Neil Armstrong passes away at 82

posted at 4:45 pm on August 25, 2012 by Ed Morrissey

An American hero and icon has left us today.  Neil Armstrong, who with his partners Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins on Apollo XI redefined the meaning of the word “explorer” and extended our reach to the Moon, passed away at age 82:

Neil Armstrong, the Apollo 11 astronaut who became the first human being to set foot on another world, has died. He was 82.

In a statement his family said Armstrong had passed away following complications resulting from cardiovascular procedures.

The family described him as a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend, and also as “a reluctant American hero who always believed he was just doing his job.”

CBS has a longer video from a 60 Minutes profile from several years ago, which I’d recommend.  Armstrong’s humility and calm comes through very clearly in his interview with Ed Bradley.  CBS also gets the famous first words from man on the Moon correct: “That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind.”  Armstrong said later that the (a) got swallowed up by the transmission, and that the statement was one that underplayed his individual role in the moment while noting the monumental leap it meant for the whole human race.

Many American children grew up idolizing Armstrong, Aldrin, and all of the other astronauts who risked their lives — some of whom paid the ultimate price — in order to push our boundaries into the cosmos.  My father worked in the space program for almost 30 years, including the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle phases, and so perhaps even more than some, I thought of these men as giants.  We had the most well-known of them for a very long time, a blessing that perhaps we’ll only appreciate in retrospect.

Godspeed, Mr. Armstrong.  An entire world thanks you for your courage and accomplishment.

Update: A commenter scolded me for not mentioning Michael Collins, who flew the command module that allowed Armstrong and Aldrin to go to the moon’s surface and back safely. A point well taken, and I’ve edited the first paragraph.

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The glory days. RIP.

hillsoftx on August 25, 2012 at 4:47 PM

When America was great…seen by her own people and those of the rest of the world.

Those were real men.

These are eunuchs, the current sissies in ‘charge’.

Schadenfreude on August 25, 2012 at 4:47 PM

“Oh I Have Slipped
The Surly Bonds of Earth…
Put Out My Hand
And Touched the Face of God ”

RIP Shipmate

NavyMustang on August 25, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Rest in Peace Neil. You will forever be remembered for your valuable contribution in advancing the cause of mankind.

KickandSwimMom on August 25, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Watched the landing and walk on a 13″ B&W t.v. Even though I was only 4 at the time, I realized it was perhaps the most profound event up to that point. First time humans had done anything on another world.

He, his class and humility will be missed.

rbj on August 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM

Loaded down with courage like a Christmas tree decorated with bowling balls.

Speakup on August 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM

Aw c’mon man, the most famous misspoken line in history…and you correct it?

Great man, sorry to see him go.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 4:52 PM

R.I.P Neil;

See you next time, Space Cowboy.

CurlyTop on August 25, 2012 at 4:52 PM

Sad. Too sad for words, and our legacy is 40 years of doing nothing in space. What happened to the dreams? 2001 was not about rockets flying in space but about planes flying into buildings.
But I hope we make a big deal about Obama gutting NASA. It’s not right, especially with China aggressively advancing in space.

anotherJoe on August 25, 2012 at 4:52 PM

A man of achievement and accomplishment. RIP.

*tips hat*

Meat Fighter on August 25, 2012 at 4:52 PM

rbj on August 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM

Same here, though a little older.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 4:53 PM

An amazing man. RIP.

Gingotts on August 25, 2012 at 4:53 PM

He Bishoped the moon. Pretty damn cool.

Flange on August 25, 2012 at 4:53 PM

While Neil Armstrong was walking on the moon many who are now leaders on the lefft were bad mouthing their country and rotting their brains away with drugs at places like Woodstock.

One more step for Neil Armstrong. RIP.

bgibbs1000 on August 25, 2012 at 4:53 PM

I rememeber sitting with my father watching that moment!

A TRUE American hero. Godspeed and Rest in Peace! Prayers for family.

IMO flags should be lowered to half mass. I bet they will be here at the Johnson Space Center.

HoustonRight on August 25, 2012 at 4:54 PM

The Journalistic Greats at MSNBC mistakenly identified Armstrong in their early “report”. Called him Neil Young by mistake.

My brothers and I ran down Broadway in NYC chasing the limo with Neil, Buzz and Mike during the big ticker tape parade. We never forgot it.

Del Dolemonte on August 25, 2012 at 4:56 PM

A good man that will be missed.

Maybe we can ask the Russians or Chinese to take his ashes back to space for us.

