Once more, with feeling: “Peak oil,” isn’t

posted at 4:01 pm on July 30, 2012 by Erika Johnsen

Just in case you were looking for a couple more nails in the coffin of “peak oil,” the cataclysmic phenomenon that environmentalists are always feverishly insisting is just over the horizon, here you go. As much as the greenies like to use the “oil is a finite resource, we need to get off of it and switch to ‘sustainable’ energy, and SOON” line of attack to justify public “investments” in their green-energy whimsy, it’s an argument that increasingly has no meat to it. Yes, in some sense of the word, oil is a finite resource — but that fact is nothing to panic about. Since environmentalists’ precursors first predicted that we would run out of oil way back in the nineteenth century, not only have we constantly discovered more deposits, but we’ve also come up with the technology that makes more and more oil available for extraction. As Environmental Trends points out:

For decades now, the narrative of energy production in the United States has been one of growing energy impoverishment. Peak oil and peak gas advocates have been relentless in trying to scare us into using ever greater amounts of more expensive “renewable” forms of energy like wind and solar power.

But a funny thing happened on the way to peak everything: technology development has unlocked vast new sources of oil and natural gas. As the chart below shows, oil production rates in the United States now exceeds the level of production of 2001.

Want some specific examples of the sort of technological innovation we’re looking at? Business Insider has a great slideshow of the six largest untapped oil fields around the world that will almost certainly become available for our consumption at some point in the future:

Some aren’t reaching their potential in terms of oil extraction for political reasons.

Others present difficult technological challenges that haven’t quite been figured out yet.

These oil fields have the potential to seriously increase the world’s supply of oil if these political and technological issues can eventually be overcome, and the promise of the oil they contain is causing the industry to rise to the challenge.

Sorry I’m not much of a gloom-and-doomer, but I tend to think that over the coming decades, our demand for oil is indeed going to flatten out — but it’s not going to be because wind and solar are suddenly going to take off and demonstrate themselves able to provide energy on the same scale that traditional fuels have. It’s going to be because of more technological innovation and the accompanying efficiency. Thanks to free enterprise and profit motives, we’re everyday learning to do more with less, and that’s good news. You can see efficiency taking it’s awesome toll in all areas of environmental concern: Not merely with energy resources, but with things like the amount of resources needed for packaging and the ability to accomplish more and more tasks online. What reasons do we really have to believe that trend of material self-improvement won’t continue?


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Just wait until someone discovers that oil is biotic.

The Rogue Tomato on July 30, 2012 at 4:06 PM

We’re drowning in the stuff. Just look at the natural gas market these days.

John the Libertarian on July 30, 2012 at 4:07 PM

What reasons do we really have to believe that trend of material self-improvement won’t continue?

The Government.

Bmore on July 30, 2012 at 4:07 PM

The increase in oil consumption is fueled – put intended – by explosive growth in China and, to a lesser degree, India. Oil goes into more cars, more plastics, more electricity, and more synthetic materials. It will eventually plateau, and then drop down due to growing efficiency as well as resounding crash of overheated Chinese economy. They can exploit their population and pollute their environment only for so lo

Archivarix on July 30, 2012 at 4:10 PM

It’s no coincidence that the biggest proponents of the “in 10 years” we’ll hit peak oil are global warming (er… climage change) advocates. The warmists with almost no exceptions have a leftist agenda. Take Michael Mann, the fabricator of the debunked hockey stick graph, is a graduate of Berkeley, imo indisputably the most leftist university in the country, where also many many other alarmist deceivers hail from, including Peter Gleick (of Fakegate fame) who got his doctorate from Berkeley. There’s nothing wrong the climate (hockey stick debunked), and there is no evidence that CO2 has anything to do with it: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WK_WyvfcJyg&desc=GGWarmingSwindle_CO2Lag

anotherJoe on July 30, 2012 at 4:14 PM

Asked which might be the next hot play, Byrne said: “We haven’t officially put out that opinion yet. That will have to be reserved until we finish our study.”

The energy industry is “very creative,” he noted. “It seems like every quarter another play shows up.”

http://fuelfix.com/blog/2012/07/30/eagle-ford-a-contender-for-top-u-s-play/

According to this article Eagle Ford is producing double that of Bakken and will nearly double it again in 2012.

