Where were you when the world stopped turning?

posted at 12:41 pm on September 11, 2012 by Erika Johnsen

Driving into the office this morning and seeing all of the giant American flags unfurled over all of the tallest buildings, and revisiting all of the pictures, videos, and soundbites coming through my newsfeed today, I’m irresistibly and just as poignantly reminded of exactly how I felt on the terrible day of September 11th, 2001. I’m sure that everybody who lived through that day remembers where they were and what they were doing when they saw the news, and I’d like to briefly share my experience — an experience probably familiar for many, but I’ve just realized, I don’t think I’ve ever written it down before, and I’d like to take a moment to do so.

On the beautiful, clear morning of this day, eleven years ago, I was sitting in my middle school Civics class. The lesson that day had to do with the three branches of our government and the separation of powers, and at least half of the class was having difficulty containing their impatience for the early lunchtime period. Toward the end of the hour, a teacher from down the hall burst through the door, whispered something to my Civics teacher, and rushed back out again. My teacher went over to the TV, turned it on, flipped to CNN, and stood back. There it was. The horrible image of a bright blue sky filled with black smoke. We all stared in silence for a minute, and I don’t think I nor my peers really had any comprehension of what it was we were looking at. The bell rang, but nobody moved. My teacher turned away from the TV and looked at all of our bewildered faces, clearly at a loss for what to say. He finally managed to get something out: “This… this is huge.” That was when the first wave of cold horror washed over me. We all filed out into the hall to go to our next period, and the normal buzz was even louder than usual — it wasn’t quite panic, but our eight-grade minds were having trouble grasping what was happening. During my next period, we all sat in silence again and just watched the news with my teacher. That was when I began to understand the enormity of what I was seeing: As I was sitting there in Yearbook class, thousands of Americans were staring the reality of imminent and gruesome death in the face. As I was at a large school in the northern Virginia suburbs, several of my peers who had parents working at the Pentagon were pulled out of school early that day. I don’t remember any tears from anyone — just shock. Confused, paralyzing shock. At home that evening, my dad sat me and my brother down and told us solemnly: “Kids… your lives are never going to be the same.” And that was when I started to cry.

I don’t have a ton of distinct memories from my middle-school era, but that one is forever imprinted on my consciousness. I even remember exactly what I was wearing and what I had packed for lunch. I invite you to share your own stories in the comments, as we take this day to remember and reflect upon the thousands of people who died at the hands of hateful terrorists; the countless displays of courage and kindness in the aftermath of the attack; and the men and women who have worked tirelessly since to keep the forces of evil at bay. God bless America.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2 3 4

I watched on MSNBC as the entire attack played out. Used to watch Imus religiously, and I had him on as usual all morning that morning. Imus said something about a plane hitting the WTC, it was odd but no real panic at first, just an attitude of, how strange. It was Jansen and Greg Jarrett on with updates, iirc. They were showing the split screen or double screen, and then, there it was…the second tower looked like it had an explosion…second plane. I will never forget, my friend had called me after the first plane hit, we were wondering about what happened, how could a plane hit the WTC, etc. She called me again after the second plane hit, i said, what the hell is happening…she said, and I’ll never forget her words and tone, IT’S A TERRORIST ATTACK. I called my father, who was very ill with cancer. A man who was drafted into WWII, occupied Japan, lost a brother in law in Korea, had a brother who repatriated a concentration camp…he’d seen a lot in his life…he didn’t have the TV or radio on, and had no idea what had happened, even though he was only about 25 minutes outside of NYC. I couldn’t even bring myself to say to him what happened, I just told him to turn on the TV…he watched for a few seconds, and then said, “I never thought I’d live to see this”…I’ll never forget the sound of his voice…I’ll certainly never forget.

ellifint on September 11, 2012 at 1:21 PM

The enemy is still out there. Thinking of ways to kill you and me.

faraway on September 11, 2012 at 1:21 PM

…I also remember sitting in the stands for a couple of days at community football games…the whole day…clear skys…without a plane in the sky anywhere!!!

KOOLAID2 on September 11, 2012 at 1:18 PM

I noticed there were less trucks on the road after that. Flying was forbidden, road travel wasn’t, but it still affected the amount of stuff available to move by road.

backwoods conservative on September 11, 2012 at 1:23 PM

I remember waking up in Southern California to my alarm radio with the news of the first plane…

… by the time I turned on the TV, they were replaying the second plane.

I spent the entire day watching people jumping out of buildings…

… the collapses, the Pentagon, a field in Pennsylvania, the fires, smoke, and dust.

I remember having to go to the store and noticing that everything was “different”…

… No one really spoke to each other if you didn’t know them, and I had an uneasy feeling wanting to get back home as soon as possible.

I’ll never forget that day, and in fact, I have a copy of Jules and Gedeon Naudet’s Documentary that I showed Little 7% the other night…

… He was born in the Summer of the following year, and has never known a world before 9/11.

Seven Percent Solution on September 11, 2012 at 1:23 PM

I was in Sarasota, caught in a morning traffic jam caused by President Bush’s visit to Booker Middle School, cursing him for causing our delay. My wife and I were just dropping a car off at the shop, and were on the way back though the diverted traffic when we heard the first reports on the radio.

We passed by the Sarasota Airport on the way home, Air Force One sitting regally on the tarmac, visible from the road. I never went to work that day, and never called, just sat on my bed, in shock over the events unfolding on the tv. We live close to and in the flight path of SRQ, so when the news cut to Bush boarding AF1, and then taking off, I went out on my deck, where I saw Air Force One, in all it’s sky blue majesty, flying low, loud, and seemingly in slow motion over my house.

The memory still evokes chills…

Never forget.

ornery_independent on September 11, 2012 at 1:23 PM

From four years ago.

Noocyte on September 11, 2012 at 1:24 PM

I was in my fourth grade homeroom english class, it was a Tuesday, and the first full week of school. The phone in the room was going off all day, parents calling to bring their kids home from school early.
I remember hoping I’d be called home from school early too, not knowing why the other kids were.

About seven of the roughly sixteen kids in my class went home early that day. My homeroom teacher broke the news to us right at the end of the day, also telling us that our homework on pie charts would not be due until the 13th.

When I got in the car my younger brother, my mom, and I discussed the events of the day. My brother had been told about the plane in Pennsylvania too, while I was just told about the ones in the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. My mom had apparently considered calling us home early that day, but decided against it, wondering why us watching gruesome news all day would be better than being in class.

That was the first day of my life I remember being interested in watching the news. I stayed up much later that night than I usually did, I didn’t end up going to bed until after 10pm, catching the first reports of who was responsible for this horror in my parents’ bedroom while I brushed my teeth.

As I was only nine years old, this was the first I’d heard of the country of Afganistan, al Qaeda, or Osama Bin Laden. For some reason I vividly remember seeing three photos on the TV screen against a blue background, those must have been photos of al Qaeda members, burned into my memory as I went to sleep and woke up in a world completely unlike the one I had awakened to the day before.

vegconservative on September 11, 2012 at 1:25 PM

I was shaving and listening to Howard Stern when he announced a building had been hit by a plane.

libertarianlunatic on September 11, 2012 at 1:04 PM

Yep, I was also listening to Howard Stern as I was pulling into the parking lot at work (I was running late, it was a few minutes past 9:00 AM). The second plane had just hit the WTC, and Baba Booey just came in to tell Howard about it.