LarryinLA on August 25, 2012 at 4:56 PM

I remember watching the landing and the first moonwalk; I was 10 at the time and expected that was the beginning of our future in space. Now we don’t even have the ability to place a man in orbit and Jugears has canceled the program to get us back there.

Condolences to the Armstrong family; he was a great man.

AZfederalist on August 25, 2012 at 4:56 PM

RIP Commander Armstrong.

If anyone deserves a state funeral, Neil does.

rickyricardo on August 25, 2012 at 4:56 PM

R.I.P. to a real American hero. We need more people like Neil Armstrong these days.

simkeith on August 25, 2012 at 4:56 PM

Too young. Sad. RIP.

petefrt on August 25, 2012 at 4:56 PM

HoustonRight on August 25, 2012 at 4:54 PM

They will be.

BallisticBob on August 25, 2012 at 4:57 PM

*sob*

A true hero lost to us, but moves on to the greatest place EVAH…

ladyingray on August 25, 2012 at 4:57 PM

An amazing man. If you are not familiar with what he did on Gemini 8, check it out. He was one cool customer and it might be the reason that he was selected for Apollo 11.

Truly a sad day.

Roderick Spode on August 25, 2012 at 4:57 PM

Glued to the TV, we were back then, and what a joy it was. Obama, as usual, does not comprehend what he has attempted to destroy. Maybe a future president will set us on a course that leads to more Neil Armstrongs, and I hope our grandkids will have an opportunity to be as thrilled we were.

GaltBlvnAtty on August 25, 2012 at 4:58 PM

Are we sure it wasn’t Neil Young?

*facepalm for NBC*

catmman on August 25, 2012 at 4:59 PM

There are, and now were, only two men I would consider it an honor just to shake hands with. Neil Armstrong and Sandy Koufax. It leaves me sad that an era seems to be passing away. Rest in peace.

BubbaCluck on August 25, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Godspeed, Neil Armstrong. The greatest American in history.

wildcat72 on August 25, 2012 at 5:00 PM

“That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind.“ Armstrong said later that the (a) got swallowed up by the transmission,

I’ve always been skeptical that the (a) got swallowed up. For one thing, the line was clearly scripted, and it’s not hard to assume that Armstrong was a bit shaken by being the first man to set foot on a heavenly body, and muffed the line.

It doesn’t diminish the significance of it all, but still.

KingGold on August 25, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Are we sure it wasn’t Neil Young?

*facepalm for NBC*

catmman on August 25, 2012 at 4:59 PM

Those dopes are idiots.

BallisticBob on August 25, 2012 at 5:01 PM

Oh, and one more thing.

Good luck, Mr. Gorsky. :)

KingGold on August 25, 2012 at 5:01 PM

rbj on August 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM

I was seven and remember it vividly. My whole family went to a neighbor’s house to watch it on their new color TV. RIP Neil.

behiker on August 25, 2012 at 5:02 PM

KingGold on August 25, 2012 at 5:00 PM

It wasn’t

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 5:03 PM

Good luck, Mr. Gorsky. :)

KingGold on August 25, 2012 at 5:01 PM

Shame on you.

You brought it up, you get to explain it.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 5:04 PM

If a re-post is permitted:

Like a lot of us, the late Ray Bradbury stayed up all night that night Neil Armstrong landed on the moon. He said he cried all night, too, he was so happy. And he was beamed round the world via Telstar on camera with Cronkite, to whom he said:

“We’re always asking, ‘What are we doing here on earth?’ We are the audience. There’s no use having a universe, a cosmology, if you don’t have witnesses. We are the witnesses to the miracle. We are put here by creation, by God, by the cosmos, whatever name you want to give it. We’re here to be the audience to the magnificent. It is our job to celebrate.”

I was only a child, but I was a witness. And I’ll never forget the magnificent Mr. Armstrong. RIP.

de rigueur on August 25, 2012 at 4:53 PM

de rigueur on August 25, 2012 at 5:04 PM

Damn it.

Robert_Paulson on August 25, 2012 at 5:05 PM

Oh, and one more thing.

Good luck, Mr. Gorsky. :)

KingGold on August 25, 2012 at 5:01 PM

Beat me to it. The greatest urban legend ever.

RIP Neil

Chuck Schick on August 25, 2012 at 5:05 PM

The overused word “hero” is most appropriate when applied to Mr. Armstrong. We have lost a great American who not only “reached for the stars” but actually reached the heavens.