DanMan on July 30, 2012 at 4:14 PM

OT: The most shocking thing of the month

Ford Foundation gives Washington Post $500,000 grant

The grant will be used to fund four new newsroom positions to work on special projects

Assistant Managing Editor Jeff Leen will supervise the work of this new team, working with editors on other staffs. Its work will augment the work of Jeff’s investigative unit,

Soros is now putting people directly into newsrooms to develop their own investigative reports.

faraway on July 30, 2012 at 4:14 PM

Archivarix on July 30, 2012 at 4:10 PM

Allow me, it’s what friends are for.

ng.

Or if you prefer.

The increase in oil consumption is fueled – put intended – by explosive growth in China and, to a lesser degree, India. Oil goes into more cars, more plastics, more electricity, and more synthetic materials. It will eventually plateau, and then drop down due to growing efficiency as well as resounding crash of overheated Chinese economy. They can exploit their population and pollute their environment only for so long.

Archivarix on July 30, 2012 at 4:10 PM

Bmore on July 30, 2012 at 4:15 PM

See that big spike in 2008? 0bama did that.

jukin3 on July 30, 2012 at 4:16 PM

“Business Insider has a great slideshow of the six largest untapped oil fields around the world that will almost certainly become available for our consumption at some point in the future:”

It will be the day that Obowma is dragged kicking and screaming from the White House…

… and all the grant money from the EPA that funds all of the law suits is cut off.

Seven Percent Solution on July 30, 2012 at 4:16 PM

We can also postpone hitting Peak Wind by making every Democrat in Congress wear a Bane-style facemask with a little propeller generator in the front.

JeremiahJohnson on July 30, 2012 at 4:17 PM

Business Insider has a great slideshow of the six largest untapped oil fields around the world that will almost certainly become available for our consumption at some point in the future:

They didn’t even include the massive Siberian Bazhenov formation, which could hold upwards of a trillion barrels of recoverable oil.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on July 30, 2012 at 4:17 PM

And the higher the price goes, the more oil/gas becomes economically available. That whole supply n demand thing.

Plus, at about $100, it is economic to make oil from coal. Well, it would be if the EPA would allow it.

iurockhead on July 30, 2012 at 4:19 PM

Wasn’t peak oil the plot for the “The man with the Golden Gun”? Solar was going to replace oil…in 1974.

Oil Can on July 30, 2012 at 4:20 PM

I am sure that The Rogue Tomato means “abiotic“, which means: characterized by the absence of life or living organisms.

We now know this has to be true because the deep oil and gas wells now being drilled are below the levels possible for rotted carbon-based plants and animals. Besides, we now have wells filling back up with oil originating from deep within the earth’s crust.

herdgadfly on July 30, 2012 at 4:22 PM

Just wait until someone discovers that oil is biotic.
The Rogue Tomato on July 30, 2012 at 4:06 PM

I’m sure you mean abiotic.

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 4:24 PM

oil is a finite resource — but that fact is nothing to panic about. Since environmentalists’ precursors first predicted that we would run out of oil way back in the nineteenth century, not only have we constantly discovered more deposits, but we’ve also come up with the technology that makes more and more oil available for extraction

…my patience is becoming a finite resource with these greenie cavemen!

KOOLAID2 on July 30, 2012 at 4:24 PM

Some current shale frack areas can pull oil out profitably in the $50 range. Others need the price up around $75-$80 because of depth or less stable rock conditions. Other areas have yet to be touched aside from federal regulations, because it’s not viable even at the current levels. But it’s there, and will remain the prime energy source until something as efficient and at roughly the same price level finally comes along.

jon1979 on July 30, 2012 at 4:26 PM

Just in case you were looking for a couple more nails in the coffin of “peak oil,” the cataclysmic phenomenon that environmentalists are always feverishly insisting is just over the horizon, here you go. As much as the greenies like to use the “oil is a finite resource, we need to get off of it and switch to ‘sustainable’ energy, and SOON”
======

Well,I believe,Mother Earth,produces oil,and the planet will never
run out of it…………….never..ever!!

Unless the Sun Flares up,and roasts and vapourizes da planet,
right down to da core!

canopfor on July 30, 2012 at 4:27 PM

iurockhead on July 30, 2012 at 4:19 PM

Wrong, with EPA regs circa 1990, it is more like around $35 per bbl as the breakeven point.