As I rushed into my building, I could see that everyone was packed into one person’s cubicle watching ABC News on their computer. The whole room was silent. It was terribly eerie.

When the first plane hit, some thought it had to be an accident. As soon as the second plane hit, everyone knew at that moment that it was a deliberate attack.

UltimateBob on September 11, 2012 at 1:25 PM

faraway on September 11, 2012 at 1:21 PM

In ways we can’t even imagine and will shock us all over again.

Cindy Munford on September 11, 2012 at 1:26 PM

Your account was heartbreaking, Erika. It makes me realize how traumatizing 9/11 was for young children and pre-teens viewing the events on TV. It seems like your teacher should have done a little more to prepare you or perhaps SHIELDED you somewhat from the unraveling horror of that day.

But then everyone was reacting hysterically to the news in real time, not thinking about the effects on young children.

I remember all the criticism George Bush received for sitting quietly for several minutes in the classroom of young children in Florida after receiving the news. In hindsight, I admire him even more for not panicking. Certainly, he didn’t want to traumatize those kids. And his steely resolve and compassion came through so clearly in the days and months that followed 9/11.

I’m grateful that my three children weren’t born yet on 9/11. I tell them the story of how I was telecommuting that day for a company located on Wall Street. And I tell them about receiving confusing emails about the World Trade Center being on fire. I instantly recalled having eaten dinner at the Windows on the World restaurant six months prior.

Some of my co-workers were on their way to work that day and got caught in the hazy evacuation of lower Manhattan. From the 23rd floor of our company’s office, one of my co-workers saw the 2nd plane hurtling up the Hudson and heard the impact as it slammed into the 2nd tower several blocks away.

For days and weeks afterward, our small company was shellshocked. No one was hurt, thankfullly. But the emotional damage was severe for those working in the New York office. One employee who had the misfortune of beginning her first day of work on 9/11 couldn’t continue. The association was too raw, too painful.

Even being far away in Omaha, I mourned for the loss of such talent in the WTC and Pentagon. My husband saw Air Force One carrying President Bush to Offut Air Base in Omaha on the afternoon of 9/11. Pres. Bush stayed there several hours before returning to Washington D.C. (against the wishes of the Secret Service, apparently).

It was a sad day for everyone, but in hindsight it seems like for that one brief moment, we were all united as Americans. There really were no red states and blues states. No Democrats and Republicans. We mourned together. And in today’s bitterly divided atmosphere, it’s a surreal, and somewhat whimsical memory.

Nicole Coulter on September 11, 2012 at 1:26 PM

…I also remember sitting in the stands for a couple of days at community football games…the whole day…clear skys…without a plane in the sky anywhere!!!

KOOLAID2 on September 11, 2012 at 1:18 PM

I remember when they finally reopened the airspace over the US. Every time I saw a plane overhead, I whispered a prayer for them.

CurtZHP on September 11, 2012 at 1:27 PM

Caracas, Venezuela
4 days of CNN en Espanol, with the english speakers dubbed over.
The people were wonderful, btw
AeroPostal will forever be the airline that brought me home,
Not a clothing company

tomg51 on September 11, 2012 at 1:28 PM

I had been told the day prior to 9/11/01 that I would be being laid off on 9/11. We were finishing up a job in the shop when the owners wife came in room the office and told us that a plane had slammed into the Trade Center. We were watching the cafeteria tv when the 2nd plane hit.
-
For the next 2 weeks I watched tv every day and injured my back with the stress. I also wrote this, which i put to photos later…
http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=417944041600351&set=vb.205065229509229&type=2&theater
-
I felt so sad for all those who said goodbye to family and friends that day.

RalphyBoy on September 11, 2012 at 1:28 PM

I was in L.A. at a week-long seminar when I woke up early and caught the news about the 1st plane. I immediately phoned my family in MI and told them to get out of bed and turn on the television. I said it at that time: this is a terrorist attack. That was before the 2nd plane hit and sadly, I was right. I decided, right then and there, that I wasn’t going to wait and see if LA was a target. I packed up the Mustang convertible and headed to Reno to change cars and continued on from there. I spent the next couple of days driving from LA to Detroit with two other people in the car. Not seeing planes fly into Salt Lake City at night was . . . strange, to say the least. We kept in touch with people at the office and home and watched the news as soon as we got into our hotels at night. I’ll never forget it.

totherightofthem on September 11, 2012 at 1:29 PM

FYI NOOCYTE, your link is broken. it should look like this:

http://noocyte.blogspot.com/2008/09/seven-years-hence.html?m=0

ornery_independent on September 11, 2012 at 1:29 PM

I was in the basement of the house getting ready to warm up for a rehearsal and had the radio on the “Barbara Carlson (Tucker’s mom) and Friends Show” when the news came in.

princetrumpet on September 11, 2012 at 12:58 PM

The famous Tucker’s mom isn’t the old broad (her term) that was married to Gov. Arne Carlson. Tucker of bow tie fame is the son of frmr Ambassador to the Seychelles Richard Warner Carlson. Being Barbara’s kid would mess him up soooo much!

I was on my way to work when reports came in. I spent most of the day trying to get info from the internet.

banjohack on September 11, 2012 at 1:30 PM

8 months after 9-11, we went to Ukraine to adopt our son. When one of the boys in his group found out my son was going to America, he said “Oh no! Don’t go to America. People are dying there.”

AubieJon on September 11, 2012 at 1:32 PM

I was in Yuma… just got off my eastbound train a few hours earlier…

R.I.P CAPT Bob Dolan, USN (Pentagon, Navy Operations Center)
R.I.P Mike McGinty (World Trade Towers)

Your fellow USNA Classmates miss you both, and we will NEVER NEVER forget…

Khun Joe on September 11, 2012 at 1:32 PM

ornery_independent on September 11, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Oh, blast. Thanks.

Noocyte on September 11, 2012 at 1:33 PM

How is your son now?

CurtZHP on September 11, 2012 at 1:18 PM

he has CP. very long struggle after he did eventually get out of hospital in Jan 2002. he is kind of a mircale. they said he would never walk, or talk, and would have severe brain damage. we were extremely lucky. he is the toughest fella i’ve ever met. and i’ve learned more form him than anyone in my life. he is my hero. and i was saddened this morning. i was putting up the flag. and he asked me why i was putting it up. i stopped. frozen. i didnt want to go thru it again with him; he has trouble with rememebribng things. i just wnated him to be happy. maybe not knowing or rememebring is better.

t8stlikchkn on September 11, 2012 at 1:33 PM

I was at Ft. Jackson, SC for Army Reserve training. Otherwise, I would have been at my office at the Pentagon.

oceansidecon on September 11, 2012 at 1:34 PM

People love to talk about themselves!

ImageSniper on September 11, 2012 at 12:52 PM

If you don’t like this thread why comment?

sandee on September 11, 2012 at 12:55 PM

When did I say I didn’t like the thread? My gosh, you grumpy old fart!

ImageSniper on September 11, 2012 at 1:34 PM

Every American should always be reminded, that there are forces out there, beyond and within our borders, who want to exterminate us.

OhEssYouCowboys on September 11, 2012 at 12:56 PM

And there always will be. So let’s keep sending our men and women to die for useless causes, shall we?

