Where were you when the world stopped turning?

posted at 12:41 pm on September 11, 2012 by Erika Johnsen

Driving into the office this morning and seeing all of the giant American flags unfurled over all of the tallest buildings, and revisiting all of the pictures, videos, and soundbites coming through my newsfeed today, I’m irresistibly and just as poignantly reminded of exactly how I felt on the terrible day of September 11th, 2001. I’m sure that everybody who lived through that day remembers where they were and what they were doing when they saw the news, and I’d like to briefly share my experience — an experience probably familiar for many, but I’ve just realized, I don’t think I’ve ever written it down before, and I’d like to take a moment to do so.

On the beautiful, clear morning of this day, eleven years ago, I was sitting in my middle school Civics class. The lesson that day had to do with the three branches of our government and the separation of powers, and at least half of the class was having difficulty containing their impatience for the early lunchtime period. Toward the end of the hour, a teacher from down the hall burst through the door, whispered something to my Civics teacher, and rushed back out again. My teacher went over to the TV, turned it on, flipped to CNN, and stood back. There it was. The horrible image of a bright blue sky filled with black smoke. We all stared in silence for a minute, and I don’t think I nor my peers really had any comprehension of what it was we were looking at. The bell rang, but nobody moved. My teacher turned away from the TV and looked at all of our bewildered faces, clearly at a loss for what to say. He finally managed to get something out: “This… this is huge.” That was when the first wave of cold horror washed over me. We all filed out into the hall to go to our next period, and the normal buzz was even louder than usual — it wasn’t quite panic, but our eight-grade minds were having trouble grasping what was happening. During my next period, we all sat in silence again and just watched the news with my teacher. That was when I began to understand the enormity of what I was seeing: As I was sitting there in Yearbook class, thousands of Americans were staring the reality of imminent and gruesome death in the face. As I was at a large school in the northern Virginia suburbs, several of my peers who had parents working at the Pentagon were pulled out of school early that day. I don’t remember any tears from anyone — just shock. Confused, paralyzing shock. At home that evening, my dad sat me and my brother down and told us solemnly: “Kids… your lives are never going to be the same.” And that was when I started to cry.

I don’t have a ton of distinct memories from my middle-school era, but that one is forever imprinted on my consciousness. I even remember exactly what I was wearing and what I had packed for lunch. I invite you to share your own stories in the comments, as we take this day to remember and reflect upon the thousands of people who died at the hands of hateful terrorists; the countless displays of courage and kindness in the aftermath of the attack; and the men and women who have worked tirelessly since to keep the forces of evil at bay. God bless America.


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That Obama became president of the U.S., so soon after 9/11/2001, is proof that the muzzies won. However, there are 1001 other reasons of such proof.

Schadenfreude on September 11, 2012 at 2:23 PM

Well yes. For those of us who fly there is TSA.

And every single time I get on a plane and have to deal with the morons at TSA I think, maybe we have lost already.

CorporatePiggy on September 11, 2012 at 2:27 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

People grieve in different ways. No need to get all in-your-face with other people about their way of dealing with emotions, no matter how old. Some hurts never stop for some people. If you can’t deal with others talking about it, then don’t come on these types of threads. No one is forcing you to be here.

chelie on September 11, 2012 at 2:27 PM

I was just leaving English 110 in my freshman year of college, here in North Dakota. I headed over to the Union for a coffee, and as I was entering the first plane had already hit. There was a huge crowd gathered around the big-screen TV, and shortly after I arrived I saw the second plane hit. I think I realized it was a terrorist attack almost immediately, but I’m not sure; it may have been the TV reporter who made the connection.

History class immediately followed, and he promptly dismissed us saying “this is far more important than anything I will be teaching today.” Campus went on lockdown, because we were very close to an international airport. There were some scares because the tall dormitories were pretty visible and isolated from the rest of campus…

The Happy Hooligans (our local Air Guard F-16) scrambled very loudly shortly after the second plane hit. They flew CAP over the east coast for quite quote a while.

College just seemed kind of pointless after that.

ctwelve on September 11, 2012 at 2:30 PM

Sekhmet on September 11, 2012 at 2:14 PM

As an avid aviator and aspiring pilot, I have been watching this in awe today

http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLDF5B3135CB2F4A5D

The pilot had balls of steel unlike the pu**ys who crashed into the WTC. As an airman, you are supposed to f**king fly. Not crash.

Like I said in another thread, no kid deserves to watch his parent die, either live or in live replay.

sram on September 11, 2012 at 2:30 PM

I was at home (called off work that morning due to rotator-cuff pain) listening to WHP 580 AM, Harrisburg, PA.

R.J. Reynolds cut-in to announce that an aircraft had crashed into the World Trade Center.

I immediately turned on the TV (WGAL 8 NBC, Lancaster) to see the North Tower on fire, and the “imprint” of the plane that had struck it clearly stood out. Couric and Lauer were talking, but I wasn’t listening.
Right then I knew it had been a large aircraft, and was certain it was not an accident.
I was watching live when the second plane struck the South Tower.

Sometime after that, it was said that an aircraft was reported having crashed near the Pentagon. Shortly after, it was stated that an aircraft had crashed into the Pentagon.

Not sure when I first heard about Flight 93.

Not much else to add here . . . : (
.
.
If you visit the Flight 93 Memorial, you’ll find it’s very somber and depressing.

Don’t leave Somerset Co, PA that way.

Please go visit the location of the Quecreek Mine Accident and Rescue. You’ll come away from that one feeling MUCH better.

listens2glenn on September 11, 2012 at 2:31 PM

An unlike some who were in high school when that day broke over us others grew the hell up and still travel to the wilderness to keep back the beasts.

God bless those sons and daughters. The ones who paid attention to lessons of family, and community, and country, and still do today.

Limerick on September 11, 2012 at 2:31 PM

I live in PA, about an hour or so from where Flight 93 went down. I was getting my two year old ready to go to her play group. They cancelled that, and I spent the whole morning on the phone while watching on TV. I was passing information to my sister who was at work because they didn’t have a TV. Friends from Texas were calling because they didn’t know where Shanksville was, wondering if we were okay. I remember how quiet everything was, no planes, hardly any traffic, etc. I remember being glad my daughter had no idea what was going on. I never cried back then, I guess it was anger and shock. Now, I cry every year, and I allow myself to wallow in it for this one day. No one should be killed just going to work. No one should have to jump from 100 stories to avoid burning to death instead. No one should get on an airplane and end up fighting for their lives trying to stop savages from killing them and us. I went to a few military funerals in the years following, and I remember how our whole town showed up and lined the streets as the hearses went by, and the giant flags held up by fire truck cherry picker things. My daughter is in 8th grade now, and this morning before she got on the bus she told me not to look on YouTube for 9/11 videos because the comments there are really ugly. The hate never goes away, on either side.

Night Owl on September 11, 2012 at 2:33 PM

11 years ago today 3000 innocent Americans lost their lives in an act of pure evil. Never before or since has the evilness of our fellow humans been visited upon this nation. I am well aware that we all have our personal memories of that day, but I would like us all to reflect on a few things that are not so much personal as they are universal to all Americans. Regardless of your politics we all were privileged to see our President in what is truly a presidential moment. His address the tragedy was something we all needed to see. The American people managed to come together in a way not seen in this country since WW2. Sadly this didn’t last and today we find ourselves as divided as ever. I think the way we held each other up in those dark post 9/11 days should be an example of what is possible when we are able to put the differences aside and strive together as a nation. Today I call on all Americans to remember those dark days and honor the fallen by coming together in the knowledge that we are Americans first and everything else is secondary. Don’t look at yourself as African-American, Gay-American, Muslim-American etc. Honor what unites us not what separates us. We owe that much to the dead on this day. Some may say 11 years is too long to hold onto a memory but I say never forget. I have thought long on if forgiveness is possible and I realized that it is , I forgive those savages for their actions but pledge in my heart to never allow then to commit these types of evil acts on my nation again at any cost. It is hard to forgive but necessary for me to honor my convictions. My most fervent wish to all my fellow Americans is always remember that day and honor those who paid the ultimate price. God Bless Us All.