Go with God, sir.

hillbillyjim on August 25, 2012 at 5:06 PM

You brought it up, you get to explain it.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 5:04 PM


Snopes does it better than I ever could.
It’s totally false but hilarious nonetheless.

KingGold on August 25, 2012 at 5:06 PM

There are, and now were, only two men I would consider it an honor just to shake hands with. Neil Armstrong and Sandy Koufax. It leaves me sad that an era seems to be passing away. Rest in peace.

BubbaCluck on August 25, 2012 at 5:00 PM

I’ve met Sandy before, and he’s just as advertised: a humble man whose aura alone conveys incredible prestige, grace and dignity.

RIP, Neil. A reminder that “American Exceptionalism” isn’t just some jingoist buzzword, it’s the real life exploits of heroes like Neil.

Good Solid B-Plus on August 25, 2012 at 5:07 PM

His first step onto the moon surface may well be the apex of the American era – perhaps human history – considering how things are going.

Godspeed, Mr. Armstrong. We hardly knew ye.

turfmann on August 25, 2012 at 5:07 PM

What a great man. RIP

St. Regis Philbin on August 25, 2012 at 5:08 PM

When I think of our astronauts, and Neil in particular, I think of my dad. Thanks to our space program, when Armstrong stepped foot on lunar soil, the Moon ceased to be just a thing. It became a place. My father was one of the thousands of engineers, scientists and workers who helped bring about that accomplishment. They inspired me to make a career in engineering from an early age.

MJBrutus on August 25, 2012 at 5:08 PM

There are two things I remember from my youth:
a) The assassination of John F. Kennedy
b) Neil Armstrong stepping onto the moon.

Both are tied together — JFK was the guy who said we’d put a guy on the moon before the Russians, and Niel was that guy.

unclesmrgol on August 25, 2012 at 5:08 PM

I was 7 years old at the time. I remember we had a Black maid (on a trial basis, since my Mom preferred doing all the housework herself) and she said “You think they’re really up there? I don’t believe it”.

ardenenoch on August 25, 2012 at 5:11 PM

Watched the landing and walk on a 13″ B&W t.v. Even though I was only 4 at the time, I realized it was perhaps the most profound event up to that point. First time humans had done anything on another world.

He, his class and humility will be missed.

rbj on August 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM

Same here. I was 8 at the time and we were in a crowd of people gathered outside in a camp ground to watch.

MJBrutus on August 25, 2012 at 5:11 PM

Glued to the TV, we were back then, and what a joy it was. Obama, as usual, does not comprehend what he has attempted to destroy. Maybe a future president will set us on a course that leads to more Neil Armstrongs, and I hope our grandkids will have an opportunity to be as thrilled we were.

GaltBlvnAtty on August 25, 2012 at 4:58 PM

…..still remember as a kid…Walter Cronkite’s voice…and I was ‘wiggling’ because I didn’t want to miss it by going to the bathroom

KOOLAID2 on August 25, 2012 at 5:13 PM

Rest in peace. What a great man.

AbaddonsReign on August 25, 2012 at 5:13 PM

Loaded down with courage like a Christmas tree decorated with bowling balls.

Speakup on August 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM

Mind if I borrow that?

bernzright777 on August 25, 2012 at 5:15 PM

RIP sir.

We’ll be talking about you a long time hence…

CorporatePiggy on August 25, 2012 at 5:16 PM

An amazing man. If you are not familiar with what he did on Gemini 8, check it out. He was one cool customer and it might be the reason that he was selected for Apollo 11.

Truly a sad day.

Roderick Spode on August 25, 2012 at 4:57 PM

His earlier exploits as a test pilot at Edwards Air Force Base are also legendary, and just a year before the moon landing, he was almost killed when he was flying the experimental “Flying Bedstead”, which was an early version of the Lunar Landing Module. He came within 1/2 second of losing his life but ejected just before it crashed.

Del Dolemonte on August 25, 2012 at 5:20 PM

How many times have we herd some one say, “If we could land a man on the moon, we could …?” The sad truth is that we no longer can land a man on the moon. Sure we have the technology, but we lack the courage. We lack the willingness to take the most calculated and intelligent of risks. We have become so bureaucratized and risk averse that all that matters is never put a foot out of place. We no longer reward achievement and courage, we reward safety and protection. I truly hope that America can rediscover its spirit of achievement and learns what our fathers knew. That it is more important to reward success than to punish failure.