I was involved with one such demonstration project where even a coal slurry pipeline from WV to Deer Park (Houston area) TX was proposed.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:28 PM

herdgadfly on July 30, 2012 at 4:22 PM

Yez. And there’s this: how would any decayed substance contain more energy than its living version?

The earth produces oil and gas. Just like it produces water and granite. Pretty cool, really. What an awesome God!

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 4:29 PM

What reasons do we really have to believe that trend of material self-improvement won’t continue?

…WHAT?…are the environmentalists going to start giving themselves oil enemas?

KOOLAID2 on July 30, 2012 at 4:29 PM

jon1979 on July 30, 2012 at 4:26 PM

Tuscaloosa Marine Shale formation (larger than Eagle Ford) requires above $110 thus far due recently drilled and producing wells are not even enough to cover basic cost, much less risk of capital.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:31 PM

…my patience is becoming a finite resource with these greenie cavemen!

KOOLAID2 on July 30, 2012 at 4:24 PM

KOOLAID2:Yupper!:)

canopfor on July 30, 2012 at 4:34 PM

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 4:29 PM

In theory and lab yes, but in reality every single drop of oil produced has been biotic. It isn’t from “dinosaurs” but instead from ancient microscopic organisms present where a lack of oxygen does not allow them to decompose (after dying) but instead be covered up by layers of silt then geology takes over.

Those promoting abiotic oil have one goal in mind, to disprove Darwin.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:35 PM

Algae is gonna be BIG! Just need to work out a few kinks.

a capella on July 30, 2012 at 4:37 PM

Soros is now putting people directly into newsrooms to develop their own investigative reports.

faraway on July 30, 2012 at 4:14 PM

A half mil to WAPO and a mil to the LAT

news 05-17-12 , “Buffett Buys 63 Newspapers for $142 Million”

Berkshire already owns the Buffalo News, the Omaha World-Herald Co., and a stake in the Washington Post Co. The conglomerate also reportedly holds a small stake in the recently reorganized newspaper chain Lee Enterprises.

With the Media General deal, Buffett will own, outright or in large part, three of the top 10 newspapers in the country by market penetration, according to the Pew Research Center.

With the nearly 20 percent stake in Media General, Buffett also gets a foot back into the broadcast television business, an industry he knows well. After the newspaper sale, the remaining Media General will be mostly a TV company, with a number of NBC affiliates.

entagor on July 30, 2012 at 4:38 PM

… and all the grant money from the EPA that funds all of the law suits is cut off.

Seven Percent Solution on July 30, 2012 at 4:16 PM

Seven Percent Solution:Yup,and heres a Heads-Up,on another
Brilliant Democrat idea!:)
=================================================

Lautenberg, McCarthy, Advocates Announce New Legislation to Effectively Ban Online Ammo Sales

Bill Would Also Require Reporting to Law Enforcement of Bulk Ammo Sales

Lautenberg Press Office, 202-224-3224
Monday, July 30, 2012

The bill, called the Stop Online Ammunition Sales Act, will keep Americans safe bylimiting the ability of people planning for mass murder(A lot More…..)

http://www.lautenberg.senate.gov/newsroom/record.cfm?id=337363&

canopfor on July 30, 2012 at 4:39 PM

The earth produces oil and gas. Just like it produces water and granite. Pretty cool, really. What an awesome God!

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 4:29 PM

That’s correct. This is the reason for the Red “Green” Movement. “Environmentalism” is from The Other Guy….

ScottG on July 30, 2012 at 4:39 PM

Tuscaloosa Marine Shale formation (larger than Eagle Ford) requires above $110 thus far due recently drilled and producing wells are not even enough to cover basic cost, much less risk of capital.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:31 PM

Wolfbone in the western Permian Basin is viable in the $80 range for oil, but the current natural gas prices means virtually no one is drilling for that, since you’re not going to make your money back when it’s in the $2 mcf range (other than chilling the ‘wet gas’ and evaporating out the liquids that can be sold as higher-value bi-products and then shipping the ‘dry gas’ to market).

jon1979 on July 30, 2012 at 4:41 PM

If we pair these advanced technologies for finding and using oil and gas with replacing our current nuclear reactors with thorium liquid salt reactors our energy needs would be amply met for centuries and in a much cleaner, safer, environmentally friendly way.