JKotthoff on September 11, 2012 at 2:34 PM

Dupont Circle.

Christien on September 11, 2012 at 2:34 PM

OT: Obama refuses Netanyahu’s request for a meeting.
Drudge.

pambi on September 11, 2012 at 2:41 PM

http://rickrescorla.com/

I met Rick shortly after the Ia Drang Valley fight. (I had been there two years at that time)

On 9-11, Rick led hundreds to safety. He was down…he was out…he was safe……and he turned around and went back in to help some more.

Solaratov on September 11, 2012 at 2:42 PM

ornery_independent on September 11, 2012 at 1:23 PM

Sarasota here as well.

FLconservative on September 11, 2012 at 2:43 PM

OT:

MOB STORMS EMBASSY IN CAIRO
TEAR DOWN AMERICAN FLAG

Big red quote on Drudge…

affenhauer on September 11, 2012 at 2:45 PM

I don’t recall crying that day either, but I was definitely stunned. I stared at the TV most of the day and skipped half my classes just watching it.

There was some panic cause Crawford ranch is close to Baylor, and Barbara Bush had to cancel a speech, but mostly everyone was just shocked.

Esthier on September 11, 2012 at 2:47 PM

On the PATH train to WTC from Newark Penn when the first plane hit. Walked to the office listening to Howard Stern probably, then curiously walked back to WTC wondering why all these bits of paper and old plane ticket stubs were flying around.
Stood directly across the street looking up at this surreal fireball rushing down at my face, as the second plane hit the backside of the tower.
Watching BBC on an old tv we got working with network cables for antenna as the buildings came down, then moments later watched the dust clouds engulf our building.

smfic on September 11, 2012 at 2:49 PM

On 9/11, I was a student in Stuyvesant High School a few blocks away. I had a pretty good view of the towers. Because my teacher didn’t warn to turn the TV on, there was a lot of information that I wasn’t privy to until I went to another class.

Some things I remember…

We heard a loud noise and lots of car alarms. I saw a lot of smoke which led to the twin towers.

One of the Towers obscured the other from my field of vision, so I thought one of the towers had been hit. When the second plane hit, we all heard a loud explosion. And there were suddenly two holes in the tower that was visible to the classroom, so we just assumed it was related to whatever hit the towers.

It was in my next class that we had the news on, and saw the initial reports. That’s when I learned that two towers had been hit. When there was footage of Bush on CNN, someone in the class yelled “They should drop a plane on him!” And someone else yelled “Cheney and Ashcroft too!” A lot of people said that they had bad vibes that day.

A girl was particularly upset because her mother worked at the Twin Towers. There was an odd moment when it seemed on TV as if the Twin Towers were shaking. The lights went off, and we lost the TV signal. From the 90s bombing, we knew that TV Antennas were located on the WTC, so it was clear that something bad had happened.

When we were evacuated, rescue workers seemed a bit pissed that it hadn’t happened earlier.

I had never been as happy to see my family as I was at the end of that day.

Mister Mets on September 11, 2012 at 2:50 PM

I was actually home from school that day, faking sick. I remember laying in bed half awake when my dad started yelling “holy s***!” and other things downstairs and I thought “Oh, I wonder if World War 3 started?” in that “I’m a teenager who’s barely awake and I’m not gonna care about anything” way. Then I went downstairs just in time to see the second plane hit. I kept trying to do the “nothing gets to me” thing but seeing the plane hit and the towers fall was one of the top five worst experiences of my life. The next few days with all the tributes and flags flying was the first time I ever really understood patriotism though. I always thought it was something lame, old people did because they were stuck in the past but after that and to this day I still have to fight not to smile when I see a lot of American flags flying together in one area. So something personally good came out of it, at least.

Cyhort on September 11, 2012 at 2:54 PM

It was a sad day for everyone, but in hindsight it seems like for that one brief moment, we were all united as Americans. There really were no red states and blues states. No Democrats and Republicans. We mourned together. And in today’s bitterly divided atmosphere, it’s a surreal, and somewhat whimsical memory.

Nicole Coulter on September 11, 2012 at 1:26 PM

Yep, remember this?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Izb459vJ-8Q&feature=youtu.be

Flora Duh on September 11, 2012 at 2:16 PM

Thanks! I was looking for that clip this morning. All that unity so quickly dissipated. Seems like a dream, doesn’t it?

Nicole Coulter on September 11, 2012 at 2:56 PM

I was sleeping in that day in Dallas when the radio alarm went off and I heard that a plane had hit the WTC tower. The radio reports were that a small plane had hit. So I said “I must get up and see this.” As I turned on the TV I knew immediately that this was no small plane. As an engineer I could see that the building was going to have a tough time holding up. I saw the second plane approach and hit and I knew that this was no accident. I watched the rest of the day in horror. I think the worst part of all was seeing the people jump from the buildings. To think that these bast@7ds took all hope from these people and made the jump look like a good idea really hit me. Hearing the stories from several of the first responders that made it out made the images only worse as they tell of pregnant women jumping. I moved to NY for work (like that ever happens I have since escaped) and met several of the men that were there and heard their horror stories.
Where I lived in Dallas we were near DFW airport so we are used to the sound of planes all the time. During the three or so days of no flights it was surreal. It almost seems as if the birds refused to fly. Everything changed that day and I loved my children a little more and began to get that fear that I lived with as a child through the cold war. Too bad Bush was not quite the Reagan for this generation but he did a good job keeping that off our shores.
That fear has never left us and with this pres. it seems to get worse.

DrM2B on September 11, 2012 at 3:00 PM

I was with my wife at a sonogram at 21st and K, finding out our first child would be a boy. We walked back to my wife’s office at 18th and M not knowing anything was going on, until we found the office empty — everyone was in the boardroom using the video-wall to put every available channel up. As soon as the local news feed came in the Pentagon was hit. Car bomb, as initially misreported. We evacuated immediately and walked home, avoiding the Metro. I remember the large crowd walking up Connecticut, and occasionally someone would report one of the rumors that was spreading, like the car bomb at the State Department; or ask whether we were walking past an embassy that might be a target. Saw the first tower fall in a store-window TV in Dupont Circle. Second had fallen by the time we arrived home.

DrSteve on September 11, 2012 at 3:03 PM

I was two days away from where I’m standing right now.

Bmore on September 11, 2012 at 3:09 PM

I was running to get out of the black clouds of debris all around me.

BrunoMitchell on September 11, 2012 at 3:16 PM

Cairo:

After the protest, the U.S. Embassy issued this statement on its website:

The Embassy of the United States in Cairo condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims â?? as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions. Today, the 11th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, Americans are honoring our patriots and those who serve our nation as the fitting response to the enemies of democracy. Respect for religious beliefs is a cornerstone of American democracy. We firmly reject the actions by those who abuse the universal right of free speech to hurt the religious beliefs of other

The official US statement is one that “rejects” free speech and in support of the protection of Islam.