MJBrutus on August 25, 2012 at 5:22 PM

Immortal

A name that will be known as long as humans exist.

aniptofar on August 25, 2012 at 5:25 PM

Mr. Armstrong is truly a hero. A sad day. He was an Eagle Scout and a great Christian man.

ted c on August 25, 2012 at 5:26 PM

“Flying Bedstead”, which was an early version of the Lunar Landing Module. He came within 1/2 second of losing his life but ejected just before it crashed.

Del Dolemonte on August 25, 2012 at 5:20 PM

Not an early version, a practice simulator.

The early versions of the LEM, later changed to LM so as not to lose funding for the rover were all too heavy.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 5:26 PM

G-d Bless Neil Armstrong and his family. A true hero that almost none of this generation’s tatooed moocher/losers know anything about. The fact that most of us can say we lived on this planet while Neil Armstrong put his foot on the moon is an honor by itself. Too bad our NASA pisslam outreach goon of a preezy doesn’t feel the same way.

Obama, as usual, does not comprehend what he has attempted to destroy.
GaltBlvnAtty on August 25, 2012 at 4:58 PM

Doesn’t he?

Western_Civ on August 25, 2012 at 5:30 PM

MJBrutus on August 25, 2012 at 5:22 PM

I’m afraid that if we try again to put a man on the moon, the stack of paperwork will reach the moon long before our spacecraft does.

Roderick Spode on August 25, 2012 at 5:35 PM

One of these things is not like the other. One of these things just doesn’t belong.

Coach Paul “Bear” Bryant: “There’s a lot of blood, sweat, and guts between dreams and success.”

Neil Armstrong: “One small step for a man, a giant leap for mankind.”

Ronald Reagan: “Mr. Gorbachev: Tear down this wall.”

Steve Jobs: “But it’s a disservice to constantly put things in this radical new light — that it’s going to change everything. Things don’t have to change the world to be important.”

George W. Bush: “I believe that freedom is the deepest need of every human soul.”

Barack Obama: “You didn’t build that.”

AubieJon on August 25, 2012 at 5:35 PM

Neil Armstrong, who with his partner Buzz Aldrin

What’s this? Buzz Aldrin gets mentioned (deservedly so) but not Michael Collins? I guess if you don’t actually get to walk on the moon, no one remembers your name. C’mon Ed, show some respect.

Goldenavatar on August 25, 2012 at 5:35 PM

My junior high was named after an Apollo 1 astronaut (Virgil Grissom) so I am familiar with the price we paid in blood to get to the moon.

Godspeed.

TheLastBrainLeft on August 25, 2012 at 5:36 PM

Del Dolemonte on August 25, 2012 at 5:20 PM

Thanks, I had forgotten about that. In my youth those guys were like gods to me.

Roderick Spode on August 25, 2012 at 5:37 PM

A great man, Eagle scout too.

yongoro on August 25, 2012 at 5:39 PM

I went to Armstrong Elementary School in Hazelwood, Missouri back in the 1970s; it was great that so shortly after his landing on the moon the school was named after him. He’ll be greatly missed and fondly remembered!

Sir Rants-A-Lot on August 25, 2012 at 5:39 PM

TheLastBrainLeft on August 25, 2012 at 5:36 PM

I often visit Gus’ grave when I am at Arlington Cemetery.

bernzright777 on August 25, 2012 at 5:40 PM

Neil was a fraternity brother – a Phi Delt at Purdue 20 or so years before me. One afternoon a couple of us were sitting in the living room of the house when the front door opened and some guy walked in. We asked if we could help and he said he was a brother/alum and just wanted to look around and share memories. The guy sitting nest to me all of a sudden says, “are you Neil Armstrong?” Well duh, he was standing next to a photo of himself. And he kinda says…well…um…yes I am, do you mind if I look around?
Nothing but humble. Wow. I will always remember looking up at the moon that night he stepped foot on it and saying wow to myself.

baseballguy on August 25, 2012 at 5:54 PM

Another very large piece of my childhood is gone forever. RIP Mr. Armstrong, you truly shaped my and many of my generations future. Other kids wanted to be firemen and policemen, I always wanted to be an astronaut because of you and the many other brave men of our early space program. How this nation has fallen, reduced to hitching rides on Russian spacecraft. Godspeed Sir and Salute.

Mini-14 on August 25, 2012 at 5:55 PM

On the 40th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing, the historic crew was invited to the White House.

Niel Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were welcomed by President Obama while Michael Collins stayed in the car and circled the block.

