’s really just a moralist with a persecution complex.

Leonard210 on September 17, 2012 at 6:43 PM

bluegill on September 17, 2012 at 6:14 PM

Thank you. Missed your comment, but I was beginning to think that I was the only one who noticed that Crowder has never been funny nor particularly thought provoking. And it’s easy to find excellent examples of Christian or family-friendly comedy, if that’s your thing. You want to encourage young upstarts but this was beyond the pale. Hot Air has never published the self-preening nuptials of any other conservative or Christian that I am aware. I suppose it’s because there has never been another person in the history of history who was a virgin at the altar. Or maybe it’s just a really cool way to get a headline on Hot Air.

Leonard210 on September 17, 2012 at 6:58 PM

This is greatness. Crowder will be blessed in many ways he doesn’t even know yet for the path he and his wife chose for their relationship.

jediwebdude on September 17, 2012 at 10:00 PM

Oh great, so now we’re going to have politicos running around accussing other people’s weddings of being..

..

WINOs?

Reaps on September 17, 2012 at 10:42 PM

That was one of the most pretentious things I’ve ever read, thanks.

triple on September 18, 2012 at 12:18 AM

Leonard210 on September 17, 2012 at 6:43 PM

.

bluegill on September 17, 2012 at 6:14 PM

Thank you. Missed your comment, but I was beginning to think that I was the only one who noticed that Crowder has never been funny nor particularly thought provoking.

Leonard210
on September 17, 2012 at 6:58 PM

.
Okay Leonard’, we won’t look for you in his audience.
.

triple on September 18, 2012 at 12:18 AM

.
That’s one of the most pretentious comments I’ve ever read.

listens2glenn on September 18, 2012 at 12:49 PM

listens2glenn on September 18, 2012 at 12:49 PM

Must be on his writing team. :-)

Leonard210 on September 18, 2012 at 12:56 PM

listens2glenn on September 18, 2012 at 12:49 PM

.
Must be on his writing team. :-)

Leonard210 on September 18, 2012 at 12:56 PM

.

Damn ! . . . (my cover’s been blown).

listens2glenn on September 19, 2012 at 10:21 AM

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