*DOUBLE FACEPALM*

Difficultas_Est_Imperium on September 11, 2012 at 3:19 PM

I was in the eighth grade, getting ready to go to school early that morning for band practice. I was brushing my teeth as my dad yelled from the living room that a plane had hit a building. Then, we thought it was an accident. I went to school, and my band teacher had the TV on. We saw the second plane hit on replay, and watched live as the towers fell. I was consumed with sadness, and then rage. The room was silent. We watched TV all day at school that day, and once I got home, my family watched until the wee hours. I will never forget seeing people fall from the buildings as they made the choice to jump. It’s seared in my mind.

My now brother in law was on a submarine that day, somewhere in the Mid East. It was my mother in law’s birthday, and my father in law was on a plane to Hawaii as the planes hit. Hearing them recount the absolute fear that day breaks my heart all over again.

I will never forgive or forget. That day, heathens destroyed my innocence. I have been terrified of planes since and still cringe when I hear one flying overhead. I can’t remember what life was like before that day – only that it was forever changed after.

conservative_student on September 11, 2012 at 3:20 PM

DrM2B on September 11, 2012 at 3:00 PM

Living in So. Arlington, the lack of DFW (and our nearby Arlington Airport) aircraft… noise, shadows over the ground… was often strange enough to bring neighbors out into the street, all feeling totally discombobulated.
The shocks of the events themselves were sinking in, but the continuing air-silence was unexpectedly unsettling.
Probably one of the very best decisions made on that day IMHO.

pambi on September 11, 2012 at 3:20 PM

Sadly, there was one person that said my friend Glenn and I shouldn’t be upset because it didn’t affect us and that he has family and friends that worked in the WTC. …

MobileVideoEngineer on September 11, 2012 at 2:26 PM

Ouch! :-(

Mary in LA on September 11, 2012 at 3:30 PM

We had just moved to Texas in August of 2001, just north of Dallas. I had left my oldest, a daughter, in NY starting her freshman year at a nice little East Coast college nestled along the Hudson in upstate NY and flew “home” to Texas on September 1st.

I remember dismissing my son’s comment that a plane had hit the World Trade Center. I thought, stupid tour planes, and told him to come downstairs, it was time to leave for school.

Much of what happened is now fading but I remember having the radio on as I drove back from dropping my youngest three children off at their new schools. I was torn between turning the car around to go gather up my kids and continuing home alone.

I went home alone and watched the TV in horror as the towers fell. I remember repeating no, no, no when the first fell. And when the second fell, I broke down in tears. I talked to my husband but don’t recall any of the conversation. Probably, a lot of, are you alright? What should we do?

An elderly neighbor who was from South Africa came over to check on me as he knew we had just moved to the area. I found out I wasn’t alone after all. I’ll always remember his kindness. Then, I did the only thing I could think of to do. I put out my American flag.

A little after noon, I received an email from my daughter in NY saying she was fine and that I should not try to call as the phone lines need to be left as open as possible. Many of her new friends had parents and relatives who worked in or near the towers or were firemen or in law enforcement. I was relieved but the distance between Texas and New York felt even farther than it actually is, my firstborn was so far away.

We lived about 15-20 minutes from DFW and I remember taking my youngest son outside to look at the night sky without an airplane in sight. I told him I hope this never happens again.

Being in Texas during this attack was enlightening. Texans love Texas but they love America just as much. Coming from the Chicago area, I was struck by their displays of patriotism and kindness. I felt a bit like a distant observer to the tragedy. It didn’t seem real. Sometimes, it still doesn’t seem real but then I get randomly groped just about everytime I fly and it reminds me of the ways the world has changed for the worse since 911.

Fallon on September 11, 2012 at 3:34 PM

I’m in my late 20s. I was in high school when it happened. 9/11 arguably effected my generation more than any other. I too watched it unfold on TV with similar terror that folks are recounting here. But I don’t feel the need to post all over my facebook about where i was, what i was doing, etc 11 years ago. I’m more concerned about the fact that 11 years later, we’re still in a pointless war costing trillions of dollars killing thousands of our young men and women.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:45 PM

This is why I’m glad I’m well out of my 20s. I pray I didn’t sound like this.

You say stupid things (It affects ME more!). You troll the adults talking about an adult subject. You smell of pi$$ and vinegar.

Feel free to talk about your opposition to the wars, spending, all that jazz. There’s a place – actually plenty of places – for that.

But it’s not here.

JRCash on September 11, 2012 at 3:37 PM

I just remembered…
I had an appointment calendar on my desk at work that somehow went untouched for a couple years afterward. It sat there, frozen on Sept 11, 2001 for a while.

freedomfirst on September 11, 2012 at 3:41 PM

sram on September 11, 2012 at 2:30 PM

I have an old version of MS Flight Simulator where the towers are still there. Holler if you want it.

teejk on September 11, 2012 at 3:42 PM

I had a very early conference call with some bankers at No5 WTC. My client needed a certificate from the bank for a corporate event and during the call the first plane hit but they had no idea what was going on. At the end of the call they said that they had a local issue but I insisted that they fax over the documents and they did. Right after the call I flicked on my tv and watched the second plane hit. When I went into the office days later I had forgotten about the fax but there it was on my desk dated September 11th, 2001 with a time stamp of 9am EST.

lexhamfox on September 11, 2012 at 3:43 PM

I was in Seattle just got up to go to work and turned on the tv to see just one of the towers smoking. Thought, wow big fire. Was in a hurry and went ot work. Then I got the word that both towers were hit by planes and that one had collapsed. SEATAC airport was shut down.

jake49 on September 11, 2012 at 3:47 PM

working in White Plains NY area…recently relocated from an overseas assignment living in a very crappy temporary corporate apt in Tarrytown with a wife and 2 kids…first report sounded like an accident…then “we’re not in Kansas anymore” hit…wife was out walking the dog and not answering her phone, kids were in school 40 miles away. I’ll never forget that panic.

and then the smell for a few weeks drifting up the Hudson River to where we lived…never forget that either.

teejk on September 11, 2012 at 3:52 PM

jake49 on September 11, 2012 at 3:47 PM

Our son lived in Tacoma at the time, and this morning he tweeted remembering seeing the incredible stacks of aircraft awaiting landing clearance @ SEATAC.
Then, the area was completely silent.
Creepy.

pambi on September 11, 2012 at 3:57 PM

I had a very early conference call with some bankers at No5 WTC. My client needed a certificate from the bank for a corporate event and during the call the first plane hit but they had no idea what was going on. At the end of the call they said that they had a local issue but I insisted that they fax over the documents and they did. Right after the call I flicked on my tv and watched the second plane hit. When I went into the office days later I had forgotten about the fax but there it was on my desk dated September 11th, 2001 with a time stamp of 9am EST.

lexhamfox on September 11, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Whoa, eerie! :-(

Do you happen to know if any of those bankers survived?

Mary in LA on September 11, 2012 at 4:03 PM

America apologizes to Islam today for bad people disrespecting Islam.

The Embassy of the United States in Cairo condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims â?? as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions. Today, the 11th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, Americans are honoring our patriots and those who serve our nation as the fitting response to the enemies of democracy. Respect for religious beliefs is a cornerstone of American democracy. We firmly reject the actions by those who abuse the universal right of free speech to hurt the religious beliefs of other

This thread should be titled…Where were you when America was conquered by Muslims?

BL@KBIRD on September 11, 2012 at 4:03 PM

http://theblackday.org/

Ugly on September 11, 2012 at 4:05 PM

I was scheduled for a morning meeting with a Navy client in the section of the Pentagon that was struck by the airplane 9/11/01, but my meeting was cancelled shortly before I left my office that morning. If that meeting had not been cancelled, I’m not sure if I would alive today.