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:35 PM

t8stlikchkn on September 11, 2012 at 1:33 PM

Glad to hear he’s come so far. My daughter has a friend with CP. One of the sweetest kids I know.

CurtZHP on September 11, 2012 at 1:36 PM

I was at work, got snippets on the phone and could not fathom. Our employers wanted us to go home but it wasn’t that easy. Many of our clients scheduled that day were watching, wondering what was happening to their co-workers with offices in the Twin Towers. Cancelling and rescheduling their tests and making sure that no one was charged as a no show took a lot longer than expected. I can’t explain how it felt to have no visual or audio of the events other than other people’s fear and sorrow. The Husband was due to fly out on a trip for the government and was at the airport but luckily everything had been grounded before they were scheduled to depart.

Cindy Munford on September 11, 2012 at 1:36 PM

I was living/working in Budapest, Hungary. I had a client meeting, then made my way home to catch up on emails. I got home around 2:30pm CET (8:30am in NYC) and turned on CNN International (the only English-speaking channel on my cable system) and starting culling through my inbox. About 2:47pm, CNN cut to a shot of smoke billowing from the WTC. They had some CNN VP saying he thought he saw a plane fly into the building and thought it was a commercial airline. I called my mother in NY to get her to a TV, then called my friend Dave who is a pilot to get his thoughts on whether a plane could “accidentally” fly into the WTC. He said not-a-chance. As I was talking to him, I clearly saw a United Airlines 767 fly into the South Tower despite the CNN talking head exclaiming “There’s been an explosion!” I stood there stunned. I heard my friend Dave saying “Are you there? Are you there?” Still stunned, I muttered “I think we’re being attacked.” The rest of the day was a blur. The facade of my building was being renovated, so I grabbed some stuff and went across the river to my friend Amy’s place in Buda and watched the events unfold there until falling asleep around 4am (10pm in NYC).

I distinctly remember going into the office the next day and feeling weird, especially since I couldn’t get any news from friends that worked in the towers. I was the only American and most folks were sympathetic. I had dinner on the 12th with my friend Olgica who is Serbian. She was more sympathetic than I expected given that American warplanes bombed her apt building with her in it during NATO Operation Allied Force in ’99 (she lived in a building 50 metres from the bridge at Novi Sad). When I suggested that OBL was responsible, she said we had no proof. I told her that “we could have video of these guys doing it and you wouldn’t believe it.” A few weeks later when we had the names, documents and suitcases that indicated OBL and al Qaeda did it, sure enough she dismissed it all as faked. So predictable.

On the 13th I had flight to London. I arrived at the airport and fully armed Hungarian soldiers were all around the front of the airport. The taxi ramp was closed off so I had to walk a ways to get to the temporary security check point outside terminal. Two soldiers asked for my papers. When I showed them my U.S. passport, the soldiers went nuts. “Nem! Nem! Amerikai! Belépni tilos!” (No! No! American! No entry!) My Hungarian sucked, but I understood and said something like “We WERE attacked, not the other way around, idiot!” After pointlessly jabbering back-n-forth for a bit, I was able to flag a senior officer who eventually let me into the terminal. Crazy.

I made it a point to remember as many details as I could after learning that seven of my friends were in the towers and didn’t make it out. It is the very least I could do.

rcpjr on September 11, 2012 at 1:36 PM

did anyone who may have lapsed at their church make sure to go that wednesday night and the next sunday? i was one.

t8stlikchkn on September 11, 2012 at 1:37 PM

oceansidecon on September 11, 2012 at 1:34 PM

That must have been a very very odd feeling.

Cindy Munford on September 11, 2012 at 1:37 PM

I was at home. I had just woken up around 9:00 AM and turned the T.V. on around 10 AM. (I was working the late shift until 2AM, so I slept in) I turned on the news to watch as I was playing with my one year old daughter and saw them reporting on the first plane hitting the tower.

Like most people I thought that it was a horrible tragedy, but nothing more. It was a curiosity. An unusual news item in a flood of other news items. I watched a bit more closely, but still thought nothing of it, until the second plane hit soon after.

Watching that plane fly full-bore into the tower I knew that we were in trouble. One plane crash is an accident. Two aimed at the same target is an attack. By that time i was already calling my wife at her job, and then desperately trying to reach my parents who were slated to fly out to the Ukraine. I knew that sometimes their plane trip took them through NYC, so I was terrified that they might have been on one of those planes. (They weren’t)

I remember just holding onto my daughter so tight she started squirming trying to get loose. I remember crying and screaming and raging at the world that such a thing could happen. I remember many tearful prayers for the people in those towers, and a building rage that anyone would dare to attack us in so cowardly a way.

I will never forgive, I will never forget.

God Bless America.

wearyman on September 11, 2012 at 1:38 PM

Because we’re still at involved in a hot war.

Two simple facts:

a) We didn’t start it despite what the Paulistas claim
b) Americans need to be reminded. Regularly. Most of us have the attention span of gnats sadly.

It’ not some grand conspiracy to scare you…

CorporatePiggy on September 11, 2012 at 1:07 PM

And evvvvery year people recount the exact details of their day like it matters. I’m sure terrorists LOVE that we set a whole day aside to mark their accomplishments. The biggest threat against terrorism is irrelevance, and the more we ‘remember’, the more relevant they become. 9/11 was bad, but in a country of 300,000,000+ people, is it really worth ‘remembering’ every year for 11 years? I understand why we do it, but at some point, let’s move on. Moving on doesn’t mean we forget, it just means we look to the future, not back to the past.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:38 PM

I was walking in to a trade show in Atlanta getting ready for a great day (my birthday) with some colleagues.

We walked in and within a few minutes someone told us what happened so we found a booth with a live TV feed and watched has history unfolded. The trade show basically ended.

Back at the hotel I saw airline pilots sitting in the lobby as their planes were grounded. I will never forget the look on their faces as they realized the hijacking game had changed forever.

Robert Jensen on September 11, 2012 at 1:39 PM

If you ask what image leaps to my mind when someone mentions 9/11, its not the planes hitting the towers that springs to my mind, unbidden.

Its the Americans holding one another’s hand as they leaped from the upper floors, above the raging fire, together.

I weep as I think of it, and as I write this. That they tried to be of comfort to one another, the lend one another courage in the face of the awful moment, that they chose their fate, and faced it together…

Its defines what Americans are, and what we’re made of, for me.

thatsafactjack on September 11, 2012 at 1:39 PM

I worked the late shift the night before and so I got up late that morning. I turned on the radio and instead of music I heard the announcer say that the WTC was GONE in this vicious attack on the United States. I didn’t own a TV then (and still don’t) so I headed down to the university where I was going to school to see a TV. It was all people talked about and even on that day some people were blaming the existence of Israel. There were people speaking and someone from the muslim student association was distancing the group from the attacks. Later on we learned that one of the hijackers had spent time at the University of Arizona and been part of their organization.

I’m sad that the result of 9/11 is that the nation bends over for islam instead of running them it of the country. They brought the war to us and we welcome them. It’s as the Nazis to the French.

Dan_Yul on September 11, 2012 at 1:39 PM

I had just put my daughter on the bus a little before 9 am and came back in the house and turned on the TV. I normally didn’t watch in the morning, but something made me tune into the Today Show just as they started talking about the impact of the first plane. I was home in Ohio, and my husband was in Anaheim, California, on a business trip. That morning he was supposed to be on the 7 am American Airlines flight up to San Jose. He called, as he always did, before he was supposed to board the flight, and as we were talking, I watched as the second plane hit the tower and told him what was going on.