Alberta_Patriot on August 25, 2012 at 5:55 PM

Sorry to hear this. My parents woke me to see his step at age six. Got his autograph at a stamp show three years later. He seemed like a real nice guy.

elfman on August 25, 2012 at 5:56 PM

American exceptionalism — at its finest.

RIP Neil Armstrong.

FlatFoot on August 25, 2012 at 5:58 PM

“That’s one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind.“ Armstrong said later that the (a) got swallowed up by the transmission,

I’ve always been skeptical that the (a) got swallowed up. For one thing, the line was clearly scripted, and it’s not hard to assume that Armstrong was a bit shaken by being the first man to set foot on a heavenly body, and muffed the line.

It doesn’t diminish the significance of it all, but still.

KingGold on August 25, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Well I remember reading at the time that at the very beginning of the moon walk, NASA was indeed having radio and TV reception problems at one of their earth stations due to a huge thunderstorm, and the first transmissions were horrible to start as a result. As the Earth rotated they were able to switch to another earth station relatively quickly. Remember, this was still before we had synchronous communications satellites.

Del Dolemonte on August 25, 2012 at 5:59 PM

One last breath for man… one giant leap into eternity.

Marcola on August 25, 2012 at 6:01 PM

Ed,
I lived in Central Florida in the 60′s and early 70′s We were 50 miles from the Cape. School would have the tv tuned to the news whenever there was a launch and we’d follow the teachers out into the yard to watch the rockets go up.

I like so many other children idolized these men, and wished I could walk among them. My path did not go that way, but I still hold them high.

My father worked for Bendix for a while and particularly during the Apollo 8 launch. We had the chance to watch the launch from the family and visitor area. Unbelievable.

Apollo 17, the only Apollo night launch, was spectacular. I can still see her as she rose above the trees and lit up the countryside, and left shadows in the night even 50 miles away.

My heart is indeed very heavy today.

20th Century Columbus passes into history.
His footsteps remain where he left them 43 years ago in July.

“Now he belongs to the ages.”
Godspeed Neil Armstrong.

Tenwheeler on August 25, 2012 at 6:02 PM

Best wishes to family and friends.

Neil was a humble man. What a journey he lived. He is one of those people you wish you could sit down and chat with.

Tranquility Base still flying our flag, yea!

plutorocks on August 25, 2012 at 6:02 PM

rbj on August 25, 2012 at 4:51 PM

Same here, but just a bit older. My dad pulled my brother and me out of bed at 11:00 pm (a very late hour for us at the time) so we could watch history in the making.

Bigfoot on August 25, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Del Dolemonte on August 25, 2012 at 5:59 PM

No, no, no Go to: 109:24:23 in the official transcript.

It contains analysis of the transmission.

IT…remains…the…most…famous…misspoken…line…in…history.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Alberta_Patriot on August 25, 2012 at 5:55 PM

Heh.

BallisticBob on August 25, 2012 at 6:06 PM

Not an early version, a practice simulator.

The early versions of the LEM, later changed to LM so as not to lose funding for the rover were all too heavy.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 5:26 PM

One of the two crashes of the LLTV and two crashes of the later LLRV were due to control system failures.

These three crashes out of four total were due to the control system and had nothing to do with weight.

Tenwheeler on August 25, 2012 at 6:11 PM

The most unique human in history.

Rest in the stars, Neil.

(Obama tries to hog the spotlight in 3…2…1…)

profitsbeard on August 25, 2012 at 6:13 PM

These three crashes out of four total were due to the control system and had nothing to do with weight.

Tenwheeler on August 25, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Yes, the weight comment was an aside. What NASA envisioned for the the LEM, and what got built bear very little resemblance to each other.

Some changes came so late into the program that the models NASA sent out to the press were wrong.

IIRC, the last major change to the LM was the shape of the door, and that was made very late in the game.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 6:17 PM

baseballguy on August 25, 2012 at 5:54 PM

Great story.

Alberta_Patriot on August 25, 2012 at 5:55 PM

You’re bad. (but cute)

Neil Armstrong was one of the reasons I went to the Air Force Academy. Those were magical times. Saluting you, sir. Godspeed.

SailorMark on August 25, 2012 at 6:18 PM

The Right Stuff.

RIP.

AYNBLAND on August 25, 2012 at 6:25 PM

Neil Armstrong passes away at 82

Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins lifted the spirits of both an entire nation and generation.

Now Armstrong’s spirit is being lifted on its’ final journey.