My wife was attending a DoD meeting in Rosslyn, VA that morning and saw the plane as it passed close overhead on its approach to the Pentagon and felt the building she was in shake from the concussion of the blast.

Eleven years later, it is still difficult to remember that day.

Researcher1946 on September 11, 2012 at 4:05 PM

Still have the WSJ from Sept. 12& 13, 2001 on my desk.
Neatly wrapped around them is WSJ from May 3, 2011.

Jabberwock on September 11, 2012 at 4:09 PM

I had a very early conference call with some bankers at No5 WTC. My client needed a certificate from the bank for a corporate event and during the call the first plane hit but they had no idea what was going on. At the end of the call they said that they had a local issue but I insisted that they fax over the documents and they did. Right after the call I flicked on my tv and watched the second plane hit. When I went into the office days later I had forgotten about the fax but there it was on my desk dated September 11th, 2001 with a time stamp of 9am EST.

lexhamfox on September 11, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Whoa, eerie! :-(

Do you happen to know if any of those bankers survived?

Mary in LA on September 11, 2012 at 4:03 PM

They all survived. Even more eerie is that the CEO of my client firm was meant to be on the plane that went down in PA. He missed the flight by not setting his alarm properly.

I sat my exams at WTC2 and knew the security guy at Morgan Stanley and many of the others there… Later I spent about two weeks in NY attending funerals and memorial services.

One good thing did come of this… a very close buddy at college and I lost touch and then I read about him in the NYT. He was one of the only survivors from Marsh (that is another weird story in itself involving another college friend) and we got in touch again after that. He never wanted to visit me in the UK because he was afraid of terrorism. After we got in touch he visited my family in London and had a great time.

lexhamfox on September 11, 2012 at 4:16 PM

Posted this before

Ugly on September 11, 2012 at 4:16 PM

I’m in my late 20s. I was in high school when it happened. 9/11 arguably effected my generation more than any other. I too watched it unfold on TV with similar terror that folks are recounting here. But I don’t feel the need to post all over my facebook about where i was, what i was doing, etc 11 years ago. I’m more concerned about the fact that 11 years later, we’re still in a pointless war costing trillions of dollars killing thousands of our young men and women.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:45 PM

This is why I’m glad I’m well out of my 20s. I pray I didn’t sound like this.

You say stupid things (It affects ME more!). You troll the adults talking about an adult subject. You smell of pi$$ and vinegar.

Feel free to talk about your opposition to the wars, spending, all that jazz. There’s a place – actually plenty of places – for that.

But it’s not here.