He went ahead and boarded his plane, and called me shortly before 10 am to say that though they were on the plane, they were told there would be a delay in departure. I filled him in on what had happened at the Pentagon. As I was on the phone, I heard the pilot come on and tell the passengers what had happened in New York and they were uncertain about when they would be able to take off. Obviously that flight was cancelled, and my husband collected his luggage and took the shuttle back to his hotel. This hotel was one used by American Airlines for its pilots and flight attendants, and my husband rode back with several AA pilots and flight attendants, many in tears and discussing what was going on. My husband ended up renting a car and driving up to San Jose, and didn’t get back home until September 21.

JenWestin on September 11, 2012 at 1:39 PM

I was backing out of the driveway on the way to work when news of the first plane hitting was announced. My first thought was, “ATC error in this day and age?” and then, “Well the Empire State building was hit by a plane in the 40′s and survived”. I was a few minutes down the road when I heard that the second plane had hit the second tower. By the time I got to work, my comment was, “This was a declaration of war and we darned well better respond”. Whatever else is said about Bush, I will give him high praise for the fact that he responded to this as a declaration of war and was willing to attack the state actors who were harboring terrorists.

AZfederalist on September 11, 2012 at 1:39 PM

I was sitting in Constitutional Law class about 50 miles north of NYC at a Point on the West side of the Hudson. Changed my life forever….

Youngs98 on September 11, 2012 at 1:40 PM

Are we really still doing this? I thought last year would pretty much be it. Apparently not.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 12:50 PM

I don’t know how old or young you are, but my generation’s 9/11 event was the assassination of President Kennedy and I still vividly can recall the moment when I learned about it. Next year, November 22, 2013, will be the 50th anniversary of that tragedy which will see much commemoration, I’m sure, and the likely resurrection of all the conspiracy theories, so no, I don’t think we’re done with a lot of it. We all remember or forget in our own ways.

stukinIL4now on September 11, 2012 at 1:40 PM

I’m always reminded of the great remarks of a man who knew how to get things done, the pilot of the Enola Gay:

“I don’t know any more about these terrorists than you do, I know nothing. When they bombed the Trade Centre I couldn’t believe what was going on. We’ve fought many enemies at different times. But we knew who they were and where they were. These people, we don’t know who they are or where they are. That’s the point that bothers me. Because they’re gonna strike again, I’ll put money on it. And it’s going to be damned dramatic. But they’re gonna do it in their own sweet time. We’ve got to get into a position where we can kill the bastards. None of this business of taking them to court, the hell with that. I wouldn’t waste five seconds on them.”

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2002/aug/06/nuclear.japan

JeremiahJohnson on September 11, 2012 at 1:41 PM

I was on the phone calling about a delivery time for a rocking chair…for my baby girl due in Nov.

I was upset it was late, but as I turned on the TV while on hold, I saw the second plane hit.
My mind turned to the story my mother had told me, she was pregnant with me during the Cuban missile crisis thinking she might never see me.

MontanaMmmm on September 11, 2012 at 1:41 PM

I saw it all happen live as soon as the networks started airing it. I watched the entire day. And aside from the birth’s of my children — for the first time in my adult life I openly wept.

Rest in Peace — One and All. God help us all.

FlatFoot on September 11, 2012 at 1:41 PM

For days and weeks afterward, our small company was shellshocked. No one was hurt, thankfullly. But the emotional damage was severe for those working in the New York office. One employee who had the misfortune of beginning her first day of work on 9/11 couldn’t continue. The association was too raw, too painful.

Nicole Coulter on September 11, 2012 at 1:26 PM

I used to work with people who were in a building by I-395 that the plane that hit the Pentagon went over at a very low level (so much so they thought there had been an explosion in the building). Apparently more than a few employees couldn’t deal mentally with being that close to the attack.

Happy Nomad on September 11, 2012 at 1:42 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:38 PM

You’re an idiot. 3,000 people lost their lives in the worst Terrorist attack in history on American soil.

It is their families and their memories we will continue to honor every September 11th…as long as there continues to be a United States of America.

So help us God.

kingsjester on September 11, 2012 at 1:42 PM

I was getting ready to go to work at our local elementary school when I turned on the TV in the kitchen. I NEVER do that. I saw the first tower in flames and thought how horrible it was that such a tragic accident occured. I couldn’t stop watching and saw the second plane as it hit. I knew then it was no accident. I left a little later than usual for work. When I got there I asked the school secretaries if they had heard about the attacks. They turned the radio to a news station and we heard about the pentagon being hit. Horror and shock all around. All during the morning teachers were talking about it and some listening to coverage on their room televisions. Finally the principle sent word around to everyone to turn the sets off because we were scaring the students.

The next Tuesday (and for every Tuesday until this day) our elementary school started the day at the first bell with all the students in the gym at an assembly reciting the Pledge of Allegiance and singing patriotic songs including the Star Spangled Banner. 10 minutes once a week, for 11 years, and it makes me tear up every time.

Lily on September 11, 2012 at 1:44 PM

I had arrived to work a little early. After settling in, about 15 minutes later I heard the report of the first plane hitting one of the towers. I heard the report from two of my female colleagues, in between bouts of crying.
We closed the office around lunchtime.
My heart hurt for the rest of the week.
I had plans to attend a church retreat that weekend and there were rumors that it might be cancelled. Fortunately it did go on as planned. The time to be together with friends away from Washington was much needed. We spent some time praying for the nation and for the folks who lost loved ones.

22044 on September 11, 2012 at 1:44 PM

I was in class, just 4th or 5th grade. Another teacher came in and she and our teacher went out and talked in the hall. I heard that a plane had hit a building later, but I don’t think I found out it wasn’t an accident until I got home. There’s a few moments crystallized in my head – the other teacher coming and and pulling our teacher into the hall, and seeing replays on TV, but the rest of the day is a blur.

I remember when they killed bin Laden, there were various opinion columns, etc wondering at young people’s response to the news (someone talking about those college students in DC who went and celebrated in front of the White House is what comes to mind). It was like they didn’t expect us to care that much since we’d been so young when it happened or something. Kinda pissed me off, since the exact opposite is true.

AndStatistics on September 11, 2012 at 1:44 PM

I don’t know how old or young you are, but my generation’s 9/11 event was the assassination of President Kennedy and I still vividly can recall the moment when I learned about it. Next year, November 22, 2013, will be the 50th anniversary of that tragedy which will see much commemoration, I’m sure, and the likely resurrection of all the conspiracy theories, so no, I don’t think we’re done with a lot of it. We all remember or forget in our own ways.

stukinIL4now on September 11, 2012 at 1:40 PM

I’m in my late 20s. I was in high school when it happened. 9/11 arguably effected my generation more than any other. I too watched it unfold on TV with similar terror that folks are recounting here. But I don’t feel the need to post all over my facebook about where i was, what i was doing, etc 11 years ago. I’m more concerned about the fact that 11 years later, we’re still in a pointless war costing trillions of dollars killing thousands of our young men and women.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:45 PM

Notice how the tone-deaf, in-your-face “audacious” President Obysmal memorialized September 11 today: http://www.breitbart.com/Big-Peace/2012/09/11/Obama-Releases-Message-to-Arab-Forum-on-9-11

These actions are as deliberate as his message to the Poles about the cancellation of the missile shield on the anniversary of the invasion of Poland, signaling the beginnings of WWII.

onlineanalyst on September 11, 2012 at 1:46 PM

This is my story, from other thread.