Better living through technology.

By the way, the next time you hear the greenies demanding an end to meat production, according to our federal governments own estimates another 10% of the worlds population will move up to middle class in the next 18 years, bringing that total from 50% to 60%, and those living in poverty( defined as making $1 or less per day) will drop by a full 50% in that same time period. The report continues that with increasing wealth these people will want more meat in their diets, which will require more grain and water to produce it. Though 50% of the worlds population lives in water stressed environments, advanced technology is expected to meet the increased requirements for fresh water.

The other benefit the report cites for an increase in the world’s middle class is that these people will be loath to tolerate authoritarian regimes or dictatorships, will demand more democratic, participatory governance, and with the aid of advanced communication and information technology, will get it.

thatsafactjack on July 30, 2012 at 4:42 PM

I’m sure you mean abiotic.

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 4:24 PM

Yes, or abiogenic. Better: Wait until they discover that it is a renewable resource.

The Rogue Tomato on July 30, 2012 at 4:43 PM

Would be nice to breakdown private oil fields from government oil field production.

Romney could use the answer as ammo to Obama’s claim of oil production increase in the states.

plutorocks on July 30, 2012 at 4:45 PM

In theory and lab yes, but in reality every single drop of oil produced has been biotic. It isn’t from “dinosaurs” but instead from ancient microscopic organisms present where a lack of oxygen does not allow them to decompose (after dying) but instead be covered up by layers of silt then geology takes over.

Then why is there abundant methane on Saturn and Titan and other planets and moons in the Solar System where there is no life? I can’t think of any reason why the abiotic hydrocarbon would appear in those places, but be absent from Earth.

Socratease on July 30, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Socratease on July 30, 2012 at 4:50 PM

We have not produced any from Saturn or any other celestial body to find out.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:53 PM

Would be nice to breakdown private oil fields from government oil field production.

Just imagine what that graph would look like if Obama didn’t shut down the Gulf in 2010.

Obama told us “we can’t drill our way to energy independence.”

To paraphrase Obama circa 2008: YES WE CAN!!!

Let’s get Obama out of the way, and Drill Baby Drill !!!

Steve Z on July 30, 2012 at 4:54 PM

Would be nice to breakdown private oil fields from government oil field production.

Romney could use the answer as ammo to Obama’s claim of oil production increase in the states.

plutorocks on July 30, 2012 at 4:45 PM

Answer already exists here.

hillsoftx on July 30, 2012 at 4:55 PM

plutorocks on July 30, 2012 at 4:45 PM

Make sure that this is only from onshore production since ALL of offshore (even not in Federal water) is from government owned reserves whether Fed or state owned. That is a lot, and I’m will to bet that it is close to 40% without even looking.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:56 PM

You can see efficiency taking it’s awesome toll in all areas of environmental concern…

‘its’ awesome toll…

Typhoon on July 30, 2012 at 4:58 PM

Then why is there abundant methane on Saturn and Titan and other planets and moons in the Solar System where there is no life? I can’t think of any reason why the abiotic hydrocarbon would appear in those places, but be absent from Earth.

Socratease on July 30, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Socratease:Most brilliant point!:)

canopfor on July 30, 2012 at 5:03 PM

Answer already exists here.

hillsoftx on July 30, 2012 at 4:55 PM

Good read, thanks.

plutorocks on July 30, 2012 at 5:06 PM

canopfor on July 30, 2012 at 5:03 PM

We have not produced any from anywhere besides here on earth. All thus far has a biotic signature.

Not a valid argument for what is has been produced here on earth.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 5:07 PM

We definitely have an abundance of oil and gas here on earth, the problem thus far has been the ability to produce it. Somehow every generation seems to find a way to produce and utilize that which the previous generation could not.

Take for instance the Green River Formation and its kerogen (locked in shale) content. We have tried and could not produce and refine any of it without significant Federal subsidies, not just tax credits. All production and refining of it was shutdown and since dismantled/demolished after subsidies were cut off.

However, science marches on and a few new but yet to be proven technologies will may well emerge, but it will require that the price be high.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 5:12 PM

You’ll never convince the ‘Chick Littles’ of the environmental movement.

They live in a pristine world along with their iPhones and iPads, all powered by dancing rainbow-colored, carbon-free unicorns.