JRCash on September 11, 2012 at 3:37 PM

~~~~~~~

Great post, JRCash…

ellifint on September 11, 2012 at 4:16 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

So should we stop observing Veteran’s Day as well? Remember, Veteran’s day – originally called Armistice Day – was instituted to commemorate the ending of WWI – which, after all, ended nearly 100 years ago…

psrch on September 11, 2012 at 4:23 PM

For those of you who thinks it’s our fault, take a look at this…

The Embassy of the United States in Cairo condemns the continuing efforts by misguided individuals to hurt the religious feelings of Muslims â?? as we condemn efforts to offend believers of all religions. Today, the 11th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States, Americans are honoring our patriots and those who serve our nation as the fitting response to the enemies of democracy. Respect for religious beliefs is a cornerstone of American democracy. We firmly reject the actions by those who abuse the universal right of free speech to hurt the religious beliefs of others

We currently have an administration that puts out announcements blaming free speech, and mean people offending “others” while apologizing profusely for being so horrid that they are forced to attack us, and STILL they attack our embassy and burn our flag.

It doesn’t matter how much we grovel folks. They want us dead. Or enslaved. All of us. Pretending that making nice will help just makes their job easier.

Lily on September 11, 2012 at 4:25 PM

I distinctly remember where I was today back in 2001 when I first heard a plane hit the WTC. I was driving to work. I didn’t know what to make of it at the time. I thought maybe it was a foggy day and some small single engine prop plane got lost and accidentally hit the tower (a B-25 hit the Empire State building during WWII in foggy weather IIRC). I get to work and I see something that was not normally there, a TV with the news on. I see the WTC, a bright sunny day and a huge hole in the building clearly from a large plane. I wondered at the time if maybe it was some freak accident, some catastrophic failure in the controls or engines and that’s just where the plane ended up crashing though a part of me had a bad feeling it was terrorism given the clear weather. Then the second plane hit on live TV. No doubt at that moment what was going on.

Yakko77 on September 11, 2012 at 4:27 PM

Never forget? An awful lot of people never even understood, and still don’t, what actually happened.

By far the biggest difference between 9/11 and Pearl Harbor was that with Pearl Harbor our politicians and our media and our Generals immediately recognized the enemy, while with 9/11, and even 11 years later, our politicians and our media and our generals do not. And we are still chasing our tails.

VorDaj on September 11, 2012 at 4:33 PM

I was in fourth grade, yo. It was so whack.

GW_SS-Delta on September 11, 2012 at 4:34 PM

I was in fourth grade, yo. It was so whack.

GW_SS-Delta on September 11, 2012 at 4:34 PM

Yo Dick, show some respect

Ugly on September 11, 2012 at 4:39 PM

Heard on my radio that big-hearted, lame-brained Biden, today, referred to 9/11 as a “bitter-sweet moment” for the USA. Bitter-sweet?!

mkenorthshore on September 11, 2012 at 4:42 PM

It was a beautiful day in suburban DC. I was in my garage office when news of the NYC crashes came over the radio. Then the second, then the Pentagon. It was hours before we heard confirmation about Flight 93. In utter anger I remember saying, “Someone has to die for this” many times that day. Our next door neighbor worked across the highway from the Pentagon in a Crystal City high rise office building He heard the blast and saw the horror up close. The AF communications officer across the street, whose son played with ours, was in the Pentagon. It was hours before his wife knew he was unhurt and something like 12 hours more before he could get home. We were all very thankful he had been in a sub-level on the opposite side of the building. It was about two days later before I had to go into DC, past the Pentagon. I won’t forget the black scar. I also won’t forget the chilling sight of machine gun armed sentries, dressed in black BDUs on corners in the city. Reminded me of the aftermath of the’68 riots.

ironked on September 11, 2012 at 4:44 PM

I was in fourth grade, yo. It was so whack.

GW_SS-Delta on September 11, 2012 at 4:34 PM

If you study real hard I bet you can make it to 5th grade someday.

Buttercup on September 11, 2012 at 4:49 PM

I was out in Spokane, WA. A buddy of mine woke me up at 6 or 6:30 PDT, 9 or 9:30 EDT, and said the words I will never forget, “Turn on your TV”. That’s all he said…I was glued to the TV until my rep showed up for an appt. We made the sales call, but no one was into it, and finally the rep said he was going home. EVERY thing stopped.I watched TV from 11 to 3 PDT, then took a cab to give blood. My anger and rage boiled over at those terrorists that murdered thousands. I waited in line hours to give blood then went back to the Hampton Inn. I was stuck there as all flights were grounded, all I did was watch Fox News. I tried to book a flight later in the week, no dice. I finally rented a car on Friday of that week and drove back to Cincinnati, with a detour to Colorado Springs to pick up my Pastor’s daughter. I remember going over the continental divide in Montana with the memorial service on the radio, tears streaming down my face.Drove straight thru to the Springs arriving at 3AM. Left at 7 AM and got home at 6 pm on Sunday night…I will NEVER FORGET those lost at 9/11/01 and thereafter..and oh yeah 9-11 was my little sisters’ birthday, what a way to remember it… :(

MJScanlonOH on September 11, 2012 at 4:52 PM

I was in fourth grade, yo. It was so whack.

GW_SS-Delta on September 11, 2012 at 4:34 PM

If you study real hard I bet you can make it to 5th grade someday.

Buttercup on September 11, 2012 at 4:49 PM

Thank you.

Ugly on September 11, 2012 at 4:53 PM

I was in Kona, Hawaii, working on one of my books, and doing a little remote consulting. As you tend to do in Hawaii with the time change, I was up pretty early, and checked in with my consulting client in Connecticut via email. She sent me an odd email extending my deadline, saying that all the airports were closed and all hell was breaking loose. I inquired about the details, and she said to turn on my TV (which I almost never turn on when I’m there.) I turned on the TV and was just speechless. One of the news anchors thought that other cities might also be attacked, so I called my husband and other family members to make sure they were okay; all were on the west coast or Midwest, so they were all right.

I sat glued to the TV for hours, watching the horror of it all. I had been scheduled to fly home on September 12th, so I knew that wasn’t going to happen. I called the rental car company to extend my reservation until I didn’t know when, because all air traffic was grounded indefinitely. The experience of being on an island during a time of “war” was very strange. Military vessels cruised around all of the islands on high alert. All cruise ships were confined to port indefinitely. Aircraft that were in the air in the Pacific when flights were grounded were making unscheduled landings at all the islands’ airports. Several inbound flights from Japan and China enroute to the west coast landed at the Kona airport. The amazing thing was the hospitality; several hundred passengers got to stay in local Kona hotels for free – how’s that for Aloha?

The stores were running out of things because everything has to be flown in from Honolulu; there is no ferry service between the Hawaiian islands. I finally was able to reach my airline after a couple more days, and got a flight for September 15th. The strangest thing was getting on the airplane and seeing nothing, I mean nothing in the seat back pockets. No magazines, no nothing. And for the inflight meal (which they still served in those days) we had plastic ware for the first time. It was a stark reminder that flying would never be the same again.

One thing I noticed is that everyone I encountered that week and after returning home were just a little nicer to one another. We were all Americans, in this together, united against a common enemy.

BoomerInOC on September 11, 2012 at 5:00 PM

As Glenn would say…Question with BOLDNESS!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW6mJOqRDI4

dom89031 on September 11, 2012 at 5:17 PM

I didn’t realize that the world had stopped turning. If anything maybe it is spinning a little faster and a little more out of control now more than then.

Where was I on 9-11-01? I was enjoying the success of a company that I had started a few years earlier…and yes, I built it myself, often in spite of the government and its oppressive taxation and regulations. I was celebrating life with two young children whose future was limitless and certain to be even better than mine. I was oblivious to the dangers of an evil world while basking in the glory of living in the greatest country on earth. I was living in a country where if we work hard, find success and pay our fair share, the government will protect us from the unthinkable and through its strength and leadership keep us safe and our utopian dreams alive. Eleven years later, the question for the day is not so much where were you when, but where were you in the days, weeks and years after. In retrospect, where are you now? Have you found the peace, hope and security that you felt before? Is your confidence and trust in your government and our society as strong as it once was? Do you find peace in the burning embers that have been allowed to blow across the Middle East? Does it bring you comfort to watch nations be taken over by groups who don’t champion democracy or respect human life? The light shining on the hill has grown dim. Now we bow in the name of free rights rather than rise to protect the freedom of man. I worry for my children’s future.

Yes, I remember where I was on the morning of 9-11-01, and I long for the kind of leadership that assured us on that day and reaffirmed the conviction to protect our nation and our peace.

tnarch on September 11, 2012 at 5:23 PM

I am a state trooper in Omaha, Nebraska. I got home on 9/11 at about 3am thanks to an individual with a warrant and a load of dope in his car. I slept through the first wave. Then the phone rang. A fellow troop told me a plan had just hit the tower. He is a former marine. Both of us take an interest in the world. We knew it was no accident.