Godspeed Neal Armstrong.

rukiddingme on August 25, 2012 at 6:26 PM

Armstrong’s walk on the moon is one of the things you remember where you were for, like the Challenger disaster and 9/11. I was sitting on the floor of our living room in Chesapeaker, Virginia in July 1969. A star-struck kid. I loved the space program.

RIP, Neil Armstrong.

We’ll be back there — and beyond — someday soon.

J.E. Dyer on August 25, 2012 at 6:27 PM

J.E. Dyer on August 25, 2012 at 6:27 PM

Apollo 13 disaster transmission, Reagan getting shot, Berlin wall being torn down, Columbia…I was to young to remember Kennedy.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 6:32 PM

Godspeed, Mr. Armstrong. An entire world thanks you for your courage and accomplishment.

Seven Percent Solution on August 25, 2012 at 6:34 PM

I don’t think he’s resting in peace.

I think he’s exploring.

After all, he can go ANYWHERE he wants to now.

clayj on August 25, 2012 at 6:34 PM

The Christopher Columbus of Space.

PappyD61 on August 25, 2012 at 6:40 PM

The Eagle has wings!

DarkCurrent on August 25, 2012 at 6:40 PM

Apollo 13 disaster transmission, Reagan getting shot, Berlin wall being torn down, Columbia…I was to young to remember Kennedy.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 6:32 PM

Yep. I was too young to remember JFK too, but I do remember MLK Jr. and RFK. What a weird spring that was in ’68. The assassinations were part of the reason I was glued to the party conventions on TV that summer, for which there was day-long coverage. The Youngest Political Geek. I was the kid who used to point out the errors in the Weekly Reader, because Dad kept me abreast of the correct information at the dinner table. I was in second grade before I realized that President Johnson’s name wasn’t “Light Bulb.”

Ah, memories.

J.E. Dyer on August 25, 2012 at 6:43 PM

In a tribute to Mr. Armstrong…….Mammy and all the yung uns said his Moon quote word for word.

Quote of the ages.

PappyD61 on August 25, 2012 at 6:45 PM

I was 12. It was monumental! I will never forget it. As I got older I appreciated even more how it exemplified the American spirit, the can-do, never-say-die attitude of this country. I don’t care if a line was misspoken, it’s not important. What is important is that this man achieved something that few ever thought possible. He lived, and showed, the greatness and ability of America. And even after that glorious event he remained humble. I think the fact that he stayed out of the spotlights, kept to himself, and remained the man he always was, makes him even more of a hero to me. RIP Commander .. we will never forget…

vamp57mw on August 25, 2012 at 6:51 PM

00764

DarkCurrent on August 25, 2012 at 6:54 PM

Oh, and I forgot one thing… going to Catholic school, I remember being told that the first three men on God’s earth were Adam, Cain and Abel and the first three men on the moon had last names starting with those letters… Armstrong, Collins, Aldrin… LOL… it was pretty cool at the time!!

vamp57mw on August 25, 2012 at 6:56 PM

The moment Neil Armstrong’s boot touched the face of the moon, he became The Man In The Moon, to me.

Armstrong, Aldrin, and Collins brought the moon home to us.

Extraordinary men, extraordinary spirit, extraordinary accomplishments. They set the bar.

Thank you, Commander Armstrong.

thatsafactjack on August 25, 2012 at 6:59 PM

“To Know”

Who said you could use
them…the sky and the clouds…
The sunrise and moonglow, who Said you’re allowed…
To rise above man, look down on the Earth,
Feel the freedom of flight man
has sought since his birth.
Who said you could use them…
the sun and the stars…
To find your way home and know
who you are.

To fly west, my friend, is a flight we must all take for that final check.

–Author unknown

punditbob on August 25, 2012 at 7:02 PM

Ah, memories.

J.E. Dyer on August 25, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Strange how those things work. I don’t remember RFK or MLK jr. at all. And only remember Nixon resigning because my mom made us wait to go play be cool so my friend and I watched it.

But I would devour news of Skylab, Salyut, Concorde, Apollo/Soyuz, 1972 Olympics massacre, Yom Kippur war, Entebbe and Evel Knievel over the Snake river canyon.

cozmo on August 25, 2012 at 7:03 PM

and the strung out morons at NBC post a flash that says Neil Young died?????

this really means that the people who work for NBC et al. are stone cold losers.

let me say that again…stone. cold. losers.

not fit to print for one of those throw-away ‘newspapers’ that clutter the yard

r keller on August 25, 2012 at 7:26 PM

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