GarandFan on July 30, 2012 at 5:18 PM

To me the problem with “peak oil” is that as the price of oil rises because of falling supply or rising demand (some combo) then oil that was not economical to extract will become available. As it gets harder and harder to extract oil, the price will rise and then alternate energy sources will become themselves economical and come into more general use.

Why do I get the impression that some folks think that if they can shutdown oil NOW and substitute ‘renewable’ sources that their lives couldn’t possibly adversely affected?

Russ808 on July 30, 2012 at 5:38 PM

It’s a losing battle for the Greenies.They will and are shifting to water.The earth is 2/3 water but I see a coming shortage.Texas is trying small desalination units for the ocean of brackish water that runs under most of the state.See T Boone Pickens and Nancy Pelosi’s investments in water rights.

docflash on July 30, 2012 at 5:47 PM

Actually, as far as I can make out without the aid of a decoder ring…the green movement is fighting the use of oil and gas now… NOT because they fear that we’ll run out of it… as they used to do…. NOW the argument is that its causing…

ANTHROPOGENIC GLOBAL WARMING….er….

GLOBAL WARMING…er….uh….oh, yeah..

CLIMATE CHANGE…. yeah, that’s the ticket… that climate change thing…

Even of the US stopped using oil and gas and coal… dead stop… today…. CHINA, INDIA, and the ‘developing’ nations are ramping up their usage exponentially.

Ironically, China already gets a vast amount of the coal it burns directly from…. US.

The global manufacturing floor, that exists in China today, will move to India, Viet Nam, and Indonesia tomorrow, because they have a young population of manpower, unlike China’s aging workforce, who will work for lower wages and less in terms of benefits… its cost effective… and it will be powered by.. oil, gas, and coal…because its cost effective.

So the green movement has gone from a cynical tale about ‘peak oil’ to bring about their unrealistic yet preferred personal vision of utopia… to another cynical tale about the developed nations of the world creating weather conditions that will destroy mankind.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2171973/Tree-ring-study-proves-climate-WARMER-Roman-Medieval-times-modern-industrial-age.html

thatsafactjack on July 30, 2012 at 5:51 PM

Solar panels and windmills are made in factories.

Oil is hand-made by Mother Nature. It’s a compost-pile of free-range dinosaurs and organic plant manner.

When you support drilling here in the USA you are:

- Buying local

- Supporting the “Slow Energy” movement. (it takes awhile to make the stuff)

- Choosing organic energy. (no pestides on the plant matter back then)

- Recycling (Dino’s and veggies)

catalan on July 30, 2012 at 6:39 PM

catalan on July 30, 2012 at 6:39 PM

Why do people keep saying dino? It is 100% former microscopic aquatic plant life.

Perhaps you never got beyond newbie stage in the oilfield and the chicken bone trick was played on you?

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 6:46 PM

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 6:46 PM

No work in the field yet. I think aquatic plant life has a nicer ring to it. Sounds Vegan.

catalan on July 30, 2012 at 7:01 PM

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 6:46 PM

Not necessarily aquatic. Our atmosphere was reduced at first by airborne microorganisms as well as aquatic. (Excessive simplification alert!) These creatures ate ammonia and methane and released the poisonous substance called oxygen.

Random Numbers (Brian Epps) on July 30, 2012 at 7:10 PM

In the common sense, oil is from organic life. Other hydrocarbons such as methane and more on places like Titan are from abiotic processes. These abiotic processes also did and do take place on the Earth alongside biotic processes.

What we are really talking about is the collection and storage of solar (and other) energy. Plants and animals are in a very real sense are just quite efficient solar energy collectors. Celestial bodies, like the Earth are can also be rightly viewed as refineries of both biotic and abiotic fuels/raw materials (carbon, hydrogen, microbe, plant, dinosaur, human).

I wrote about this at the link below last year, scroll down a post or so for an interesting video about a “lake” of hydrocarbon at the bottom of the gulf of mexico. Note: I did not say “under” the gulf. Watch it, it’s worth it.

Lastly, we will never completely run out of oil and hydrocarbons until the sun boils and blasts them into space long after we are gone.

Jason Coleman on July 30, 2012 at 7:18 PM

Just wait until someone discovers that oil is biotic.