I hung up the phone, got up and turned on the TV. Then the second plane hit. I was standing there powerless…full of rage. I was not in this fight. I was pissed. I called my wife who works in a VERY large tower and told her to get home NOW. Leave, just go, don’t stop to talk to anybody, hit the door.

When the Pentagon got hit work called. I was already dressed. Just waiting to be tasked out. The instructions were to muster at station wait for further assignment.

I remember driving in my patrol car crying. Listening to the radio. What a sight I must have been. At a stop light a woman and I locked eyes…we both had tears. I had to pull it together. I couldn’t be like that…not now, later maybe. Get my head in the game.

It did not take long…in fact I don’t think I made it to the station. I was told to go to Offutt air base and assist in perimeter security.

I was given a road it was an off ramp from Hwy 75 near the base. My instructions NOBODY gets by you. Block the road, shut it down, full dress, no excuses, any one runs the road block, stop them by any means necessary. I kept looking down the road….wanting and somewhat hoping for somebody to try. It was my chance to get in the fight. You have to recall the time. It was a feeling of siege. We didn’t know from where or who. There was a feeling of war…we were under attack…The President was coming to Offutt. Maybe they were in Omaha.

A woman approached slowly. She was pissed. “How do I get home?” “Ms.” I replied, “I don’t know where you live. I have no idea how to direct you home.” She started in on me. I finally told her there were many thousands of people who will never go home to their families again. Move on.

When air force one took off it pushed hard and fast. I watched it as it joined a fighter escort. I got back in my patrol car and thought, now what? It was a crazy day. Full of well intentioned actions of no consequence given what we now know of the attacks. We made it up as we went.

This day is still very hard for me. Not as hard as the many families who lost loved ones. Told myself the best way to honor those who died was to do my job. Do it well.

Inzax on September 11, 2012 at 5:27 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

So sorry it was even mentioned to where you had to address it. Let’s just forget it ever happened.

Pathetic.

Maybe you weren’t touched by the events. Many of us lost friends and family. Many of us went to war over the attack.

hawkdriver on September 11, 2012 at 5:33 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

So sorry it was even mentioned to where you had to address it. Let’s just forget it ever happened.

Pathetic.

Maybe you weren’t touched by the events. Many of us lost friends and family. Many of us went to war over the attack.

hawkdriver on September 11, 2012 at 5:33 PM

He sounds like my mother. She actually said something similar today-and then decided to ‘volunteer’ that a big reason that we were attacked was because of our relationship with Israel. My mother is Jewish-last time I checked-and is obviously suffering from some mind-eating, logic-destroying malady of the brain. *sigh*

annoyinglittletwerp on September 11, 2012 at 5:42 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

It would please me, no end, to see the draft re-instituted and see you serve. I know you’d never dream of enlisting. The military has a way of making men out of boys like you.

thatsafactjack on September 11, 2012 at 5:48 PM

I remember as if it were yesterday. I remember not having a clue till I went to my Economics class and seeing students talk in whispering tones. I remember the Professor coming to the front of the class and telling us that if we didn’t know what was going on to go to the main office and watch the television. I remember going in there and seeing the World Trade Center on fire. I remember watching in stunned disbelief for about 20 minutes till the Pentagon was hit. I remember running back to my class and telling them what just happened and then the Professor telling me in response, “that’s not possible.” I remember going to my Accounting class next in stunned disbelief and having the Professor trying to teach class. I remember walking out of that class and going home, taking the bus, watching the smoke rise from above the World Trade Center all those miles away.

njrob on September 11, 2012 at 5:48 PM

He sounds like my mother. She actually said something similar today-and then decided to ‘volunteer’ that a big reason that we were attacked was because of our relationship with Israel. My mother is Jewish-last time I checked-and is obviously suffering from some mind-eating, logic-destroying malady of the brain. *sigh*

annoyinglittletwerp on September 11, 2012 at 5:42 PM

It blows my mind that people feel that way. My own father has the same attitude (he doesn’t express it verbally, just kinda shrugs and says “Oh well”).

Ugly on September 11, 2012 at 5:49 PM

I was working at home with my 3 young children (10 months, 2 yrs, and 5 yrs). I was listening to Fox and Friends and heard about the first plane crash. I went to the TV to see it, then went to get my 5 year old to show her the fire. When we saw the second plane hit, I thought it was a replay of the first plane crash. I knew it was bad when they said it was a second plane. I didn’t take my oldest to her afternoon kindergarten, and stayed glued to the TV all day, calling my husband at work with updates. I was on the phone with him when the first tower fell, and told my husband, “Oh my God! It’s gone! One of the towers just collapsed!” When my husband got home, we began discussing where we would meet up if we were separated when the next attack came; who would get the kids from school, and where we would go. We lived between a nuclear power plant in Zion, and one in Kewaunee. so we thought we should head west. We also discussed getting guns. I remember the fear of the next attack, knowing it was coming. I still cry when I see these stories and hear of the courage of the American people.

Sasha List on September 11, 2012 at 5:50 PM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLt9AYYwliM

dom89031 on September 11, 2012 at 5:52 PM

Mr. Tarallo’s Non-Western World History course, Fordham Prep, Bronx NY. The walls were an ugly green.

ernesto on September 11, 2012 at 5:52 PM

My most vivid memory was when a colleague of mine, a person who did lots of engineering calculations, looked at me while the two towers were in huge flames and simply stated “You know, those building are going to collapse”. He realized that the structural steel of the buildings would be greatly weakened by the high temperatures from the infernos.

I think of that every time I hear some brain-dead truther like Rosie O’Donnell.

Henry Bowman on September 11, 2012 at 5:54 PM

dom89031 on September 11, 2012 at 5:52 PM

Thanks for that bit of TRUTHERISM. Check is in the mail.

Ugly on September 11, 2012 at 5:54 PM

I was a Mormon missionary knocking on doors that day. No body was answering the doors and we didn’t know why. LDS missionaries are forbidden from using any electronic media. So, we didn’t know what had happened when a gentlemen firmly told us to stop knocking on people’s doors and to come inside to watch television.

We did and when we saw the second tower hit, my companion and I knew we weren’t gonna get any work done that day. The kind Christian man fed us all day, and drove us back to our apartment at the end of the day.

Conservative Samizdat on September 11, 2012 at 5:57 PM

On that fateful day, in Lawton OK, I was going to a dental appt scheduled for 9.15am… was listening to the radio, when a news alert came on. It said that a plane had crashed into one of the twin towers in NYC, and it was said to be a terrible accident…

I got into the dental office moments later and everyone staff and other people who were there to see their dentist were all glued to the tv set in the reception area… we mumbled and muttered and some of us said a prayer many silently I am sure, and as we turned to go to our respective appointments, another plane hit, live, on tv, we were not quiet any more, a gentleman shouted, it’s a terrorist attack has to be and we pretty much in unison agreed.

Those of us able to go on with our appts, did so… thankfully I was there for a cleaning and it went fast… Drove home and turned on CNN and I didn’t stop watching… I couldn’t pull myself away.

I cried…

I went outside and for the first time there was a hush, a silence I had not heard before, I never truly understood how it could be so quiet… the eerieness was the fact that all flights had been cancelled…

For the next week so long as there was coverage I watched…

I still watch every Sept 11th…

My heart still breaks for everyone who lost a loved one that day…

May God rest their souls and may God give comfort and strength to all those who survive…

God Bless America…

Scrumpy on September 11, 2012 at 6:04 PM

I was in court waiting to go into a hearing when we heard that a plane had hit the WTC. After the hearing was over, we learned the news. We had a mediation scheduled that day and decided to go ahead with it because our client had flown in from out of town and wouldn’t be flying out any time soon. It wasn’t until the day was over that I was able to go home and turn on the TV and see the full scope of what had happened. Frankly, I was glad I’d been preoccupied all day and that I wasn’t glued to the TV for the wall-to-wall coverage. So sad and painful. And I didn’t even personally know anyone who’d lost a loved one that day. On this day and every 9/11 since, my thoughts and prayers go out to the thousands who weren’t as fortunate as I.

Syzygy on September 11, 2012 at 6:08 PM

OT-sort of: I was interviewed by the local NC affiliate after the cameraman saw me laying some flowers @ the local veterans memorial.
I think I did well. If it shows I won’t be able to link it here-but I did mention HA(though not by name).

annoyinglittletwerp on September 11, 2012 at 6:08 PM

San Diego. I was half-awake, listening to Clear Channel on the radio. Usually it was Howard Stern (his voice used to get me out of bed to turn off the alarm). But this morning was different. I worked the 9/11 coverage into a kind of War of the Worlds drama in my mind. I refused to awaken to the fact that this was real. Finally, I did.

9/11/01 will always be remembered as the day I became aware of how much some Americans hate this country. That was staggering to me, more than the horror perpetrated by foreign enemies.