I was there. We saw the 2nd plane hit from our office on Hanover Square and knew we were under attack. No one knew what to do and they finally told us to get out after 2WTC fell. Right after we started walking up Water St to the Brooklyn Bridge, 1WTC fell, and we started running (As the brave police and FF were headed right into hell, God Bless them). We finally made it to the Williamsburg Bridge and I got home to Long Island at about 8 that evening and went to my best friends house, whose husband worked at Cantor. I was in the insurance industry and lost many friends and colleagues. Not a day goes by that I don’t think about them, I WILL NEVER FORGET!

FLconservative on September 11, 2012 at 10:58 AM

For a further and powerful reminder, and I preface this with a WARNING, go to Bare Naked Islam. You will need tissues.

FLconservative on September 11, 2012 at 1:46 PM

I remember waking up in Southern California to my alarm radio with the news of the first plane…

… by the time I turned on the TV, they were replaying the second plane.

I spent the entire day watching people jumping out of buildings…

… the collapses, the Pentagon, a field in Pennsylvania, the fires, smoke, and dust.

I remember having to go to the store and noticing that everything was “different”…

… No one really spoke to each other if you didn’t know them, and I had an uneasy feeling wanting to get back home as soon as possible.

I’ll never forget that day, and in fact, I have a copy of Jules and Gedeon Naudet’s Documentary that I showed Little 7% the other night…

… He was born in the Summer of the following year, and has never known a world before 9/11.