The Rogue Tomato on July 30, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Big Green will never admit that, they just can’t. It would explode their watermelon heads.

slickwillie2001 on July 30, 2012 at 7:25 PM

OT: The most shocking thing of the month

Ford Foundation gives Washington Post $500,000 Grant

The grant will be used to fund four new newsroom positions to work on special projects

Assistant Managing Editor Jeff Leen will supervise the work of this new team, working with editors on other staffs. Its work will augment the work of Jeff’s investigative unit.

Soros is now putting people directly into newsrooms to develop their own investigative reports.

faraway on July 30, 2012 at 4:14 PM

Can you imagine the mushroom cloud over DC if the Koch brothers had done that?

slickwillie2001 on July 30, 2012 at 7:31 PM

My husband works in the Bakken. Oil isn’t going anywhere.

TXMomof3 on July 30, 2012 at 7:33 PM

Those promoting abiotic oil have one goal in mind, to disprove Darwin.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:35 PM

Seems pointless since a) Darwin has never been proved in the first place and b) the existence of microscopic organisms in the past would hardly prove or disprove Darwin in the first place.

(Hint: it’s not proven unless you can eliminate all other possibile explanations except the one you’re trying to prove)

tom on July 30, 2012 at 7:39 PM

Those promoting abiotic oil have one goal in mind, to disprove Darwin. Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 4:35 PM

“…data from the Cassini probe orbiting Saturn has shown that the ringed planet’s moon [Titan] has “hundreds of times more liquid hydrocarbons than all the known oil and natural gas reserves on Earth,” according to research reported in the Geophysical Research Letters. The stuff is literally falling from the sky.”

Would you like to argue that these hydrocarbons are biotic in origin?

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 8:02 PM

“…data from the Cassini probe orbiting Saturn has shown that the ringed planet’s moon [Titan] has “hundreds of times more liquid hydrocarbons than all the known oil and natural gas reserves on Earth,” according to research reported in the Geophysical Research Letters. The stuff is literally falling from the sky.”

Would you like to argue that these hydrocarbons are biotic in origin?

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 8:02 PM

Intra-solar system oil tankers; bring it on.

slickwillie2001 on July 30, 2012 at 8:27 PM

Akzed on July 30, 2012 at 8:02 PM

When the first abiotic hydrocarbons are produced here on earth, let me know.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 8:54 PM

tom on July 30, 2012 at 7:39 PM

I never said that Darwin was proven, just that the only pundits touting abiotic oil/gas are doing to to disprove Darwin.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 8:56 PM

tom on July 30, 2012 at 7:39 PM

I never said that Darwin was proven, just that the only pundits touting abiotic oil/gas are doing to to disprove Darwin.

Kermit on July 30, 2012 at 8:56 PM

Fair enough. I don’t see how abiotic oil/gas couldn’t be squeezed into either model of origin perfectly well. Seems like the only way it fits the evolutionary model better is the assumption of huge time frames being required to produce oil, which seems questionable at best. Fossilization can occur quickly under the right conditions.

tom on July 30, 2012 at 9:07 PM

Two great sources on how markets and expanding human knowledge lead to increasing resources are economists Julian Simon and George Reisman.

AshleyTKing on July 30, 2012 at 9:31 PM

Harness the real potential of poop. There is quite a bit of it wasted.

Bmore on July 30, 2012 at 10:02 PM

Harness the real potential of poop. There is quite a bit of it wasted.

Bmore on July 30, 2012 at 10:02 PM

I hear that the WhiteHouse is the best source of it at the moment, but their expecting it to shift back to Chicago in November.

catalan on July 30, 2012 at 11:18 PM

“Whether naphta was formed by organic matter is very doubtful, as it is found in the most ancient Silurian [Ordovician] strata which correspond with the epochs of the earth’s existence when there was very little organic matter; it could not penetrate from the higher to the lower (more ancient) strata as it floats on water (and water penetrates through all strata).” — Dmitri Mendeleyev, chemist, 1877

Abiotic hydrocarbons also vent from the mid atlantic ridge.

Biotic processes are FAR, FAR more efficient at combining hydrogen and carbon but there plenty of abiotic processes that do. See Titan.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091104123032.htm. Mendeleyev’s theory successfully tested.

Comet Halley even contains hydrocarbon solids and hydrocarbons in general are available throughout the solar system and universe. See: http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/40177(207)107

Jason Coleman on July 31, 2012 at 7:34 PM