Americans, hating America. So Barry and Moochelle were old hat by the time they rolled around. Still, it is rather amazing that we have enemies of America actually living in the White House.

disa on September 11, 2012 at 6:24 PM

I, too, will never forget September 11, 2001.

I was in my home office doing some paperwork; I’d not yet turned on a television, radio or the computer.

Hubby called and asked if I’d heard about a plane hitting the WTC; when I said no, he asked me to turn on the computer and call him back. When I turned on the puter, all the breaking news I’d found (at that point – about one or two mins. afterward was reporting a small plane.) After a few moments, I went to the other room to turn on the t.v. While I was deciphering the newscast, the second plane hit the south tower. At that point, I immediately called the boss back to no avail–no one in this area was receiving or able to make outgoing calls, whether by cell or landline. In retrospect, I’m sure I had the same feeling nearly every other American felt at that point–one of shock, horror, terror and incredulity. Then, and only then, did I grasp the complete and utter impact of loss, sorrow and finally, resolve.

Hubby was unreachable at that point. Our son, who often worked in Manhattan was unreachable. Parents across town were unreachable. It felt like I was in an isolated world at that point. I remember going outside and looking east. I remember the horror of what I saw. I remember the anger I felt. I remember the prayers I offered.

We live near the top of a small ‘mountain’ in northern jersey. I saw lower Manhattan smoke and then smolder FOR MONTHS.

I will NEVER forget.

jersey taxpayer on September 11, 2012 at 6:26 PM

I was in the air over the Midwest en route to Chicago. The FAA ordered us down and we landed in Sioux City,IA. It was a remarkable day. I drove the rest of the way home with several others.

DevilsPrinciple on September 11, 2012 at 6:33 PM

Howard Stern on 9/11

27mb…. low quality (24 kbps), but sounds okay.
2:38:10 in length. About 00:15:40 is when they realize what is happening, so feel free to FF to that segment.

The horror is apparent.

Ugly on September 11, 2012 at 6:35 PM

I work late so I was sleeping, my wife just left for work. She called me and told me to turn on the TV and find out “what the eff was going on, something about a plane hitting a building”. The rest of the day needless to say sucked.

I work in a casino in Vegas, I was surprised how many people still gambled that day. But what else were they to do?

rac on September 11, 2012 at 6:38 PM

Told myself the best way to honor those who died was to do my job. Do it well.

Inzax on September 11, 2012 at 5:27 PM

Thank you, Inzax.

jersey taxpayer on September 11, 2012 at 6:40 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

Your moniker–what is there ‘no stopping us’ from, if not evil?

Do you understand that the 1993 bombing of the WTC, and subsequently the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack on the WTC, the Pentagon and a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, has been the first attacks on American soil since WWII?

Perhaps you might study a bit of history–the American and World kind. Further, don’t get your reading material from American university progressives, be they ‘perfessors’ or ‘comrades.’

jersey taxpayer on September 11, 2012 at 6:49 PM

I’m in the Denver area. I had just moved into my first home I had purchased the day before, Sept. 10. It was a very long moving day, and by the end, everyone involved was exhausted. After everyone left, my boyfriend and I got the bed set up, found the towels toiletries, and plugged in the phone before dropping, exhausted, into bed. The next morning, I awoke to the sound of the phone ringing. It was my sister. She was yelling, “we’ve been attacked! The United States has been attacked!” A thousand thoughts raced through my mind in those seconds after she yelled those words. I quickly got the scoop, threw on a robe, and ran outside. I don’t know why I ran outside. I think I was expecting to see planes in formation dropping bombs on everything. It was a beautiful, sun-drenched morning, and it was so very eery to hear – nothing. No planes. Not even birds that morning. It truly was as if the world had stopped. I have always called it stunned silence.

I called in to work, and said I wouldn’t be there. I worked downtown in one of the high-rise buildings at that time, and no way was I going to be in a high-profile building, in a central location. (Most of the employees didn’t come in that day anyway.) Because we didn’t have the TV set up, my boyfriend and I went to a friend’s house, and spent the day GLUED to the TV. I just couldn’t believe what I was seeing and hearing. I traveled much for work, and had spent considerable time at the World Trade Center over the years. And I was stunned that people were jumping to their deaths – many falling through the cover of the outdoor bandstand in the courtyard, smashed to pieces on the stage like watermelons. I still cannot fathom being forced to make a decision like that. I was stunned that the towers collapsed. It’s astonishing – to this day, it’s astonishing.

That terrible day is as fresh to me as if it all happened yesterday. For me, time doesn’t diminish the memories. I spent time watching the 9/11 programs on TLC this weekend. Time will NEVER diminish the fact that Muslims murdered 3,000 people that day, in the name of their “god” and their murdering, savage ideology. And STILL to this day, Muslims worldwide have not stood together to call for an end to the violence. They have not banded together en masse, to condemn what their terrorist counterparts did that day. If anything, the vicious savagery has only ramped up further. To this date, 19,582 ISLAMIC terrorist attacks have been carried out in the name of their “god” since 9/11.

That day changed me forever. For me, Islam = death. And until supposed “moderate” Muslims overhaul their ideology and stop the violence, I cannot and will not trust them. Not one.

littlekittie on September 11, 2012 at 6:55 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

Just go celebrate with the rest of the “religion of peace” at the victory mosque 3 blocks away. While your at it you can go enjoys yourself at one of the countless street festivals and celebrations that occur at all of the muslim “holy sites”. Afterwards you can help draft the apology to the vermin that burned our flag in our embassy in the festering sewer of a city. You can then close out your wonderful day by having your head chopped off since you are gay and the prophet mohamed demands that of any gays or any women that shows her face/legs in public.

acyl72 on September 11, 2012 at 6:58 PM

FWIW Dept., I was in Fiji teaching Bible courses to pastors. The news came from a daughter of the head of the missions team who woke us all up at 3 a.m. We didn’t have a TV so that day we borrowed one from one of the students. All we could get was BBC and to this day when I hear BBC’s intro it makes me shudder. We couldn’t hardly sleep for a week, and we’ve been in prayer for our country ever since.

Christian Conservative on September 11, 2012 at 7:01 PM

Working when my brand new husband called me from Ft. Benning to tell me to turn on the TV. He was with 75th Ranger Regiment at the time, and we didn’t know when or where he’d be going, but we knew he’d be going somewhere soon.

He’s currently on his fifth deployment. Seems like whenever I start to get grumpy about all the single parenting, etc., a 9-11 anniversary rolls around to get my head on straight again.

jmfe on September 11, 2012 at 7:17 PM

I was in Fiji teaching Bible courses to pastors. The news came from a daughter of the head of the missions team who woke us all up at 3 a.m. We didn’t have a TV so that day we borrowed one from one of the students. All we could get was BBC and to this day when I hear BBC’s intro it makes me shudder. We couldn’t hardly sleep for a week, and we’ve been in prayer for our country ever since.

Christian Conservative on September 11, 2012 at 7:01 PM

As another Christian Conservative, I thank you for not only doing the work of God, but more importantly, never forgoing it.

jersey taxpayer on September 11, 2012 at 7:17 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

Your moniker–what is there ‘no stopping us’ from, if not evil?

jersey taxpayer on September 11, 2012 at 6:49 PM

Pretty sure it’s a reference to the gay rights movement.

hawkdriver on September 11, 2012 at 7:18 PM

First off, I feel very old to find out so many HA posters are recounting their experiences in high school or even younger.

On 9/11/01, I was 15 years into my military career. I think others on active duty at the time will attest that as far as the military goes, everything changed by noon on that day. There definitely was a new normal. Not the least of which is that the vast majority on active duty for any length of time since 9/11/01 have served in combat operations or deployed in support of these operations.

Debate over prolonged military operations is a topic for another time (a fact some very rude posters have decided to ignore in their self-centered ignorance). But there is no question that the military is far different in 2012 than it was in 2001.

Happy Nomad on September 11, 2012 at 7:30 PM

At the time I had a different job than now and worked nights, so I slept during the day. I was asleep when it happened. I was woken around 1 pm by my mother who was hysterically crying. She said the twins towers were attacked and the buildings collapsed. I didn’t believe her, but why would she say something like that. I got dressed and went to the tv room and just watched, numb. I kept switching channels to get all the news I could.

Eventually it was time to go to work. It felt odd to do so, but I had to go. I was thinking work might be cancelled. It wasn’t, but many employees chose not to work. We were going through the motions trying to be normal.

I was resolved for the entire week, until that Saturday. I was visiting friends that day in Brooklyn. I was reading the newspaper on the LIRR. There was a small article mentioning the E train would end at Canal St, naturally since it couldn’t terminate at the World Trade Center. I know the E train well. I took it often when I used to live in Queens.