Seven Percent Solution on September 11, 2012 at 1:23 PM

~~~~

Did you ever hear the phone message from the young woman from California? She was in NYC for business on September 11…the message was for her husband, and while i only heard it once, I can remember so clearly the sound of her voice, how scared she was…she said something like, I’m in this building and I don’t know what to do…absolutely broke my heart, and I think of her almost every time I think about September 11th.

ellifint on September 11, 2012 at 1:47 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:45 PM

There are other forums and sites for you to post this. Not here please.

22044 on September 11, 2012 at 1:48 PM

The libertarians I know personally have a deep sense of patriotism and the same reverence for days like today that I do. They also have some sort of functional intelligence.

These trolls like libertarianlunatic, NoStoppingUs, and Dante are nothing but cheap poseurs whose only purpose is to antagonize. If it’s not this thread, it’s on one of the others today, but you’re each despicable.

AubieJon on September 11, 2012 at 1:48 PM

Working at a nuclear power plant. Very limited communications with the outside, so it was hard to know what was going on. Finally, they sent people like myself, who were not needed to keep the plant operational, home. Home for me was a hotel down the road where I sat with a couple of co-workers watching the coverage at a Red Lobster next door. I couldn’t fly home because there was no air travel, and I couldn’t go to work, because they only allowed essential personnel in.

GCM on September 11, 2012 at 1:51 PM

Notice how the tone-deaf, in-your-face “audacious” President Obysmal memorialized September 11 today:

onlineanalyst on September 11, 2012 at 1:46 PM

Well, what is the deaths of 3,000 Americans to Obama? Seriously, if it isn’t about him he isn’t interested and doesn’t pretend otherwise. It is pretty low-class that he declared that he would not campaign and then is out there doing just that.

Happy Nomad on September 11, 2012 at 1:52 PM

i was in the first tower that got hit, 83rd floor. took an hour to come down, over the Brooklyn bridge when the first tower came down (the second one to get hit)and watched it come down, it was something i never thought possible when you walk by those buildings. Somewhere in queens when the second tower came down. Made it home around 5 when the transit system started again. One day i will share this with my kids who are just too young to understand now.

GOD BLESS.

phatfawzi on September 11, 2012 at 1:53 PM

I was stationed at Dover AFB when a co-worker called and told us all to turn on the news. We saw the pictures of the first tower as it was burning. We all wondered how a plane could accidentally hit the building. (this was before it was known to be a terrorist attack) As we all watched CNN I asked “how close to the buildings do planes normally fly?” Just then the second plane flew into the live TV shot. I remarked on how surprised I was that they flew so close and then watched in horror as it hit the tower live on TV. It was then that we got word that it was a terrorist attack. They sent all civilians home and informed us that we would be processing any bodies from NYC and the Pentagon at the mortuary at Dover. I worked on ordering supplies late into the night and had companies calling me until 3-4AM letting me know that our stuff was in route and we would have it that day.

I saw first hand, the damage done to the brave men and women and the innocent lives that were taken that day. I will NEVER FORGET!

geramy2012 on September 11, 2012 at 1:54 PM

I was just starting middle school at the time, sixth grade. Other than the videos from where the strikes happened, all I really remember from that day was when I found out and how I found out.

For some reason, my school decided not to let the students know and no one did, at least not in my class and I heard nothing at lunch that day. All I really remember from school that day was that the school cancelled all after school activities, even detention (I found that last bit a little odd.)

When I got home after being dropped off at my normal bus stop, the first thing out of my sister’s mouth when she opened the door was “The Twin Towers are gone.” She was a sophomore in high school at the time.

I think I was too young to really understand what that meant and everything. By the week’s end, I knew in full reality.

My childhood innocence died that day. Everyone’s did.

BigWillieStyles on September 11, 2012 at 1:54 PM

I had worked graveyard the previous night and was asleep on
9-11-01 morning when I was woken up by a phone call from my brother who lived in Singapore at that time. He was totally freaked out and wanted me to turn on the TV . So I did.
They were replaying the whole thing and I remember me and my brother crying , not being able to say a word.
My brother and his wife were supposed to visit us and we had planned to visit the WTC on Sept 17 the next week.
He couldn’t visit us because of flights disruptions but the following year , we did visit that hallowed ground.

burrata on September 11, 2012 at 1:54 PM

I was in NY north of the WTC in a large office
building. I had previously worked downtown Manhattan so I knew the building well. That morning my young daughter called me in a frightened voice to tell me one of the towers had fallen. I was skeptical and thought that some fascia had fallen from the building. As the reports came in it became clear something terrible had happened. Initial news reports suggested 50,000 casualties were possible. (I still have the newspaper).
In the following days I received numerous calls of concern from a business acquaintances and friends from Canada, Germany, and the UK. I have a friend who was a police officer on the detail to retrieve bodies and missing limbs from the roofs of adjacent buildings. He doesn’t talk much about that. I contrast this to our corporate HQ on the west coast who’s first thought was how this would affect the sale of some corp. property in NY. (Yeah, you know the company) It was just one of those bizarre things that stay with you.
-
For those who never had the opportunity to visit lower Manhattan, pictures don’t do justice to how enormous these buildings were and just how many people are concentrated downtown NYC. (The WTC was also the transit terminus for thousands of commuters from NJ). For many weeks afterward the smoldering ground zero could be seen for miles around.
-
If New Yorkers make a big deal of this every 9-11, please understand.
-

diogenes on September 11, 2012 at 1:55 PM

I’m in my late 20s. I was in high school when it happened. 9/11 arguably effected my generation more than any other. I too watched it unfold on TV with similar terror that folks are recounting here. But I don’t feel the need to post all over my facebook about where i was, what i was doing, etc 11 years ago. I’m more concerned about the fact that 11 years later, we’re still in a pointless war costing trillions of dollars killing thousands of our young men and women.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:45 PM

For some of us it’s more “real” than for others. I was a freshman at Syracuse University. Many of the students on that campus and in my classes had parents that worked in the WTC especially and also some that worked in the Pentagon. It tends to be a little more real and important when you have friends and acquaintances that lost family members on that day.

MobileVideoEngineer on September 11, 2012 at 1:55 PM

I was still working then, as an Admin to the President of Oracle in Redwood City, CA, and someone yelled, “Turn the TV on in the conference room, NOW”.

There were about 20 of us all in shock.

I remember all the people posting pictures of their lost loved one on telephone polls…Falling Man…the buildings collapsing and the image of the 2nd plane going into the building.

I have not healed from it. Today’s images on TV are just as painful and I break down in tears.

Thank you, President Bush.

I will always love him for being our Commander-in-Chief.
Can’t imagine Kerry or Gore or Obummer as our POTUS then.

Typicalwhitewoman on September 11, 2012 at 1:56 PM

When the first plane hit, some thought it had to be an accident. As soon as the second plane hit, everyone knew at that moment that it was a deliberate attack.

UltimateBob on September 11, 2012 at 1:25 PM

Exactly. The first plane could have been a horrible accident, but as soon as the second plane hit, you knew it was an attack. I distinctly remember thinking, “This is a modern-day Pearl Harbor.”

A friend of mine from High School was killed in the WTC on 9/11/2001. I really hope that she died instantly, because the thought of her surviving the initial impact of the plane, and then having to deal with the aftermath and deciding how to die, is just gut-wrenching.

ITguy on September 11, 2012 at 1:57 PM

I don’t want to sully this thread.

I woke up from a terrible hangover and looked at the morning papers to find that the US has been attacked. My first reaction was “We told you so”. You cannot fault me because I am from that country whose mortal enemy is the country that hosted OBL and where he was killed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kargil_War
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Airlines_Flight_814 (search for Ahmed Omar Saeed)

The same country that had the highest approval rating for W when he left office.

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0807/5268.html

sram on September 11, 2012 at 1:59 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:45 PM

No, obviously it DIDN’T affect you at all.

I was working in the tallest building in the northern flight pattern of Dulles airport during 9/11.

I could have been killed, so you’ll excuse me if it DOES still affect ME.

I spent DAYS tracking down friends in both NYC and DC, trying to find out if they were even ALIVE.

They could have been killed, so you’ll excuse me if it DOES still affect ME and THEM.

It’s ironic that someone of your age finds these posts to be UNSEEMLY, given all the other “Look at me, I just took a dump on a cop car!” quality your generation has no qualms laying out on the Internet for the world to see.

Your comments are insulting, juvenile, and pedantic.

Miss_Anthrope on September 11, 2012 at 1:59 PM

That morning we were sitting around the conference table waiting for two more people to show up for the management meeting. Someone flicked on the TV. It was about 15 mins later the world changed. The meeting lasted until late that afternoon with every eye, and every ear, and every heart tuned into the broadcasts.

Forget? When ice skates are issued in Hell.

Limerick on September 11, 2012 at 2:00 PM

It tends to be a little more real and important when you have friends and acquaintances that lost family members on that day.

MobileVideoEngineer on September 11, 2012 at 1:55 PM

And then it becomes even more real when it could’ve been you…

Miss_Anthrope on September 11, 2012 at 2:01 PM