As the train gets close to Jamaica I’m looking out the window. I remember on clear days with the angle just right you could see the silhouette of the Twin Towers. I get off at Jamaica to get on the J subway train. I first have to walk past the E platform. An E train arrives as I do so. The sign says it terminates at Canal Street. Of course, I just read about that in the newspaper. As I reach the J platform it finally hits me. The E train is not going to the World Trade Center. THE E TRAIN IS NOT GOING TO THE WORLD TRADE CENTER!! I collapse bawling my eyes out.

hadsil on September 11, 2012 at 7:33 PM

How did the terrorists get here?

The “Visa Express Program” that was started in June 2001 in Saudi Arabia. No other country in the world, including our closest allies, had ever had a “Visa Express Program” and no other country in the world has ever had one since. Wierd Huh?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2fuh9htSxLU

dom89031 on September 11, 2012 at 7:57 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

Really? 10 years and 3,000 innocent deaths should be forgotten?

I can still remember many events from the day when JFK was assassinated. 9/11/2001 won’t be leaving my memory either.

katablog.com on September 11, 2012 at 8:07 PM

In middle school. If memory serves, I was in my homeroom class for the actual course taught in said class later in the day. All I remember straight is the teacher turning the classroom TV to the news and seeing both towers burning.

Wrote in giant letters “TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE WORLD TRADE CENTER!!” in my journal, which I have unfortunately since lost. Went home scared out of my mind that the tallest, landmark building in my homecity would be next.

MelonCollie on September 11, 2012 at 8:10 PM

Part of me hesitates to do this, because I hate the thought of America haters and terrorists reading and knowing they caused so much sadness and fear, but they will also know that we don’t forget, and that we have resolved not to let the fear paralyze us. So…

My husband, an airline pilot, was home, thank God. I think I’d have become hysterical if he’d been at work. He had just left the house to take our almost 3 yr. old to Mom’s day out, while I was home with our 11 month old who was still sleeping. I had just sat down with my morning coffee and turned on the TV a few minutes before the second plane hit. I will never forget those images. When my husband walked in, a few minutes later, I asked if he had heard. He had and we watched as the buildings collapsed. I cried. He went and got our flag and put it out.

We were living in Norfolk, VA, about 3 miles from the world’s largest military base. I feared it would be a target, and wanted my husband to go get our daughter, but he said it was better for her to stay and play, rather than see me so upset. He understood before I did what the terrorists were, Cowards, and that they were unlikely to attack the world’s largest military facility with airplanes. At least after the base was alerted and the fighters from Oceana would have had a chance to scramble. We were as safe as anyone, but I didn’t feel safe. I have never felt completely safe since. Not like I had before…

Over the next week, I would cry off and on, for those poor people…the ones trapped in the towers, jumping. *horror* And because things would never be the same, especially when I looked at my little children. My husband was strong and put the flag out every morning. The day he had to go back to work…that was a hard day.

I remember when they finally reopened the airspace over the US. Every time I saw a plane overhead, I whispered a prayer for them.
CurtZHP on September 11, 2012 at 1:27 PM

Me too, after I would get over the urge to hit the ground. We also lived under the flight path for Norfolk International. Between it and the NAS, there were always planes overhead, but the silence in the week after 9/11 was so eerie. I’ll never forget the first time a plane flew over after they reopened. I was on a walk with the kids, and I literally almost dove to the ground.

God forgive me, but sometimes I find comfort in imagining the looks on the evil faces when they realized that the only virgin awaiting them was The Just Judge in all His awful power.

pannw on September 11, 2012 at 8:14 PM

RalphyBoy on September 11, 2012 at 1:28 PM

Beautiful, Ralph. Thank you.

Solaratov on September 11, 2012 at 8:19 PM

This cartoon by Steve Breen captured the rage I felt in the days after the attacks.

PatriotGal2257 on September 11, 2012 at 8:26 PM

“God forgive me, but sometimes I find comfort in imagining the looks on the evil faces when they realized that the only virgin awaiting them was The Just Judge in all His awful power.”

pannw – I think about that often, too. They are burning forever in hell, and frankly, I am very happy about that. Eternity is a very long time.

littlekittie on September 11, 2012 at 8:27 PM

After reading the earlier comments I’d like to mention that 9/11 is one of the reasons I now donate blood as often as physically possible. Even though my GF says I look like I’m gonna faint each time.

MelonCollie on September 11, 2012 at 8:42 PM

As a Naval Reserve Medical Corps officer, I was doing a temporary (one week) assignment at the Naval Medical Center Portsmouth (Virginia). It was a slow Tuesday morning at the Internal Medicine outpatient clinic. Suddenly, one of the nurses ran down the hall, repeating the horrible news that an airplane had run into one of the towers at the World Trade Center. My first thought was that a pilot had bungled an instrument approach, in bad visibility. I ran into the waiting room, where we had CNN going, just in time to see the second plane drill in. At that moment, four thoughts ran through my mind:

1. This was no accident
2. This is real
3. This is serious
4. I won’t be going home on Friday like I thought I was

(I ended up voluntarily extending my temporary duty orders, in order to backfill the Active Duty physicians who went forward to man the USNS Comfort, which was on scene.)

Later that evening (after we had heard the news about the Pentagon strike, and United 93) all of the off-duty personnel at NMC Portsmouth gathered in the auditorium for a briefing by the NMC Commander. He gave us a brief about what was known about the attack. After the brief, during a pause for questions, I made a brief statement. Presuming to speak for the reservists in the room (and, in reality, for everybody present) I stated “Just let us know what needs to be done, and we will do it”. Cheers of agreement followed. The Admiral was literally choking back tears of pride, knowing that he was leading a group of sailors who would go anywhere and do whatever needed to be done to respond to the attacks of that fateful day.

SubmarineDoc on September 11, 2012 at 9:01 PM

In Korea. The base was locked down for a couple months afterward and I remember having to get special permission to go on mid-tour leave to come back to the States in November. When I arrived at SeaTac they evacuated everyone because an unknown person entered a restricted area and the police had to check it out.

Russ86 on September 11, 2012 at 9:15 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

Mind of American liberal leftist democrat/marxist/socialist: “We need to assuage our guilt for what the “rightist facists” have done to torture and take advantage of the rest of the world, so we’ll apologize and stop fighting.”

Mind of Muslims who hear the American liberal saying that: “You’ve vanquished us. Our Western kufr societies now beg you for the mercy of dhimmitude.”

Yiwen on September 11, 2012 at 9:21 PM

Was getting my 1st grader ready for school when a friend called and said turn on the tv news. We watched for a bit and then went to school. Drove home and watched the first tower fall. Had to go to work then.
A week later I put up my Americn Flag. I buy a new one every year and it has flown 24-7 ever since. Every morning when I see it I remember why it’s there.
No, I will never forget that day. Nor will my son.

scookam on September 11, 2012 at 9:27 PM

I am a state trooper in Omaha, Nebraska. I got home on 9/11 at about 3am thanks to an individual with a warrant and a load of dope in his car. I slept through the first wave. Then the phone rang. A fellow troop told me a plan had just hit the tower. He is a former marine. Both of us take an interest in the world. We knew it was no accident.

I hung up the phone, got up and turned on the TV. Then the second plane hit. I was standing there powerless…full of rage. I was not in this fight. I was pissed. I called my wife who works in a VERY large tower and told her to get home NOW. Leave, just go, don’t stop to talk to anybody, hit the door.

When the Pentagon got hit work called. I was already dressed. Just waiting to be tasked out. The instructions were to muster at station wait for further assignment.

I remember driving in my patrol car crying. Listening to the radio. What a sight I must have been. At a stop light a woman and I locked eyes…we both had tears. I had to pull it together. I couldn’t be like that…not now, later maybe. Get my head in the game.

It did not take long…in fact I don’t think I made it to the station. I was told to go to Offutt air base and assist in perimeter security.

I was given a road it was an off ramp from Hwy 75 near the base. My instructions NOBODY gets by you. Block the road, shut it down, full dress, no excuses, any one runs the road block, stop them by any means necessary. I kept looking down the road….wanting and somewhat hoping for somebody to try. It was my chance to get in the fight. You have to recall the time. It was a feeling of siege. We didn’t know from where or who. There was a feeling of war…we were under attack…The President was coming to Offutt. Maybe they were in Omaha.

A woman approached slowly. She was pissed. “How do I get home?” “Ms.” I replied, “I don’t know where you live. I have no idea how to direct you home.” She started in on me. I finally told her there were many thousands of people who will never go home to their families again. Move on.

When air force one took off it pushed hard and fast. I watched it as it joined a fighter escort. I got back in my patrol car and thought, now what? It was a crazy day. Full of well intentioned actions of no consequence given what we now know of the attacks. We made it up as we went.

This day is still very hard for me. Not as hard as the many families who lost loved ones. Told myself the best way to honor those who died was to do my job. Do it well.

Inzax on September 11, 2012 at 5:27 PM

.
Thank for posting that, Inzax.

Well said.

listens2glenn on September 11, 2012 at 9:28 PM

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