And evvvvery year people recount the exact details of their day like it matters. I’m sure terrorists LOVE that we set a whole day aside to mark their accomplishments. The biggest threat against terrorism is irrelevance, and the more we ‘remember’, the more relevant they become. 9/11 was bad, but in a country of 300,000,000+ people, is it really worth ‘remembering’ every year for 11 years? I understand why we do it, but at some point, let’s move on. Moving on doesn’t mean we forget, it just means we look to the future, not back to the past.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:38 PM

Well, your mileage may vary, but in my case, remembering this day restrengthens the resolve that we need to remember who these b@$tard$ are and continue to stomp them back into the stone age in which they live. It reminds people that the Religion of Peace is really the Religion of Pieces and that there is no compromise with a people whose going in position is that they want you converted or dead.

Unfortunately, we have too many people like you who just want to “move on” and see nothing wrong with the number of mosques in the US doubling since 9/11.

Not politically correct? Guess what? I don’t give a rip.

AZfederalist on September 11, 2012 at 2:03 PM

With my children at school, I was getting ready to go to the gym, my husband getting ready for work when I turned on the news, as usual. I saw the second plane hit on Fox News. I said to my husband “Holy s***t, I can’t believe what I just saw!” Then I spent the rest of the morning on the phone with various relatives as they kept calling me, wondering if I had heard from my sister, who worked nearby and who’s husband worked for Lehman Brothers in World Financial Center next door. She called me about 12:30, saying they were fine. She had to walk several miles home from work that day (6 months pregnant) and my brother-in-law happened to out of work at the doctor’s office due to a bike injury he got that Sunday. Calling my mom to tell her my sister was fine was a great relief. And then watching the horror unfold for everyone else was terrible. My nephew watched a friend of his at school learn of his father’s death, etc. It’s still terrible.

ktrich on September 11, 2012 at 2:05 PM

I was at my boyfriend-at-that-time’s apartment, and went to turn something on for my son to watch, and on every channel was the first plane having hit the first tower. There was still talk of it being some poor bastidge in a Cessna. And then the second plane hit. We all sat on the couch and just watched in horror.

Sekhmet on September 11, 2012 at 2:05 PM

Never forget. They are laughing at us.

Difficultas_Est_Imperium on September 11, 2012 at 2:00 PM

Reason #534 why I’ll never be President: every September 11 would be marked by dropping a Tomahawk into some heavily-populated Muslim hellhole. See who’s laughing then, muthafuquahs…

affenhauer on September 11, 2012 at 2:06 PM

I was at my current job with an alarm company.
I thought the highlight of my day was when I had spoken to one of our customers just after 7am who happened to be a former high ranking government official.
We had some accounts in the WTC and we had a hard time getting through to NYC authorities that day.
Very surreal.
Many businesses called in to say they were closing business for the day.

dverplank on September 11, 2012 at 2:06 PM

If it doesn’t still totally p*ssuoff then…..oh nevermind, banning ain’t worth saying your worthless.

Limerick on September 11, 2012 at 2:06 PM

I was in Dallas Tx. and had already dropped my daughter off at her Catholic School. I was in my studio working on a mural panel for the Old Downtown Neiman’s (The X-mas deadline was breathing down my neck).

I had just poured another cup of coffee when I saw what was happening on TV. I remember just standing there as my coffee went cold…I just couldn’t move & then the other plane hit.

I remember going outside and I was crying…People were jumping.

I watched as people ran and the buildings collapsed…I saw Rudy on TV and then went to get my daughter, praying that God would put the words in my mouth to explain this horrifying event to an 11 year old. I told her in the car.

We went into the church for a while…there were other parents there with their children…kneeling and praying quietly…stunned I guess.

The TV’s were off until the kid went to bed…

workingclass artist on September 11, 2012 at 2:07 PM

I used to work with people who were in a building by I-395 that the plane that hit the Pentagon went over at a very low level (so much so they thought there had been an explosion in the building). Apparently more than a few employees couldn’t deal mentally with being that close to the attack.

Happy Nomad on September 11, 2012 at 1:42 PM

Yeah, post-traumatic stress does weird things to people. Even as far away as I was, it completely threw me out of all of my healthy routines. I can’t imagine being near the epicenters of terror.

Nicole Coulter on September 11, 2012 at 2:07 PM

It tends to be a little more real and important when you have friends and acquaintances that lost family members on that day.

MobileVideoEngineer on September 11, 2012 at 1:55 PM

And then it becomes even more real when it could’ve been you…

Miss_Anthrope on September 11, 2012 at 2:01 PM

Well and I didn’t even mention that my step-father’s daughter was a flight attendant and was supposed to be American flight 11, but switched shifts with someone.

MobileVideoEngineer on September 11, 2012 at 2:08 PM

I was in law school at the time. That morning when I tried to check my email and the news online, the internet didn’t work. But that wasn’t unusual in those dial-up days. So I went on about my day not knowing all that had happened. (Ever since then, I am somewhat obsessive about checking the news in the morning, and always turn on the TV or radio if for some reason I can’t get online.) I had to pick something up at city hall, and I remember that the employees there were all very quiet and had the radio on, but I couldn’t hear what they were listening to. I went to campus, and went to ask a question at the law school registrar’s desk. A classmate came up and started talking about what was going on – planes crashing into buildings in NYC and the Pentagon. I remember not grasping the enormity of the situation, and asking if these were small planes, like Cessnas. No – jetliners. I went to the law review office to use the phone and tell my wife it looked like we were at war. Another classmate overheard my end of the call and was concerned because she thought a relative or friend (I’m not sure which) might have been at the WTC. All classes were cancelled for the day, save one small class, because we all showed up; the professor said we could cancel class if we wanted, but the consensus was that we should have class because everyone was there anyway — and I think we all wanted to do one normal thing that day. I spent the next many hours gathered around televisions with my classmates at the law school. We were all mostly sitting in stunned silence, but occasionally wondering aloud if there were more planes missing and was the President safe. I remember some news reporter saying on television that, based on the number of people who work in those buildings, the casulaties might be tens of thousands. The local newspaper published a special mid-day edition (headline: “Terror Strikes”), which was being handed out along the street. (I still have my copy.) At home, I had the television on almost constantly for the next several days. We were constantly hoping for news of survivors in the rubble, and there were occasional rumors, but generally the news was only bad. The 14th was my son’s first birthday, and my wife (wisely) said we needed to turn off the TV and not talk about it during his birthday party.

acasilaco on September 11, 2012 at 2:09 PM

I was on duty as a patrol officer at my department that morning and was walking out to my car when my deputy chief told me about the first plane strike. As we walked back into roll call to check out the tv news reports, I was looking right at the televison set and saw the second plane hit.
Within an hour all hands were on duty and some of us were deployed to the regional airport at the request of the FAA to close the airport and secure all hangars and aircraft on the ground.
It was the first time I was deployed with heavy body armor (besides my usual daily vest), riot helmet and AR15 rifle. Training at that time never prepared us for what we faced. We all called our loved ones and told them we would be home as soon as possible.
I can still recall hearing the fear in my wife’s voice as she told me to be careful and come home to her safe.

ChicagoBlues on September 11, 2012 at 2:10 PM

Out here in CA, it was just before 6:00 AM that my husband and I were awakened by our friend Billy, who was living with us at the time, pounding on our bedroom door and yelling, “They did it! Those sons of bitches finally did it!” Billy is from New Jersey, worked in New York for many years, and still has a lot of friends back there. He had been on the phone with one of them, who had apparently had the TV on.

We ran out to the living room and turned ours on, too. I think we all watched it all day. My work called and told me that no one was to come in to work that day, or the next day, either, as it turned out.

Back then I used to listen to Dennis Prager every day. (Still love his show, but current work hours prevent my listening to it in real time.) God bless Dennis. He was my rock that day and for many days afterward.

Mary in LA on September 11, 2012 at 2:10 PM

I woke up feeling bad that day, and almost considered not going to work. At the time, I thought it was because I was so tired of fighting with graduate students who had applied to graduate, but hadn’t completed their requirements. But I went anyway, because I wasn’t sick, and the best way out of argument hell is straight through with the documented facts. I had work to do, so I went and did it.

Then the admissions officer came out of her office as I was reviewing applications and student files and said she heard on her radio that a plane had hit one of the towers of the WTC. Naturally, we all thought it was an accident involving a small plane. I turned to the internet, but there was nothing on it yet. Minutes later, the admissions officer, white-faced, said another plane had hit the other tower. We knew then it was no accident. It was an act of war.

We went down to the student lounge on the first floor where there was a TV and with a group of students huddled around it, and saw the images of the burning towers. I remember covering my face and gasping, “Oh my God! Oh my God!” when I realized that I had just seen what could only be a body falling from the tower. That was the only time I saw it. The networks suppressed all coverage of the jumpers after that. We went back to the Graduate Office, and no more work was done.

Someone in the office (I no longer remember who) started saying something like, “This is what we get when we keep meddling in other countries’ affairs.” Red rage washed over me. At a university, you get used to hearing things like that, but this was too much. I said, “Nothing justifies this! Those people in those towers don’t deserve this!” That shut up any more talk like that in our office, at least on that day. I also remember saying, “If you want to know what war looks like, this is it.”

The university was closed in the early afternoon, all classes cancelled. I don’t think I knew the buildings had collapsed until I heard it on the car radio on the way home. I spent the rest of that day in my recliner at home, next to my husband, watching the news until well into late night. It took that long, I think, to absorb it. And I remember my husband and I both wept.

I still cry at least once during the day every September 11. I don’t think it will ever go away, and I don’t want it to. I want the grief and the anger to stay fresh until I die, or until the jihadist enemy is defeated forever, whichever comes first.

RebeccaH on September 11, 2012 at 2:11 PM

I understand why we do it, but at some point, let’s move on. Moving on doesn’t mean we forget, it just means we look to the future, not back to the past.

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:38 PM

So let’s do away with Memorial Day too. Oh and I guess you think remembering people in your family who have died by sitting around and talking about them is a waste of time too. I know people who still remember 12/7 and honor it. We are moving forward but remembering and reliving makes that possible. If we don’t what would be the reason to move forward?

Deanna on September 11, 2012 at 2:11 PM

I was working. I do IT networking and we had a router install scheduled for 9am that morning on the 77th floor of the WTC. I was to provide remote central site support. The router did not arrive in time so we had to cancel it. This no doubt saved the Hewlett Packard vendor’s life. I spoke to him a fews days afterward and he was pretty freaked out but feeling blessed and thankful the postal service is so lame. The router was returned to us a few weeks later all beat up and dirty. It was kind of haunting to get a package back from the Trade Center after so much time.

Buttercup on September 11, 2012 at 2:11 PM

I like the thoughts that David French shares on this anniversary:
http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/316519/911-case-controlled-and-sustained-rage-david-french

onlineanalyst on September 11, 2012 at 2:13 PM

Was in the Pentagon. We watched the first building burn, wondering how that could have happened on a clear day. Then the second building got hit, saw folks jumping from the buildings. Then we got hit, the building was (mostly) evacuated. Took hours of alternate transportation to get home. No cell phones worked. Extended family was scared, left them voice mails and sent emails when I finally got home. Went back to work the next day, while the Pentagon was still burning, halls and rooms were hazy, smoky and started planning for the war.

Grinch on September 11, 2012 at 2:14 PM

I don’t want to sully this thread.

I woke up from a terrible hangover and looked at the morning papers to find that the US has been attacked. My first reaction was “We told you so”. You cannot fault me because I am from that country whose mortal enemy is the country that hosted OBL and where he was killed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kargil_War
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Airlines_Flight_814 (search for Ahmed Omar Saeed)

The same country that had the highest approval rating for W when he left office.

http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0807/5268.html

sram on September 11, 2012 at 1:59 PM

An honest opinion from a well-intentioned ally is not inappropriate. I’d say most of us here are very appreciative of the help and support we have received from the Indian people and their government.

Sekhmet on September 11, 2012 at 2:14 PM

Deanna on September 11, 2012 at 2:11 PM

Hear, hear! Big tip of the hat to you, miss.

Pathetic that someone could not take that horror as a direct and personal attack on them and their family. The attack has one motive and one motive only, killing Americans for sport.

Limerick on September 11, 2012 at 2:15 PM

I remember having to go to the store and noticing that everything was “different”…

… No one really spoke to each other if you didn’t know them, and I had an uneasy feeling wanting to get back home as soon as possible.

Seven Percent Solution on September 11, 2012 at 1:23 PM

I also went to the grocery store that evening. I remember an eery quiet and the still stunned faces of others. It was like we were just going through the motions of our lives, but our hearts and our minds were in NY, D.C. and Shanksville, PA.

I also remember there being a couple of people there who were obviously from the Middle East. They kept their heads down avoiding any eye contact with others, but those that I did make eye contact with I could see nothing but fear on their faces.

It was a sad day for everyone, but in hindsight it seems like for that one brief moment, we were all united as Americans. There really were no red states and blues states. No Democrats and Republicans. We mourned together. And in today’s bitterly divided atmosphere, it’s a surreal, and somewhat whimsical memory.

Yep, remember this?

Nicole Coulter on September 11, 2012 at 1:26 PM

Flora Duh on September 11, 2012 at 2:16 PM

I was on a plane headed to South America. Ended up at Miami airport for most of the week, and got on one of the first flights allowed up to go back home.

Vashta.Nerada on September 11, 2012 at 2:16 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:45 PM

You think this thread is self-indulgent.

I think its worth remembering that this is an ongoing threat all of us face. We’d all like to pretend it isn’t there. Many of us did when 911 went down, totally forgetting about the other very serious incidents before it.

Complacency can get you killed.

Deal with it.

CorporatePiggy on September 11, 2012 at 2:17 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:38 PM

Perhaps you missed the point of this thread.

I invite you to share your own stories in the comments, as we take this day to remember and reflect upon the thousands of people who died at the hands of hateful terrorists; the countless displays of courage and kindness in the aftermath of the attack; and the men and women who have worked tirelessly since to keep the forces of evil at bay. God bless America.

Buttercup on September 11, 2012 at 2:18 PM

Big Internet hugs to the HAers who were there, or nearby, or who had near-misses, or who lost or feared for loved ones.

We must never forget. Our traitorous news media want us to forget, to succumb to their manipulation. We must not do it.

Oh, and as for NoStoppingUs: Do you go to funerals and tell the mourners there that since the loss of the dead person didn’t affect you personally, they should stop mourning and move on?

Mary in LA on September 11, 2012 at 2:19 PM

And here’s how some people are honoring the day…disgusting.

CHICAGO (WLS) – Dozens of striking Chicago teachers are protesting outside a Sept. 11 memorial event where Gov. Pat Quinn is speaking.

The Chicago Democrat hasn’t weighed in on the walkout, which entered its second day on Tuesday.

http://www.wlsam.com/Article.asp?id=2530875&spid=

Deanna on September 11, 2012 at 2:20 PM

NoStoppingUs on September 11, 2012 at 1:38 PM

Seems to me the people who most want to de-emphasize 9/11 do so because the attacks directly refute their cotton-candy-and-unicorns take on foreign policy.

JohnTant on September 11, 2012 at 2:22 PM

That Obama became president of the U.S., so soon after 9/11/2001, is proof that the muzzies won. However, there are 1001 other reasons of such proof.

Schadenfreude on September 11, 2012 at 2:23 PM

Robert Jensen on September 11, 2012 at 1:39 PM

Happy Birthday.

Flora Duh on September 11, 2012 at 2:25 PM

Big Internet hugs to the HAers who were there, or nearby, or who had near-misses, or who lost or feared for loved ones.

We must never forget. Our traitorous news media want us to forget, to succumb to their manipulation. We must not do it.

Oh, and as for NoStoppingUs: Do you go to funerals and tell the mourners there that since the loss of the dead person didn’t affect you personally, they should stop mourning and move on?

Mary in LA on September 11, 2012 at 2:19 PM

Sadly, there was one person that said my friend Glenn and I shouldn’t be upset because it didn’t affect us and that he has family and friends that worked in the WTC. This was outside of a programming lab later that evening (I don’t know why the lab wasn’t canceled). In hindsight I realize that he was probably just speaking out of fear and hurt, but we were on a major university campus that was only 3 hours from NYC with over 50% of the students being from the state of New York, so it just seemed like an odd thing to say.

MobileVideoEngineer on September 11, 2012 at 2:26 PM

JohnTant on September 11, 2012 at 2:22 PM

A++

AubieJon on September 11, 2012 at 2:26 PM

I’ll never forget that morning. I owned a small software company and 5 or 6 of us were leaving that morning to drive to New Mexico to meet with a big client for a few days at a mountain cabin, and work on a proposal for a large development project.

My bags were packed. My wife had already left for work. She called me on the phone and said “turn on Fox, you have to see this.” I watch, with tears in my eyes. Confused like so many, wondering what was happening to our country.

Suddenly I didn’t want to go on this trip. Are we at war? What will happen after we leave? Where else are we being attacked?

Fifteen minutes later, one of my employees that was driving the Suburban stopped at the house to pick me up. We all talked about what was going on and whether we should still leave. We agreed it was probably isolated to NY, but would keep tabs on the radio on the way up.

All I could think about was my fellow Americans suffering and how big is this? Is this “Red Dawn” on a bigger scale?

We were in New Mexico for four days. Miserable trip. We secured the contract with the client, who contracted with the Air Force. The next week, we learned two of the guys our client worked with, died in the Pentagon attack. Put the project on hold indefinitely.

Everything else in the country “froze” and we ended up laying off about twenty employees over the next six months. After a year, our company was bankrupt. No business, no anything. We lost our home, our cars and pretty much everything. We had a five bedroom home, all furnished nicely. It was so bad, we had to have a garage sale before our home was foreclosed, to sell off everything we could, to scrape together enough money to put down a deposit on a two bedroom rental property and buy a cheap car with cash.

Had to start everything all over again. God blessed us with a new business, but it took years to develop and it’s made me extremely cautious about growth and expanding.

BruthaMan on September 11, 2012 at 2:26 PM

Comment pages: 1 2 3 4